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Encyclopedia > Giovanni da Capistrano
San Giovanni da Capistrano

Pulpit of John Capistrano at the Stephansdom in Vienna
Born June 24, 1386, Capestrano
Died October 23, 1456, Ilok, modern Croatia[1]
Venerated in Roman Catholicism
Canonized 1690 or 1724
Feast 28 March
Saints Portal

Saint Giovanni da Capestrano (in English, John Capistrano, June 24, 1386Ilok, October 23, 1456), Italian friar, theologian and inquisitor, was born in the village of Capestrano, in the diocese of Sulmona in the Abruzzi. His father had come to Italy with the Angevin court of Louis I of Anjou, King of Naples. He lived at first a wholly secular life, studied law at the University of Perugia under the legal scholar Pietro de Ubaldis, married, and became a successful magistrate. In 1412 Ladislas of Naples appointed him governor of Perugia, a tumultuous and resentful papal fief held by Ladislas as the pope's champion, in order to effectively establish public order. When war broke out between Perugia and Sigismondo Malatesta in 1416, John was sent as ambassador to broker a peace, but Malatesta threw him in prison. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 290 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (450 × 930 pixel, file size: 204 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... Year 1386 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Capestrano is a little town with 965 inhabitants (2001), in Abruzzo, a mountainous region in Central Italy, known to the Romans as Aufina, a city of the Vestini. ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events July 7 - Joan of Arc acquitted (but she had already been executed). ... iLok SmartKey The iLok or InterLok is a copy protection method developed and manufactured by PACE Anti-Piracy of San Jose, California utilizing a USB hardware key or Dongle, and an online registration system at www. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Icon of St. ... Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... Events January 14 - King Philip V of Spain abdicates the throne February 20 - The premiere of Giulio Cesare, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel, takes place in London June 23 - Treaty of Constantinople signed. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are often depicted as having halos. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... Year 1386 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... iLok SmartKey The iLok or InterLok is a copy protection method developed and manufactured by PACE Anti-Piracy of San Jose, California utilizing a USB hardware key or Dongle, and an online registration system at www. ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events July 7 - Joan of Arc acquitted (but she had already been executed). ... A friar is a member of a religious mendicant order of men. ... Capestrano is a little town with 965 inhabitants (2001), in Abruzzo, a mountainous region in Central Italy, known to the Romans as Aufina, a city of the Vestini. ... View of the citys center. ... Categories: Regions of Italy | Abruzzo ... Angevin (IPA: ) is the name applied to the residents of Anjou, a former province of the Kingdom of France, as well as to the residents of Angers. ... Louis I of Anjou (July 23, 1339, Château de Vincennes, – September 20, 1384, Biselia) was the second son of King John II of France and Bonne of Luxembourg. ... For other uses see, Naples (disambiguation) and Napoli (disambiguation) Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... Location of Perugia in Italy Coordinates: Country Italy Region Umbria Province Province of Perugia Government  - Mayor Renato Locchi Area  - City 449 km²  (1,165 sq mi) Elevation 493 m (1,617. ... Baldus de Ubaldis (Italian: Baldo degli Ubaldi; 1327—1400) was an Italian jurist. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Go-Komatsu of Japan. ... Coat of Arms of Ladislas, as titular King of Hungary, titular King of Jerusalem, and King of Naples. ... A champion refers to the sexy boy by the name of Joe Champion. ... Errico Malatesta Errico Malatesta (December 14, 1853 – July 22, 1932) was an anarchist with an unshakable belief, which he shared with his friend Peter Kropotkin, that the anarchist revolution would occur soon. ... May 30 - The Catholic Church burns Jerome of Prague as a heretic. ...


