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Encyclopedia > Giant (mythology)
"Jack the Giant-Killer" by Arthur Rackham.

The mythology and legends of many different cultures include mythological creatures/monsters of human appearance but prodigious size and strength. "Giant" is the English word commonly used for such beings, derived from one of the most famed examples: the gigantes of Greek mythology. Image File history File links Rackham_giant2. ... The word mythology (from the Greek μυολογία mythología, from mythologein to relate myths, from mythos, meaning a narrative, and logos, meaning speech or argument) literally means the (oral) retelling of myths – stories that a particular culture believes to be true and that use the supernatural to interpret natural events and... A legend (Latin, legenda, things to be read) is a narrative of human actions that are perceived both by teller and listeners to take place within human history and to possess certain qualities that give the tale verisimilitude. ... The word culture comes from the Latin root colere (to inhabit, to cultivate, or to honor). ... A legendary creature is a mythical or fantastic creature (often known as fabulous creatures in historical literature). ... Gigantomachia: Dionysos attacking a Gigante, Attic red-figure pelike, ca. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ...


In various Indo-European mythologies, gigantic peoples are featured as primeval creatures associated with chaos and the wild nature, and they are frequently in conflict with the gods, be they Olympian or Norse. Proto-Indo-European Indo-European studies The existence of similarities among the gods and religious practices of the Indo-European peoples suggests that whatever population they actually formed had some form of polytheistic religion. ... The Twelve Olympians, in Greek mythology, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... In Old Norse, the Æsir (singular Ás, feminine Ásynja, feminine plural Ásynjur, Anglo-Saxon Ós, from Proto-Germanic *Ansuz) are the principal gods of the pantheon of Norse mythology. ...


There are also other stories featuring giants in the Old Testament, perhaps most famously Goliath. Attributed to them are superhuman strength and physical proportions, a long lifespan, and thus a great deal of knowledge as well. Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh to refer to its canon, which corresponds to the Protestant Old Testament. ... David faces Goliath in single combat. ...


Fairy tales such as Jack and the Beanstalk have formed our modern perception of giants as stupid and violent monsters, frequently said to eat humans, and especially children. However, in some more recent portrayals, like those of Roald Dahl, the giants are both intelligent and friendly. A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... Illustration by Arthur Rackham from a 1918 English Fairy Tales, by Flora Annie Steel Jack and the Beanstalk is an English fairy tale, closely associated with the tale of Jack the Giant Killer. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (13 September 1916 – 23 November 1990) was a Welsh novelist, short story author and screenwriter of Norwegian parentage, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ...

Contents

Contemporary religious traditions

Abrahamic faiths

"There were giants in the earth in those days; and also after that, when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men, and they bare children to them, the same became mighty men which were of old, men of renown. And God saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually." Genesis 6:4-5.


The Anakites, who "come from the Nephilim" (Numbers 13:28-33), the Emites (Deuteronomy 2:10), and the Rephaites (Joshua 12:4) were giants living in the Promised Land. The Bible also tells of strife between David and the giant Goliath, ending with the defeat of the latter. According to the Bible, Goliath was "six cubits and a span" in height—over nine feet tall (1 Samuel 17:4 KJV). Nephilim are considered by some to be supernatural beings, specifically the offspring of human women and “sons of God” (proposed to be fallen angels), who appear significantly in several books of the Bible, as well as in the Torah and some non-canonical Jewish writings. ... Main article: Land of Israel The Kingdom of David and Solomon. ... David and Goliath, by Caravaggio, c. ... David faces Goliath in single combat. ... Cubit is the name for any one of many units of measure used by various ancient peoples. ... Three archaic hand units of measurment: * 1: Palm¹ * 2: Span, Shaftment * 3: Hand ¹ In English, a Palm is commonly used to represent four fingers held together. ...


