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Encyclopedia > Gil Hodges
Gil Hodges
First Baseman
Born: April 4, 1924
Died: April 2, 1972 (aged 47)
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
October 3, 1943
for the Brooklyn Dodgers
Final game
May 5, 1963
for the New York Mets
Career statistics
AVG     .273
HR     370
RBI     1274
Teams

As Player Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The position of the first baseman First base redirects here. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899-1910), (1913) Brooklyn Grooms... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (126th in leap years). ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league titles World Series titles... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Mark McGwire swinging for the fences. ... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ...

As Manager Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899-1910), (1913) Brooklyn Grooms... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1961 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league titles World Series titles... The following are the events of the year 1962 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... The following are the events of the year 1963 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ...

Career highlights and awards
  • All-star:1949-1955, 1957
  • 1959 Lou Gehrig Memorial Award
  • Gold Gloves:1957-1959

Gilbert Raymond Hodges (April 4, 1924April 2, 1972) was an American first baseman and manager in Major League Baseball who played most of his career for the Brooklyn & Los Angeles Dodgers. He was the major leagues' outstanding first baseman in the 1950s, with teammate Duke Snider being the only player to have more home runs or runs batted in during the decade. His 370 career home runs set a National League record for right-handed hitters, and briefly ranked tenth in major league history; he held the NL record for career grand slams from 1957 to 1974. He anchored the infield on six pennant winners, and remains one of the most beloved and admired players in team history. A sterling defensive player, he won the first three Gold Glove Awards and led the NL in double plays four times and in putouts, assists and fielding percentage three times each. He ranked second in NL history with 1281 assists and 1614 double plays when his career ended, and was also among the league's career leaders in games (6th, 1908) and total chances (10th, 16,751) at first base. He managed the New York Mets to the 1969 World Series title, one of the greatest upsets in Series history, before his sudden and untimely death at age 47. Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1972–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 26, 34, 42 Name Texas Rangers (1972–present) Washington Senators (1961-1971) Other nicknames The Lone Stars Ballpark Rangers Ballpark in Arlington (1994–present) a. ... The following are the events of the year 1963 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1967 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league titles World Series titles... The following are the baseball events of the year 1968 throughout the world. ... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 31 - The new Special Veterans Committee selects seven men for enshrinement to the Hall of Fame: former players Dave Bancroft, Jake Beckley, Chick Hafey, Harry Hooper, Joe Kelley, Rube Marquard, and executive George Weiss. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The position of the first baseman First base redirects here. ... New York Yankees manager Joe Torre returning to the dugout (September 2005). ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in North American professional baseball. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899-1910), (1913) Brooklyn Grooms... Edwin Donald Duke Snider (born September 19, 1926 in Los Angeles, California), nicknamed The Silver Fox, is a former Major League baseball center fielder and left-handed batter who played with the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers (1947-62), New York Mets (1963) and San Francisco Giants (1964). ... Mark McGwire swinging for the fences. ... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ... The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the National League, is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball in the United States and Canada and the worlds oldest extant professional team sports league. ... In the sport of baseball, a grand slam is a home run hit with all the bases occupied, thereby scoring 4 runs - the most possible on a single play. ... In American baseball, the Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to simply as the Gold Glove, is the award annually given to the Major League player judged to be the most superior individual fielding performance at each position (in each league), as voted by the managers and coaches in each... After stepping on second base, the fielder throws to first to complete a double play In baseball, a double play (denoted on statistics sheets by DP) for a team or a fielder is the act of making two outs during the same continuous playing action. ... In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly-ball when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by one of the following methods: tagging a runner with the ball touching a base that a runner on a force play is trying to reach catching... In baseball, an assist (denoted by A) is a defensive statistic, baseball being the rare sport in which the defensive team controls the ball. ... In baseball statistics, fielding percentage, also known as fielding average, is a measure that reflects the percentage of times a defensive player handles a batted ball properly. ... In baseball statistics, total chances (denoted by TC) represents the number of plays that a defensive player participated in. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league titles World Series titles... The 1969 World Series was played between the New York Mets and the Baltimore Orioles, with the Mets prevailing in 5 games to accomplish one of the greatest upsets in Series history, as that particular Orioles squad was (and still is by some baseball pundits) considered to be one of...

