FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Giacomo Puccini
Giacomo Puccini

Background information
Birth name Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini
Born December 22, 1858
Flag of Italy Lucca, Italy
Died November 29, 1924 (age 66)
Brussels, Belgium
Occupation(s) Composer

Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858November 29, 1924) was an Italian composer whose operas, including La bohème, Tosca, and Madama Butterfly, are among the most frequently performed in the standard repertoire.[1][2] Some of his melodies, such as "O mio babbino caro" from Gianni Schicchi and "Nessun dorma" from Turandot, have become part of modern culture. One of the few operatic composers to successfully use both German and Italian techniques of opera, Puccini is regarded as the successor to Giuseppe Verdi. Image File history File links ComposerPuccini. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Lucca is a city in Tuscany, northern central Italy, situated on the river Serchio in a fertile plain near (but not on) the Ligurian Sea. ... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Nickname: The Capital Of Europe, Comic City City of a 100 Museums[] Map showing the location of Brussels in Belgium Coordinates: Country Belgium Region Brussels-Capital Region Founded 979 Founded (Region) June 18, 1989  - Mayor (Municipality) Freddy Thielemans Area    - City 162 (Region) km²  (62. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The New Opera in Oslo, Norway The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... For other uses, see La bohème (disambiguation). ... Original poster Tosca is an opera in three acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on Victorien Sardous drama, La Tosca. ... Madama Butterfly (Madame Butterfly) is an opera in three acts (originally two acts) by Giacomo Puccini, with an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa. ... This page lists important operas by date of first performance, together with brief notes on their importance. ... Gianni Schicchi is an opera in one act by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Giovacchino Forzano, based on a story that is referred to in Dantes The Divine Comedy. ... Nessun dorma is an aria from the final act of Giacomo Puccinis opera Turandot. ... For the opera by Ferruccio Busoni, see Turandot (Busoni). ... Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (either October 9 or 10, 1813 – January 27, 1901) was an Italian Romantic composer, mainly of opera. ...

Contents

Early life

Puccini was born in Lucca in Tuscany, Italy into a family with five generations of musical history behind them. His father died when he was five years old, and he was sent to study with his uncle Fortunato Magi, who considered him to be a poor and undisciplined student. Later, he took the position of church organist and choir master in Lucca, but it was not until he saw a performance of Verdi's Aida that he became inspired to be an opera composer. He and a friend walked 18.5 mi (30 km) to see the performance in Pisa. Lucca is a city in Tuscany, northern central Italy, situated on the river Serchio in a fertile plain near (but not on) the Ligurian Sea. ... Tuscany (Italian: ) is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... An organist is a musician who plays the organ, whether pipe or electronic. ... Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (either October 9 or 10, 1813 – January 27, 1901) was an Italian Romantic composer, mainly of opera. ... AIDA is an acronym used in marketing that describes a common list of events that are very often undergone when a person is selling a product or service: A - Attention (Awareness): attract the attention of the customer. ... This article discusses the Italian city. ...


In 1880, with the help of a relative and a grant, Puccini enrolled in the Milan Conservatory to study composition with Amilcare Ponchielli and Antonio Bazzini. In the same year, at the age of 21, he composed the Messa, which marks the culmination of his family's long association with church music in his native Lucca. Although Puccini himself correctly titled the work a Messa, referring to a setting of the full Catholic Mass, today the work is popularly known as his Messa di Gloria, a name that technically refers to a setting of only the first two prayers of the Mass, the Kyrie and the Gloria, while omitting the Credo, the Sanctus, and the Agnus Dei. Puccini's work is, in fact, a Messa. The Milan Conservatory, or the Conservatorio Giuseppe Verdi, is a famous music school in Milan whose alumni include Giacomo Puccini, Giovanni Bottesini, Vittorio Giannini, Francisco Mignone, Italo Montemezzi, Alceo Galliera, Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli, Maurizio Pollini, and Claudio Abbado. ... Amilcare Ponchielli (August 31, 1834 – January 17, 1886) was an Italian composer, largely of operas. ... Antonio Bazzini Antonio Bazzini (March 11, 1818-Feb 10, 1897) was an Italian violinist, composer and teacher born in Brescia, Italy. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Kyrie is the vocative case of the Greek word κύριος (kyrios - lord) and means O Lord; it is the common name of an important prayer of Christian liturgy, also called Kyrie eleison. ... Gloria may be: Gloria (song), any one of several songs from the history of popular music Gloria in Excelsis Deo, the main doxology of the Roman Catholic Mass Vivaldis Gloria, a musical setting of the doxology Gloria Patri, a relatively short, common doxology Gloria, Oriental Mindoro, a municipality in... In Latin, the word credo means I believe. ... Sanctus is the Latin word for holy, and is the name of an important hymn of Christian liturgy. ... A lamb holding a Christian banner is a typical symbol for Agnus Dei. ...


