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Encyclopedia > Gertrude Lawrence
Gertrude Lawrence

Birth name Gertrude Alexandria Dagmar Lawrence-Klasen
Born July 4, 1898(1898-07-04)
London, England
Died September 6, 1952 (aged 54) (aged 54)
New York City, New York, USA
Spouse(s) Francis Gordon-Howley (1924-1927)
Richard Aldrich (1940-1952)

Gertrude Lawrence (July 4, 1898 - September 6, 1952) was an actress and musical performer popular in the 1930s and 1940s, appearing on stage in London and on Broadway, and in several films. She is particularly associated with the light comedy of Noel Coward. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York redirects here. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ... The Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical is awarded to the actress who was voted as the best actress in a musical, whether a new production or a revival. ... The King and I is a musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, with a script based on the book Anna and the King of Siam by Margaret Landon. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Noël Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973) was an Academy Award winning English actor, playwright, and composer of popular music. ...


She was born Gertrude Alexandria Dagmar Lawrence-Klasen, of English and Danish extraction, in London, England, and was a professional performer by the age of ten. She was sent to Catholic convent schools and attended the Italia Conti Academy, presumably to keep her out of trouble. She understudied Beatrice Lillie in the Andre Charlot London revues in the 1920s. In the 1921 revue "A to Z", she co-introduced with Jack Buchanan Furber and Braham's "Limehouse Blues." She achieved stardom when the revues were brought to Broadway in 1924 and 1926. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Italia Conti Academy is Britains oldest theatre arts training school. ... Bea Lillie (May 29, 1894 – January 20, 1989) was a comic actress. ... Jack Buchanan (April 2, 1891 - October 20, 1957) was a British actor and singer. ...


Gertrude Lawrence was one of the foremost comediennes of her day, capable of playing both slapstick clowns and elegant ladies. Her great charisma is attested to by those who saw her on stage, but her films struggle to convey her charm. The only one of her movies in which she acted alongside stars whom most people recognize today was a poorly made Hollywood treatment of Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie. The film, featuring the ensemble cast of Lawrence, Kirk Douglas and Jane Wyman, failed at the box office. Lawrence's charisma and energy are more evident, albeit for just a few minutes, in Stage Door Canteen in which a Hollywood studio recreated the New York nightclub where World War II soldiers danced with famous actresses and enjoyed all-star entertainment. In the uncut DVD version of the film that runs two hours and 15 minutes, unique musical talent is displayed by Gertrude Lawrence, Al Jolson, Peggy Lee, Benny Goodman and many others who make the silly plot unimportant. A comedian (also comedienne, female) is a person who attempts to make people laugh through a variety of methods, normally through joke telling. ... Thomas Lanier Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983), better known by the pseudonym Tennessee Williams, was a major American playwright and one of the prominent playwrights of the twentieth century. ... The Glass Menagerie is a play by Tennessee Williams. ... Kirk Douglas (born Issur Danielovitch Demsky December 9, 1916) is an iconic American actor and film producer known for his gravelly voice and his recurring roles as the kinds of characters Douglas himself once described as sons of bitches. He is also father to Hollywood actor and producer Michael Douglas. ... Jane Wyman (January 5, 1917[1]– September 10, 2007) was an Oscar, Golden Globe-winning and Emmy-nominated American actress. ... Stage Door Canteen is a 1943 film. ... Al Jolson was a highly acclaimed American singer, comedian and actor of Jewish heritage whose career lasted from 1911 until his death in 1950. ... Peggy Lee (May 26, 1920 – January 21, 2002) was an American jazz and traditional pop singer and songwriter and Oscar-nominated performer. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

Personal Life And Activities During World War II

Lawrence married Francis Gordon-Howley, a director in the theaters of London's West End, during World War I, and they divorced in 1928, having had one daughter, Pamela (1918-2005). In 1928, she announced her engagement to Bertrand L. Taylor Jr., a New York stockbroker but the marriage was eventually called off. Lawrence then married Richard Aldrich, an American legitimate theater owner and producer from a blueblood family in Massachusetts, on July 4, 1940, and they remained married until her death. A Harvard graduate, he became a naval officer during World War II, during which time Lawrence became one of the most active entertainers at the club portrayed in the Hollywood film Stage Door Canteen and at many other venues for enlisted men all over the world, including the South Pacific. The couple spent a lot of time apart, but Gertrude enjoyed sending Richard telegrams from thousands of miles away. // West End most commonly refers to: West End of London West End theatre West End may also refer to: West End, Queensland in Brisbane West End, Queensland (Townsville) in Townsville West End, Vancouver of Vancouver, British Columbia West End of New Westminster, in British Columbia West End, Winnipeg of Winnipeg... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Stage Door Canteen is a 1943 film. ...