Contents

Career

Early years

Hodges was born Gilbert Ray Hodge in Princeton, Indiana, the son of coal miner Charlie and his wife Irene; the family moved to nearby Petersburg when Gil was seven. Hodges was a star four-sport athlete at Petersburg High School, earning a combined seven varsity letters in football, baseball, basketball, and track. He declined a 1941 contract offer from the Detroit Tigers and instead attended Saint Joseph's College with the hope of eventually becoming a collegiate coach. He was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1943, and appeared in one game for the team as a third baseman that year. He entered the Marine Corps during World War II after having participated in its ROTC program at Saint Joseph's, serving as an anti-aircraft gunner in the battles of Tinian and Okinawa and receiving a Bronze Star and a commendation for courage under fire for his actions. After his 1946 military discharge he returned to Brooklyn and saw play as a catcher in 1947, joining the team's already solid nucleus of Jackie Robinson, Pee Wee Reese and Carl Furillo; but the emergence of Roy Campanella made it evident that Hodges had little future behind the plate, and he was shifted by manager Leo Durocher to first base, where his play came to be regarded as exemplary. Hodges' only appearance in the 1947 World Series against the New York Yankees was as a pinch-hitter for pitcher Rex Barney in Game 7; he struck out. As a 1948 rookie, he batted .249 with 11 home runs and 70 RBI. Princeton is a city located in Gibson County, in the US state of Indiana. ... Petersburg is a city located in Pike County, Indiana. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42 Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin Field (1912-1938) Bennett... Saint Josephs College (SJC; colloquially, St. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The position of the third baseman Third base redirects here. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) program is a college-based, officer commissioning program, predominantely in the United States. ... The battle of Tinian was a battle of the Pacific campaign of World War II, fought on the island of Tinian in the Mariana Islands from 24 July 1944 to 1 August 1944. ... Combatants United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand Empire of Japan Commanders Simon B. Buckner†, Joseph W. Stilwell, Ray Spruance Mitsuru Ushijima† Isamu Cho† Strength 548,000 regulars, 1300 ships,  ? aircraft 100,000 regulars and militia,  ? ships,  ? aircraft Casualties 12,513 dead or missing, 38,916 wounded, 33,096... The Bronze Star Medal is a United States Armed Forces individual military decoration and is the fourth highest award for bravery, heroism or meritorious service. ... The position of the catcher Catcher is also a general term for a fielder who catches the ball in cricket. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1947 throughout the world. ... For the basketball player, see Jackie Robinson (basketball). ... Harold Henry Pee Wee Reese (July 23, 1918 - August 14, 1999) was an American professional baseball player who played for the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers from 1940 to 1958. ... Carl Anthony Furillo (March 8, 1922 - January 21, 1989) was an American Major League Baseball right fielder and right-handed batter who played his entire career for the Brooklyn & Los Angeles Dodgers. ... Roy Campanella (November 19, 1921 – June 26, 1993) was an American catcher in the Negro leagues and Major League Baseball. ... Leo Ernest Durocher (July 27, 1905 — October 7, 1991), nicknamed Leo the Lip, was an American infielder and manager in Major League Baseball. ... The 1947 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the Brooklyn Dodgers, with the Yankees winning the Series in 7 games for their first title since 1943, and the 11th championship in team history. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Rex Barney (1924-1997) was a hard-throwing pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1943 and from 1946 through 1950. ... Cincinnati Reds outfielder Adam Dunn strikes out swinging to Atlanta Braves pitcher John Smoltz (not pictured). ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1948 throughout the world. ...