The work anticipates Puccini's career as an operatic composer by offering glimpses of the dramatic power that he would soon unleash on the stage; the powerful “arias” for tenor and bass soloists are certainly more operatic than is usual in church music and, in its orchestration and dramatic power, the Messa compares interestingly with Verdi's Requiem. Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (either October 9 or 10, 1813 – January 27, 1901) was an Italian Romantic composer, mainly of opera. ... The Requiem by Giuseppe Verdi is a musical setting of the Roman Catholic funeral Mass (called the Requiem for the first word of the text, which begins Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine, meaning, Grant them eternal rest, O Lord — see the entry at Dies Irae) that was completed to mark...


While studying at the Conservatory, Puccini obtained a libretto from Ferdinando Fontano and entered a competition for a one-act opera in 1882. Although he did not win, Le Villi was later staged in 1884 at the Teatro dal Verme and it caught the attention of Giulio Ricordi, head of G. Ricordi & Co. music publishers, who commissioned a second opera, Edgar, in 1889. Puccini and Fontana were to become life-long friends. A libretto is the complete body of words used in an extended musical work such as an opera, operetta, masque, sacred or secular oratorio and cantata, musical, and ballet. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Le villi (The Willis) is an opera composed by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Ferdinando Fontana, based on the short story Les Willis by Alphonse Karr. ... 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Giulio Ricordi (Milan 1840-1912) was an Italian Editor, musician and composer. ... Casa Ricordi was a classical music publishing company founded in 1808 as G. Ricordi & Co. ... Edgar is an opera in three acts (originally four acts) by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Ferdinando Fontana, based on the play in verse La Coupe et les lèvres by Alfred de Musset. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Puccini at Torre del Lago

From 1891 onwards, Puccini spent more of his time at Torre del Lago, a small community about fifteen miles from Lucca situated between the Tyrrhenian Sea and Lake Massaciuccoli, just south of Viareggio. While renting a house there, he spent time hunting but regularly visited Lucca. By 1900 he had acquired land and built a villa on the lake, now known as the "Villa Museo Puccini". He lived there until 1921 when pollution produced by peat works on the lake forced him to move to Viareggio, a few kilometres north. After his death, a mausoleum was created in the Villa Puccini and the composer is buried there in the chapel, along with his wife and son who died later. Torre del Lago is a village in Versilia, Tuscany, Italy. ... Viareggio is a town in the province of Lucca situated on the coast of the Ligurian Sea in the north of Tuscany, Italy. ... St. ... A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ...


The "Villa Museo Puccini" is presently owned by his granddaughter, Simonetta Puccini, and is open to the public.

Original poster for Puccini's Tosca
Original poster for Puccini's Tosca

Image File history File links Puccini_Tosca. ... Image File history File links Puccini_Tosca. ... Original poster Tosca is an opera in three acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on Victorien Sardous drama, La Tosca. ...

Operas written at Torre del Lago

Manon Lescaut (1893), his third opera, was his first great success. It launched his remarkable relationship with the librettests Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, who collaborated with him on his next three operas, which became his three most famous and most performed operas. These were: Manon Lescaut is an opera in four acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Domenico Oliva and Luigi Illica, based on L’histoire du chevalier des Grieux et de Manon Lescaut by Abbé Prévost. ... A libretto is the complete body of words used in an extended musical work such as an opera, operetta, masque, sacred or secular oratorio and cantata, musical, and ballet. ... Born: CastellArquato, near Piacenza, Italy, 9 May 1857 Died: Colombarone, Italy, 16 Dec. ... Giuseppe Giacosa Giuseppe Giacosa (21 October 1847 – 1 September 1906) was an Italian poet, playwright and librettist. ...

  • La bohème (1896) is considered one of his best works as well as one of the most romantic operas ever composed. It is arguably today's most popular opera.
  • Tosca (1900) was arguably Puccini's first foray into verismo, the realistic depiction of many facets of real life including violence. The opera is generally considered of major importance in the history of opera because of its many significant features.
  • Madama Butterfly (1904) was initially greeted with great hostility (mostly orchestrated by his rivals) but, after some reworking, became another of his most successful operas.

After 1904, compositions were less frequent. Following his passion for driving fast cars, Puccini was nearly killed in a major accident in 1903. In 1906 Giacosa died and, in 1909, there was scandal after Puccini's wife, Elvira, falsely accused their maid Doria Manfredi of having an affair with Puccini. The maid then committed suicide. Elvira was successfully sued by the Manfredis, and Giacomo had to pay damages. Finally, in 1912, the death of Giulio Ricordi, Puccini’s editor and publisher, ended a productive period of his career. For other uses, see La bohème (disambiguation). ... Original poster Tosca is an opera in three acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on Victorien Sardous drama, La Tosca. ... Verismo was an Italian literary movement born approximately between 1875 and 1895. ... Madama Butterfly (Madame Butterfly) is an opera in three acts (originally two acts) by Giacomo Puccini, with an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa. ... It has been suggested that Suicide method be merged into this article or section. ...