During the captivity, in despair he put aside his new young wife, with the claim that he had never consummated the marriage, and, studying with St Bernardino of Siena, together with St Giacomo della Marca, he entered the Franciscan order at Perugia on October 4, 1416. At once he gave himself up to the most rigorous asceticism, violently defending the ideal of strict observance and the narrowest reading of orthodoxy, following Bernardino as he preached and from 1420 onwards and preaching himself, with great effect, in many cities. Unlike most Italian preachers of repentance in the 15th century, Giovanni da Capestrano was effective in the north, in Germany, Bohemia, Austria, Hungary and Poland. The largest churches could not hold the crowds, so he preached in the piazzas: at Brescia he preached to a crowd of 126,000. When he was not preaching, he was writing tracts against heresy of every kind. This facet of Giovanni's life is covered in great detail by his early biographers, Nicholas of Fara, Christopher of Varese and Girolamo of Udine. While he was thus evangelizing, he was actively engaged in assisting Bernardino in the reforms of the Franciscan Order, largely in the interests of more rigorous hierarchic discipline. Saint Bernardino of Siena (sometimes Bernardine, September 8, 1380 – May 20, 1444) was an Italian preacher, Franciscan missionary and Christian saint. ... Saint James of the Marches (1391 – November 28, 1476) (Italian: , Spanish: ) was an Italian Franciscan Friar Minor, preacher and writer. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 21 - Treaty of Troyes. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ... A piazza is an open square in a city, often used as a marketplace, found in Italy. ... For the Italian administrative area, see Province of Brescia. ... Look up Heresy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Like St Bernardino of Siena he greatly proselytized devotion to the Holy Name of Jesus, and, together with that saint, was accused of heresy on this account. In 1429 John, together with other Observant friars, was called to Rome on the charge of heresy, and he was chosen by his companions to defend them; the friars were acquitted by the commission of cardinals. He was frequently employed on embassies by the popes Eugene IV and Nicholas V, in which he acquitted himself with implacable violence. In 1439 he was sent as legate to Milan and Burgundy, to oppose the claims of the antipope Felix V; in 1446 he was on a mission to the King of France; in 1451 he went at the request of the emperor as Apostolic nuncio to Austria. During the period of his nunciature John visited all parts of the Empire, preaching and combatting the heresy of the Hussites; he also visited Poland at the request of Casimir IV. As legate or inquisitor he persecuted the last Fraticelli of Ferrara, the Jesuati of Venice, the Jews of Sicily, Moldavia and Poland, and, above all, the Hussites of Germany, Hungary and Bohemia; his aim in the last case was to make conferences impossible between the representatives of Rome and the Bohemians, for every attempt at conciliation seemed to him to be conniving at heresy. Monotheistic faiths believe that there is a supreme being, who is necessarily unique, and the different names given to that being in different languages could in principle be translated as English God. ... January 10 - Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, founds the European Order of the Golden Fleece February 12 - Battle of Rouvray (or of the Herrings). English Forces under Sir John Fastolf defend a supply convoy carrying rations to the army of William de la Pole, 4th Earl of Suffolk at... A cardinal is a senior ecclesiastical official, usually a bishop, of the Roman Catholic Church, a member of the College of Cardinals which as a body elects a new pope. ... Eugenius IV, né Gabriel Condulmer (1383 - February 23, 1447) was pope from March 3, 1431 to his death. ... Nicholas V, né Tomaso Parentucelli (November 15, 1397 – March 24, 1455) was Pope from March 6, 1447, to his death. ... Events Battle of Grotnik, which ended the hussite movement in Poland Eric of Pomerania, King of Sweden, Denmark and Norway is declared deposed in Sweden. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... Coat of arms of the second Duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: ; German: ) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks; the former gave their... Antipope Felix V, the last historical Antipope. ... Events Mehmed II Sultan of the Ottoman Empire is forced to abdicate in favor of his father Murad II by the Janissaries. ... // Events February 3 - Murad II, Sultan of the Ottoman Empire dies and is succeeded by his son Mehmed II. April 11 - Celje acquires market-town status and town rights by orders from the Celje count Frederic II. June 30 - French troops under the Comte de Dunois invade Guyenne and capture... Nuncio is an ecclesiastical diplomatic title, derived from the ancient Latin Nuntius, meaning any envoy. ... The Hussites comprised a Christian movement following the teachings of the reformer Jan Hus (circa 1369–1415), who was influenced by John Wyclif and became one of the forerunners of the Protestant Reformation. ... Reign From 1446 until June 7, 1492 Coronation On June 25, 1447 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland Royal House Jagiellon Parents Władyslaw II Jagiełło Zofia Holszańska Consorts Elżbieta Rakuszanka Children with Elżbieta Rakuszanka Władys&#322... A medieval Roman Catholic group which can trace its origins to the Franciscan Spirituals, but which came into being as a separate entity - and problem - for the Church in 1318, when Angelo da Clareno defied the authority of Pope John XXII. Other figures included Michael of Cesena and Peter Olivi. ... Ferrara is a city in Emilia-Romagna, Italy, capital city of the province of Ferrara. ... The Jesuati were a religious order founded by Giovanni Colombini of Siena in 1360. ... Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venetian: Venezsia, Latin: Venetia) is a city in northern Italy, the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,251 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... For other uses of Moldavia or Moldova, see Moldova (disambiguation). ... The Hussites comprised a Christian movement following the teachings of the reformer Jan Hus (circa 1369–1415), who was influenced by John Wyclif and became one of the forerunners of the Protestant Reformation. ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ...