On June 25, 1949, he hit for the cycle. He led the NL in putouts (1336), double plays (142) and fielding average (.995) that season, and tied Hack Wilson's 1932 club record for right-handed hitters with 23 homers. His 115 RBI were fourth in the NL, and he made his first of seven consecutive All-Star teams. Facing the Yankees again in the 1949 Series, he batted only .235 but did drive in the sole run in Brooklyn's only victory, a 1-0 triumph in Game 2. In Game 5 he hit a 3-run homer with two out in the seventh to pull the Dodgers within 10-6, but struck out to end the game and the Series. On August 31, 1950 against the Boston Braves, he joined Lou Gehrig as just the second player since 1900 to hit four home runs in a game without the benefit of extra innings; he hit them against four different pitchers, with the first coming off Warren Spahn. That year he also led the league in fielding (.994) and set an NL record with 159 double plays, breaking Frank McCormick's mark of 153 with the 1939 Cincinnati Reds; he broke his own record in 1951 with 171, a record which stood until Donn Clendenon had 182 for the 1966 Pittsburgh Pirates. He finished 1950 third in the league in both homers (32) and RBI (113), and came in eighth in the MVP voting. In 1951 he became the first Dodger to hit 40 home runs, breaking Babe Herman's 1930 mark of 35; Campanella hit 41 in 1953, but Hodges would recapture the record with 42 in 1954 before Snider eclipsed him again with 43 in 1956. His last home run of 1951 came on October 2 against the New York Giants, as the Dodgers tied the 3-game NL playoff series at a game each with a 10-0 win; New York would take the pennant the next day on Bobby Thomson's "Shot Heard 'Round the World". Hodges also led the NL with 126 assists in 1951, and was second in HRs, third in runs (118) and total bases (307), fifth in slugging average (.527), and sixth in RBI (103). is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1949 throughout the world. ... Eric Davis hit for the cycle in 1989 In baseball, a player hits for the cycle when he hits a single, a double, a triple and a home run in the same game, though not necessarily in that order. ... // Biography Lewis Robert Hack Wilson (April 26, 1900 – November 23, 1948) was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball from 1923 to 1934. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1932 throughout the world. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the manager (the managers from the previous years... The 1949 World Series featured the New York Yankees. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1950 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... Listed below are the 15 occurrences of Major League Baseball players who have hit four home runs in a single game. ... Warren Edward Spahn (April 23, 1921 – November 24, 2003) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for 21 seasons, all in the National League. ... Frank Andrew McCormick (b. ... == July == July 4 = Lou Gehrig day was held at Yankee Stadium,Lou said in his speech that he is the luckiest man on the face of the earth. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Ballpark Great American Ball Park (2003–present) Riverfront... The following are the baseball events of the year 1951 throughout the world. ... Donn Alvin Clendenon (July 15, 1935 – September 17, 2005) was a first baseman in Major League Baseball. ... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 20 - The Baseball Writers Association of America voters elect Ted Williams to the Hall of Fame. ... Major league affiliations National League (1887–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 20, 21, 33, 40, 42 Name Pittsburgh Pirates (1891–present) Pittsburgh Innocents (1890) Pittsburg Alleghenies (1882–1889) (Also referred to as Infants in 1890) Ballpark PNC Park (2001–present) Three Rivers... In the game of baseball, both amateur and professional, it is tradition to annually recognize the one player in the league who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ... Floyd Caves Babe Herman (June 26, 1903 - November 27, 1987) was an American Major League Baseball player. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1930 throughout the world. ... The following are the events of the year 1953 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1954 throughout the world. ... September 30 Chicago White Sox pitcher Jim Derrington becomes the youngest pitcher in modern history to start a game. ... October 2 is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885-1957) New York Gothams (1883-1885) Ballpark AT&T Park (2000–present) a. ... Robert Brown Bobby Thomson (born October 25, 1923 in Glasgow, Scotland), nicknamed The Staten Island Scot, is a Scottish-American former Major League Baseball outfielder and right-handed batter who played for the New York Giants (1946-53, 1957), Milwaukee Braves (1954-57), Chicago Cubs (1958-59), Boston Red Sox... The Shot Heard Round the World In baseball, the Shot Heard Round the World is the term given to the walk-off home run hit by New York Giants outfielder Bobby Thomson off Brooklyn Dodgers pitcher Ralph Branca at the Polo Grounds to win the National League pennant at 3... Bengie Molina of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (in gray and red) scores a run by touching home plate after rounding all the bases. ... In baseball statistics, total bases refers to the number of bases a player has gained with hits, i. ... Barry Bonds holds the MLB record for highest slugging average in a season (.863). ...


Hodges was an eight-time All-Star, from 1949-55 and in 1957. With his last home run of 1952, he tied Dolph Camilli's Dodger career record of 139, and he passed him in 1953; Snider would move ahead of him in 1956. He again led the NL with 116 assists in 1952, and was third in the league in HRs (32) and fourth in RBI (102) and slugging (.500). A great fan favorite in Brooklyn, he was perhaps the only Dodger regular never booed at their home park, Ebbets Field. Fans were very supportive even when Hodges suffered through one of the most famous slumps in baseball history, going hitless in the last nine games of 1952; during the 1952 World Series against the Yankees, he finished the Series 0-21 at the plate as Brooklyn lost in seven games. When his slump continued into the following spring, fans reacted with countless letters and good-luck gifts, and one Brooklyn priest – Father Herbert Redmond of St. Francis Roman Catholic Church – told his flock: "It's far too hot for a homily. Keep the Commandments and say a prayer for Gil Hodges."[1] Hodges began hitting again soon afterward, and rarely struggled again in the World Series. The following are the events of the year 1952 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... Adolph Louis Camilli (April 23, 1907 - October 21, 1997) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who spent most of his career with the Philadelphia Phillies and Brooklyn Dodgers. ... Ebbets Field was a Major League Baseball park located in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, New York. ... The 1952 World Series featured the three-time defending champion New York Yankees and the Brooklyn Dodgers, with the Yankees winning in 7 games for their fourth straight title – tying the mark they set between 1936 and 1939 – and the 15th in their history, and their third defeat...