However, Puccini completed La fanciulla del West in 1910 and finished the score of La rondine in 1917, a piece he reworked from an operetta he had attempted to compose, only to find that his style and talent were incompatible with the genre. La Fanciulla del West (The Girl of the Golden West) is an opera in three acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Guelfo Civinini and Carlo Zangarini, based on the play The Girl of the Golden West by David Belasco. ... A poster for the Italian premiere. ...


In 1918, Il Trittico premiered in New York. This work is composed of three one-act operas: a horrific episode (Il Tabarro), in the style of the Parisian Grand Guignol, a sentimental tragedy (Suor Angelica), and a comedy (Gianni Schicchi). Of the three, Gianni Schicchi has remained the most popular, containing the popular O mio babbino caro. 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Il trittico (The Triptych) is the title to a collection of three one-act operas, Il tabarro, Suor Angelica, and Gianni Schicchi, by Giacomo Puccini. ... NY redirects here. ... Il tabarro (The Cloak) is an opera in one act by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Giuseppe Adami, based on Didier Golds La Houppelande. ... The Grand Guignol (Grahn Geen-YOL) was a theatre (Le Théâtre du Grand-Guignol) in the Pigalle area of Paris (at 20 bis, rue Chaptal), which, from its opening in 1897 to its closing in 1962, specialized in the most naturalistic grisly horror shows. ... In general usage a tragedy is a play, movie or sometimes a real world event with a sad outcome. ... Suor Angelica (Sister Angelica) is an opera in one act by Giacomo Puccini to an original Italian libretto by Giovacchino Forzano. ... Comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humour with an intent to provoke[[ laughter in general). ... Gianni Schicchi is an opera in one act by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Giovacchino Forzano, based on a story that is referred to in Dantes The Divine Comedy. ...


The final years

Giacomo Puccini with conductor Arturo Toscanini
Giacomo Puccini with conductor Arturo Toscanini

A habitual cigarette chain smoker, Puccini began to complain of chronic sore throats towards the end of 1923. A diagnosis of throat cancer led his doctors to recommend a new and experimental radiation therapy treatment, which was being offered in Brussels, Belgium. Puccini and his wife never knew how serious the cancer was, as the news was only revealed to his son. Image File history File links Puccini-Toscanini. ... Image File history File links Puccini-Toscanini. ... Arturo Toscanini listening to playbacks at RCA Victor (BMG Music) Arturo Toscanini (March 25, 1867 – January 16, 1957) was an Italian musician. ... A smoking symbol. ... Clinac 2100 C100 accelerator Radiation therapy (or radiotherapy) is the medical use of ionizing radiation as part of cancer treatment to control malignant cells (not to be confused with radiology, the use of radiation in medical imaging and diagnosis). ... Nickname: The Capital Of Europe, Comic City City of a 100 Museums[] Map showing the location of Brussels in Belgium Coordinates: Country Belgium Region Brussels-Capital Region Founded 979 Founded (Region) June 18, 1989  - Mayor (Municipality) Freddy Thielemans Area    - City 162 (Region) km²  (62. ...


Puccini died there on November 29, 1924 from complications from the treatment; uncontrolled bleeding led to a heart attack the day after surgery. News of his death reached Rome during a performance of La bohème. The opera was immediately stopped, and the orchestra played Chopin's Funeral March for the stunned audience. He was buried in Milan, but in 1926 his son arranged for the transfer of his father's remains to a specially-created chapel inside the Puccini villa at Torre del Lago. November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), commonly known as a heart attack, is a disease state that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban... The only known photograph of Frédéric Chopin, believed to have been taken in 1849 by Louis-Auguste Bisson. ... Frédéric Chopin composed his Piano Sonata No. ... Milan (Italian: ; Lombard: Milán (listen)) is one of the biggest cities in Italy, located in the plains of Lombardy. ...


Turandot, his final opera, was left unfinished and the last two scenes were completed by Franco Alfano based on the composer's sketches. When Arturo Toscanini conducted the premiere performance in April 1926, (in front of a sold-out crowd with every prominent Italian with the exception of Benito Mussolini in attendance), he had chosen not to perform Alfano's portion of the score. The performance reached the point where Puccini had completed the score, at which time Toscanini stopped the orchestra. The conductor turned to the audience and said: "Here the opera finishes, because at this point the Maestro died". (Some record that he said, more poetically, “Here the Maestro laid down his pen”). For the opera by Ferruccio Busoni, see Turandot (Busoni). ... Franco Alfano (March 8, 1875 – October 27, 1954) was an Italian composer and pianist. ... Arturo Toscanini listening to playbacks at RCA Victor (BMG Music) Arturo Toscanini (March 25, 1867 – January 16, 1957) was an Italian musician. ... Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini (July 29, 1883 – April 28, 1945) was the prime minister and dictator of Italy from 1922 until 1943, when he was overthrown. ...


