FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
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Encyclopedia > Gifford Miller
New York City Council Speaker Gifford Miller.
New York City Council Speaker Gifford Miller.

Alan Gifford Miller (born November 6, 1969) is the former Speaker of the New York City Council, where he represented Council District 5. Barred from seeking reelection due to term limits, the Democrat ran in the Democratic primary for the opportunity to run against incumbent Republican Mayor, multi-billionaire Michael Bloomberg in November 2005. New York City Council Chair Gifford Miller File links The following pages link to this file: Gifford Miller Categories: Free use images ... New York City Council Chair Gifford Miller File links The following pages link to this file: Gifford Miller Categories: Free use images ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... New York City Hall The New York City Council is the lawmaking body of the City of New York. ... A term limit is a provision of a constitution, statute, or bylaw which limits the number of terms a person may serve in a particular elected office. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... The New York City mayoral election of 2005 occurred on Tuesday November 8, 2005, with incumbent Republican mayor Michael Bloomberg defeating former Bronx borough president Fernando Ferrer, the Democratic nominee. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born February 14, 1942) is a prominent American businessman, the founder of Bloomberg L.P., and the current Mayor of New York City. ... Ongoing events • Abramoff-Reed gambling scandal • Al Jazeera bombing memo • Avian influenza (H5N1) outbreak • Black sites scandal • Conservative leadership race (UK) • Fuel prices • Irans nuclear program • Jilin chemical plant explosions • Kashmir earthquake • Malawi food crisis • Malaysian prisoner abuse scandal • New Delhi bombings investigation • Niger food crisis • North Indian cyclone...


Early life and education

According to the New York Observer, Miller grew up in New York City, with mother Lynden, a landscape designer and father Leigh Miller, who was a political appointee to Presidents Kennedy and Johnson. The New York Observer is a weekly newspaper first published in New York City on September 22, 1987 by Arthur L. Carter, a very successful former investment banker with publishing interests. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, John Kennedy or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... “LBJ” redirects here. ...


Miller attended St. Bernard's School, a day school for young boys. He later graduated from Princeton University with a degree in political science. Miller attended Fordham University Law School leaving before completing his degree in 2000 to focus on his successful race for the New York City Council Speaker. A lifelong Upper East Sider, he lives on East 82nd Street with his wife since 1999, Pamela Addison, and their two sons, Marshall and Addison Leigh. According to the New York Times, Miller also sings, plays basketball and has "eclectic tastes in music". St. ... Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ... Political science is the field of the social sciences concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behavior. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ...


Following his graduation from Princeton in 1992, Miller joined the staff of Representative Carolyn B. Maloney, a Democrat who represents the New York 14th Congressional District, which overlaps Council District 5. Council District 5 represents of the Upper East Side, Yorkville, Carnegie Hill, Turtle Bay, Sutton Place and Roosevelt Island. Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Carolyn Maloney (born on February 19, 1948) is a politician from the U.S. state of New York. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Upper East Side at Sunset The Upper East Side is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, between Central Park and the East River. ... A section of Yorkville as seen from a high rise on Second Avenue and 87th Street Yorkville is a neighborhood within the Upper East Side of the borough of Manhattan in the city of New York City. ... Carnegie Hill is a neighborhood within the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City. ... Turtle Bay is a neighborhood in New York City, on the east side of Midtown Manhattan. ... Main Street on Roosevelt Island Roosevelt Island, formerly known as Welfare Island, is a narrow island in the East River of New York City. ...


Political career

In January 1996, Miller won his first term in the New York City Council at the age of 26. He was the first Democrat in recent history elected to represent the traditionally wealthy district. He easily won reelection in 1997, 2001 and 2003; term limits laws prohibited him from seeking a fifth term. Following a unanimous election on January 9, 2002, Miller succeeded Peter Vallone, Sr. as the Speaker of the New York City Council. 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A term limit is a provision of a constitution, statute, or bylaw which limits the number of terms a person may serve in a particular elected office. ... January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Peter F. Vallone, Sr. ...