He ended 1953 with a .302 batting average, though only fifth in the NL in RBI (122) and sixth in HRs (31). Against the Yankees in the 1953 Series, Hodges hit an impressive .364; he had three hits including a homer in the 9-5 Game 1 loss, but the Dodgers again lost in six games. Under new manager Walter Alston in 1954 he enjoyed one of his best campaigns, setting the team HR record, hitting a career-high .304 and again leading the NL in putouts (1381) and assists (132). He was second in the league to Ted Kluszewski in HRs and RBI (130), fifth in total bases (335) and sixth in slugging (.579) and runs (106), and placed tenth in the MVP vote. The 1953 World Series matched the four-time defending champion New York Yankees against the Brooklyn Dodgers in a rematch of the 1952 Series. ... In Major League Baseball history, Ty Cobb had a record 4,191 hits by 1928; Pete Rose would surpass it 57 years later, and finish with 4,256 career hits. ... Walter Emmons Alston (December 1, 1911 - October 1, 1984) was an American baseball player and manager. ... Theodore Bernard Ted Kluszewski (September 10, 1924 - March 29, 1988), nicknamed Big Klu, was a slugging first baseman who played in Major League Baseball between 1947 and 1961. ...


The Boys of Summer

1955 saw his regular-season production drop off to a .289 average, 27 HRs and 102 RBI, but the year ended with a most satisfying conclusion. Facing the Yankees in the World Series for the fifth time, he was 1-for-12 in the first three games before coming around. In Game 4 he hit a 2-run homer in the fourth inning to put Brooklyn ahead 4-3, and later had an RBI single as they held off the Yankees 8-5; he scored the first run in the 5-3 win in Game 5. In Game 7 he drove in Campanella with two out in the fourth for a 1-0 lead, and added a sacrifice fly to score Reese with one out in the sixth. Johnny Podres scattered eight New York hits, and when Reese threw Elston Howard's grounder to Hodges for the final out, Brooklyn had a 2-0 win and the first World Series title in franchise history. The following are the events of the year 1955 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... The 1955 World Series matched the Brooklyn Dodgers against the New York Yankees, with the Dodgers winning the Series in 7 games to capture the first championship in franchise history. ... In baseball, a batted ball is considered a sacrifice fly (denoted by SF) if the following four criteria are met: There are fewer than two outs. ... John Joseph Johnny Podres (born September 30, 1932 in Witherbee, New York) is a former Major League Baseball left-handed starting pitcher who played with the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers (1953-55, 1957-67); Detroit Tigers (1966-67), and San Diego Padres (1969). ... Elston Gene Howard (February 23, 1929-December 14, 1980) was a Major League Baseball player. ...


In 1956 he had 32 home runs and 87 RBI as Brooklyn won the pennant again, and once more met the Yankees in the World Series. In the third inning of Game 1 he hit a 3-run homer to put Brooklyn ahead 5-2, and they went on to a 6-3 win; he had three hits and four RBI in Game 2's 13-8 slugfest, scoring to give the Dodgers a 7-6 lead in the third and doubling in two runs each in the fourth and fifth innings for an 11-7 lead. In Game 5 he struck out, flied to center and lined to third base in Yankee Don Larsen's perfect game, and Brooklyn went on to lose in seven games. The 1956 World Series of Major League Baseball was played between the New York Yankees (representing the American League) and the defending champion Brooklyn Dodgers (representing the National League) during the month of October 1956. ... In baseball, a double is the act of a batter safely reaching second base by striking the ball and getting to second before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... Donald James Larsen (born August 7, 1929 in Michigan City, Indiana) was a Major League Baseball pitcher for 14 seasons. ... Pitcher David Cone (left) of the New York Yankees reacting to the completion of his perfect game with catcher Joe Girardi on July 18, 1999. ...


