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Encyclopedia > Gillian Bradshaw

Gillian Marucha Bradshaw (born May 14, 1956) is an American writer of historical fiction, children's literature, science fiction and contemporary novels with a strong scientific background who lives in Britain. Her historical novels - set in Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, the Duchy of Brittany, the Byzantine Empire, Saka & the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom, Imperial Rome, Sub-Roman Britain and Roman Britain - have led to her being described as Rosemary Sutcliff's literary heir. May 14 is the 134th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (135th in leap years). ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A historical novel is a novel in which the story is set among historical events, or more generally, in which the time of the action predates the lifetime of the author. ... Jane Frank: illustration from Thomas Yoseloffs The Further Adventures of Till Eulenspiegel (1957). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... ↔--71. ... The Temple to Athena, the Parthenon Ancient Greece is a period in Greek history that lasted for around three thousand years. ... The Duchy of Brittany was an independent state from 841 to 1532. ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ... The Sakas were Iranian people stock who lived in what is now Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and parts of Iran, Ukraine, and Altay Mountains and Siberia in Russia, in the centuries before 300 AD. They are considered to be a branch of Scythians by most scholars. ... Approximate extent of the Greco-Bactrian kingdom circa 220 BCE. The Greco-Bactrians were a dynasty of Greek kings who controlled Bactria and Sogdiana, an area comprising todays northern Afghanistan and parts of Central Asia, the easternmost area of the Hellenistic world, from 250 to 125 BCE. Their expansion... Roman Empire between AD 60 and 400 with major cities. ... Sub-Roman Britain is a term derived from an archaeologists label for the material culture of Britain in Late Antiquity. ... Principal sites in Roman Britain Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Rosemary Sutcliff (December 14, 1920 - July 23, 1992) was a British novelist, best known as a writer of highly acclaimed historical fiction. ...


Gillian Bradshaw was born in Arlington County, Virginia and spent part of her youth in Santiago, Chile. She attended the University of Michigan where she won the Phillips Prize for Classical Greek in both 1975 and 1977, as well as the Hopwood Prize for fiction for her first novel, Hawk of May. She went on to advanced study at Newnham College, Cambridge, where she studied Classical philology. Hawk of May was published while she was preparing for University of Cambridge exams. Arlington County is an urban county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the U.S., directly across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C. Originally part of the District of Columbia, the land now comprising the county was retroceded to Virginia in a July 9, 1846 act of Congress... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... The snowcapped Andes above downtown Santiago Santiago (frequently called   in Spanish) is Chiles capital and, when viewed as a conurbation, its largest city. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (UM, U of M or Umich) is a coeducational public research university in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... Full name Newnham College Motto - Named after Its location in the village of Newnham Previous names Newnham Hall Established 1871 Sister College(s) Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford Principal Dame Patricia Hodgson Location Sidgwick Avenue Undergraduates 396 Postgraduates 120 Homepage N/A A view of the Clough and Kennedy buildings of... Classical scholarship, also known as classical philology or classics, is the study of ancient Greece and Rome. ... The University of Cambridge (usually abbreviated as Cantab. ...


She decided to stay in Cambridge for another year to write another novel and think about what to do for a Real Job. However, while there, she discovered she could live on her income as a novelist and also met her husband, who was completing his doctorate in physics. Between books and children she never did get a Real Job, and she's been writing novels ever since. She and her husband, a British Mathematical physics professor, have four children and a dog. She describes herself as "an enthusiast for classical antiquity, and love roaming about Graeco-Roman ruins on holiday. The rest of the family has a huge exposure to hypocausts and hippodromes. They have sometimes protested ("Not another Roman ruin!") but mostly they've quite enjoyed it." Geography Status City (1951) Region East of England Admin. ... Physics (Greek: (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the science concerned with the fundamental laws of the universe. ... Mathematical physics is the scientific discipline concerned with the application of mathematics to problems in physics and the development of mathematical methods suitable for such applications and for the formulation of physical theories1. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ...