Miller sought the Democratic mayoral nomination in 2005. His opponents for the nomination included former Bronx borough president Fernando Ferrer, Congressman Anthony D. Weiner and outgoing Manhattan borough president C. Virginia Fields. The winner of the Democratic primary election on September 13, 2005 was Ferrer, who was easily defeated by Republican mayor Michael Bloomberg in the general election held on November 8, 2005. 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fernando Ferrer Fernando James Freddy Ferrer (born April 30, 1950 in the Bronx, New York) was the Borough President of The Bronx from 1987 to 2001, and was a candidate for Mayor of New York in 2001 and the Democratic Party nominee for Mayor in 2005. ... Anthony David Weiner (born September 4, 1964) is a Democratic politician from the U.S. state of New York. ... C. Virginia Fields is the former Borough President of Manhattan, elected in 1997 and reelected in 2001. ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Republican Party is a one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Democratic Party. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born February 14, 1942) is a prominent American businessman, the founder of Bloomberg L.P., and the current Mayor of New York City. ... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Miller was according to a New York Magazine article, beat up and barraged by local media, and politicos, perhaps unfairly.[1] Some claimed that Miller lacked an "ethnic base" necessary to be a successful politican in New York City-wide elections. According to the New York Observer, Miller is "widely regarded as a decent and talented man" who has nonetheless shown "signs of immaturity: his reversal on his reversal on lead-paint legislation after pressure from special interests; his eagerness to spend the city budget surplus to hire teachers, reopen firehouses and cut taxes despite an ongoing climate of fiscal uncertainty." [2] The New York Observer is a weekly newspaper first published in New York City on September 22, 1987 by Arthur L. Carter, a very successful former investment banker with publishing interests. ...


Although Miller had the most money of any of the candidates in the Democratic, as well as many key endorsements, he suffered severe reversals of fortune in the final month of the primary. He failed to get backing from much of the entrenched local Democratic Party machinery. He was criticized for being too predictable and safe in his public appearances and debate performances. There was a report concerning voter information mailings coming close to the primary election; it was alleged that Gifford's aides initially claimed the mailings cost only $37,000 (which would have been by far the lowest of all City Council members), but later stated they cost taxpayers $1.6 million. Miller also claimed $1.5 million of his fund was exempt from the primary's $5.7 million spending limit (as it was self-financed) which caused a spat with the Campaign Finance Board. While he maintained his position, Gifford Miller ended the dispute by cancelling over $450,000 in important final stage advertisements, thus negating his spending edge. Miller saw much of his potential support drift to Congressman Weiner. In the end, Miller placed fourth in the primary field with 10.19%.


In Fall 2006, Miller was at New York University teaching at the College of Arts and Science and leading a Freshman Honors Seminar on public policy and urban planning in New York City. Miller also runs a strategic consulting firm, Miller Strategies. Miller has not ruled out another run for office. New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ...

Preceded by
Peter Vallone
Speaker, New York City Council
2002-2006
Succeeded by
Christine Quinn

Peter F. Vallone, Sr. ... New York City Hall The New York City Council is the lawmaking body of the City of New York. ... Christine C. Quinn (b. ...

External links and references

  • Hu, Winnie, For Ex-Council Speaker, Few Regrets and a New Role as N.Y.U. Public Figure, New York Times, February 26, 2006
  • Hu, Winnie, The Missteps That Hampered Miller, New York Times, September 15, 2005
  • New York crooner aims for office, BBC News, May 11, 2005
  • Confessore, Nicholas, That's Entertainment? No, It's Politics, New York Times, May 11, 2005

  Results from FactBites:
 
INSTAAR: Gifford Miller (459 words)
Miller, G.H., Magee, J.W. and Jull, A.J.T., 1997: Low-latitude glacial cooling in the Southern Hemisphere from amino acid racemization in emu eggshells.
Miller, G.H., Mangan, J., Pollard, D., Thompson, S.L., Felzer, B.S., and Magee, J.W., 2005: Sensitivity of the Australian Monsoon to insolation and vegetation: Implications for human impact on continental moisture balance.
Geirsdottir, A., Miller, G.H., and Andrews, J.T. Glaciation, erosion, and landscape evolution of Iceland.
The Progress & Freedom Foundation - About PFF - Board of Directors (1715 words)
Gifford earned his law degree from the University of Chicago, where he absorbed the "law and economics" jurisprudence for which the school is (in)famous.
Gifford teaches a seminar on the Law and Economics of the Information Age at the University of Colorado School of Law.
From 1985 to 1988, Miller was director of the Office of Management and Budget, a member of President Reagan's Cabinet; and a member of the National Security Council.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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