In 1957 Hodges set the NL record for career grand slams, breaking the mark of 12 shared by Rogers Hornsby and Ralph Kiner; his final total of 14 was tied by Hank Aaron and Willie McCovey in 1972, and broken by Aaron in 1974. He had another excellent season, finishing seventh in the NL with a .299 batting average and fifth with 98 RBI, and leading the league with 1317 putouts. He was also among the NL's top ten players in HRs (27), hits (173), runs (94), triples (7), slugging (.511) and total bases (296); in late September he drove in the last Dodger run ever at Ebbets Field, and also the last run in Brooklyn history. He was named to his last All-Star team, and placed seventh in the MVP balloting. After the Dodgers relocated to Los Angeles, on April 23, 1958 he became the seventh player to hit 300 home runs in the NL, connecting off Dick Drott of the Chicago Cubs. That year he also tied a post-1900 record by leading the league in double plays (134) for the fourth time, equaling McCormick and Kluszewski; Clendenon eventually broke the record in 1968. But he had only 22 HRs and 64 RBI as the Dodgers finished in seventh place in their first season in California. Also in 1958, he broke Camilli's NL record of 923 career strikeouts. The following are the baseball events of the year 1957 throughout the world. ... Rogers Hornsby (April 27, 1896 in Winters, Texas - January 5, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois), nicknamed The Rajah, was a Major League Baseball second baseman and manager. ... Ralph McPherran Kiner (born October 27, 1922) is an American former Major League Baseball player and current announcer. ... Henry Louis Hank Aaron (born February 5, 1934 in Mobile, Alabama) is a retired American baseball player and member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. ... Willie Lee McCovey (born January 10, 1938 in Mobile, Alabama), nicknamed Big Mac and Stretch, is a former slugger and first baseman who played Major League Baseball for the San Francisco Giants, San Diego Padres and Oakland Athletics between 1959 and 1980. ... The following are the events of the year 1972 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 16 - The Baseball Writers Association of America elects former New York Yankees teammates Mickey Mantle and Whitey Ford to the Hall of Fame. ... In baseball, a triple is the act of a batter safely reaching third base by striking the ball and getting to third before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the events of the year 1958 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... Dick Drott was a Major League Baseball player who pitched for the Chicago Cubs and the Houston Colt . ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ...


Things turned around in 1959 as the Dodgers captured another NL title, with Hodges contributing 25 HRs and 80 RBI and hitting .276, coming in seventh in the league with a .513 slugging mark; he also led the NL with a .992 fielding average. He batted .391 in the 1959 World Series against the Chicago White Sox (his first against a non-Yankee team), with his solo home run in the eighth inning of Game 4 giving the Dodgers a 5-4 win, as they triumphed in six games for another Series championship. In 1960 he broke Kiner's NL record for right-handed hitters of 351 career home runs, and appeared on the TV program Home Run Derby. In his last season with the Dodgers in 1961, he became the team's career RBI leader with 1254, passing Zack Wheat; Snider moved ahead of him the following year. Hodges received the first three Gold Glove Awards ever presented from 1957 to 1959; his career fielding average of .992 is outstanding. The following are the baseball events of the year 1959 throughout the world. ... The 1959 World Series featured the Los Angeles Dodgers, who had won their first pennant since moving from Brooklyn in 1958 by defeating the Milwaukee Braves 2-0 in a three-game pennant playoff, and the Chicago White Sox, who had earned their first pennant in the 40 years since... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1960 throughout the world. ... The Home Run Derby is an event played prior to the Major League Baseball All-Star Game. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1961 throughout the world. ... Zachary Davis Wheat (May 23, 1888 - March 11, 1972) was a left-handed Major League Baseball outfielder. ...


