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Encyclopedia > Ghassanids

language|Arabic]]:الغساسنة) were [[Arab Christian|Arab it is assumed that the Ghassanids adopted the religion of Christianity from the native Aramaeans and Romans. Modern southern-Syrians are a mix of these three peoples. The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... The Arameans or Aramaeans (also called Syriacs) were a Semitic, nomadic people who dwelt in Aram-Naharaim or Aram of the two rivers, also known as Mesopotamia a region including modern Syria, Iraq, Jordan, Iran that is mentioned six times in the Hebrew Bible. ... The Roman Forum was the central area around which ancient Rome developed. ...


The Ghassanid kingdom was an ally of the Byzantine Empire. More accurately the kings can be described as phylarchs, native rulers of subject frontier states. The capital was at Jabiyah in the Golan Heights. Geographically, it occupied much of Syria, Palestine, Jordan and the northern Hijaz as far south as Yathrib (Medina). It acted as guardian of trade routes, policed Bedouin tribes and was a source of troops for the Byzantine army.The Ghassanid king al-Harith ibn Jabalah (reigned 529-569) supported the Byzantines against Sassanid Persia and was given the title patricius in 529 by the emperor Justinian I. Al-Harith was a Monophysite Christian; he helped to revive the Syrian Monophysite (Jacobite) Church and supported Monophysite development despite Orthodox Byzantium regarding it as heretical. Later Byzantine mistrust and persecution of such religious unorthodoxy brought down his successors, al-Mundhir (reigned 569-582) and Nu'man. Byzantine Empire (Greek: Βασιλεία Ῥωμαίων) is the term conventionally used since the 19th century to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... Sites on the Golan in blue are Israeli settlement communities. ... Map of the British Mandate of Palestine. ... Hejaz (also Hijaz, Hedjaz) is a region in the northwest of present-day Saudi Arabia; its main city is Jeddah, but it is probably better-known for the holy city of Mecca. ... This article is about the city of Medina in Saudi Arabia. ... Bedouin resting at Mount Sinai Bedouin, derived from the Arabic , a generic name for a desert-dweller, is a term generally applied to Arab nomadic groups, who are found throughout most of the desert belt extending from the Atlantic coast of the Sahara via the Western Desert, Sinai, and Negev... al-Harith ibn Jabalah was a king of the Ghassanids, an pre-Islamic Arab people who lived on the eastern frontier of the Byzantine Empire. ... For other uses, see number 529. ... Events The Nubian kingdom of Alodia is converted to Christianity, according to John of Ephesus. ... Sassanid Empire at its greatest extent The Sassanid dynasty (also Sassanian) was the name given to the kings of Persia during the era of the second Persian Empire, from 224 until 651, when the last Sassanid shah, Yazdegerd III, lost a 14-year struggle to drive out the Umayyad Caliphate... The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Patricians (patricii) were originally the elite caste in ancient Rome. ... Justinian I depicted on one of the famous mosaics of the St. ... Monophysitism (from the Greek monos meaning one and physis meaning nature) is the christological position that Christ has only one nature, as opposed to the Chalcedonian position which holds that Christ has two natures, one divine and one human. ... The Syriac Orthodox Church is an autocephalous Oriental Orthodox church based in the Middle East with members spread throughout the world. ... Separate articles treat Eastern Orthodox Christianity and Orthodox Judaism. ... Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the ‘catholic’ or orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox. ... Events Maurice I succeeds Tiberius II Constantine as Byzantine Emperor. ...