In addition to an affair with film star Douglas Fairbanks Jr., she also allegedly had lesbian affairs, including possible ones with the British novelist Dame Daphne du Maurier, and with Beatrice Lillie who, when referring to Lawrence, said: "I knew her better than her husband." Du Maurier's passionate letters about Lawrence were published in a 1993 biography of du Maurier, who long outlasted her one-time love interest but died four years before the relationship was made public. Lawrence also appears to have had a much earlier affair with du Maurier's own father, Sir Gerald du Maurier; in fact, Daphne du Maurier referred to Lawrence as "the last of Daddy's actress loves." Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. ... Dame Daphne du Maurier DBE (13 May 1907–19 April 1989) was a famous British novelist best known for her short story The Birds and her classic novel Rebecca, published in 1938. ... Bea Lillie (May 29, 1894 – January 20, 1989) was a comic actress. ... Sir Gerald Hubert Edward Busson du Maurier (March 26, 1873–April 11, 1934) was a British actor and manager. ...


Only Lawrence's two marriages were reported by newspapers and magazines during her lifetime. Her affairs with the du Maurier family and with Beatrice Lillie were not even hinted at by journalists. They were known only to a few people until many decades later. And a best-selling posthumous biography by her widower Richard Aldrich, which is known to have been read by Marilyn Monroe [1] and other stars, he gives no hint as to whether he ever suspected her of infidelity with either sex. One year after the 1954 publication of his book he remarried and moved to Spain, where he became the minister of the Embassy for Economic Affairs for that country's government. From 1962 to 1965 he held a U.S. government post in Morocco. [2] Thereafter, Aldrich, his second wife and four children (none of them from Lawrence) moved to Charlottesville, Virginia, where there is no record of anyone interviewing him about his legendary first wife before his death in 1986. Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson; June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe award winning American actress, model and sex symbol. ... Charlottesville is an independent city located within the confines of Albemarle County in the Commonwealth of Virginia, United States, and named after Princess Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the wife of King George III of England. ...


Legendary Performances

Lawrence's onstage persona inspired composers and writers. George and Ira Gershwin wrote the musical Oh, Kay! for her, which included the well-loved song "Someone to Watch Over Me." She was the first British actress to have a lead role on Broadway. Cole Porter wrote Nymph Errant for her to star in, and it opened in London in 1933. Noel Coward wrote Private Lives and Tonight at 8:30 (a cycle of nine one-act musicals and plays) for her. She starred as Liza Elliot in Moss Hart, Kurt Weill, and Ira Gershwin's psychoanalytical musical Lady in the Dark (played in the film version by Ginger Rogers). “Gershwin” redirects here. ... Ira Gershwin (6 December 1896 – 17 August 1983) was an American lyricist who collaborated with his younger brother, composer George Gershwin, to create some of the most memorable songs of the 20th century. ... Oh, Kay! is a Broadway musical with book by Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse, lyrics by Ira Gershwin and music by George Gershwin. ... Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Peru, Indiana. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Private Lives is a play written by Noel Coward in 1930. ... Tonight at 8:30 (1936) is a unique cycle of short plays by Noel Coward, the first production of which was a bold experiment in the history of theatre. ... Moss Hart (October 24, 1904 – December 20, 1961) was an American playwright and director of plays and musical theater. ... Kurt Julian Weill (March 2, 1900 – April 3, 1950), born in Dessau, Germany and died in New York City, was a German and in his later years, a German-American composer active from the 1920s until his death. ... Ira Gershwin (6 December 1896 – 17 August 1983) was an American lyricist who collaborated with his younger brother, composer George Gershwin, to create some of the most memorable songs of the 20th century. ... Lady in the Dark was a Broadway musical written by Kurt Weill (music), Ira Gershwin (lyrics), and Moss Hart (book and direction). ... Ginger Rogers (July 16, 1911 – April 25, 1995) was an Academy Award-winning American film and stage actress and singer. ...