Also, Gog and Magog are usually considered to be giants, and are also found in the folklore of Britain. The tradition of Gog and Magog begins in the Hebrew Bible with the reference to Magog, son of Japheth, in the Book of Genesis and continues in cryptic prophecies in the Book of Ezekiel, which are echoed in the Book of Revelation and in the Quran. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Hinduism

In Hinduism, the giants are called Daityas. They were a race who fought against the gods because they were jealous of their Deva half-brothers. Some Daityas from Hindu mythology include Kumbhakarna and Hiranyaksha. Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages) is a religious tradition that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... In Hinduism, the Daityas (दैत्‍य) were the children of Diti and the sage Kashyapa. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... It has been suggested that Deva (tribe) be merged into this article or section. ... Hindu mythology is a term used by modern scholarship for a large body of Indian literature that details the lives and times of legendary personalities, deities and divine incarnations on earth interspersed with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ... Kumbhakarna (Sanskrit: कुम्भकर्ण, kumbhakarNa), in the Hindu epic Ramayana, was a Rakshasa and brother of Ravana. ... In Hinduism, Hiranyaksha was a demon killed by Varaha after taking the Earth to the bottom of the ocean. ...


Folklore and mythology

Greek polytheism

In Greek mythology the gigantes (γίγαντες) were (according to the poet Hesiod) the children of Uranos (Ουρανός) and Gaea (Γαία) (The Heaven and the Earth). They were involved in a conflict with the Olympian gods called the Gigantomachy (Γιγαντομαχία), which was eventually settled when the hero Heracles decided to help the Olympians. The Greeks believed some of them, like Enceladus, to lay buried from that time under the earth, and that their tormented quivers resulted in earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... Gigantomachia: Dionysos attacking a Gigante, Attic red-figure pelike, ca. ... Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... Ouranos is the Greek name of the sky, latinized as Uranus. ... For other uses, see Gaia. ... The Twelve Olympians, in Greek mythology, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... Dionysos attacking a Giant during the Gigantomachia, Attic red-figure pelike, ca. ... Hercules, a Roman bronze (Louvre Museum) For other uses, see Heracles (disambiguation). ... Fountain of the Gigantes in the gardens of Versailles In Greek mythology, Enceladus was one of the Gigantes, the enormous children of Gaia (Earth). ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998. ... This article is about volcanoes in geology. ...


Herodotus in Book 1, Chapter 68, describes how the Spartans uncovered in Tegea the body of Orestes which was seven cubits long -- around 10 feet. In his book The Comparison of Romulus with Theseus Plutarch describes how the Athenians uncovered the body of Theseus, which was of more than ordinary size. The kneecaps of Ajax were exactly the size of a discus for the boy's pentathlon, wrote Pausanias. A boy's discus was about twelve centimeters in diameter, while a normal adult patella is around five centimeters, suggesting Ajax may have been around 14 feet tall. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... There is also an ancient Tegea near Kissamos in the island of Crete, see Tegea, Crete Tegea was an important religious center of ancient Greek containing the Temple of Athena Alea. ... Orestes Ορεστης is a Greek name, literally he who stands on the mountain, or mountain-dweller. Orestes can refer to: In Greek mythology, the son of Agamemnon. ... Mestrius Plutarchus (Greek: Πλούταρχος; 46 - 127), better known in English as Plutarch, was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist. ... Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night. ... Aias (Greek: ), or Ajax, king of Salamis, a legendary hero of ancient Greece. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ...


Germanic polytheism

In Germanic polytheism – of which Norse mythology, due to its extensive Icelandic sources, is the only form extensively recorded – the giants (jötnar in Old Norse, a cognate with ettin) are often opposed to the gods. They come in different classes, such as frost giants (hrímþursar) fire giants (eldjötnar) and mountain giants (bergrisar). Germanic paganism refers to the religion of the Germanic nations preceding Christianization. ... Norse or Scandinavian mythology comprises the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... The giants Fafner and Fasolt seize Freyja in Arthur Rackhams illustration to Richard Wagners version of the Norse myths. ... Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... An Ettin is originally a three-headed giant in English fairy tales. ...


The giants are the origin of most of various monsters in Norse mythology (e.g. the Fenrisulfr), and in the eventual battle of Ragnarök the giants will storm Asgard and defeat them in war. Even so, the gods themselves were related to the giants by many marriages, and there are giants such as Ægir, Loki, Mímir and Skaði, who bear little difference in status to them. According to the Edda Fenrisulfr bites off the hand of Týr (John Bauer, 1911) In Norse mythology, Fenrir or Fenrisulfr is a wolf, the son of Loki and the giantess Angrboða. ... Odin is depicted falling with his spear Gungnir while Surtr brandishes his sword. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... In Norse mythology Ægir is a giant and a king of the sea. ... It has been suggested that Loki and the dwarfs be merged into this article or section. ... Mimir was a primal god of Norse mythology whose head was severed and sent to Odin during the war between the Aesir and the Vanir deities. ... In Norse mythology, Skaði ‡ is a mountain giantess, wife of the Van god Njord and thus a Van goddess herself. ...