The Ghassanids, who had successfully opposed the Persian allied Lakhmids of al-Hirah (Southern Iraq and Northern Arabia), prospered economically and engaged in much religious and public building; they also patronised the arts and at one time entertained the poets Nabighah adh-Dhubyani and Hassan ibn Thabit at their courts. Ghassan remained a Byzantine vassal state until its rulers were overthrown by the Muslims in the 7th century, following the Battle of Yarmuk. It was at this battle that some 12,000 Ghassanid Arabs defected to the Muslim side due to the Muslims offering to pay their arrears in wages. Their real power, however, had been destroyed by the Persian invasion in 614. The Lakhmids (Arabic: ) or Muntherids (Arabic: ) were a group of Arab Christians who lived in Southren Iraq, and made al-Hirah which was was a fabulous city with many castles and bath-houses and Palm gardens their capital in 266 AD. Poets described it as a Paradise on earth, an... Hassan Ibn Thabit (died 674), Arabian poet, was born in Yathrib (Medina), a member of the tribe Khazraj. ... A puppet state is a state whose government, though notionally of the same culture as the governed people - owes its existence (or other major debt) to being installed, supported or controlled by a more powerful entity, typically a foreign power. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... // Overview Events The Roman-Persian Wars end. ... Combatants Byzantine Empire Muslim Arabs Commanders Theodore the Sacellarius Baänes Khalid ibn Walid Strength About 200,000 About 24,000 Casualties Very Heavy,About 50,000 Unknown,Relativly low The Battle of Yarmuk (also spelled Yarmuq or Hieromyax) took place between the Muslim Arabs and the Byzantine Empire in... Events The Persian Empire under general Shahrbaraz captures and sacks Jerusalem; the Church of the Holy Sepulchre is damaged by fire and the True Cross is captured. ...


Many Christian families of Lebanon, Jordan, Syria, and Palestine trace their roots to the Ghassanid dynasty, including the Maalouf and Jabara families. The religious backgrounds of these families tend to be either Greek Orthodox or Greek Catholic, despite the Ghassanids Monophysite Syrian Orthodox religion. Map of the British Mandate of Palestine. ... The Antiochian Orthodox Church is one of the five churches that composed the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church before the Great Schism, and today is one of the autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Churches. ... The coat of arms of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church The Melkite Greek Catholic Church is an Eastern Rite sui juris particular Church in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church and the Pope of Rome. ... Monophysitism (from the Greek monos meaning one and physis meaning nature) is the christological position that Christ has only one nature, as opposed to the Chalcedonian position which holds that Christ has two natures, one divine and one human. ... The Syriac Orthodox Church is an autocephalous Oriental Orthodox church based in the Middle East with members spread throughout the world. ...


Ghassanid Kings

  1. Jafnah I ibn `Amr(220-265)
  2. `Amr I ibn Jafnah(265-270)
  3. Tha'labah ibn Amr(270-287)
  4. al-Harith I ibn Th`alabah(287-307)
  5. Jabalah I ibn al-Harith I(307-317)
  6. al-Harith II ibn Jabalah "ibn Maria"(317-327)
  7. al-Mundhir I Senior ibn al-Harith II(327-330) with...
  8. al-Aiham ibn al-Harith II(327-330) and...
  9. al-Mundhir II Junior ibn al-Harith II(327-340) and...
  10. al-Nu`man I ibn al-Harith II(327-342) and...
  11. `Amr II ibn al-Harith II(330-356) and...
  12. Jabalah II ibn al-Harith II(327-361)
  13. Jafnah II ibn al-Mundhir I(361-391) with...
  14. al-Nu`man II ibn al-Mundhir I(361-362)
  15. al-Nu`man III ibn 'Amr ibn al-Mundhir I(391-418)
  16. Jabalah III ibn al-Nu`man(418-434)
  17. al-Nu`man IV ibn al-Aiham(434-455) with...
  18. al-Harith III ibn al-Aiham(434-456) and...
  19. al-Nu`man V ibn al-Harith(434-453)
  20. al-Mundhir II ibn al-Nu`man(453-472) with...
  21. `Amr III ibn al-Nu`man(453-486) and...
  22. Hijr ibn al-Nu`man(453-465)
  23. al-Harith IV ibn Hijr(486-512)
  24. Jabalah IV ibn al-Harith(512-529)
  25. al-Harith V ibn Jabalah(529-569)
  26. al-Mundhir III ibn al-Harith(569-581) with...
  27. Abu Kirab al-Nu`man ibn al-Harith(570-582)
  28. al-Nu`man VI ibn al-Mundhir(582-583)
  29. al-Harith VI ibn al-Harith(583)
  30. al-Nu'man VII ibn al-Harith Abu Kirab(583- ?)
  31. al-Aiham ibn Jabalah(? -614)
  32. al-Mundhir IV ibn Jabalah(614- ?)
  33. Sharahil ibn Jabalah(? -618)
  34. Amr IV ibn Jabalah(618-628)
  35. Jabalah V ibn al-Harith(628-632)
  36. Jabalah VI ibn al-Aiham(632-638)

www.abouhaidar.com Abou Haidar family originated from the royal Ghassanids.