Return to New York

After being chosen in the expansion draft, Hodges was one of the original 1962 Mets; despite knee problems he was persuaded to continue his playing career in New York, and he hit the first home run in franchise history. By the end of the year, in which he played only 54 games, he ranked tenth in major league history with 370 HRs – second to only Jimmie Foxx among right-handed hitters. After 11 games with the Mets in 1963, during which he batted .227 with no homers and was plagued by injuries, he was traded to the Washington Senators in late May for outfielder Jimmy Piersall with the purpose of him replacing Mickey Vernon as Washington's manager. Hodges immediately announced his retirement from playing in order to clearly focus on his new position. The Giants' Willie Mays had passed him weeks earlier on April 19 to become the NL's home run leader among right-handed hitters; Hodges' last game had been on May 5 in a doubleheader hosting the Giants (who had moved to San Francisco in 1958). The 1961 MLB Expansion Draft was held by Major League Baseball on October 10, 1961 to fill the rosters of the New York Mets and the Houston Colt . ... The following are the events of the year 1962 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... The following are the events of the year 1963 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1972–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 26, 34, 42 Name Texas Rangers (1972–present) Washington Senators (1961-1971) Other nicknames The Lone Stars Ballpark Rangers Ballpark in Arlington (1994–present) a. ... Austin Kearns, an outfielder, catches a fly ball. ... James Anthony Piersall (born November 14, 1929 in Waterbury, Connecticut) is a former center fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Mickey Vernon, playing for Washington James Barton Vernon (Mickey) (born April 22, 1918 in Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania) is a former Major League Baseball player for the Washington Senators (1939-1948, 1950-1955) for the majority of his career, plus 4 other teams: the Cleveland Indians (1949-1950, 1958), the Boston... Willie Howard Mays, Jr. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (126th in leap years). ...


Hodges managed the Senators through 1967, and although they improved in each season they never achieved a winning record. One of the most notable incidents in his career occurred in the summer of 1965, when pitcher Ryne Duren – reaching the end of his career and sinking into alcoholism – walked onto a bridge with intentions of suicide; his manager talked him away from the edge. In 1968 Hodges was brought back to manage the perennially woeful Mets, and while the team only posted a 73-89 record it was nonetheless the best mark in their seven-year existence. In 1969, he led the "Miracle Mets" to the World Series championship, defeating the heavily favored Baltimore Orioles; after losing Game 1, they came back for four straight victories, including two by 2-1 scores. Finishing higher than ninth place for the first time, the Mets became not only the first expansion team to win the Series, but also the first team ever to win the Series after finishing at least 15 games under .500 the previous year. Hodges was named The Sporting News' Manager of the Year. Rinold George Ryne Duren (born February 22, 1929, Cazenovia, Wisconsin) is a former relief pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1969 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 4, 5, 8, 20, 22, 33, 42 Name Baltimore Orioles (1954–present) St. ... The Sporting News Manager of the Year Award was established in 1936 by The Sporting News and was given annually to one manager in Major League Baseball. ...


Death

After identical third-place seasons of 83-79 in 1970 and 1971, Gil Hodges died suddenly of a heart attack in West Palm Beach, Florida while playing golf with other members of the Mets coaching staff, including Yogi Berra, during an off day from spring training in April of 1972. Hodges was just two days short of his 48th birthday. He had suffered a previous heart attack during a September 1968 game. He was survived by his wife, the former Joan Lombardi, whom he had married in 1948, and his son and three daughters. Berra was named to succeed him as manager. Gil Hodges is buried at Holy Cross Cemetery in East Flatbush, Brooklyn. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), more commonly known as a heart attack, is a disease state that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ... Nickname: Location in Palm Beach County and the state of Florida. ... Lawrence Peter Yogi Berra (born May 12, 1925 in St. ... Holy Cross Cemetery located at 3620 Tilden Avenue in Brooklyn, New York City is an American Roman Catholic cemetery operated by the Diocese of Brooklyn. ... East Flatbush is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ...


Accomplishments

Hodges batted .273 in his career with a .487 slugging average, 1921 hits, 1274 RBI, 1105 runs, 295 doubles and 63 stolen bases in 2071 games. His 361 home runs with the Dodgers remain second in team history to Snider's 389. His 1614 career double plays placed him behind only Charlie Grimm (1733) in NL history, and were a major league record for a right-handed first baseman until Chris Chambliss surpassed him in 1984. His 1281 career assists ranked second in league history to Fred Tenney's 1363, and trailed only Ed Konetchy's 1292 among all right-handed first basemen. Snider broke his NL record of 1137 career strikeouts in 1964. The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1988. ... Charlie Grimm (August 28, 1898 - November 15, 1983), was a popular major league baseball first baseman and manager, sometime radio broadcaster, and generally a goodwill ambassador for baseball. ... Chris Chambliss (born Carroll Christopher Chambliss on December 26, 1948 in Dayton, Ohio) was a Major League Baseball player from 1971-1988 for the Cleveland Indians, New York Yankees and Atlanta Braves. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1984 throughout the world. ... Frederick Tenney (November 26, 1871 - July 3, 1952) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Beaneaters/Doves/Braves (1894-1907, 1911) and New York Giants (1908-1909). ... Edward Joseph Konetchy (September 3, 1885 - May 27, 1947), nicknamed Big Ed, was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball for a number of teams, primarily in the National League, from 1907 to 1921. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1964 throughout the world. ...