Norse mythology also holds that the entire world of men was once created from the flesh of Ymir, a giant of cosmic proportions, which name is considered by some to share a root with the name Yama of Indo-Iranian mythology. Ymir is killed by the sons of Borr in this artwork by Lorenz Frølich In Norse mythology, Ymir, also named Aurgelmir (Old Norse gravel-yeller) among the giants themselves, was the founder of the race of frost giants and an important figure in Norse cosmology. ... The root is the primary lexical unit of a word, which carries the most significant aspects of semantic content and cannot be reduced into smaller constituents. ... A modern depiction of Yamarajas Court, by Dominique Amendola Tibetan Dharmapala at the Field Museum in Chicago 19th century kagamibuta netsuke depicting Enma This article is about the deity Yama. ...


A bergrisi appears as a supporter on the coat of arms of Iceland. In heraldry, supporters are figures placed on either side of the shield and depicted holding it up. ... The Coat of arms of Iceland, or Skjaldamerkið, depicts the four protectors of Iceland (landvættir) standing on a pahoehoe lava block with the Icelandic flag in the front. ...


Other

In folklore from all over Europe, giants were believed to have built the remains of previous civilizations. Saxo Grammaticus, for example, argues that giants had to exist, because nothing else would explain the large walls, stone monuments, and statues that we now know were the remains of Roman construction. Similarly, the Old English poem Seafarer speaks of the high stone walls that were the work of giants. Even natural geologic features such as the massive basalt columns of the Giant's Causeway on the coast of Northern Ireland were attributed to construction by giants. Giants provided the least complicated explanation for such artifacts. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Saxo, etching by the Danish-Norwegian illustrator Louis Moe (1857 – 1945) Saxo Grammaticus (estimated. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Old English poetry is based upon one system of verse construction which was used for all poems. ... An artist impression of Seafarers. ... Basalt Basalt (IPA: ) is a common gray to black extrusive volcanic rock. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Northern Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ...


In Basque mythology, giants appear as jentilak and mairuak (Moors), and were said to have raised the dolmens and menhirs. After Christianization, they were driven away, and the only remaining one is Olentzero, a coalmaker that brings gifts on Christmas Eve. Ancient Basque mythology is centered around the figure of the goddess Mari, and her consort Sugaar (also called Maju). ... The jentilak (singular: jentil, meaning gentile from Latin gentilis) are a race of giants in Basque mythology. ... In Basque mythology, the mairuak (Moors) (along with the jentilak) are giants who built dolmens and menhirs. ... The Moors were the medieval Muslim inhabitants of the western Mediterranean and western Sahara, including: al-Maghrib (the coastal and mountain lands of present day Morocco and Algeria, and Tunisia although Tunisia often is separately called Ifriqiya after the former Roman province of Africa); al-Andalus (the former Islamic sovereign... Poulnabrone dolmen in County Clare, Ireland For the French TV miniseries, see Dolmen (TV miniseries). ... -1... St Francis Xavier converting the Paravas: a 19th-century image of the docile heathen The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once, also includes the practice of converting pagan practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Christmas Eve (1904-05), watercolor painting by the Swedish painter Carl Larsson (1853-1919) Christmas Eve, the evening of December 24th, the preceding day or vigil before Christmas Day, is treated to a greater or a lesser extent in most Christian societies as part of the Christmas season. ...


Medieval romances such as Amadis de Gaul feature giants as antagonists, or, rarely, as allies. This is parodied famously in Cervantes' Don Quixote, when the title character attacks a windmill, believing it to be a giant. This is the source of the phrase tilting at windmills. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Amadis de Gaula. ... (IPA: , but see spelling and pronunciation below), fully titled (The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha) is an early novel written by Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. ... Tilting at Windmills is the first full-length release by the band Consafos. ...