In her 1976 memoir My Heart Belongs, Mary Martin recalled going out with Lawrence and a group to a New York nightclub in the late 1940s. Martin described her as "a star with a capital 'S' of whom I was in awe." Mary Virginia Martin (b. ...


In 1946 Lawrence saw the film version of the book Anna and the King of Siam, which she decided would make a perfect musical. She persuaded the American team of Rodgers and Hammerstein to write it for her. The result was The King and I, which introduced such memorable songs as: "Hello Young Lovers," "Getting to Know You" and "Shall We Dance." Anna and the King of Siam is a 1944 book by Margaret Landon, a play and a 1946 movie directed by John Cromwell. ... This article is about the American composer. ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... The King and I is a musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, with a script based on the book Anna and the King of Siam by Margaret Landon. ...


The King and I opened on Broadway in 1951, with Lawrence in the role of Anna and became her greatest success. Also that year she received the prestigious "Woman of the Year" award from Harvard University's famed performance troupe, the Hasty Pudding Theatricals. In 1952, she won the Tony Award for Best Actress for her role as Anna Leonowens. From the fall of 1950 to the spring of 1952 she was a professor of theater at Columbia University. Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Hasty Pudding Theatricals, known informally simply as The Pudding, is a theatrical student society at Harvard University, known for its burlesque musicals and for its status as the oldest collegiate theatrical organization in the United States. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Alma Mater Columbia University in the City of New York is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ...


Unexpected Death And Funeral

Lawrence died of liver cancer, which caused her to suffer jaundice, in what was then New York Hospital, today known as Weill Medical Center, at the age of 54. The hospital, located on York Avenue, was a mile away from her home, which was on Manhattan's East 54th Street. Newspapers reported incorrectly that she was 52 and that her cancer was confined to the liver. The ex - husband of her daughter Pamela was a doctor whom Lawrence's husband Richard Aldrich summoned by telephone to her bedside. The former son-in-law said more than 25 years later that her cancer had spread considerably, but nobody knew that until an autopsy was performed. The hospital staff, knowing she had performed in The King and I less than three weeks earlier, expected her to recover. [3] Over many years Gertrude Lawrence was known to suffer bouts of severe illnesses, including pleurisy, that contrasted with her high energy level and optimistic attitude. Her mental condition was never affected. Her former son-in-law recalled that moments before her death she opened her eyes and seemed puzzled as to why he was standing at her bedside. Lawrence did not realize that, though he was divorced from Pamela, his office was across the street from the hospital and Richard had telephoned him at home minutes earlier begging him to hurry to her bedside. Before the hospital staff could transfer her to intensive care, Lawrence suddenly entered a coma in the "big private room" where she had been confined for almost three weeks. Pamela's ex - husband and other doctors and nurses "managed to get [Lawrence] out of shock," she opened her eyes, seemed puzzled by his presence and then she died. [4] Hepatic tumors are tumors or growths on or in the liver (medical terms pertaining to the liver often start in hepato- or hepatic from the Greek word for liver, hepar). ... The Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College is the medical school and biomedical research unit of Cornell University. ... The King and I is a musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, with a script based on the book Anna and the King of Siam by Margaret Landon. ... Pleurisy, also known as pleuritis, is an inflammation of the pleura, the lining of the pleural cavity surrounding the lungs, which can cause painful respiration and other symptoms. ...