Bradshaw's husband was an inspiration for her portrayal of Archimedes in her novel The Sand-Reckoner, though she states in the afterword of the novel that she based him on her personal knowledge of many physicists. She has been a judge in the Institute of Physics Paperclip Physics competition, and her contemporary and historical novels with a scientific background show a deep interest in human responses to scientific discoveries. Archimedes (Greek: c. ... The Institute of Physics (IOP) is the United Kingdoms professional body for physicists. ...


Works

Bradshaw's first published novels were the Arthurian historical fantasy trilogy, Down the Long Wind. These books, Hawk of May, Kingdom of Summer, and In Winter's Shadow were released between 1980 and 1982. Set in Sub-Roman Britain, the trilogy's main character is Gwalchmai (Gawain), who must choose between supporting his evil mother Morgawse or his maternal uncle Arthur. The title Down the Long Wind is taken from Alfred, Lord Tennyson's Idylls of the King: King Arthur is an important figure in the mythology of Britain. ... The Accolade by British painter Edmund Blair Leighton exhibits an idealized view of history common in historical fantasy. ... Hawk of May is the first of a trilogy of fantasy novels written by Gillian Bradshaw which interprets the King Arthur legend. ... Kingdom of Summer is the second book in a trilogy of fantasy novels written by Gillian Bradshaw. ... In Winters Shadow is the final book in a trilogy of fantasy novels written by Gillian Bradshaw. ... Sub-Roman Britain is a term derived from an archaeologists label for the material culture of Britain in Late Antiquity. ... Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Gawain (Gwalchmei, Gawan, Gauvain, Walewein etc. ... In Arthurian legend, Morgause or Morgase (also known as Anna-Morgause or Ann-Morgause) is the half-sister of King Arthur who slept with him and produced Mordred, the incestuous heir that would lead to Camelots downfall. ... Alfred, Lord Tennyson Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (6 August 1809 – 6 October 1892) was Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom and is one of the most popular English poets. ... The Idylls of the King (1856 - 1885) are a cycle of poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson that express the legend of King Arthur in terms of the psychology and concerns of nineteenth-century England. ...

"And fainter onward, like wild birds that change
Their season in the night and wail their way
From cloud to cloud, down the long wind the dream
Shrilled; but in going mingled
with dim cries."

Tennyson's verse describes the premonitory dream Arthur has before the Battle of Camlann; in it, the recently deceased Gawain warns him he will face doom should he face the traitor Mordred before Lancelot can arrive. Commanders King Arthur † Mordred † How Mordred was Slain by Arthur, and How by Him Arthur was Hurt to the Death, by Arthur Rackham Camlann redirects here. ... Mordred or Modred (Welsh: Medraut) is a legendary figure of Britain, known in Arthurian legend as a notorious traitor who fought King Arthur at the Battle of Camlann, where he was killed and Arthur fatally wounded. ... For other uses, see Lancelot (disambiguation). ...


