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Encyclopedia > Gettysburg College
Gettysburg College

Established 1832
Type: Private liberal arts college
Endowment: $233.8 million [1]
President: Katherine Haley Will
Faculty: 180
Students: 2,600
Location Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, United States of America
Colors: Orange and Blue
Nickname: Bullets
Website: gettysburg.edu

Coordinates: 39°29′N, 77°14′W Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Katherine Haley Will, Ph. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... Gettysburg is a borough 38 miles (68 km) south by southwest of Harrisburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania, USA, of which it is the county seatGR6. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Gettysburg College is a private national four-year liberal arts college founded in 1832, in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, adjacent to the famous battlefield. Its athletic teams are nicknamed the Bullets. Gettysburg College has about 2,600 students, with roughly equal numbers of men and women. Gettysburg students come from 40 states and 35 countries. The school is affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America. Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Gettysburg is a borough 38 miles (68 km) south by southwest of Harrisburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania, USA, of which it is the county seatGR6. ... Gettysburg Map The Gettysburg Battlefield was the site of the Battle of Gettysburg, fought July 1 to July 3, 1863, in and around the borough of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, the county seat of Adams County, which had approximately 2,400 residents at the time. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America or ELCA is a mainline Protestant denomination headquarted in Chicago, Illinois. ...


The college is the home of The Gettysburg Review, a highly respected literary magazine. Autumn 1991 issue The Gettysburg Review is a quarterly literary magazine featuring short stories, poetry, essays and reviews. ...

Contents

History

Gettysburg College campus entrance 4 November 2001

Gettysburg College campus entrance
4 November 2001 Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1017x763, 261 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Gettysburg College User:Koweja/Images Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1017x763, 261 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Gettysburg College User:Koweja/Images Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...

Founding and early roots

Gettysburg College was founded in 1832 as a sister institution for the Lutheran Theological Seminary. Both owe their inception to Thaddeus Stevens, a Radical Republican and abolitionist from Gettysburg. The college's original name was Pennsylvania College, and was founded by Samuel Simon Schmucker. Image:Olddorm. ... Thaddeus Stevens (April 4, 1792 – August 11, 1868), was one of the most powerful members of the United States House of Representatives, representing the state of Pennsylvania. ... The Radical Republicans were an influential faction of American politicians in the Republican party during the American Civil War and Reconstruction eras, 1860-1876. ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... Samuel Simon Schmucker (1799-1873) was an American Lutheran divine. ...


Battle of Gettysburg

In June 1863, southern Pennsylvania was invaded by Confederate forces during the Gettysburg Campaign. Many local militia forces sprung up around the area between Chambersburg and Philadelphia to face the oncoming foe. A group of Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government during the American Civil War. ... Meade and Lee of Gettysburg Gettysburg Campaign (through July 3); cavalry movements shown with dashed lines. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia The term Militia is commonly used today to refer to a military force composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency, law enforcement, or paramilitary service, and those engaged in such activity, without being paid a regular salary or committed to a fixed term of service. ... Chambersburg is a borough in Pennsylvania, United States. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...


Among these units was Gettysburg's 26th Pennsylvania Emergency Militia Regiment (PEMR). Comprising mostly students from the College and Seminary, the 26th PEMR was mustered into service on June 22, 1863. Four days later, the students would fight just to the north of town, skirmishing with troops of Confederate division commander Jubal A. Early. Neither side sustained heavy casualties, although around one hundred of the militiamen were taken captive. British regiment A regiment is a military unit, consisting of a variable number of battalions - commanded by a colonel. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to twenty thousand soldiers. ... For other uses, see Jubal Early (disambiguation). ...


During the Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania Hall, or Old Dorm, was used as both a signal corps station and field hospital. Penn Hall is an interesting anomaly in the battle. Due to the geographic position it held, it was used by both Confederate and Union troops during the battle for signal work and surgery. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 93,921[1] 71,699[2] Casualties 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured/missing)[1] 23,231 (4,708 killed, 12,693 wounded, 5,830 captured/missing... Branch insignia of the U.S. Army Signal Corps, representing Myers Wigwag The U.S. Army Signal Corps was founded in 1861 by United States Army Major Albert J. Myer, a physician by training. ... 47th Combat Support Hospital, 2000 A field hospital is a large mobile medical unit that temporarily takes care of casualties on-site before they can be safely transported to more permanent hospital facilities. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ...