Tales of combat with giants were a common feature in the folklore of Wales, Scotland and Ireland. Some Irish giants such as Fionn mac Cumhaill (Finn McCool) were considered benevolent and well liked by humans. Celtic giants also figure in Breton and Arthurian romances, and from this source they spread into the heroic tales of Torquato Tasso, Ludovico Ariosto, and their follower Edmund Spenser. In the small Scottish village of Kinloch Rannoch, a local myth to this effect concerns a local hill that apparently resembles the head, shoulders, and torso of a man, and has therefore been termed 'the sleeping giant'. Apparently the giant will awaken only if a specific musical instrument is played near the hill. This article is about the country. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic) Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic and Scots1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... Fionn mac Cumhaill (pronounced /fuN mÉ™ ku:L/, /fiN mÉ™ ku:L/, /fu:n mÉ™ ku:l/ or /foun mÉ™ ku:l/ according to dialect)(earlier Finn or Find mac Cumail or mac Umaill, later Anglicised to Finn McCool) was a hunter-warrior of the Gaelic... Breton literature is the Breton language literary tradition of Brittany. ... A bronze Arthur in plate armour with visor raised and with jousting shield wearing Kastenbrust armour (early 15th century) by Peter Vischer, typical of later anachronistic depictions of Arthur. ... As a literary genre, romance or chivalric romance refers to a style of heroic prose and verse narrative current in Europe from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. ... “Tasso” redirects here. ... Statue of the poet in Reggio Emilia. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic) Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic and Scots1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... Kinloch Rannoch. ...


Many giants in British folklore were noted for their stupidity.[1] A giant who had quarreled with the Mayor of Shrewsbury went to bury the city with dirt; however, he met a shoemaker, carrying shoes to repair, and the shoemaker convinced the giant that he had worn out all the shoes coming from Shrewsbury, and so it was too far to travel.[2]


Other British stories told of how giants threw stones at each other. This was used to explain many great stones on the landscape.[3]


Giants figure in a great many fairy tales and folklore stories, such as Jack and the Beanstalk, The Giant Who Had No Heart in His Body, Nix Nought Nothing, Robin Hood and the Prince of Aragon, Young Ronald, and Paul Bunyan. Ogres and trolls are humanoid creatures, sometimes of gigantic stature, that occur in various sorts of European folklore. An example of another folklore giant is Rübezahl, a kind giant in German folklore who lived in the Giant Mountains (nowadays on the Czech-Polish border). Illustration by Arthur Rackham from a 1918 English Fairy Tales, by Flora Annie Steel Jack and the Beanstalk is an English fairy tale, closely associated with the tale of Jack the Giant Killer. ... The Giant Who Had No Heart in His Body is a Norwegian fairy tale collected by Asbjørnsen and Moe. ... Nix Nought Nothing is an English fairy tale collected by Joseph Jacobs in his English Fairy Tales. ... Robin Hood and the Prince of Aragon is Child ballad 129. ... Young Ronald is Child ballad 304. ... Paul and Babe in Bemidji, Minnesota Paul Bunyan is a mythical lumberjack in tall tales. ... Hop o My Thumb, illustrated by Gustave Doré An ogre (feminine: ogress) is a large and hideous humanoid monster. ... Trolls with an abducted princess (John Bauer, 1915). ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... Rübezahl, Moritz von Schwind, 1859 Rübezahl (Czech: KrakonoÅ¡, Polish: Liczyrzepa) is the mountain spirit (woodwose) of the Karkonosze Mountains (also known as the Giant Mountains or the Riesengebirge) along the modern border between Poland and the Czech Republic. ... German folklore shares many characteristics with Scandinavian folklore due to origins in a common Germanic mythology. ... Aerial view over Karkonosze Karkonosze Mountains (pronounced kár-ko-no-she) in Polish or   KrkonoÅ¡e? in Czech (known as Giant Mountains in English, or Riesengebirge in German) is a mountain range, part of the Sudetes in Central Europe. ...


Giants in the West

Aside from mythology and folklore (see Tall tales), mysterious remains of giants have been found in America. Giants are usually classified as human-like remains that are 7'-5" or more in height. The book Forbidden Land by Robert Lyman (1971) recounts the following finds: A tall tale is a story that claims to explain the reason for some natural phenomenon, or sometimes illustrates how skilled/intelligent/powerful the subject of the tale was. ...