In 2001 an official new ending was composed by Luciano Berio from original sketches, but this finale is performed infrequently. Luciano Berio (October 24, 1925 – May 27, 2003) was an Italian composer. ...


Politics

Unlike Wagner and Verdi, Puccini did not appear to be active in the politics of his day. However, Mussolini, Fascist dictator of Italy at the time, claimed that Puccini applied for admission to the National Fascist Party. This appears to be highly unlikely. There appear to be no records or proof of any application given to the party by Puccini. In addition, it can be noted that had Puccini done so, his close friend, Arturo Toscanini, (an extreme anti-fascist), would have sufficiently influenced Puccini, and would not have been as friendly to the composer as he was. Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... The National Fascist Party (Partito Nazionale Fascista; PNF) was an Italian party, created by Benito Mussolini as the political expression of Fascism (previously represented by groups known as Fasci; see also Italian fascism). ...


Style

Puccini's style has been one long avoided by musicologists; this avoidance can perhaps be attributed to the perception that his work, with its emphasis on melody and evident popular appeal, lacked "seriousness" (a similar prejudice beset Rachmaninoff during his lifetime). Despite the place Puccini clearly occupies in the popular tradition of Verdi, his style of orchestration also shows the strong influence of Wagner, matching specific orchestral configurations and timbres to different dramatic moments. His operas contain an unparalleled manipulation of orchestral colors, with the orchestra often creating the scene’s atmosphere. Musicology is reasoned discourse concerning music (Greek: μουσικη = music and λογος = word or reason). In other words: the whole body of systematized knowledge about music which results from the application of a scientific method of investigation or research, or of philosophical speculation and rational systematization to the facts, the processes and the... Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff (Russian: , Sergej Vasilevič Rakhmaninov, 1 April 1873 (N.S.) or 20 March 1873 (O.S.) – 28 March 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor, one of the last great champions of the Romantic style of European classical music. ... Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 – February 13, 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ...


The structures of Puccini's works are also noteworthy. While it is to an extent possible to divide his operas into arias or numbers (like Verdi's), his scores generally present a very strong sense of continuous flow and connectivity, perhaps another sign of Wagner’s influence. Like Wagner, Puccini used leitmotifs to connote characters (or combinations of characters). This is apparent in Tosca, where the three chords which signal the beginning of the opera are used throughout to announce Scarpia. Several motifs are also linked to Mimi and the Bohemians in La Bohème and to Cio-Cio-San's eventual suicide in Butterfly. Unlike Wagner, though, Puccini's motifs are static: where Wagner's motifs develop into more complicated figures as the characters develop, Puccini's remain more or less identical throughout the opera (in this respect anticipating the themes of modern musical theatre). This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Fantasticks was the longest-running musical in history. ...


Another distinctive quality in Puccini's works is the use of the voice in the style of speech: characters sing short phrases one after another, as if they were talking to each other. Puccini is celebrated, on the other hand, for his melodic gift, and many of his melodies are both memorable and enduringly popular. These melodies are often made of sequences from the scale, a very distinctive example being Quando me'n vo' (Musetta's Waltz) from La Bohème and E lucevan le stelle from Act III of Tosca. Today, it is rare not to find at least one Puccini aria included in an operatic singer's CD album or recital.


Music

Although Puccini is mainly known for his operas, he also wrote some orchestral pieces, sacred music, chamber music and songs for voice and piano.


