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Encyclopedia > Gerry Conway
Gerry Conway
Birth name Gerard F. Conway
Born September 10, 1952 (1952-09-10) (age 54)
New York City, New York
Nationality American
Area(s) Writer
Notable works Punisher

Gerard F. "Gerry" Conway (September 10, 1952 - ) is an American writer of comic books and television shows. He is best known for co-creating the Marvel Comics vigilante The Punisher (with artist Ross Andru) and scripting the death of the character Gwen Stacy during his long run on The Amazing Spider-Man. He is also known for co-creating the DC Comics superhero Firestorm (with artist Al Milgrom), and for scripting the first major, modern-day intercompany crossover, Superman vs. the Amazing Spider-Man. September 10 is the 253rd day of the Gregorian calendar (254th in leap years). ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... New York, NY redirects here. ... NY redirects here. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the Gregorian calendar (254th in leap years). ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The term writer can apply to anyone who creates a written work, but the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Marvel Comics (Stan Lee is behind many of the superheros) is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... The Punisher is a fictional vigilante and anti-hero in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practising the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... Cover of The Amazing Spider-Man #136 pencilled by Andru. ... Gwendolyne Gwen Stacy[1] is a fictional character that has been a supporting character in Marvel Comics’ Spider-Man series. ... The Amazing Spider-Man is the title of a comic book published by Marvel Comics, a television program and a daily newspaper comic strip. ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... For the Aqua Teen Hunger Force episode, see Super Hero (Aqua Teen Hunger Force episode). ... Firestorm is a DC Comics superhero. ... Cover to West Coast Avengers #1, Art by Milgrom Allen Al Milgrom is an American comic book writer, penciller, inker and editor. ... In comic books, an intercompany crossover (also called cross-company or company crossover) is a comic or series of comics where characters published by one company meet those published by another (for example, DC Comics Superman meeting Marvels Spider-Man). ...

Contents

Biography

Early career

The Amazing Spider-Man #121: "The Night Gwen Stacy Died". Cover art by John Romita Sr.
The Amazing Spider-Man #121: "The Night Gwen Stacy Died". Cover art by John Romita Sr.

Born in New York City, New York, United States, Conway published his first professional comic-book work while still in his mid-teens,[1] with the 6 1/2-page horror story "Aaron Philips' Photo Finish" in DC Comics' House of Secrets #81 (Sept. 1969). He continued selling such anthological stories for that series and for Marvel's Chamber of Darkness and Tower of Shadows through the end of 1970, by which time he had also published one-page, text short stories in DC's All-Star Western #1 (Sept. 1970) and Super DC Giant #S-14 (Oct. 1970). He published his first continuing-character story in DC's semi-anthological occult comic The Phantom Stranger #10 (Dec. 1970). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (498x757, 104 KB)Cover to The Amazing Spider-Man #121, June, 1973. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (498x757, 104 KB)Cover to The Amazing Spider-Man #121, June, 1973. ... John Romita, Sr. ... New York, NY redirects here. ... NY redirects here. ... Horror fiction is, broadly, fiction in any medium intended to scare, unsettle, or horrify the reader. ... The House of Secrets #92 (July 1971), introducing Swamp Thing. ... An anthology, literally a garland or collection of flowers, is a collection of literary works, originally of poems, but in recent years its usage has broadened to be applied to collections of short stories and comic strips. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The word occult comes from the Latin occultus (clandestine, hidden, secret), referring to knowledge of the hidden. In the medical sense it is used commonly to refer to a structure or process that is hidden, e. ... The Phantom Stranger is a fictional character of unspecified paranormal origins who battles mysterious and occult forces in various titles published by DC Comics, sometimes under their Vertigo imprint. ...