Hodges was inducted into the New York Mets Hall of Fame in 1982. The Mets also retired his uniform number 14 in 1973. The New York Mets Hall of Fame was created in 1981 to recognize the careers of former New York Mets players, managers, broadcasters and executives. ... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 13 - Hank Aaron and Frank Robinson become the 12th and 13th players elected to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America in their first year of eligibility. ...


In 1978 the Marine Parkway Bridge, connecting the Marine Park area of Brooklyn with the Rockaways in Queens, was renamed the Marine Parkway-Gil Hodges Bridge in his memory. Other Brooklyn locations named for him are a park on Carroll Street, a Little League field on MacDonald Avenue in Brooklyn, a section of Avenue L and P.S. 193. In addition Bedford Ave. in Brooklyn also dawns the name Gil Hodges Way. There's also a bowling alley named after him named Gil Hodges Lanes. In Indiana, there is the high school baseball stadium in his birthplace of Princeton, Indiana, as well as a bridge spanning the East Fork of the White River in northern Pike County, Indiana on State Road 57. Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... The Marine Parkway-Gil Hodges Memorial Bridge in New York City (originally Marine Parkway Bridge) is a toll bridge that crosses Rockaway Inlet and connects Rockaway Peninsula, in Queens, with Brooklyn. ... Gerritsen Avenue is a major traffic corridor in the nighborhood. ... The Rockaway Peninsula, also known as The Rockaways, is the name of a peninsula of Long Island, most of which is located within the borough of Queens in New York City; the peninsulas easternmost section forms the town of East Rockaway, in suburban Nassau County. ... Queens is one of the five boroughs of New York City, USA. Geographically the largest borough in the city, Queens is home to many immigrants and the two major airports. ... Little League Baseball - Logo Little League pitcher in Winesburg, Ohio Little League, Wayne, Michigan Little League Baseball is the name of a non-profit organization in the United States which organizes local childrens leagues of baseball and softball throughout the USA and the rest of the world. ... Gil Hodges, the schools namesake P.S. 193 is an elementary school in Kings County, Brooklyn, New York City. ... The forks of the White River are highlighted in blue. ... Pike County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... State Road 57 in the U.S. State of Indiana is a north-south, largely two-lane road in the southwestern portion of the state. ...


The book Carl Erskine's Tales from the Dodgers Dugout: Extra Innings (2004) includes short stories from former Dodger pitcher Carl Erskine; Hodges is prominent in many of these stories. Carl Daniel Erskine (born December 13, 1926 in Anderson, Indiana) is a former starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Brooklyn & Los Angeles Dodgers from 1948 through 1959. ...


Why not the Hall of Fame?

The fact that Gil Hodges has not been elected to membership in the Baseball Hall of Fame is somewhat controversial. He was considered to be one of the finest players of the 1950s, and graduated to managerial success with the Mets. But critics of his candidacy point out that despite his offensive prowess, he never led the NL in any offensive category such as home runs, RBI or slugging average, and never came close to winning an MVP award (in fact, he was never named first on any MVP ballot). The latter fact may have been partially due to his having many of his best seasons (1950-51, 1954, 1957) in years when the Dodgers did not win the pennant. In addition, his career batting average of .273 was likely frowned on by many Hall of Fame voters in his early years of eligibility; at the time of his death, only five players had ever been elected by the Baseball Writers Association of America with batting averages below .300 – all of them catchers or shortstops, and only one (Rabbit Maranville) who had an average lower than Hodges' or who had not won an MVP award. By the time his initial eligibility expired in 1983, the BBWAA had elected only two more players with averages below .274 – third basemen Eddie Mathews (.271), who hit over 500 HRs, leading the NL twice, and Brooks Robinson (.267), who won an MVP award and set numerous defensive records. The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... official logo The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) is a professional association for baseball journalists writing for daily newspapers and magazines. ... Rabbit Maranville Walter James Vincent Maranville (November 11, 1891 - January 5, 1954), better known as Rabbit Maranville, was a Major League Baseball shortstop. ... Edwin Lee Eddie Mathews (October 13, 1931 – February 18, 2001) was a Hall of Fame third baseman in Major League Baseball and is widely regarded as one of the greatest, if not the greatest, third baseman to play the game. ... Brooks Calbert Robinson, Jr. ...