Puccini's operas

Puccini's statue in the piazza close to his birthplace in his hometown of Lucca.
  • Le Villi, libretto by Ferdinando Fontana (in one act – premiered at the Teatro dal Verme, 31 May 1884)
    • second version (in two acts – premiered at the Teatro Regio, 26 December 1884)
    • third version (in two acts – premiered at the Teatro alla Scala, 24 January 1885)
    • fourth version (in two acts – premiered at the Teatro dal Verme, 7 November 1889)
  • Edgar (opera), libretto by Ferdinando Fontana (in four acts – premiered at the Teatro alla Scala, 21 April 1889)
    • second version (in four acts – premiered at the Teatro del Giglio, 5 September 1891)
    • third version (in three acts – premiered at the Teatro Comunale, 28 January 1892)
    • fourth version (in three acts – premiered at the Teatro Colón di Buenos Aires, 8 July 1905)
  • Manon Lescaut, libretto by Luigi Illica, Marco Praga and Domenico Oliva (premiered at the Teatro Regio, 1 February 1893)
    • second version (premiered at the Teatro Coccia, 21 December 1893)
  • La bohème, libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa (premiered at the Teatro Regio, 1 February 1896)
  • Tosca, libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa (premiered at the Teatro Costanzi, 14 January 1900)
  • Madama Butterfly, libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa (in two acts – premiered at the Teatro alla Scala, 17 February 1904)
    • second version (in two acts – premiered at the Teatro Grande di Brescia, 28 May 1904)
    • third version (premiered at Covent Garden, London 10 July 1905)
    • fourth version (premiered at the Opéra Comique in Paris, 28 December 1906)
    • fifth version (premiered at the Teatro Carcano, 9 December 1920)
  • La fanciulla del West, libretto by Guelfo Civinini and Carlo Zangarini (premiered at the Metropolitan, 10 December 1910)
    • second version (premiered at the Teatro alla Scala, 29 Decembre 1912)
  • La rondine, libretto by Giuseppe Adami (premiered at the Opéra of Monte Carlo, 27 March 1917)
    • second version (premiered at the Opéra of Monte Carlo, 10 April 1920)
    • third version (possible premier at the Teatro Verdi, 11 April 1924)
  • Il trittico: Il tabarro, libretto by Giuseppe Adami, Suor Angelica, Gianni Schicchi, libretto by Giovacchino Forzano (premiered at the Metropolitan, 14 December 1918)
  • Turandot, libretto by Renato Simoni and Giuseppe Adami (incomplete at the time of Puccini's death, completated by Franco Alfano: premiered at the Teatro alla Scala, 25 April 1926)

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (681x1024, 332 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Giacomo Puccini ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (681x1024, 332 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Giacomo Puccini ... Lucca is a city in Tuscany, northern central Italy, situated on the river Serchio in a fertile plain near (but not on) the Ligurian Sea. ... Le villi (The Willis) is an opera composed by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Ferdinando Fontana, based on the short story Les Willis by Alphonse Karr. ... La Scala The Teatro alla Scala (or La Scala for short), in Milan, Italy, is one of the worlds most famous opera houses. ... Edgar is an opera in three acts (originally four acts) by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Ferdinando Fontana, based on the play in verse La Coupe et les lèvres by Alfred de Musset. ... Night shot of the Colon Theatre in Buenos Aires, Argentina. ... Cover of a recent translation of Manon Lescaut. ... For other uses, see La bohème (disambiguation). ... Original poster Tosca is an opera in three acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on Victorien Sardous drama, La Tosca. ... Madama Butterfly (Madame Butterfly) is an opera in three acts (originally two acts) by Giacomo Puccini, with an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa. ... Covent Garden is a district in central London and within the easterly bounds of the City of Westminster. ... Opéra comique is a French style of opera that is a partial counterpart to the Italian opera buffa. ... La Fanciulla del West (The Girl of the Golden West) is an opera in three acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Guelfo Civinini and Carlo Zangarini, based on the play The Girl of the Golden West by David Belasco. ... When the word metropolitan (from the Greek metera = mother and polis = town) is used as an adjective, as in metropolitan bishop, metropolitan France, or metropolitan area it can mean: of or characteristic of a metropolis; see also metropolitan area, Metropolitan Police, Metropolitan Railway of or belonging to the home territories... A poster for the Italian premiere. ... Il trittico (The Triptych) is the title to a collection of three one-act operas, Il tabarro, Suor Angelica, and Gianni Schicchi, by Giacomo Puccini. ... Il tabarro (The Cloak) is an opera in one act by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Giuseppe Adami, based on Didier Golds La Houppelande. ... When the word metropolitan (from the Greek metera = mother and polis = town) is used as an adjective, as in metropolitan bishop, metropolitan France, or metropolitan area it can mean: of or characteristic of a metropolis; see also metropolitan area, Metropolitan Police, Metropolitan Railway of or belonging to the home territories... For the opera by Ferruccio Busoni, see Turandot (Busoni). ...

Puccini's works and versions

(with dates of premieres and locations)