After Down the Long Wind, Bradshaw continued writing historical fiction. Her 1986 novel The Beacon at Alexandria features Charis of Ephesus, a female doctor cross-dressing as a eunuch in 4th century Alexandria, Roman Egypt. The Bearkeeper's Daughter tells the story of Theodora, empress consort of Byzantine Emperor Justinian I. Theodora was born into the lowest class of Byzantine society, the daughter of Acacius, a bearkeeper for the circus. Imperial Purple, released in 1988 features Demetrias of Tyre, a woman born into slavery but becoming a skilled weaver. The plot focuses on her discovery of a plot to depose Theodosius II and remove from power his sister Pulcheria. In 1990 she wrote Horses of Heaven, about a marriage alliance between the Saka Kingdom of Ferghana, Afghanistan and the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom. The marriage of King Mauakes and Princess Heliokleia occurs around 140 BC and brings many changes at court. A historical novel is a novel in which the story is set among historical events, or more generally, where the time the action takes place in predates the time of the first publication -- distinguish and contrast the genre of alternate history. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Historical Map of Ephesus, from Meyers Konversationslexikon 1888 Ephesus (Greek: , Turkish: ), was one of the great cities of the Ionian Greeks in Asia Minor, located in Lydia where the Cayster River (Küçük Menderes) flows into the Aegean Sea (in modern day Turkey). ... This articles is about cross-dressing in general, that is the act of wearing the clothing of another gender for any reason. ... European illustration of a Eunuch (1749) A eunuch is a castrated man; the term usually refers to those castrated in order to perform a specific social function, as was common in many societies of the past. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... ---- Alexandria (Greek: , Coptic: , Arabic: , Egyptian Arabic: Iskindireyya), (population of 3. ... The conquests of Alexander the Great brought Egypt within the orbit of the Greek world for the next 900 years. ... Theodora, detail of a Byzantine mosaic in Basilica of San Vitale, Ravenna. ... King George V of the United Kingdom and his consort, Queen Mary A queen consort is the wife and consort of a reigning king. ... This is a list of Byzantine Emperors. ... Justinian depicted on one of the famous mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Triumphal Arch Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ... Theodosius II Flavius Theodosius II (April, 401 - July 28, 450 ). The eldest son of Eudoxia and Arcadius who at the age of 7 became the Roman Emperor of the East. ... Pulcheria (January 19, 399 – 453) was the daughter of the Eastern Roman Emperor Arcadius and Aelia Eudoxia. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... The Sakas were Iranian people stock who lived in what is now Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and parts of Iran, Ukraine, and Altay Mountains and Siberia in Russia, in the centuries before 300 AD. They are considered to be a branch of Scythians by most scholars. ... Approximate extent of the Greco-Bactrian kingdom circa 220 BCE. The Greco-Bactrians were a dynasty of Greek kings who controlled Bactria and Sogdiana, an area comprising todays northern Afghanistan and parts of Central Asia, the easternmost area of the Hellenistic world, from 250 to 125 BCE. Their expansion... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC - 140s BC - 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC Years: 145 BC 144 BC 143 BC 142 BC 141 BC - 140 BC - 139 BC 138 BC...


She next began writing children's literature set in ancient Egypt, with two tales involving Ancient Egypt, The Dragon and the Thief in 1991 and The Land of Gold in 1992. The latter features a Nubian princess who survives her parents' murder and attempts to regain her throne with the assistance of the dragon Hathor. These works were followed by Beyond the North Wind (1993). The novel features a young magician assigned by Apollo to protect a tribe of griffins from a hostile queen. The title is again a reference to an earlier work, in this case Aristeas of Proconnesus, a 7th century BC Greek who reported that the griffins lived in Scythia, near the cave of Boreas, the North Wind. All three works began as stories for the pleasure of her own children. Jane Frank: illustration from Thomas Yoseloffs The Further Adventures of Till Eulenspiegel (1957). ... ↔--71. ... ↔--71. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... Nubia is the region in the south of Egypt, along the Nile and in northern Sudan. ... // This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The Enchanted Garden of Messer Ansaldo by Marie Spartali Stillman: a magician makes his garden bear fruit and flowers in winter. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo (Ancient Greek , Apóllōn; or , Apellōn), the ideal of the kouros (a beardless youth), was the god of music, medicine, death dealing, and archery and also a brother of Artemis. ... Composite of Pomeranian heraldic charges of griffins. ... Aristeas was a semi-legendary Greek poet and miracle-worker, a native of Proconnesus in Asia Minor, active ca. ... Marmara Island is a turkish island in the Sea of Marmara. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 7th century BC started on January 1, 700 BC and ended on December 31, 601 BC. // Overview Events Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria who created the the first systematically collected library at Nineveh A 16th century depiction of the Hanging Gardens of... Approximate extent of Scythia and Sarmatia in the 1st century BC (the orange background shows the spread of Eastern Iranian languages, among them Scytho-Sarmatian). ... There was one person and one god known as Boreas in Greek mythology. ...