  • A decayed human skeleton claimed by eyewitnesses to measure around 3.28 metres (10 feet 9 inches tall), was unearthed by labourers while ploughing a vineyard in November 1856 in East Wheeling, now in West Virginia.
  • A human skeleton measuring 3.6 metres (12 feet) tall was unearthed at Lompock Rancho, California, in 1833 by soldiers digging in a pit for a powder magazine. The specimen had a double row of teeth and was surrounded by numerous stone axes, carved shells and porphyry blocks with abstruse symbols associated with it.
  • Several mummified remains of red haired humans ranging from 2-2.5 metres (6.5 feet to over 8 feet) tall were dug up at Lovelock Cave, (70 miles) north-east of Reno, Nevada, by a guano mining operation. These bones substantiated legends by the local Paiute Indians regarding giants which they called Si-Te-Cahs. For some reason scientists did not seem to want to investigate these finds further so many of the bones were lost. Fortunately one of the giant Lovelock skulls is still preserved today. It measures almost 30cm (1 foot) tall and resides along with other various Lovelock artefacts in the Humboldt Museum in Winnemucca, Nevada. Some of these artifacts can also be found in the Nevada State Historical Society's museum at Reno.
  • A 9' 11" skeleton was unearthed in 1928 by a farmer digging a pit to bury trash in Tensas Parish, Louisiana near Waterproof. In 1931 a 10' 2" skeleton was unearthed by a boy burying his dog in 1933 in Nearby Madison Parish.

Aside from in Forbidden Land, we can find other unverified examples or legends about the remains of giants: Tensas Parish is a parish located in the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... Waterproof is a town located in Tensas Parish, Louisiana. ... Madison Parish is a parish located in the state of Louisiana. ...

  • A 9' 8" skeleton was excavated from a mound near Brewersville, Indiana (Indianapolis News, Nov 10, 1975).
  • In Clearwater Minnesota, the skeletons of seven giants were found in mounds. These had receding foreheads and complete double dentition (Childress 1992, p. 468).
  • A mound near Toledo, Ohio, held 20 skeletons, seated and facing east with jaws and teeth "twice as large as those of present day people," and beside each was a large bowl with "curiously wrought hieroglyphic figures." (Chicago Record, Oct. 24, 1895; cited by Ron G. Dobbins, NEARA Journal, v13, fall 1978).
  • In the city of Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada there is a span of mountains five miles long that is in the shape of a man wearing a headdress lying down on his back. The span is called "The Sleeping Giant" from local Ojibway legend that identifies the giant as Nanabijou, the spirit of the Deep Sea Water, who was turned to stone when the secret location of a rich silver mine, now known as Silver Islet, was disclosed to white men.[citation needed]
  • Patagons of Patagonia in South America, are giants claimed to have been seen by Ferdinand Magellan and his crew.[citation needed]

The New England Antiquities Research Association (NEARA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to a better understanding of the historic and prehistoric past through the study and preservation of New Englands Pre-Columbian archaeology and stone sites in their cultural context. ... Nickname: Motto: Superior by nature Location of Thunder Bay, Ontario Coordinates: Country Canada Province Ontario Region Northwestern Ontario District Thunder Bay District CMA Thunder Bay Established 1970 (amalgamation between Fort William and Port Arthur) Incorporated as Towns Port Arthur in 1884 Fort William in 1892 Incorporated as Cities Both Port... The Patagones were a legendary tribe of native giants that Ferdinand Magellan and his crew claimed to have seen while exploring South America in the 1520s. ... Patagonia, as most commonly defined (in orange). ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Ferdinand Magellan, see Ferdinand Magellan Railcar. ...

Giants in popular culture

Giants are a staple in fantasy, and also appear in other genres. Smaug in his lair: an illustration for the fantasy The Hobbit Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ...

