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Encyclopedia > Girard College
Founder's Hall, Girard College
(U.S. National Historic Landmark)
Girard College in an illustration from an 1871 publication
Location: Corinthian & Girard Aves.
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Built/Founded: 1848
Architect: Thomas Ustick Walter
Added to NRHP: August 04, 1969
NRHP Reference#: 69000158[1]
Governing body: Local
Girard College Complex
(U.S. National Historic Landmark)
Location: Bounded by Poplar St., Girard, W. College, S. College, & Ridge Aves.
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Area: 43 acres
Built/Founded: 1833
Architect: Thomas Ustick Walter; et al.
Architectural style(s): Colonial Revival, Greek Revival, Other
Added to NRHP: October 29, 1974
NRHP Reference#: 74001802[1]
Governing body: Private

Girard College is a private philanthropic boarding school on a 43 acre (170,000 m²) campus in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the United States. The school is for academically capable students, grades 1 through 12, and grants full scholarships to eligible students from families with limited financial resources, headed by a single parent or guardian. For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 528 pixel Image in higher resolution (801 × 529 pixel, file size: 42 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Girard College - Project Gutenberg eText 15161. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Thomas U. Walter Thomas U. Walter; Portrait by Francisco Pausas, 1925, after a Mathew Brady photograph Thomas Ustick Walter (September 4, 1804 – October 30, 1887) of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was the dean of American architecture between the death of Benjamin Latrobe and the work of H.H. Richardson. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... August 4 is the 216th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (217th in leap years), with 149 days remaining. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Thomas U. Walter Thomas U. Walter; Portrait by Francisco Pausas, 1925, after a Mathew Brady photograph Thomas Ustick Walter (September 4, 1804 – October 30, 1887) of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was the dean of American architecture between the death of Benjamin Latrobe and the work of H.H. Richardson. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...


Girard’s mission is to prepare students for advanced education and life as informed, ethical and productive citizens through a rigorous educational program that promotes intellectual, social and emotional growth.


As of 2004, there were 669 students enrolled, 268 elementary school students (grades 1-5), 211 middle school students (grades 6-8), and 190 high school students (grades 9-12). Girard employs a total of 124 faculty members: 72 academic teachers and 52 residential advisors. It is a residential education program that seeks to provide great academic opportunites to children who would otherwise not be able to afford it. 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Broadly defined, residential education is an education provided in an environment where students both live and learn outside of their family homes. ...

Contents

History

Girard College was founded in 1833 and opened on January 1, 1848 under provisions of the will of financier Stephen Girard, who acquired his wealth as a sea captain and was possibly the wealthiest man in America at the time of his death in 1831. Originally instituted for the education of poor white orphan boys, the school now welcomes girls and boys of all races. A peculiar provision of the will prevents any ecclesiastic, missionary, or minister of any sect from having any connection with the college, and clergy are not even allowed to enter the grounds. Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Stephen Girard Stephen Girard (May 20, 1750–December 26, 1831) was an American philanthropist and banker. ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


This provision of the will and others like it led to a number of rumors about the contents of Girard's will. One widely believed but ultimately apocryphal "provision" was that the financier demanded the College be surrounded by a 20-foot wall. To be in absolute compliance with his will, his benefactors built the wall, but sunk it 10 feet below the ground, so it would appear at a less extreme height.


Not part of the School District of Philadelphia, the school was segregated well after Brown v. Board of Education up until it was ordered to desegregate by the Supreme Court. The first African American student was admitted in 1968. [2] School District of Philadelphia logo The School District of Philadelphia is a school district based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, that includes all public schools in the city of Philadelphia. ... Holding Segregation of students in public schools violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, because separate facilities are inherently unequal. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The first female student was admitted as a first grader in the 1980s. Females were gradually integrated into the school over a 12-year period with subsequent new female students only permitted to enroll in the same graduating class as the first female student or a younger class. The first females graduated in 1993. The graduating class of 1996 was the first class to graduate with more females than males. Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


Famous alumni

Graduates (or, in some cases, former students) of Girard College include:

Lawrence A. Cunningham (born July 10, 1962) is an author of several investing books and is a professor. ... Harry Davis on a 1912 American Tobacco Company baseball card (Brown Backgrounds (T207)). Harry H. Davis (July 19, 1873 - August 11, 1947) was a Major League Baseball first baseman and right-handed batter who played for the New York Giants (1895-96), Pittsburgh Pirates (1896-98), Louisville Colonels (1898), Washington... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Bold text Location in Juneau City and Borough, Alaska Coordinates: , Country State Borough Juneau City and Borough Founded 1881 Incorporated 1890 Government  - Mayor Bruce Botelho Area  - City  3,255. ... Russell Johnson as The Professor on Gilligans Island Russell David Johnson (born November 10, 1924, in Ashley, Pennsylvania), is an American television and film actor best known as The Professor on the CBS television sitcom Gilligans Island. ... For the NES (Nintendo Entertainment System) video game, see The Adventures of Gilligans Island. ... Franz Klines Painting Number 2, 1954 Franz Kline (May 23, 1910 - May 13, 1962) was an American painter mainly associated with the Abstract Expressionist group which was centered, geographically, around New York, and temporally, in the 1940s and 1950s; but not limited to that setting. ... American post-World War II art movement. ... Tracey Lee is a rapper who became known in 1997 when his single The Theme (Its Party Time) had some commercial success. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... For corner back, the Gaelic football and hurling position, see Gaelic football and Hurling positions . ... For other uses, see Buffalo Bills (disambiguation). ...

Trivia

Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Twelve Monkeys is a 1995 science fiction film written by David and Janet Peoples and directed by Terry Gilliam. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Annapolis is a 2006 motion picture starring James Franco, Tyrese Gibson, Jordana Brewster, Donnie Wahlberg, and Chi McBride. ...

References

Philadelphia Portal
  1. ^ a b National Register Information System. National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service (2007-01-23).
  2. ^ "School Desegregation and Civil Rights Stories: Girard College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania", NARA. Retrieved on 2007-02-20. 

Image File history File links Portal. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Archives building in Washington, DC The United States National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is an independent agency of the United States federal government charged with preserving and documenting government and historical records. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Philadelphia - Girard College (777 words)
Stephen Girard left donations to schools, hospitals, Masonic poor funds, for fuel for the poor, and other charitable purposes ; but the major part of his for-tune went in trust to the city of Philadelphia, partly to improve its streets and the Delaware River front, but the greater portion to endow Girard College.
The College building is of white marble, and the finest specimen of pure Grecian architecture in the United States.
Opposite Girard College are the magnificent buildings of the German Hospital and the Mary J. Drexel Home for the education of nurses, established by the munificence of John D. Lankenau, the widowed husband of the lady whose name it bears.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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