Nonetheless, Hodges was the prototype of the modern slugging first baseman, and while the post-1961 expansion era has resulted in numerous players matching his home run and RBI totals, he remains the only one of the 21 players who had 300 or more home runs by the time of his retirement who has not yet been elected (all but Chuck Klein and Johnny Mize were elected by the BBWAA). Some observers have also suggested that his premature passing in 1972 simply removed him from public consciousness, whereas other ballplayers – including numerous Dodger greats – were in the public eye for years afterward, receiving the exposure which may assist their election. He did, however, collect 3010 votes cast by the BBWAA during his initial eligibility period from 1969 to 1983 – a record for an unselected player until Jim Rice surpassed that total in 2007 – and has been regularly considered for selection by the Hall of Fame's Veterans Committee since 1987, falling one vote short of election in 1993 when no candidates were selected. Charles Herbert Klein (October 7, 1904 - March 28, 1958) was a Major League Baseball player who played for the Philadelphia Phillies (1928-33, 1936-39, 1940-44), Chicago Cubs (1934-36) and Pittsburgh Pirates (1939). ... Johnny Mize (January 7, 1913 - June 2, 1993) was a baseball player who was a first baseman for the St. ... Founded in 1908 as the Baseball Writers Association of America, the BBWAA is a professional association for baseball journalists writing for daily newspapers and magazines. ... James Edward Jim Rice (born March 8, 1953 in Anderson, South Carolina) is a former baseball player with the American Leagues Boston Red Sox from 1974 to 1989. ... The Veterans Committee, officially the Committee on Baseball Veterans, is a committee of the National Baseball Hall of Fame that provides a second chance for Hall of Fame election to players passed over in regular Hall of Fame balloting. ...


Books

  • Milton J. Shapiro published a biography of Hodges, The Gil Hodges Story (1960).
  • Hodges and Frank Slocum published a book called The Game Of Baseball (1969).
  • Marino Amaruso wrote a biography of Hodges, Gil Hodges: The Quiet Man (1991).
  • Tom Oliphant wrote "Praying for Gil Hodges : A Memoir of the 1955 World Series and One Family's Love of the Brooklyn Dodgers" (2005) ISBN 0-312-31761-1.

See also

The following is a chronology of the top ten leaders in lifetime home runs in Major League Baseball. ... In the sport of baseball, a home run is the act of hitting the ball in such a manner, whether out of the park or in (see inside the park home run), that allows the batter to safely reach home and score in one play. ... List of NL Gold Glove Winners at First Base Gold Glove AL: P | C | 1B | 2B | SS | 3B | OF NL: P | C | 1B | 2B | SS | 3B | OF Categories: Baseball Trophies and Awards ... The Lou Gehrig Memorial Award is a award created by the Phi Delta Theta Fraternity to recognize the former Major League Baseball player Lou Gehrig. ... In 1929, the New York Yankees and the Cleveland Indians began using uniform numbers so fans and scorekeepers could tell who was who on the field. ... Below is the list of Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 runs milestone. ... Below is the list of 250 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 RBI milestone. ... Eric Davis hit for the cycle in 1989 In baseball, a player hits for the cycle when he hits a single, a double, a triple and a home run in the same game, though not necessarily in that order. ... Listed below are the 15 occurrences of Major League Baseball players who have hit four home runs in a single game. ... Listed below are the occurrences of Major League Baseball players who have hit three home runs in a single game. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ Oliphant, Thomas (2005). Praying For Gil Hodges. United States: Thomas Dunne Books. ISBN 0-312-31761-1. 
Preceded by
Gil McDougald
Lou Gehrig Memorial Award
1959
Succeeded by
Dick Groat
Preceded by
Pat Seerey
Batters with 4 home runs in one game
August 31, 1950
Succeeded by
Joe Adcock
Preceded by
Eddie Yost
Washington Senators Managers
1963-1967
Succeeded by
Jim Lemon
Preceded by
Wes Westrum
New York Mets Managers
1968-1971
Succeeded by
Yogi Berra

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gil Hodges - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (483 words)
A native of Princeton, Indiana, Hodges was originally signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers as a third baseman.
A member of the 1955 World Series champion World Champion 1955 Dodgers, Hodges held the National League record for grand slams (14) for several years, and he is a member of the exclusive club of players that have hit four home runs in a single game.
Hodges died suddently of a heart attack in West Palm Beach, Florida while managing the Mets during spring training in 1972, just two days short of his 48th birthday.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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