His first continuing-character story for Marvel quickly followed, with his script for the Tarzanesque Ka-Zar in Astonishing Tales #3 (Dec. 1970). Conway's first superhero story, in Daredevil Vol. 1, #72 (Jan. 1971) quickly led to assignments on Iron Man, The Incredible Hulk, and both "The Inhumans" and "The Black Widow" features in the split book Amazing Adventures. Conway would eventually script virtually every major Marvel title, as well as co-create (with writers Roy & Dann Thomas and artist Mike Ploog) the lycanthropic lead character of the feature "Werewolf by Night", in Marvel Spotlight #2 (Feb. 1972); and write the premiere issue of Marvel's Tomb of Dracula, introducing the longstanding literary vampire into the Marvel universe. He scripted the first Man-Thing story, in 1971, sharing co-creation credit with Stan Lee and Roy Thomas. James H. Pierce and Joan Burroughs Pierce starred in the 1932-34 Tarzan radio series Tarzan, a character created by Edgar Rice Burroughs, first appeared in the 1914 novel Tarzan of the Apes, and then in twenty-three sequels. ... Ka-Zar (pronounced KAY-sar) is the name of two jungle-dwelling fictional characters, both published by Marvel Comics. ... Astonishing Tales was the name of an anthology comic book series published by Marvel Comics from 1970-1976. ... This article is about the Marvel Comics superhero. ... Iron Man (Anthony Tony Edward Stark) is a fictional comic-book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... The Inhumans are a fictional race of superhumans in the Marvel Comics Universe, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. ... The Black Widow is the name of two fictional superspy characters in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Amazing Adventures is the name of several anthology-format comic book series, all but one published by Marvel Comics. ... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... The Eisneresque Topaz: Splash panel, Werewolf by Night #13 (Jan. ... In folklore, lycanthropy is the ability or power of a human being to undergo transformation into a wolf. ... Tomb of Dracula is a horror comic book published by Marvel Comics from April 1972 to August 1979. ... Vampires are mythological or folkloric beings that subsist on human and/or animal lifeforce. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Man-Thing is a fictional comic book creature created by Stan Lee, Roy Thomas and Gerry Conway, and featured in various Marvel Comics titles, the most prominent of which was written by Steve Gerber. ... Stan Lee (born Stanley Martin Lieber on December 28, 1922[1] New York, New York) is an American writer, editor, Chairman Emeritus of Marvel Comics, and memoirist, who — with several artist co-creators, most notably Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko — introduced complex, naturalistic characters and a thoroughly shared universe into... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ...


Superman and Spider-Man

Superman vs. the Amazing Spider-Man (1976), cover art by Carmine Infantino, Ross Andru & Dick Giordano

At 19, Conway began scripting The Amazing Spider-Man, one of Marvel's flagship titles. His run, from issues #111-149 (Aug. 1972 - Oct. 1975), included the landmark death of Gwen Stacy story in #121 (June 1973). Eight issues later, Conway and Andru introduced the Punisher as a conflicted antagonist for Spider-Man. The character went on to become a popular star of numerous comic books and to be adapted into two movies. Conway additionally scripted Marvel's other flagship, Fantastic Four, from #133-152 (April 1973 - Nov. 1974) Image File history File links Superman-spiderman. ... Image File history File links Superman-spiderman. ... Cover for Spider-Woman #8 (November 1978). ... Cover of The Amazing Spider-Man #136 pencilled by Andru. ... Richard Joseph Dick Giordano (born July 20, 1932) is an American comic book artist and editor best known for introducing Charlton Comics Action Heroes stable of superheroes, and serving as editor of then industry-leader DC Comics. ... Cover of graphic novel The Death of Gwen Stacy The Night Gwen Stacy Died is a famous story arc starring the Marvel Comics character Spider-Man, published in 1973. ... An antagonist is a character or group of characters, or, sometimes an institution of a happening who represents the opposition against which the hero(es) or protagonist(s) must contend. ... The Punisher (film) relates to either one of two films about Marvel Comics character, The Punisher: The Punisher (1989 film) The Punisher (2004 film) This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics first comic book superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ...


Conway succeeded Marv Wolfman as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics in mid-1976, but held the job only briefly, relinquishing the post before the year was out and succeeded in turn by Archie Goodwin. Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1, which was written by Wolfman. ... Editing may also refer to audio or film editing. ... Archie Goodwin (September 9, 1937 – February 28, 1998) was an American comic book writer, editor, and artist. ...