  • Messa (wrongly known as Messa di Gloria, Mass, Lucca, 1880)
  • Preludio Sinfonico in A major (Milan, 1882)
  • Capriccio Sinfonico (Milan, 1883)
  • Le Villi (31-May-1884, Teatro dal Verme, Milan)
  • Le Villi [rev] (26-Dec-1884, Teatro Regio di Torino)
  • Edgar (21-Apr-1889, Teatro alla Scala, Milan - 4 acts)
  • Crisantemi (String Quartet, 1890, "Alla memoria di Amadeo di Savoia Duca d'Aosta")
  • Edgar [rev] (5-Sep-1891, Teatro del Giglio, Lucca - 4 acts)
  • Minuetto n.1 (String Quartet, published about 1892, "A.S.A.R. Vittoria Augusta di Borbone, Principessa di Capua")
  • Minuetto n.2 (String Quartet, published about 1892, "All'esimio violinista prof. Augusto Michelangeli")
  • Minuetto n.3 (String Quartet, published about 1892, "All'amico maestro Carlo Carignani")
  • Edgar [rev 2] (28-Feb-1892, Teatro Comunale, Ferrara - 3 acts)
  • Manon Lescaut (1-Feb-1893, Teatro Regio di Torino)
  • La bohème (1-Feb-1896, Teatro Regio, Turin)
  • Tosca (14-Jan-1900, Teatro Costanzi, Rome)
  • Madama Butterfly (17-Feb-1904, Teatro alla Scala, Milan)
  • Madama Butterfly [rev] (28-May-1904, Teatro Grande, Brescia)
  • Edgar [rev 3] (8-Jun-1905, Teatro Colón, Buenos Aires - 3 acts)
  • Madama Butterfly [rev 2] (10-July-1905, Royal Opera House,Covent Garden, London)
  • Madama Butterfly [rev 3] (28-Dec-1905, Opéra Comique, Paris)
  • La fanciulla del West (10-Dec-1910, Metropolitan Opera, New York)
  • La rondine (27-Mar-1917, Opéra de Monte-Carlo, Monte Carlo)
  • Il trittico (14-Dec-1918, Metropolitan Opera, New York):
    • Il tabarro
    • Suor Angelica
    • Gianni Schicchi
  • Turandot (25-Apr-1926, Teatro alla Scala, Milan)

Giacomo Puccinis Messa or Messa a quattro voci (once incorrectly entitled Messa di Gloria) was composed in 1880 as his graduation exercise at the Istituto Musicale Pacini. ... The Teatro Regio di Torino (Turin Royal Theatre) is a prominent opera house and opera company in Turin, Italy. ... La Scala The Teatro alla Scala (or La Scala for short), in Milan, Italy, is one of the worlds most famous opera houses. ... The Teatro Regio di Torino (Turin Royal Theatre) is a prominent opera house and opera company in Turin, Italy. ... The Teatro dellOpera di Roma (Rome Opera House) is an opera house in Rome, Italy. ... Night shot of the Colon Theatre in Buenos Aires, Argentina. ... The Floral Hall of the Royal Opera House The Royal Opera House is a performing arts venue in London. ... Opéra comique is a French style of opera that is a partial counterpart to the Italian opera buffa. ... The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, seen from Lincoln Center Plaza A full house at the old Metropolitan Opera House, seen from the rear of the stage, at the Metropolitan Opera House for a concert by pianist Józef Hofmann, November 28, 1937. ... The Opéra de Monte-Carlo is an opera house in Monaco. ...

Media

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Giacomo Puccini
  • Preludio Sinfonico ( file info) — play in browser (beta)
  • Problems playing the files? See media help.
  • Giacomo Puccini "E lucevan le stelle" from "Tosca", sung by Romeo Berti, 1906
  • Giacomo Puccini, "Boheme"

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Giacomo Puccini - Preludio Sinfonico. ... Software development stages In computer programming, development stage terminology expresses how the development of a piece of software has progressed and how much further development it may require. ...

See also

Festival Puccini; the annual Festival of Puccini's operas in Torre del Lago. The Festival Puccini (Puccini Festival) is an annual summer opera festival held in July and August to present the operas of the famous Italian composer, Giacomo Puccini. ...


References

  1. ^ Quick Opera Facts 2007. OPERA America (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  2. ^ Alain P. Dornic (1995). An Operatic Survey. Opera Glass. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  • Lynn, Karyl Charna (2005). Italian Opera Houses and Festivals. Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press. ISBN 0810853590. 
  • Puccini, Simonetta (ed.) (2006). Giacomo Puccini in Torre del Lago. Viareggio, Tuscany: Friends of Giacomo Puccini's Houses Association. 
  • Phillips-Matz, Mary Jane (2002). Puccini: a biography. Boston: Northeastern University Press. ISBN 1555535305. 

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ...

External links

  • http://www.bohemianopera.com/puccini.htm
  • http://w3.rz-berlin.mpg.de/cmp/puccini.html
  • http://www.r-ds.com/opera/pucciniana/
  • http://www.operapaedia.org/Home.aspx
Romanticism
18th century - 19th century
Romantic music: Beethoven - Berlioz - Brahms - Chopin - Grieg - Liszt - Mendelssohn - Puccini - Schubert - Schumann - Tchaikovsky - The Five - Verdi - Wagner
   Romantic poetry: Blake - Burns - Byron - Coleridge - Goethe - Hölderlin - Hugo - Keats - Krasiński - Lamartine - Leopardi - Lermontov - Mickiewicz - Nerval - Novalis - Pushkin - Shelley - Słowacki - Wordsworth   
Visual arts and architecture: Brullov - Constable - Corot - Delacroix - Friedrich - Géricault - Gothic Revival architecture - Goya - Hudson River school - Leutze - Nazarene movement - Palmer - Turner
Romantic culture: Bohemianism - Romantic nationalism
<< Age of Enlightenment Victorianism >>
Realism >>

The Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project is a free digital collection maintained by the University of California, Santa Barbara Libraries with streaming and downloadable versions of over 5,000 phonograph cylinders manufactured between 1895 and the mid 1920s. ... The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) is a coeducational public university located on the Pacific Ocean in Santa Barbara County, California, USA. It is one out of 10 campuses of the University of California. ... The Werner Icking Music Archive, often abbreviated WIMA, is a web archive of public domain sheet music. ... International Music Score Library Project (IMSLP) is an internet-based project to create a virtual library of musical scores which are in the public domain. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge&#8212;writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others&#8212;in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Wanderer above the sea of fog by Caspar David Friedrich Romanticism is an artistic, literary and intellectual movement that originated in 18th century Western Europe. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century &#8212; 19th century &#8212; 20th century &#8212; more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... The era of Romantic music is defined as the period of European classical music that runs roughly from the early 1800s to the first decade of the 20th century, as well as music written according to the norms and styles of that period. ... 1820 portrait by Joseph Karl Stieler Ludwig van Beethoven (IPA: ), (December, 1770[1] – March 26, 1827) was a German composer. ... Hector Louis Berlioz (December 11, 1803 – March 8, 1869) was a French Romantic composer best known for the Symphonie fantastique, first performed in 1830, and for his Grande Messe des Morts (Requiem) of 1837, with its tremendous resources that include four antiphonal brass choirs. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The only known photograph of Frédéric Chopin, believed to have been taken in 1849 by Louis-Auguste Bisson. ... Edvard Hagerup Grieg (15 June 1843 – 4 September 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist who composed in the romantic period. ... Franz Liszt (Hungarian: Liszt Ferenc; the surname is pronounced as the English word list, that is ) (October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886) was a Hungarian [1] virtuoso pianist and composer of the Romantic period of German descent. ... Felix Mendelssohn at the age of 30 Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, born and known generally as Felix Mendelssohn (February 3, 1809 – November 4, 1847) was a German composer and conductor of the early Romantic period. ... Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer. ... For others with the same name see Robert Schumann (disambiguation). ... Pyotr (Peter) Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian: Пётр Ильич Чайкoвский, Pëtr Il’ič ÄŒajkovskij;  )[1] (7 May [O.S. 25 April] 1840 – 6 November [O.S. 25 October] 1893), was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. ... The Mighty Handful (Moguchaya Kuchka / &#1052;&#1086;&#1075;&#1091;&#1095;&#1072;&#1103; &#1050;&#1091;&#1095;&#1082;&#1072; in Russian), better known as The Five in English-speaking countries, was a label applied in 1867 by the critic Vladimir Stasov to a loose collection of Russian classical composers brought together under... Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (either October 9 or 10, 1813 – January 27, 1901) was an Italian Romantic composer, mainly of opera. ... Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 – February 13, 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... Romantic poetry was part of the Romantic movement of European literature during the 18th-19th centuries. ... William Blake in an 1807 portrait by Thomas Phillips. ... Robert Burns, foremost Scottish poet Robert Burns (January 25, 1759 – July 21, 1796) was a poet and a lyricist. ... Lord Byron redirects here. ... Samuel Taylor Coleridge(October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) (pronounced ) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and one of the Lake Poets. ...  , IPA: , (28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832), commonly known as Goethe, was a German poet, novelist, theorist, and scientist who is considered one of the giants of the literary world. ... Friedrich Hölderlin Johann Christian Friedrich Hölderlin (March 20, 1770 – June 6, 1843) was a major German lyric poet. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced in French) (26 February 1802 — 22 May 1885) was a French poet, novelist, playwright, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... John Keats John Keats (31 October 1795 – February 23, 1821) was one of the principal poets of the English Romantic movement. ... Noble Family KrasiÅ„ski Coat of Arms Åšlepowron Parents Wincenty KrasiÅ„ski Maria Urszula RadziwiÅ‚Å‚. Consorts Eliza Branicka Children with Eliza Branicka Wladyslaw KrasiÅ„ski Zygmunt Jerzy Krasinski Maria Beatrix Krasinska Eliza Krasinska Date of Birth February 19, 1812 Place of Birth Paris Date of Death February 23, 1859 Place... Portrait of Alphonse de Lamartine Lamartine in front of the Hôtel de Ville de Paris, on the 25 February 1848, by Philippoteaux Alphonse Marie Louise Prat de Lamartine (Alphonse-Marie-Louis de Prat de Lamartine) (October 21, 1790 - February 28, 1869) was a French writer, poet and politician, born... Giacomo Leopardi, Count (June 29, 1798 – June 14, 1837) is generally