Relationship with the Eisenhowers

Early in his military career, Dwight D. Eisenhower and his wife, Mamie, lived in a house in Gettysburg that was near the college. Both were fond of the town, so they decided, after World War II, to retire to a working farm adjacent to the battlefield. It was here that President Eisenhower recuperated from his 1955 heart attack. Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... Mamie Geneva Doud Eisenhower (November 14, 1896 – November 1, 1979) was the wife of General and President Dwight D. Eisenhower, and First Lady of the United States from 1953 to 1961. ...


While living in Gettysburg, Eisenhower became involved with Gettysburg College. He served on the Gettysburg College Board of Trustees, and he was given an office by the college, which he used when writing his memoirs. Today, Eisenhower’s old office is named Eisenhower House” and houses Gettysburg College’s office of admissions. [1] Meanwhile, Eisenhower’s grandson, David, continues a certain level of family involvement with the institution. The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a holder of property on behalf of a beneficiary. ... Dwight David Eisenhower II (born 1948) is the grandson of the supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II and the 34th President of the United States, Dwight D. Eisenhower. ...


Campus

The college is located on a 200 acre (800,000 m²) campus adjacent to the Gettysburg National Military Park. Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, is 36 miles (60 km) from Harrisburg, 55 miles (80 km) from Baltimore, 80 miles (130 km) from Washington, D.C., 117 miles (190 km) from Philadelphia, and 212 miles (340 km) from New York City, and 425 miles (680 km) from Boston. Gettysburg Map The Gettysburg Battlefield was the site of the Battle of Gettysburg, fought July 1 to July 3, 1863, in and around the borough of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, the county seat of Adams County, which had approximately 2,400 residents at the time. ... This article is about the capital city of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. ... Baltimore redirects here. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Boston redirects here. ...


Approximately 96% of students live on campus in more than 40 residence halls, which include Theme Housing and the First-Year Residential College Program.


Academic Facilities

Musselman Library 4 November 2001

Musselman Library
4 November 2001 Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1002x752, 224 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Gettysburg College User:Koweja/Images Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1002x752, 224 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Gettysburg College User:Koweja/Images Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...

Library
Musselman Library houses the college collection of books, journals, videos, sound recordings, online publications, rare books, manuscripts, and digital collections. An online catalog, MUSCAT, provides a gateway to all library materials and is accessible through any computer terminal connected to the college network. In addition, the building contains a media theatre, computer lab, and media production center. Musselman Library is open around the clock when classes are in session. The library operates 24 hours a day on weekdays and selected hours during the weekends. And in order to help facilitate late night studying, the library provides free coffee and hot chocolate at midnight to students bringing their own mugs.
Technology
Full network capabilities in all campus buildings and each residence hall room. Students have access to more than 1,300 computers and a complex system of workstations and laboratories. Wireless connectivity is available across campus and in a majority of residence halls.

For the use of the term in networking, see Wireless networking. ...

Organization

As an independent institution, the college operates under a charter granted in 1832 by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The College is governed by a 39-member board of trustees comprising leaders from a range of professions and walks of life. Thirty of the College’s trustees are graduates of Gettysburg.


On the student level, adjudication of academic disputes takes place through an Honor Commission, which holds hearings in which students are given a chance to have their say on charges brought against them.


The Academic Honor Code has been in effect since 1957, and recently has been updated to fit better with today's technology. An honor code or honor system is a set of rules or principles governing a community based on a set of rules or ideals that define what constitutes honorable behavior within that community. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ...