  • Aramco world article on Ghassanids
  • Britannica entry on Ghassanids
  • Ghannoum family history of Ghassanids
  • Small entry on Ghassanids by xmission
This article is part of the Eastern Christianity Portal — Learn more about Eastern Christianity  

Abou Haidar Family Tree Project Image File history File links Template:Public File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Eastern Christianity refers collectively to the Christian traditions which developed in Greece, the Balkans, the rest of Eastern Europe, Asia Minor, and the Middle East over several centuries of religious antiquity. ...


The Abou Haidar family originated from the Royal Ghassanids tribes who ruled greater Syria proper from 37 AD to 637 AD. Their territory stretched through the Euphrates River to the Jordan River, including parts of Lebanon and Iraq. The Ghassanids had 32 kings over its reign (ref, Ala'akd Alfareed) and was the first Christian kingdom in the Middle East.


In 1600 AD, the tribe of Alforayjat which inhabited present day Houran, had a young, charismatic man whose name was Saadeh. He was the great grandfather of the Abou Haidar family.

 Saddeh was a very famous man who was known for his honesty, generosity and braveness. Villagers used to keep their savings of gold in his house and they could have it back at any time. He was trusted by everybody. These characters about Saddeh were not written anywhere, but were passed on from a 90 year old man in 1950. This old man lived in al Haidariah village; which we are still trying to locate in Syria. 
 Saadeh had four sons: Haidar, Freijat, Shalhoub and Shahine (Abou Kmal). Since his eldest son was Haidar, people used to call him ‘Abou-Haidar’ translated as ‘father of Haidar’. The traditions of the Arabs at the time was to call a man by his eldest sons name preceded by the word ‘abou’ or ‘father’. This was done in order to prepare him to resume the authority of the father in case the father died or was imprisoned. 
 Saddeh Abou Haidar was a very distinguished prince of the Ghassanids; even his brothers and most of his sons used his name as they were honored to say they were affiliated to Abou Haidar. He was the leader of his people and for an unknown reason he moved with his men to the Bekaa valley. 
 Presently, we have Abou Haidar’s scattered throughout Lebanon in places like Talia, Baskinta, Houshbarada, Hammana, Damour , Kaitoula as well as many other cities and villages ( to be added later) including Europe, south and north America. 
 Arabic names are usually spelled differently when they are written in foreign languages, but nevertheless the same family has remained. Some different spellings include: Abou Haidar, Abi Haidar, Abo Haidar, Abu Haidar, Haidar, Haydar, Aidar. 
 This is the root of our family based on some scarce resources available to us. We are still in the process of researching our roots with the help of some fine volunteers. All members of the family are asked to participate in the process of constructing our family tree based on real history fact because we believe that this is the right time to link our children to our noble ancestors. 

This site is solely interested in the social, ancestral, and future affairs of this family and has no religious or political agenda.


Your suggestions are always valuable to us and without your feedback we will not be able to carry out this important project. Please email us at niram1@hotmail.com remi1996@hotmail.com abouhaidar303@hotmail.com , , , with any questions, comments, or suggestions.


www.abouhaidar.com


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ghassanids - definition of Ghassanids in Encyclopedia (273 words)
The Ghassanid kingdom was a Christian Arab kingdom and ally of the Byzantine Empire.
It acted as guardian of trade routes, policed Bedouin tribes and was a source of troops for the Byzantine army.The Ghassanid king al-Harith ibn Jabalah (reigned 529-569) supported the Byzantines against Sassanid Persia and was given the title patricius in 529 by the emperor Justinian.
The Ghassanids, who had successfully opposed the Persian allied Lakhmids of al-Hirah (Southern Iraq and Northern Arabia), prospered economically and engaged in much religious and public building; they also patronised the arts and at one time entertained the poets Nabighah adh-Dhubyani and Hassan ibn Thabit at their courts.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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