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Encyclopedia > Geumgwan Gaya
Geumgwan Gaya
Hangul:
금관가야
Hanja:
金官伽倻
Revised Romanization: Kŭmgwan Kaya
McCune-Reischauer: Kŭmgwan Kaya
History of Korea

Gojoseon, Jin
Proto-Three Kingdoms:
 Buyeo, Okjeo, Dongye
 Samhan
  Ma, Byeon, Jin
Three Kingdoms:
 Goguryeo
  Sui wars
 Baekje
 Silla, Gaya
North-South States:
 Unified Silla
 Balhae
 Later Three Kingdoms
Goryeo
 Khitan wars
 Mongol invasions
Joseon
 Japanese invasions
 Manchu invasions
Korean Empire
Japanese occupation
 Provisional Gov't
Division of Korea
 Korean War
North, South Korea Jamo redirects here. ... Hanja is the Korean name for Chinese characters. ... The Revised Romanization of Korean is the official Korean language romanization system in South Korea. ... McCune-Reischauer romanization is one of the two most widely used Korean language romanization systems, along with the Revised Romanization of Korean, which replaced (a modified) McCune-Reischauer as the official romanization system in South Korea in 2000. ... Image File history File links Korea_unified_vertical. ... This article is about the history of Korea, through the division of Korea in 1945. ... Gojoseon was an ancient Korean kingdom. ... Jin was an early Iron Age state which occupied some portion of the southern Korean peninsula during the 2nd and 3rd centuries BCE, bordering the Korean kingdom Gojoseon to the north. ... Proto-Three Kingdoms of Korea (원삼국시대, 原三國時代) refers to the period after the fall of Gojoseon and before the maturation of Goguryeo, Baekje, and Silla into full-fledged kingdoms. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Okjeo was a small tribal state which arose in the northern Korean peninsula from perhaps 2nd century BC to 5th century AD. Dong-okjeo (East Okjeo) occupied roughly the area of the Hamgyŏng provinces of North Korea, and Buk-okjeo (North Okjeo) occupied the Duman River region. ... Dongye was a state which occupied portions of the northeastern Korean peninsula from roughly 150 BCE to around 400 CE. It bordered Goguryeo and Okjeo to the north, Jinhan to the south, and Chinas Lelang Commandery to the west. ... During the Samhan period, the three confederacies of Mahan, Jinhan, and Byeonhan dominated the southern portion of the Korean peninsula. ... Mahan was a loose confederacy of chiefdoms that existed from around the 1st century BC to the 3rd century CE in the southern Korean peninsula in the Chungcheong Province. ... Byeonhan, also known as Byeonjin (변진, 弁辰), was a loose confederacy of chiefdoms that existed from around the beginning of the Common Era to the 4th century CE in the southern Korean peninsula, in the south and west of the Nakdong River valley. ... Jinhan was a loose confederacy of chiefdoms that existed from around the 1st century BC to the 4th century CE in the southern Korean peninsula, to the east of the Nakdong River valley, Gyeongsang Province. ... The Three Kingdoms of Korea were Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla, which dominated the Korean peninsula and parts of Manchuria for much of the 1st millennium CE. The Three Kingdoms period in Korea is usually considered to run from the 1st century BCE (specifically 57 BC) until Sillas triumph over... Goguryeo was an ancient Korean kingdom[1][2][3][4] located in the northern Korean Peninsula and Manchuria. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Baekje (or Paekche) and later Nambuyeo (18 BCE – 660 CE) was a kingdom in the southwest of the Korean Peninsula. ... Silla (also spelled Shilla, traditional dates 57 BCE - 935 CE) was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Gaya was a confederacy of chiefdoms in the Nakdong River valley of southern Korea, growing out of the Byeonhan confederacy and later annexed by Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... North South States Period(남북국시대, 南北國時代) refers to the period from the 7th century to the 10th century when Unified Silla and Balhae coexited at the south and the north[1], [2]. Hitherto, this period had been called the period of Unified Silla. ... Unified Silla is the name often applied to the Korean kingdom of Silla after 668. ... Alternate meaning: Bohai Sea Balhae (698 - 926) was an ancient kingdom established as the successor to Goguryeo, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... The Later Three Kingdoms of Korea (892-936) consisted of Silla, Hubaekje (later Baekje), and Taebong (also known as Hugoguryeo, or Later Goguryeo). ... Taegeuk is a traditional symbol of Korea Capital Gaegyeong Language(s) Korean Religion Buddhism Government Monarchy Wang  - 918 - 946 Taejo  - 949 - 975 Gwangjong  - 1259 - 1274 Wonjong  - 1351 - 1374 Gongmin Historical era 918 - 1392  - Later Three Kingdoms rise 892  - Coronation of Taejo June 15, 918  - Korea-Khitan Wars 993 - 1019  - Mongolian... The Goryeo-Khitan Wars were a series of 10th- and 11th-century conflicts between the kingdom of Goryeo and Khitan forces near what is now the border between China and North Korea. ... The Mongol invasions of Korea consisted of a series of campaigns by the Mongol Empire against Korea, then known as Koryo, from 1231 to 1259. ... Territory of Joseon after Jurchen conquest of King Sejong Capital Hanseong Language(s) Korean Religion Confucianism Government Monarchy Wang  - 1392 - 1398 Taejo  - 1418 - 1450 Sejong  - 1776 - 1800 Jeongjo  - 1863 - 1897 Proclaimed Emperor Gojong Yeong-uijeong  - 1431 - 1449 Hwang Hui  - 1466 - 1472 Han Myeonghoe  - 1592 - 1598 Ryu Seongryong  - 1894 Kim Hongjip... Combatants Korea under the Joseon Dynasty , China under the Ming Dynasty, Jurchen tribes Japan under Toyotomi Hideyoshi Commanders Korea: King Seonjo Prince Gwanghae Yi Sun-sin†, Gwon Yul, Yu Seong-ryong, Yi Eok-gi†, Won Gyun†, Kim Myeong-won, Yi Il, Sin Rip†, Gwak Jae-u, Kim Shi-Min† China... The First Manchu invasion of Korea occurred in 1627, when Hong Taiji led the Manchu army against Koreas Joseon dynasty. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Flag of the Japanese Resident General of Korea Anthem: Kimi ga Yoa Korea under Japanese Occupation Capital Keijo Language(s) Korean, Japanese Religion Shintoisma Government Constitutional monarchy Emperor of Japan  - 1910 - 1912 Emperor Meiji  - 1912 - 1925 Emperor Taisho  - 1925 - 1945 Emperor Showa Governor-General of Korea  - 1910 - 1916 Masatake Terauchi... The Provisional Government of the Republic of Korea was a government in exile based in Shanghai, China and later in Chongqing, during the Japanese occupation of Korea. ... The Korean peninsula, first divided along the 38th parallel, later along the demarcation line The division of Korea into North Korea and South Korea stems from the 1945 Allied victory in World War II, ending Japans 35-year occupation of Korea. ... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... For the history of Korea before its division, see History of Korea. ...