Academic Programs

Majors
Anthropology, Art History, Art Studio, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Biology, Chemistry, Classical Studies, Computer Science, Economics, English, Environmental Studies, French, German, Globalization Studies, Greek, Health and Exercise Sciences, History, Japanese Studies, Latin, Management, Mathematics, Music, Music Education, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religion, Sociology, Spanish, Spanish & Latin American Studies, Theatre, Women’s Studies
Special Interest Programs (Minors)
African American Studies, American Studies, Asian Studies, Civil War Era Studies, Comparative Literature, East Asian Studies, Education (elementary and secondary, with certification), Global/Area Studies, International Affairs Concentration, Law, Ethics, and Society, Neuroscience, Writing, Film Studies

Greek Organizations

Fraternities: Alpha Chi Rho (AXP, "Crow"), Alpha Tau Omega (ATO), Phi Delta Theta (Phi Delt), Phi Gamma Delta (FIJI), Phi Kappa Psi (Phi Psi), Phi Sigma Kappa (Phi Sig), Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE), Sigma Nu (Sig Nu), Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE), Lambda Chi Alpha (Lambda Chi) Alpha Chi Rho (ΑΧΡ) is a mens collegiate fraternity founded on June 4, 1895 at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut by the Reverend Paul Ziegler, his son Carl Ziegler, and Carls friends William Rouse, Herbert T. Sherriff and William A.D. Eardeley. ... ATΩ (Alpha Tau Omega) is an American fraternity. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... Phi Gamma Delta (also known as FIJI) is a collegiate social fraternity with 116 chapters and 5 colonies across the United States and Canada. ... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... Phi Sigma Kappa (ΦΣK) is a fraternity devoted to three cardinal principles: the promotion of Brotherhood, the stimulation of Scholarship, and the development of Character. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE or Teke, pronounced T-K-E or IPA , as in teak wood) is a college fraternity with chapters in the USA, and Canada, and affiliation with a German fraternity system known as the Corps of the Weinheimer Senioren Convent (WSC). ... Lambda Chi Alpha (ΛΧΑ), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America with more than 250,000 initiated members and chapters at more than 300 universities. ...


Sororities: Alpha Delta Pi (ADPi), Chi Omega (Chi O), Delta Gamma (DG), Gamma Phi Beta (Gamma Phi), Sigma Sigma Sigma (Tri Sigma), Sigma Gamma Rho (SGRho) Alpha Delta Pi (ΑΔΠ) was founded May 15, 1851 at Wesleyan College in Macon, Georgia making it the first female fraternal organization. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Sigma Sigma Sigma (ΣΣΣ), also known as Tri Sigma or Sigma, is a national American women’s sorority with membership of more than 92,000 members (as of August 1, 2006). ... Sigma Gamma Rho (ΣΓΡ) was founded on November 12, 1922, by seven educators in Indianapolis, Indiana. ...


Service Fraternity: Alpha Phi Omega Alpha Phi Omega (commonly known as APO, but also ΑΦΩ, A-Phi-O, and A-Phi-Q) is a co-ed service fraternity organized to provide community service, leadership development, [1] and social opportunities to college students. ...


Music Sorority: Sigma Alpha Iota (SAI) Sigma Alpha Iota (ΣΑΙ) is a music fraternity for women. ...


Past Greek Organizations on Campus: Alpha Xi Delta, Chi Phi, Kappa Delta Rho,Rho Beta (local), Sigma Kappa, Theta Chi, Phi Kappa Rho (local) Alpha Xi Delta (ΑΞΔ) was founded in 1893 by ten women at Lombard College, Galesburg, Illinois, who shared a vision of an organization dedicated to the personal growth of women. ... The Chi Phi (ΧΦ) fraternity is an American college social fraternity founded in 1824 at Princeton University, in 1858 at the University of North Carolina, and in 1860 at Hobart College, making it the oldest social collegiate fraternity in history. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Sigma Kappa (ΣΚ) is a sorority founded in 1874 at Colby College in Waterville, Maine. ... Theta Chi (ΘΧ) is an international college fraternity for men. ...


Students and Faculty

Nearly 2,600 students (approximately one-half men and one-half women), representing 40 states and 35 foreign countries attend the college.


The college employs 180 full-time faculty, with 95% of the permanent faculty holding a doctorate or highest earned degree in their fields. The faculty includes noted Lincoln scholar Gabor S. Boritt, and the first double-Lincoln Prize lauereate, Allen Carl Guelzo, who directs the Civil War Era Studies program. The student/faculty ratio is 11:1, with an average class size of 18 students. The college hosts one of only 19 chapters of Phi Beta Kappa in Pennsylvania. The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an academic honor society with the mission of fostering and recognizing excellence in the undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ...