Bradshaw continued her works of historical fiction with Island of Ghosts in 1998. The novel tells the story of Ariantes, one of 8,000 Sarmatians in military service to Marcus Aurelius. In 2000 she wrote her first science fiction novel, The Wrong Reflection, about an amnesiac who finds his given identity of "Paul Anderson" to be a fabrication. This was followed by historical novel The Sand-Reckoner, a telling of the story of Archimedes of Syracuse, Italy from his studies at the Library of Alexandria to his involvement in the Second Punic War (218202 BC) and his conflict with Marcus Claudius Marcellus. 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... Sarmatia and Scythia in 100 BC, also shown is the extent of the Parthian Empire. ... Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus (April 26, 121[1] – March 17, 180) was Roman Emperor from 161 to his death. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Amnesia or amnæsia (from Greek ) (see spelling differences) is a condition in which memory is disturbed. ... Archimedes (Greek: c. ... Syracuse (Italian, Siracusa, ancient Syracusa - see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a city on the eastern coast of Sicily and the capital of the province of Syracuse, Italy. ... Inscription regarding Tiberius Claudius Balbilus of Rome (d. ... Combatants Image:SPQR-Stone. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC - 210s BC - 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC Years: 223 BC 222 BC 221 BC 220 BC 219 BC - 218 BC - 217 BC 216 BC... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 3rd century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC - 200s BC - 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC Years: 207 BC 206 BC 205 BC 204 BC 203 BC - 202 BC - 201 BC 200 BC 199 BC 198 BC 197 BC Events October... Marcus Claudius Marcellus (c. ...


Her science fiction novel Dangerous Notes (2001) features Valeria Thornham, a young classical guitarist and composer whose brain was implanted with cloned stem cells in childhood after an accident. She is considered a potential psychotic and is arrested and detained at a mental research facility where she is threatened with the prospect of undergoing surgery to remove the part of her brain that is responsible for her extraordinary musical talent. Her 2001 historical novel The Wolf Hunt was based Marie de France's Breton lai Bisclavret, and features Marie Penthive of Chalendrey, a Norman forced to live in the Brittany and becoming involved in its plots. 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In animals the brain, or encephalon (Greek for in the head), is the control center of the central nervous system. ... Cloning is the process of creating an identical copy of something. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ... “Children” redirects here. ... Psychosis (not to be confused with psychopathy) is a generic psychiatric term for a mental state in which thought and perception are severely impaired. ... Marie de France (Mary of France) was a poet evidently born in France and living in England during the late 12th century. ... A Breton lai, also known as a narrative lay or simply a lay, is a form of medieval French and English romance literature. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Norman conquests in red. ... Brittany has an expansive coastline Historical province of Brittany Flag of Brittany (Gwenn-ha-du) région of Bretagne, see Bretagne. ...