Brobdingnag is a fictional land in Jonathan Swifts satirical novel Gullivers Travels occupied by giants. ... First Edition of Gullivers Travels Gullivers Travels (1726, amended 1735), officially Vol. ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and... The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is a fantasy novel for children by C. S. Lewis. ... For other uses, see Aslan (disambiguation). ... Jadis, the White Witch is the key villain of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, the first published book in C. S. Lewiss Chronicles of Narnia series, and the second chronologically. ... Rubeus Hagrid (born December 6, year ca. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Half-giants are a mythological creature, born to a giant and a human, or other creature. ... Olympe Maxime is a character from the Harry Potter series, created by J. K. Rowling. ... Grawp is the giant half-brother of Hagrid in the Harry Potter books. ... Shadow of the Colossus , lit. ... Look up giant in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Magic: The Gathering (colloq. ... Collectible card games (CCGs), also called trading card games (TCGs), are played using specially designed sets of cards. ... The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever is a fantasy epic by Stephen R. Donaldson. ... Stephen Reeder Donaldson (born May 13, 1947 in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American fantasy, science fiction and mystery novelist. ... Spiderwick (The Spiderwick Chronicles) is a popular series of illustrated childrens fantasy books written by Tony DiTerlizzi and Holly Black. ... This article is about the mythical creature. ... The main cast of the anime Cowboy Bebop (1998) (L to R: Spike Spiegel, Jet Black, Ed Tivrusky, Faye Valentine, and Ein the dog) For the oleo-resin, see Animé (oleo-resin). ... Robotech science fiction and anime universe. ... The Super Dimension Fortress Macross (超時空要塞マクロス Chō Jikū Yōsai Makurosu) is an anime television series. ... The Zentradi are a militaristic race of giants and often the primary antagonist in the Macross and Robotech anime series. It is transliterated as Zentradi, Zjentohlauedy, and Zentraedi for the Japanese Macross series, with the Zentraedi spelling being the one most used in the Robotech adaptation. ... John Bunyan. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Pilgrims Progress The Pilgrims Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come by John Bunyan (published 1678) is an allegorical novel. ... Image:BfgCover. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (13 September 1916 – 23 November 1990) was a Welsh novelist, short story author and screenwriter of Norwegian parentage, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, giant is a type of creature, or creature type. Giants are humanoid-shaped creatures of great strength and size. ... Dungeons & Dragons (abbreviated as D&D or DnD) is a fantasy role-playing game (RPG) currently published by Wizards of the Coast. ... A roleplaying game (RPG) is a type of game in which players assume the roles of characters and collaboratively create stories. ... An image from World of Warcraft, one of the largest commercial MMORPGs as of 2004, based on active subscriptions. ... RuneScape is a Java-based MMORPG operated by Jagex Ltd. ...

Names/Races of Giants

In Hinduism, the Daityas were the children of Diti. ... The Sanskrit language ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... Gigantomachia: Dionysos attacking a Gigante, Attic red-figure pelike, ca. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: it is patent nonsense. ... Polyphemus the Cyclops. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... The Zamzummim were a race of giants in Hebrew mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. ... Nephilim are considered by some to be supernatural beings, specifically the offspring of human women and “sons of God” (proposed to be fallen angels), who appear significantly in several books of the Bible, as well as in the Torah and some non-canonical Jewish writings. ... GOG may refer to: The Gynecologic Oncology Group, a non-profit organization researching gynecological cancers. ... Magog (Bible) was one of the seven sons of Japheth mentioned in the Book of Genesis. ... Look up Jake, jake in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... David faces Goliath in single combat. ... According to several books of the Old Testament, Og (pronounced , , or ; meaning gigantic) was an ancient Amorite king of Bashan who, along with his sons and army, was slain by Moses and his men at the battle of Edrei (probably modern day Dara, Syria). ... In Irish mythology, the Fomorians, Fomors, or Fomori (Irish Fomóiri, Fomóraig) were a semi-divine race who inhabited Ireland in ancient times. ... The Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or Common Celtic, spoken by ancient and modern Celts alike. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Bran the Blessed (Welsh: Bendigeidfran, literally Blessed Crow) is a giant and king of Britain in Welsh mythology. ... In Norse mythology, Jotuns, Jötunn or Jotnar of Utgard, Jötunnheim were the race of Gods called giants (thurs), separated into categories such as frost giants (rime giants, hrimthurs), fire giants, sea giants and storm giants. ... Norse or Scandinavian mythology comprises the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... The term Germanic peoples may refer to: the Germanic tribes that in the first millennium were seen as a barbarian threat by the Roman Empire and its successors; the Germanic Christianity that in the second millennium came to dominate much of Northern Europe, politically organized in the Holy Roman Empire... Languages Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, Tuscarora, English, French Religions Christianity, Longhouse religion The Iroquois Confederacy (also known as the League of Peace and Power; the Five Nations; the Six Nations; or the People of the Long house) is a group of First Nations/Native Americans that originally consisted of... The Maliseet (also known as Wolastoqiyik and Malecite and in French also as Malécites or Étchemins (the latter collectively referring to the Maliseet and Passamaquoddy)) are a Native American/First Nations people who inhabit the Saint John River valley and its tributaries, roughly overlapping the International Boundary between New... The Navajo are a tribe of Native Americans who live in the southwestern United States. ... For other uses, see Cherokee (disambiguation). ... A legendary race of red(ish)-haired giants whose mummified remains were reported to have been discovered (under 4 ft. ... Paiute women and children in Yosemite Valley 1891. ... Until the 1980s the termKwakiutl was usually applied to all of the various First Nations peoples of northern Vancouver Island, Queen Charlotte Strait and the Johnstone Strait whose traditional Wakashan language was Kwakwala. ... The Slavey (comprised of two groups, North and South Slavey) are a native American group indigenous to the Great Slave Lake region, in Canadas Northwest Territories. ... The Pequot are a tribal nation of Native Americans who, in the 17th century, inhabited much of what is now Connecticut. ... Paul Bunyan and Babe the blue Ox in Bemidji, Minnesota Paul Bunyan is a mythical lumberjack in tall tales, originating either with an American newspaperman or with French Canadians. ... The Huichol are an indigenous ethnic group of Western Central Mexico that live in the Sierra Madre Occidental, in the states of Nayarit and Jalisco. ...