Gertrude Lawrence's funeral was described by the New York Times as follows. "Five thousand persons jammed the area of Fifth Avenue and Fifty-fifth Street yesterday [Tuesday, Sept. 9] as 1,800 others filled the flower-banked auditorium of the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church for the funeral of Gertrude Lawrence." [5] The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


In the eulogy he delivered, Oscar Hammerstein II quoted from an essay on death written by the poet / novelist Rabindranath Tagore. [6] The 1,800 inside the church included Yul Brynner, her co-star in The King And I, many child actors who played the Siamese king's children, John Davis Lodge, who was then governor of Connecticut, Marlene Dietrich, Tom Ewell, Phil Silvers, Luise Rainer, Moss Hart and his wife Kitty Carlisle. Daphne du Maurier was not in the long list of attendees reported by the Times. [7] Lawrence was buried in her champagne - colored "Shall We Dance?" gown from the second act of The King and I in the Aldrich plot belonging to her husband Richard's family in Lakeview Cemetery in Upton, Massachusetts. It is near the Cape Playhouse theater owned by Richard where she had often performed and where they had strolled together in the nearby streets of Dennis, Massachusetts. This theater is the oldest summer theater in the United States. In his posthumous biography of his wife, Richard Aldrich claimed she was always nice to townspeople who recognized her in Dennis, and he included a photograph of her wearing sunglasses chatting with a passerby. [8] For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... (Bengali: , IPA: ) (7 May 1861 – 7 August 1941), also known by the sobriquet Gurudev, was a Bengali poet, Brahmo Samaj philosopher, visual artist, playwright, novelist, and composer whose works reshaped Bengali literature and music in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... Yul Brynner (July 11, 1920[1] – October 10, 1985) was a Russian-born Broadway and Academy Award-winning Hollywood actor. ... John Davis Lodge (October 20, 1903 – October 29, 1985) was a Republican, was governor of Connecticut from 1951 to 1955. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer, and entertainer. ... Tom Ewell ( April 29, 1909 – September 12, 1994) was an American actor. ... Phil Silvers (May 11, 1911 – November 1, 1985) was an American entertainer and comedy actor. ... Luise Rainer in The Great Ziegfeld (1936) Luise Rainer (born January 12, 1910 in either Düsseldorf, Germany or Vienna, Austria) is a two-time Academy Award-winning film actress. ... Moss Hart (October 24, 1904 – December 20, 1961) was an American playwright and director of plays and musical theater. ... Kitty Carlisle in Die Fledermaus, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Kitty Carlisle Hart (b. ... The King and I is a musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, with a script based on the book Anna and the King of Siam by Margaret Landon. ... Upton is a town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, United States. ... Nickname: none Official website: http://www. ...


Legacy

In early 1953, Lawrence's name was on a list of Columbia University professors who had died the previous year and were honored with a memorial service and flags on the campus lowered to half-staff. Another professor on the list was John Dewey, the philosopher and educational reformer. [9] John Dewey (October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer, whose thoughts and ideas have been greatly influential in the United States and around the world. ...


In the biographical 1968 film, Star!, loosely based on her life, Lawrence was portrayed by Julie Andrews. Richard Crenna played the part of Richard Aldrich while the real Richard worked as a consultant on the movie. It is possible that the poor quality of Star! had something to do with younger generations knowing nothing about Gertrude Lawrence. She has never been the subject of the Biography (TV series) on the A&E Network. Ironically, The Paley Center for Media has kinescopes and written research material proving that Lawrence was one of the very first stars of either Broadway or Hollywood to appear on the new medium of television. As far back as 1938, when television broadcasting was limited to New York City and only a few hundred people owned TV sets, Lawrence took a night off from performing Susan and God to a packed Broadway audience so that she could broadcast some scenes from this play inside a primitive TV studio. When TV broadcasting resumed after World War II and spread with the networks, Lawrence made some live appearances in 1950 and 1951, including The Ed Sullivan Show. Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... Richard Donald Crenna (November 30, 1926 - January 17, 2003) was an American actor. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Biography is a documentary television program. ... Biography is one of A&Es longest-running and most popular programs. ... The Paley Center for Media, New York City The Paley Center for Media, Beverly Hills The Paley Center for Media (formerly The Museum of Television & Radio (MTR), formerly The Museum of Broadcasting), founded in 1975 by William S. Paley, is a cultural institution dedicated to the discussion of the cultural... The term kinescope originally referred to a type of early television picture tube. ... The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948 to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by former entertainment columnist Ed Sullivan. ...