Her next historical novel Cleopatra's Heir (2002) featured Caesarion, son of Julius Caesar and Cleopatra VII of Egypt, managing to escape execution at the order of his adoptive brother Caesar Augustus. The young man is then forced in a life of poverty in his new environment, the Roman Empire. In 2002 she also wrote a short story set in Ancient Egypt, The Justice of Isis, taking place in Alexandria in 58 B.C. during the reign of Ptolemy XII. It was published in 'The Mammoth Book of Egyptian Whodunits'. This short story was published in Czech as Esetina spravedlnost in 2004. For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... A relief of Cleopatra and Caesarion at the temple of Dendera, Egypt Ptolemy XV Philopator Philometor Caesar, nicknamed Caesarion (little Caesar) Greek: Πτολεμαίος ΙΕ Φιλοπάτωρ Φιλομήτωρ Καίσαρ, Καισαρίων (June 23, 47 BC – August, 30 BC) was the last king of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt, who reigned, as a child, jointly with his mother, Cleopatra VII... Gaius Julius Caesar [1] (Latin pronunciation ; English pronunciation ; July 12 or July 13, 100 BC – March 15, 44 BC), often simply referred to as Julius Caesar, was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ... Cleopatra was a co-ruler of Egypt with her father (Ptolemy XII Auletes), her brothers/husbands Ptolemy XIII and Ptolemy XIV, consummated a liaison with Gaius Julius Caesar that solidified her grip on the throne, and, after Caesars assassination, aligned with Mark Antony, with whom she produced twins. ... The famous statue of Octavian at the Prima Porta Caesar Augustus (Latin:IMP·CAESAR·DIVI·F·AVGVSTVS) ¹ (23 September 63 BC–19 August AD 14), known to modern historians as Octavian for the period of his life prior to 27 BC, is considered the first and one of the most... Motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent, c. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... ↔--71. ... ---- Alexandria (Greek: , Coptic: , Arabic: , Egyptian Arabic: Iskindireyya), (population of 3. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 63 BC 62 BC 61 BC 60 BC 59 BC 58 BC 57 BC 56 BC 55... Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos Theos Philopator Theos Philadelphos (117 BCE - 51 BCE) was son of Ptolemy IX Soter II. His mother is unknown. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


This was followed by another historical novel, Render Unto Caesar (2003), featuring Hermogenes a Roman citizen of Greek origin meeting prejudice in Rome itself. In this year she also wrote a short story set in the last decades of Imperial Rome, The Malice of the Anicii. Unusually, this is written as if it were part of a scholarly edition of Ammianus Marcellinus's 'History of Rome' and was published in 'The Mammoth Book of Roman Whodunits'. 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For with(out) prejudice in law, see Prejudice (law). ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban... Roman Empire between AD 60 and 400 with major cities. ... Ammianus Marcellinus (325/330-after 391) was a Roman historian who wrote during Late Antiquity. ...


She returned to science fiction with The Somers Treatment. The novel features neurosurgeon David Somers advancing his own unique treatment of specific language impairment. But his research receives its funding from MI5 for reasons that remain secret to the public. Her next historical novel was The Alchemy of Fire (2004) takes place in Constantinople under Constantine IV. Anna, former concubine to a prince of the Heraclian Dynasty, attempts to raise her daughter Theodosia on her own while protecting the secret of the girl's noble birth. Meanwhile alchemist Kallinikos of Baalbek works in creating Greek fire. Insertion of an electrode during neurosurgery for Parkinsons disease. ... Specific language impairment (SLI) is a form of language disorder that affects both expressive and receptive language. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Map of Constantinople. ... Constantine IV on a contemporary coin Constantine IV (649-685); sometimes incorrectly called Pogonatus, meaning the Bearded, like his father; was Byzantine emperor from 668-685. ... The Heraclian Dynasty ruled the Eastern Roman Empire from 610 to 695 and again from 705 to 711. ... For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ... Overview of Baalbek in the late 19th century Baalbek (Arabic: ‎) is a town in the Bekaa Valley of Lebanon, altitude 3,850 ft (1,170 m), situated east of the Litani River. ... Greek fire was a burning-liquid weapon used by the Byzantine Greeks, typically in naval battles to great effect as it could continue burning even on water. ...


The Elixir of Youth (2006) was her next novel, looking at the complex relationship of a philosopher daughter with her molecular biologist father, who walked out of her family when she was a child and whose serum to repair the effects of aging on the skin is missing. Like her earlier novel Dangerous Notes (2001) the use of stem cells in research is a theme. For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Bloodwood was published in 2007. This novel is set in contemporary Britain, and focusses on Antonia Lanchester, a terminally-ill employeee of a home furnishing company who hands over incriminating files from her employer's computer to an environmental campaign group. 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ...