San Giovanni da Capistrano, O.F.M., patron saint of the Spanish mission outposts in California and Texas, U.S.A.[2]

Unfortunately, John's oratory was not only used to inspire religious faith but to incite mobs to conduct the mass murders of Jews in different cities in Germany. For example, 41 Jews were burned in the city of Breslau, while 36 Jews were burned in the Berlin marketplace. In addition, the entire Jewish community of Liegnitz was burned to death because of John's incitement of mobs. Finally, after the Fall of Constantinople, at the age of seventy, Pope Calixtus III sent him to preach a Crusade against the Turks at the Diet of Frankfurt in 1454, and he succeeded in gathering troops together, which in the summer of 1456, with Capistrano leading a contingent, at least helped John Hunyadi to raise the siege of Belgrade, which was being blockaded by Mahommed II. He died of bubonic plague shortly afterwards. Capistrano, in spite of this restless life, found time to work, both in the lifetime of his master Bernardino and after, at the reform of the order of the minor Franciscans, and to uphold both in his writings and his speeches the most advanced theories upon the papal supremacy as opposed to that of the councils (see Conciliar Movement). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... ... Mission San Juan Capistrano was founded on All Saints Day (November 1), 1776. ... San Antonio Missions National Historical Park preserves four of the five Spanish frontier missions in San Antonio, Texas. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... Wrocław. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Legnica (pronounce: [lεgniʦa], formerly Lignica, German Liegnitz) is a town in south-western Poland, with 108,000 inhabitants (1995). ... Combatants Byzantine Empire Ottoman Empire Commanders Constantine XI† Loukas Notaras Giovanni Giustiniani†[1] Mehmed II Strength 7,000[2] 80,000[1]-200,000[1][3] Casualties 4,000 dead[4] 10,000 civilian dead[5][6] - The Fall of Constantinople refers to the capture of the Byzantine capital by... Callixtus III, né Alphonso de Borgia (December 31, 1378 - August 6, 1458) was born in Xàtiva, Valencia, Spain and was pope from April 8, 1455 to August 6, 1458. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... For other uses, see Frankfurt (disambiguation). ... Events February 4 - In the Thirteen Years War, the Secret Council of the Prussian Confederacy sends a formal act of disobedience to the Grand Master. ... // Events July 7 - Joan of Arc acquitted (but she had already been executed). ... John Hunyadi, as imagined by a 17th century artist John Hunyadi (Medieval Latin: Ioannes Corvinus, German: Johann Hunyadi; Hungarian: Hunyadi János, Romanian: Iancu or Ioan de Hunedoara) (c. ... Combatants Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Hungary Commanders Mehmet II John Hunyadi Strength About 100,000 About 75,000 Casualties About 50,000 About 10,000 After the fall of Constantinople in 1453, Ottoman sultan Mehmed II was rallying his resources in order to subjugate the Kingdom of Hungary. ... Mehmed II Mehmed II (March 30, 1432 – May 3, 1481; nicknamed el-Fatih, the Conqueror) was the sultan of the Ottoman Empire for a short time from 1444 to 1446, and later from 1451 to 1481. ... The bubonic plague or bubonic fever is the best-known variant of the deadly infectious disease caused by the enterobacteria Yersinia pestis. ... Referring to the doctrine of Papal Supremacy the Catechism of the Catholic Church notes in paragraph 882, “the Roman Pontiff, by reason of his office as Vicar of Christ, and as pastor of the entire Church has full, supreme, and universal power over the whole Church, a power which he... In the history of Christianity, the Conciliar movement or Conciliarism was a reform movement in the 14th and 15th century Catholic Church that held that final authority in spiritual matters resided with a general church council, not with the pope. ...


The year of his canonization is variously given as 1690 or 1724. His feast day was originally the day of his death, 23 October; it was moved to 28 March in 1890, when his feast was made general for the entire Roman Catholic Church.[3] Icon of St. ... Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... Events January 14 - King Philip V of Spain abdicates the throne February 20 - The premiere of Giulio Cesare, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel, takes place in London June 23 - Treaty of Constantinople signed. ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic...


References

  1. ^ Biography in Croatian
  2. ^ Engelhardt, Zephyrin, O.F.M. San Juan Capistrano Mission. 1922. Standard Printing Co., Los Angeles, CA.
  3. ^ ST JOHN OF CAPISTRANO (A.D. 1456) Retrieved 13 September 2006

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Giovanni da Capistrano - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (670 words)
Saint Giovanni da Capestrano (in English, John Capistrano, June 24, 1386 – Villach, October 23, 1456), Italian friar, theologian and inquisitor, was born in the village of Capestrano, in the diocese of Sulmona in the Abruzzi.
Unlike most Italian preachers of repentance in the 15th century, Giovanni da Capestrano was effective in the north, in Germany, Bohemia, Austria, Hungary and Poland.
This facet of Giovanni's life is covered in great detail by his early biographers, Nicholas of Fara, Christopher of Varese and Girolamo of Udine.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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