See also

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This is a list of giants and giantesses from mythology and folklore; it does not include giants from modern fantasy fiction or role-playing games (for those, see list of species in fantasy fiction). ... A giant animal in mythology is gigantic in the narrated myth, either large for their species or in relation to mankind. ... A Book of Giants is a 1963 anthology of 13 fairy tales from Europe that have been collected and retold by Ruth Manning-Sanders. ... Ruth Manning-Sanders (born 1895 in Swansea, Wales; died October 12, 1988, in Penzance, England) was a poet and author who was perhaps best known for her series of childrens books in which she collected and retold fairy tales from all over the world. ... André the Giant (May 19, 1946 – January 27, 1993) was a professional wrestler and actor, born André René Roussimoff in Grenoble, France. ...

References

  1. ^ K. M. Briggs, The Fairies in English Tradition and Literature, p 63 University of Chicago Press, London, 1967
  2. ^ K. M. Briggs, The Fairies in English Tradition and Literature, p 64 University of Chicago Press, London, 1967
  3. ^ K. M. Briggs, The Fairies in English Tradition and Literature, p 65 University of Chicago Press, London, 1967
  • Dictionary of Hindu Lore and Legend (ISBN 0-500-51088-1) by Anna Dhallapiccola
  • Lyman, Robert R., Sr. (1971). Forbidden Land: Strange Events in the Black Forest. Vol. 1. Coudersport, PA: Potter Enterprise.
  • Childress, David Hatcher (1992). Lost Cities of North & Central America. Stelle, IL: Adventures Unlimited.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Giant (mythology) (920 words)
There were giants in the earth in those days; and also after that, when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men and they bore children to them, the same became mighty men who were of old, men of renown.
In Greek Mythology the '' Gigantes '' (γίγαντες) were (according to the poet Hesiod) the children of Uranos (Ουρανός) and Gaea (Γαία) (The Heaven and the Earth).
In Germanic Mythologies – of which Norse Mythology, due to its extensive Icelandic sources, is the only one well recorded – the giants ('' Jötnar '' in Old Norse, a cognate with '' Ettin '' and '' Ent '') are often opposed to the gods.
Mythology @ FreshCaffeine.com (2011 words)
The Italian monk ANNIUS OF VITERBO (Giovanni Nanni, c.1432-1502) asserted the the biblical NOAH was a GIANT.
His wife was PANDORA, whose curiosity allowed the troubles of the world to be unleashed and her husband to be changed by ZEUS, the king of the gods, into a monkey for his meddling with the domain of the gods.
She is a monstrous, demonic being that belongs to a class of Nursery Bogies described with vigor by watchful nursemaids and anxious parents in order to prevent the untimely death of children in such fearful places.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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