Her next novel, Dark North, due to be published by Seven House at the end of June 2007, is a return to Roman Britain for Bradshaw. Set in A.D. 208, it looks at the troubled reign of Emperor Septimius Severus and his attempt to conquer Scotland through the eyes of Memnon, an African cavalry scout, and members of Empress Julia Domna's household. 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... Principal sites in Roman Britain Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Look up AD in Wiktionary, the free dictionary AD or ad may stand for: ad or advertisement, see advertising ad- prefix Administrative domain Air Defence Andorra, ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 country code Anno Domini (In the Year of [Our] Lord). This year is A.D. 2005. ... hello my name is marco u ... Lucius Septimius Severus (b. ... Principal sites in Roman Britain Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Julia Domna (170-217) was member of the Severan dynasty of the Roman Empire. ...


Bradshaw has a vast knowledge of classical culture, of life in the Greek and Roman world, and she puts that to use in her historical fiction. Her novels with a scientific background are similarly highly credible.


Her novels have been published in English in Britain and the USA, and in translation in Danish, French, German and Spanish (see bibliography weblinks below). (The Justice of Isis short story was also published in Czech as Esetina spravedlnost in 2004.) In all five of her major published languages her writing has earned critical acclaim. However, Bradshaw's writing does not - yet - have the public prominence that the critical reception of her works indicates that it deserves. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Complete chronological English-language Bibliography

  • Hawk of May (1980) (Historical fiction with fantasy elements)
  • Kingdom of Summer (1981) (Historical fiction with fantasy elements)
  • In Winter's Shadow (1982) (Historical fiction with fantasy elements)
  • Down the Long Wind (Omnibus edition of the above trilogy) (1984)
  • The Beacon at Alexandria (1986) (Historical fiction)
  • The Bearkeeper's Daughter (1987) (Historical fiction)
  • The Colour of Power (1988) (US title Imperial Purple) (Historical fiction)
  • Horses of Heaven (1990) (Historical fiction with fantasy elements)
  • The Dragon and the Thief (1991) (Children's historical fiction with fantasy elements)
  • The Land of Gold (1992) (Children's historical fiction with fantasy elements)
  • Beyond the North Wind (1993) (Children's historical fiction with fantasy elements)
  • Island of Ghosts (1998) (Historical fiction)
  • The Wrong Reflection (2000) (Science fiction)
  • The Sand-Reckoner (2000) (Historical fiction)
  • Dangerous Notes (2001) (Science fiction)
  • The Wolf Hunt (2001) (Historical fiction with fantasy elements)
  • Cleopatra's Heir (2002) (Historical fiction)
  • The Justice of Isis (2002) (Historical fiction short story)
  • Render Unto Caesar (2003) (Historical fiction)
  • The Somers Treatment (2003) (Contemporary fiction with strong scientific elements)
  • The Malice of the Anicii (2003) (Historical fiction short story)
  • The Alchemy of Fire (2004) (Historical fiction)
  • The Elixir of Youth (2006) (Contemporary fiction with strong scientific elements)
  • Bloodwood (2007) (Contemporary fiction with strong scientific elements)
  • Dark North (2007) (Historical fiction)

Note that Shock Monday, a book sometimes cited as being by this writer, was written by an Australian author of the same name. 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ...


External links

  • Official (but out-of-date) website
  • Gillian Bradshaw's secondary official (but more out-of-date) website
  • Severn House Publishers UK Gillian Bradshaw webpage
  • Gillian Bradshaw's page at Fantasticfiction
  • Bibliography of Danish-language titles
  • Bibliography (on Amazon.fr) of French-language titles
  • Bibliography of German-language titles
  • Bibliography of Spanish-lnaguage titles

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gillian Bradshaw - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1372 words)
Gillian Marucha Bradshaw (born May 14, 1956) is an American writer of historical fiction and science fiction.
Bradshaw spent part of her youth in Santiago, Chile.
Bradshaw has a vast knowledge of classical culture, of life in the Greek and Roman world, and she puts that to use in her historical fiction.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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