Korea Portal

Geumgwan Gaya [Kumgwan Kaya](43 - 532), also known as Bon-gaya [Pon-Kaya](본가야, 本伽倻, "original Kaya") or Karakguk (가락국, "Karak State"), was a major chiefdom of the Kaya confederacy during the Three Kingdoms Period in Korea. It is believed to have been located in modern-day [Kimhae], Kyongsangnam-do, near the mouth of the Nakdong River. Aided by its strategic location, this kingdom played a dominant role in the regional affairs from the Pyonhan period forward. Korean dynasties are listed in the order of their fall. ... Korea has a long military history going back several thousand years, with an extensive series of wars that involved invasions, civil discord, counter-piracy actions against medieval Japan, the first use of armoured battleships in seabattles, and the devastation of rebellions against the Joseon era Japanese invasions, the forced peace... This is a timeline of Korean history. ... Gaya was a confederacy of chiefdoms in the Nakdong River valley of southern Korea, growing out of the Byeonhan confederacy of the Samhan period. ... The Three Kingdoms of Korea were Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla, which dominated the Korean peninsula and parts of Manchuria for much of the 1st millennium CE. The Three Kingdoms period in Korea is usually considered to run from the 1st century BCE (specifically 57 BC) until Sillas triumph over... Korea (Korean: 한국 or ì¡°ì„ , see below) is a geographic area, civilization, and former state situated on the Korean Peninsula in East Asia. ... The Nakdong River (Rakdong in North Korean) is the longest river in South Korea, and passes through major cities such as Daegu and Busan. ... Byeonhan, also known as Byeonjin, was a loose confederacy of chiefdoms that existed from around the beginning of the Common Era to the 4th century in the southern Korean peninsula. ...


According to Samguk Yusa, Kumgwan Kaya was made of 9 villages united by King Suro. His wife Heo Hwang-ok is said to be a princess from Ayuta (아유타국), a region in India [many believe this Indian story to be a myth], although this may have been an embellishment during later Buddhist times. Samguk Yusa, or Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms, is a collection of legends, folktales, and historical accounts relating to the Three Kingdoms of Korea (Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla), as well as to other periods and states before, during, and after the Three Kingdoms period. ... Heo Hwang-ok was a princess who travelled from the ancient kingdom of Ayuta[1] to Korea. ...


During this time, several waves of migration from the north, including the earlier Ko-Choson, Puyo, and the later Koguryeo, overtook and integrated with existing populations and stimulated cultural and political developments. A sharp break in burial styles is found around the later 3rd century. Burial forms associated with North Asian nomadic peoples, such as the burial of horses with the dead, suddenly replace earlier forms in the tombs of the elite (Cheol 2000). In addition, earlier burials were systematically destroyed. In the early 1990s, a royal tomb complex was unearthed in Daeseong-dong, Kimhae, attributed to Kumgwan Kaya but apparently used since Pyonhan times. Gojoseon was an ancient Korean kingdom. ... Goguryeo was a Korean kingdom[1][2][3][4] located in the northern Korean Peninsula and southern Manchuria. ... Gimhae, also commonly spelled Kimhae, is a city in South Gyeongsang Province, South Korea. ...


After Kumgwan Kaya capitulated to [[Silla] [Shilla]] in 532, the royal house was accepted into the Silla aristocracy and given the rank of "true bone," the second-highest level of the Silla [Shilla] bone rank system. Relationship of Bone-Rank Gradations in Silla to Office Rank and Post [1] The bone rank system was the system of aristocratic rank used in the ancient Korean kingdom of Silla. ...


See also

This article is about the history of Korea, through the division of Korea in 1945. ... Korean dynasties are listed in the order of their fall. ... This is a list of Wikipedia articles on Korea-related people, places, things, and concepts. ...

References

  • Cheol, S.K. (2000). Relations between Kaya and Wa in the third to fourth centuries AD. Journal of East Asian Archeology 2(3-4), 112-122.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Geumgwan Gaya at AllExperts (331 words)
Geumgwan Gaya (43 - 532), also known as Bon-gaya (본가야, 本伽倻, "original Gaya") or Garakguk (가락국, "Garak State"), was a major chiefdom of the Gaya confederacy during the Three Kingdoms Period in Korea.
According to Samguk Yusa, Geumgwan Gaya was made of 9 villages united by King Suro.
After Geumgwan Gaya capitulated to Silla in 532, the royal house was accepted into the Silla aristocracy and given the rank of "true bone," the second-highest level of the Silla bone rank system.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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