considered, along with such figures as Dante, Ariosto and Tasso, to be among Italys greatest poets and one of its greatest thinkers. ... Mikhail Lermontov in 1837 Mikhail Yuryevich Lermontov (Михаил Юрьевич Лермонтов), (October 15, 1814–July 27, 1841), a Russian Romantic writer and poet, sometimes called the poet of the Caucasus, was the most important presence in the Russian poetry from Alexander Pushkins death until his own four years later, at the age... Adam Mickiewicz. ... Gérard de Nerval (May 22, 1808 - January 26, 1855) was the nom-de-plume of the French poet, essayist and translator Gérard Labrunie, the most essentially Romantic among French poets. ... Novalis “Novalis” (* 2. ... Aleksandr Pushkin by Vasily Tropinin Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin (Russian: Алекса́ндр Серге́евич Пу́шкин, Aleksandr Sergeevič PuÅ¡kin,  ) (June 6, 1799 [O.S. May 26] – February 10, 1837 [O.S. January 29]) was a Russian Romantic author who is considered to be the greatest Russian poet[1] [2][3] and the founder of modern Russian... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyrical poets of the English language. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770 – April 23, 1850) was a major English romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their 1798 joint publication, Lyrical Ballads. ... The Mona Lisa is one of the most recognizable artistic paintings in the Western world. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Karl Pavlovich Briullov (Карл Павлович Брюллов), called by his friends the Great Karl (December 12, 1799, St Petersburg - June 11, 1852, Rome), was the first Russian painter of international standing. ... A self portrait by John Constable John Constable (June 11, 1776 – March 31, 1837) was a British Romantic artist. ... Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot (portrait by Nadar) Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot (July 26, 1796 &#8211; February 22, French landscape painter. ... Eugène Delacroix (portrait by Nadar) Ferdinand Victor Eugène Delacroix (April 26, 1798 – August 13, 1863) was the most important of the French Romantic painters. ... Self-portrait in chalk, 1810 by fellow artist Georg Friedrich Kersting, 1812 Caspar David Friedrich (September 5, 1774 – May 7, 1840) was a 19th century German romantic painter, considered by many critics to be one of the finest representatives of the movement. ... Monument at Gericaults tomb. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic Revival was an architectural movement which originated in mid-18th century England. ... Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes (March 30, 1746 – April 16, 1828) was a Spanish painter and printmaker. ... Thomas Coles View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm, or The Oxbow, 1836 The Hudson River School was a mid-19th century American art movement by a group of landscape painters whose aesthetic vision was influenced by romanticism. ... Washington Crossing the Delaware Westward the Course of Empire Takes its Way Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze (May 24, 1816 – July 18, 1868) was a German-born American painter. ... -1... Self-portrait of the young Samuel Palmer, circa 1826. ... Self portrait, oil on canvas, circa 1799 Joseph Mallord William Turner (April 23, 1775 (exact date disputed) – December 19, 1851) was an English Romantic landscape painter, watercolourist and printmaker, whose style can be said to have laid the foundation for Impressionism. ... Wanderer above the sea of fog by Caspar David Friedrich Romanticism is an artistic, literary and intellectual movement that originated in 18th century Western Europe. ... The term Bohemian was first used in the nineteenth century to describe the non-traditional lifestyles of marginalized and impoverished artists, writers, musicians, and actors in major European cities. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Age of Enlightenment (French: Siècle des Lumières, German: Aufklärung) refers to the eighteenth century in European and American philosophy, or the longer period including the Age of Reason. ... Victorianism is the name given to the attitudes, art and culture of the later two-thirds of the 19th century. ... Realism in the visual arts and literature is the depiction of subjects as they appear in everyday life, without embellishment or interpretation. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Giacomo Puccini - Music Downloads - Online (1427 words)
Puccini quickly developed a plot for an opera called Le villi, based on the German supernatural tales that was the source of Adam's ballet Giselle.
Puccini learned that his contemporary, the composer Leoncavallo, was planning to write an opera on the subject of Henri Murger's novel Scenes de la vie de Boheme, and decided that he was also attracted to this story of young struggling artists in Paris.
At this time Puccini wished to expand his theatrical scope to the kind of pageantry and spectacle which is common in opera but rare in his works, and at the same time attempt a setting in a legendary or fairy tale setting.
Puccini English (2145 words)
Puccini, along with his brother Michele, who died young, were the fifth generation of a family of professional musicians and composers, living and working in and around Lucca, Tuscany Italy.
Puccini was suddenly established as a wealthy composer and artistic successor to Maestro Giuseppe Verdi.
Puccini said "Manon is a heroine I believe in, and therefore she cannot fail to win the heart of the public".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m