Her face and voice rarely have crossed the television airwaves or cable wires since her death. In 1992, the American Movie Classics basic cable channel revived a 1950 film version of The Glass Menagerie in which Lawrence played Amanda Wingfield to Jane Wyman's Laura and Kirk Douglas' "Gentleman Caller." Scholars of the legendary Tennessee Williams play that inspired this movie have castigated the Warner Brothers studio for substituting an inane happy ending for Williams' sad, realistic one. Although they also have criticized Warners for miscasting Lawrence, it is a fact that immediately after the film wrapped she was offered, but turned down, the role of Margo Channing in All About Eve that instead went to Bette Davis, enhancing her career enormously. [10] Posterity's lack of familiarity with the name Gertrude Lawrence has taken its toll. It is interesting to note that the Paley Center has a videocassette of a 1978 telecast of the syndicated talk show Dinah! on which Chicago newspaper columnist Irv Kupcinet recalls how Lawrence enhanced considerably the popularity of the landmark The Pump Room, Chicago, yet her name is not one of the hundreds he mentioned in his 1988 autobiography. [11] AMC was originally a basic cable channel that aired classic movies, largely pre-1950s, in a commercial-free, generally unedited format. ... Jane Wyman (January 5, 1917[1]– September 10, 2007) was an Oscar, Golden Globe-winning and Emmy-nominated American actress. ... Kirk Douglas (born Issur Danielovitch Demsky December 9, 1916) is an iconic American actor and film producer known for his gravelly voice and his recurring roles as the kinds of characters Douglas himself once described as sons of bitches. He is also father to Hollywood actor and producer Michael Douglas. ... Warner Bros. ... For other uses, see All About Eve (disambiguation). ... For the singer, see Betty Davis, for the meteorologist, see Betty Davis (meteorologist). ... Dinah! (called Dinah & Friends from 1979-1980) was a daytime talk show hosted by singer and actress Dinah Shore, which aired in American syndication markets from its premiere on September 9, 1974 until the summer of 1980. ... Irv Kupcinet (July 31, 1912-November 10, 2003) was a Chicago Sun-Times columnist and broadcast personality based in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Pump Room, established in 1938 by Ernie Byfield, is a restaurant located in Chicagos Gold Coast area. ...


Lawrence's grandson is Benn Clatworthy, a jazz saxophonist born in England after Lawrence died. The son of Pamela and her second husband, Clatworthy performs often at jazz clubs in his home base of Los Angeles. (Pamela's first husband was the New York doctor whom she divorced a few years before he coincidentally treated Gertrude Lawrence at the very end of her life in the hospital.)


Broadway

Awards
Preceded by
Ethel Merman
for Call Me Madam
Tony Award for Best Leading Actress in a Musical
1952
for The King and I
Succeeded by
Rosalind Russell
for Wonderful Town

Oh, Kay! is a Broadway musical with book by Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse, lyrics by Ira Gershwin and music by George Gershwin. ... Private Lives is a play written by Noel Coward in 1930. ... Tonight at 8:30 (1936) is a unique cycle of short plays by Noel Coward, the first production of which was a bold experiment in the history of theatre. ... Hands Across the Sea is a patriotic/military march composed in 1899 by John Philip Sousa. ... Chinese Shadow Theatre figures Shadow play (Chinese: 皮影戏, pi ying xi) is an ancient form of storytelling and entertainment using opaque, often articulated figures in front of an illuminated backdrop to create the illusion of moving images. ... Ways and Means may refer to: Committee of Ways and Means of the UK parliament United States House Committee on Ways and Means Ways and Means, an episode of The West Wing This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Family Album is the name of a Danielle Steel romance novel and of a TV movie based on it. ... A still life is a work of art which represents a subject composed of inanimate objects. ... Susan and God is a 1940 comedy-drama film made by MGM. It was directed by George Cukor and produced by Hunt Stromberg from a screenplay by Anita Loos based on the play by Rachel Crothers. ... Binomial name Alauda arvensis Linnaeus, 1758 The Skylark (Alauda arvensis) is a small passerine bird. ... Lady in the Dark was a Broadway musical written by Kurt Weill (music), Ira Gershwin (lyrics), and Moss Hart (book and direction). ... Play cover, depicting Mrs Campbell as Eliza Pygmalion (1913) is a play by George Bernard Shaw based on Ovids tale of Pygmalion. ... The King and I is a musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, with a script based on the book Anna and the King of Siam by Margaret Landon. ... Ethel Merman (January 16, 1908 – February 15, 1984) was a Tony Award winning star of stage and film musicals, well known for her powerful voice and vocal range. ... Call Me Madam is one of Irving Berlins last musical comedies. ... The Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical is awarded to the actress who was voted as the best actress in a musical, whether a new production or a revival. ... The King and I is a musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, with a script based on the book Anna and the King of Siam by Margaret Landon. ... Rosalind Russell (June 4, 1907 – November 28, 1976) was a four-time Academy Award nominated and Tony Award winning American film and stage actress, perhaps best known for her role as a fast-talking newspaper reporter in the Howard Hawks screwball comedy His Girl Friday. ... Logo for the 2003 Broadway revival of Wonderful Town Wonderful Town is a musical with lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green and music by Leonard Bernstein. ...