Athletics

Twenty-four sports programs, for both men and women, participate in NCAA Division III. Gettysburg has earned the distinction of having the best win/loss record in the Centennial Conference for the past 12 years. Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The Centennial Conference is an athletic conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. Member teams are located in Maryland and Pennsylvania. ...


The college also offers an extensive array of club, intramural, and recreational programs. Twenty-five percent of Gettysburg's students participate in intercollegiate programs, which include twelve sports for men and twelve sports for women.


"Loyalty Song"

Gettysburg College campus 4 November 2001

Gettysburg College campus
4 November 2001 Image File history File linksMetadata Gettysburg_College_campus. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Gettysburg_College_campus. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...

Fair Gettysburg our Alma Mater, hear us praise thy name,
We'll ever lend our hearts and hands to help increase thy fame.
The honor of old Gettysburg calls forth our loyalty.
So cheer (Rah! Rah!) old G'burg's Bullets on to victory!

However, another rendition exists with a few differences:

Hail Gettysburg our Alma Mater, help us praise thy name.
We'll ever lend our hearts and hands to help increase thy fame.
The honor of old Gettysburg calls forth our loyalty,
So cheer (Rah! Rah!) our G'burg Bullets on to fight for victory!

Notable alumni

James Glenn Beall James Glenn Beall (b. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Carol Bellamy, (born January 14, 1942), is the President and CEO of World Learning, and President of its School for International Training. ... New York City Hall The New York City Council is the lawmaking body of the City of New York. ... UNICEF Logo The United Nations Childrens Fund or UNICEF (Arabic: ; French: ; Spanish: ) was established by the United Nations General Assembly on December 11, 1946. ... J. Michael Bishop (born February 22, 1936) is an American immunologist and microbiologist who won the 1989 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Cancer research is research into cancer in order to identify causes and develop strategies for prevention, diagnosis, treatments and cure. ... Roanoke College is an independent, four-year, private, coeducational, liberal-arts college affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. ... Nathanial Neiman Craley, Jr. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Fred Fisher Fielding (born March 21, 1939) was selected on January 8, 2007 by President of the United States George W. Bush to replace outgoing White House Counsel Harriet Miers. ... The White House Counsel is a staff appointee of the President of the United States. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks, including preparedness for and the immediate response... Bruce Scott Gordon (born February 15, 1946) is an African American business executive who spent most of his career with Verizon and currently serves as a corporate director of CBS. He was selected in June 2005 to head the NAACP, a major American civil rights organization. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is one of the oldest and most influential hate organizations in the United States. ... Herman Haupt Herman Haupt (March 26, 1817 – December 14, 1905) was an American civil engineer and railroad construction engineer and executive. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Carson Lee Kressley (born November 11, 1969 in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania) is the fashion expert on the American television program Queer Eye, where he is one of the shows Fab Five members. ... Queer Eye (originally Queer Eye for the Straight Guy)[1] is an hour-long American Emmy award-winning television series that premiered on the Bravo cable television network on July 15, 2003, and promptly became both a surprise hit and one of the most talked-about television programs of 2003. ... George M. Leader (born January 17, 1918) was the governor of Pennsylvania from January 18, 1955 until January 20, 1959. ... This is a list of Governors of Pennsylvania. ... Ronald Ernest Ron Paul (b. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on December 11, 1971. ... Jeffrey Piccola is member of the Pennsylvania State Senate, representing the 15th State Senate District. ... The Pennsylvania State Senate is the upper house of the Pennsylvania General Assembly, the legislative branch of Pennsylvania government. ... In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ... Lieutenant General Keller E. Rockey (22 September 1888 – 6 June 1970) commanded the Fifth Marine Division in the battle of Iwo Jima in World War II and the Third Amphibious Corps during the occupation of North China following the war. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... The 5th Marine Division of the United States Marine Corps was created during World War II for the Battle of Iwo Jima and the planned invasion of the Japanese home islands. ... Combatants  United States  Empire of Japan Commanders Holland Smith Tadamichi Kuribayashi â€  Strength 110,000 21,000 Casualties 6,821 dead 19,189 wounded,[1] 494 missing[1] Total: 26,504 20,703 dead,[1] 216 captured[1] Total: 20,919 yeah it was touching. ... Jerry Spinelli (b. ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the outstanding American book for children. ... Maniac Magee is a novel written by Jerry Spinelli and was published in 1990. ... This article is about the World War II nuclear project. ... Major General Charles Andrew Willoughby (March 8, 1892-October 25th, 1972) was a Major General in the U.S. Army, serving as General Douglas MacArthurs Chief of Intelligence during most of WWII and the Korean Conflict. ... This article is about the American general; for the municipality in the Philippines, see General MacArthur, Eastern Samar. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Military Intelligence Hall of Fame is a Hall of Fame established by the Military Intelligence Corps of the U.S. Army to honor soldiers and civilians who have made exceptional contributions to Military Intelligence. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ...

Civil War History activities

Due to its close relationship to a crucial battle in the American Civil War, Gettysburg College hosts a number of activities and awards: Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...

  • In 1982, professor and historian Gabor Boritt founded the Civil War Institute, which hosts annual seminars and tours on Civil War themes. Scholarships are granted to high school students and history teachers to attend the week-long summer event.
  • Since 1998, the Gettysburg Semester, a semester-long immersion in Civil War academic study has been offered.
  • Gettysburg College students may elect to pursue a unique interdisciplinary minor in Civil War Era Studies. Requirements include a general introduction course about the Civil War and a capstone senior-level seminar. Students must also select four classes of at least two disciplines. Some of the classes offered include (but are not limited to): military history, Economics of the American South, Civil War Literature, films about the Civil War, and Gender Ideology in the Civil War.
  • The Lincoln Prize has been awarded annually since 1991 for the best non-fiction historical work of the year on the Civil War.

Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Lincoln Prize has been awarded annually since 1991 by Gettysburg College for the best non-fiction historical work of the year on the American Civil War. ... Michael Shaara Michael Shaara (June 23, 1928 - May 5, 1988) was a writer of science fiction, sports fiction, and historical fiction. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Killer Angels front cover The Killer Angels (1974) is a historical novel by Michael Shaara that was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1975. ...

Trivia

  • Seven years after Gettysburg College was first founded, it established a medical school, which was located in Philadelphia. The college was forced to close the medical school in 1861, when southern students withdrew, leaving it without adequate revenue.
  • Partly due to the role the college played during the Battle of Gettysburg, numerous legends about haunted buildings exist. One building, Pennsylvania Hall, was on an episode of Unsolved Mysteries and is featured on the Ghosts of Gettysburg tour for this reason. Other buildings also have been featured in documentaries shown on The History Channel and other outlets.
  • One of the most famous of these spurious "ghost stories" is that of "Blue Boy". This is supposedly the ghost of a young boy who froze to death on a window ledge.
  • Among the other tales is that of "The General," a Civil War era officer who appears on Kline Stage in Brua Hall (the former chapel).
  • The college dining center is still referred to by students and faculty as Servo, after a now defunct 1980s food service company, Servomation.
  • Stine Lake, a location on the Gettysburg College campus, is not a lake, but rather a quad located outside the library. Prior to Musselman Library being built in the late 1970s, and due to Gettysburg's wet climate and drainage issues, the quad and library site would be prone to accumulating water, creating a large, muddy "lake" of sorts. Today, however, Stine Lake does not flood, but the name has stuck, to the confusion of first-year students.
  • By Congressional decree, a Civil War era flag (for the year 1863) flies above Pennsylvania Hall (Old Dorm) at Gettysburg College. This building, occupied by both sides at various points of the Battle of Gettysburg, served as a lookout and battlefield hospital.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Unsolved Mysteries is an American television program that was hosted and narrated by Robert Stack. ... For the Canadian equivalent of this channel, see History Television. ...

References

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Gettysburg College

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Gettysburg College - About the College (265 words)
Gettysburg College engages highly motivated students in a comprehensive educational experience that prepares them for lives of personal fulfillment, career success, and responsible, engaged citizenship.
Ranked consistently in the top tier of the nation's liberal arts colleges, Gettysburg is a diverse, intentional community of students and educators, where everyone's contributions invigorate the educational atmosphere and define the life of the college.
Gettysburg College champions independent thinking and public action, and our students graduate with a love of learning, with the knowledge and skills they need for success, and with new insight into the world, their place in it, and their obligations to it.
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