Films

Rex Harrison and Claudette Colbert in a publicity photo for the 1985 Broadway revival Arent We All? is a play by Frederick Lonsdale. ... The name Mimi has a number of uses: Mimi Rogers, an American actress Mimi Miyagi, an adult film actress. ... Catherine II (Екатерина II Алексеевна: Yekaterína II Alekséyevna, April 21, 1729 - November 6, 1796), born Sophie Augusta Fredericka, known as Catherine the Great, reigned as empress of Russia from... The Glass Menagerie is a play by Tennessee Williams. ...

References

  1. ^ Pages 59 - 60 in Randall Riese and Neal Hitchens, The Unabridged Marilyn: Her Life From A To Z. New York: Congdon and Weed, 1987 (hardback edition).
  2. ^ Page About Richard Aldrich In A Web Site On Theatrical Figures.
  3. ^ Pages 197 - 198 in hardback edition of Sheridan Morley, Gertrude Lawrence: A Biography. New York: McGraw Hill, 1981
  4. ^ Pages 197 - 198 in hardback edition of Sheridan Morley, Gertrude Lawrence: A Biography. New York: McGraw Hill, 1981
  5. ^ New York Times edition of Wednesday, September 10, 1952, page 29
  6. ^ New York Times edition of Wednesday, September 10, 1952, page 29
  7. ^ New York Times edition of Wednesday, September 10, 1952, page 29
  8. ^ Richard Aldrich, Gertrude Lawrence As Mrs. A. New York: Greystone Press, 1954
  9. ^ New York Times edition of January 19, 1953, page 27
  10. ^ Richard Aldrich, Gertrude Lawrence As Mrs. A. New York: Greystone Press, 1954
  11. ^ The Dinah! broadcast appeared in various American cities and towns on different dates in 1978. The Paley Center for Media lists Wednesday, March 15, 1978 as the date it aired on KCST Channel 39 in San Diego. The Kupcinet autobiography that omits Gertrude Lawrence entirely is titled Kup: A Man, An Era, A City. Chicago: Bonus Books, 1988.

The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Dinah! (called Dinah & Friends from 1979-1980) was a daytime talk show hosted by singer and actress Dinah Shore, which aired in American syndication markets from its premiere on September 9, 1974 until the summer of 1980. ... The Paley Center for Media, New York City The Paley Center for Media, Beverly Hills The Paley Center for Media (formerly The Museum of Television & Radio (MTR), formerly The Museum of Broadcasting), founded in 1975 by William S. Paley, is a cultural institution dedicated to the discussion of the cultural...

External links

  • Gertrude Lawrence's Internet Broadway Database page
  • Gertrude Lawrence's Internet Movie Database page

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gertrude Lawrence - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (520 words)
Gertrude Lawrence (June 4, 1898 - September 6, 1952) was an actress and musical performer popular in the 1930s and 1940s, appearing on stage in London and on Broadway, and in several films.
She was born Gertrude Alexandria Dagmar Lawrence-Klasen, of English and Danish extraction, in London, England, and was a professional performer by the age of ten.
Lawrence died of liver cancer, which caused her to suffer jaundice, in New York, New York at the age of only 54, and she was buried in her pink "Shall We Dance?" gown from the second act of The King and I, in Lakeview Cemetery, in Upton, Massachusetts.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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