Conway returned to DC Comics in mid-1975, beginning with three books cover-dated Nov. 1975: Hercules Unbound #1, Kong the Untamed #3, and Swamp Thing #19. Shortly afterward, he was chosen by Marvel and DC editors to script the historic intercompany crossover Superman vs. the Amazing Spider-Man #1, a 96-page, tabloid-sized, $2 one-shot, at a time when comic books sold for 25 cents. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Heracles. ... Kong the Untamed is a 5 issues comic-book series created in 1975 by Jack Oleck (writer) and Alfredo Alcala (artist), and published by DC Comics. ... The Swamp Thing is a fictional character created by Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson for DC Comics, and featured in a long-running horror-fantasy comic book series of the same name. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Firestorm #1 (March 1978), cover art by Al Milgrom
Firestorm #1 (March 1978), cover art by Al Milgrom

He continued writing for DC, on titles including Superman, Detective Comics (starring Batman), Metal Men, Justice League of America, and that of the licensed character Tarzan, yet briefly returned to Marvel as editor in mid-1976. For a time, a confluence of publishing schedules resulted in Conway stories appearing in both Marvel and DC comics in the same month: The prolific Conway's comic books with January 1977 cover-dates alone, for example, are Marvel's The Avengers, The Defenders, Captain Marvel, Iron Man, The Spectacular Spider-Man and the premiere issues of Ms. Marvel and Logan's Run, and DC's flagships Superman and Action Comics (starring Superman). Cover to Firestorm #1 File links The following pages link to this file: Firestorm (comics) ... Cover to Firestorm #1 File links The following pages link to this file: Firestorm (comics) ... Superman is a comic book superhero, originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... The Metal Men are a team of robot superheroes created by writer Robert Kanigher, pencilled by Ross Andru and inked by Mike Esposito for DC Comics in 1962. ... The Justice League, sometimes called the Justice League of America or JLA for short, is a fictional DC Universe superhero team. ... James H. Pierce and Joan Burroughs Pierce starred in the 1932-34 Tarzan radio series 1964 Edition of Tarzan of the Apes Tarzan, a fictional character created by Edgar Rice Burroughs, first appeared in the 1912 novel Tarzan of the Apes, and then in twenty-three sequels. ... The Avengers are a fictional superhero team that appear in the Marvel Universe. ... The Defenders was a comic book series about a loosely-organized team of superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Captain Marvel is the name of several unique fictional Marvel Comics superheros. ... Carol Danvers, also known as Ms. ... Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ...


After leaving Marvel's editorship, he again wrote exclusively for DC, writing both major and lesser titles — from those featurng Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, and the Legion of Super-Heroes to such books as Weird Western Tales, Atari Force and Sun Devils — through mid-1986. His co-creation Firestorm, "the nuclear man", debuted in the eponymous Firestorm #1 (March 1978), which lasted five issues before being canceled during a 1978 DC retrenchment. The character then starred in a backup feature in The Flash before again receiving his own series, The Fury of Firestorm (later Firestorm the Nuclear Man), from June 1982 - Aug. 1990; Conway wrote most of the first half of the run, plus four of its five annuals. Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine co-created by William Moulton Marston and wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ... The Legion of Super-Heroes is a DC Comics superhero team. ... This article is about a corporate game company. ... Sun Devils is the title of a science fiction space opera comic book series published by DC Comics for 12 issues between July 1984 and June 1985. ... Firestorm is a DC Comics superhero. ... The Flash. ...


Conway returned to Marvel in the 1980s and served as the regular writer of both The Spectacular Spider-Man and Web of Spider-Man from 1988 until 1990. He relinquished writing duties on both titles when he became the script-editor of TV's Father Dowling Mysteries. The Spectacular Spider-Man is the name of several comic book and one magazine series starring Marvel Comics Spider-Man. ... Cover to Web of Spider-Man #118. ... Father Dowling Mysteries (also known as Father Dowling Investigates in the UK) is an American television mystery series that appeared between 30 November 1987 and 2 May 1991 on the ABC network. ...


Conway's last recorded comics credit is Topps Comics' "Kirbyverse" one-shot NightGlider [2] #1 (April 1993), scripting from a Roy Thomas plot. Topps Comics was a division of the American trading card publisher and gum/candy distributor the Topps Company, Inc. ...


Books, comic strips, screenplays

The Midnight Dancers (1971), cover art by Davis Meltzer

In addition to comics, Conway published two science-fiction novels: The Midnight Dancers (Ace, 1971, ISBN 0-441-52975-5; this is not the same-name book by Anne Maybury, nor Midnight Dancer by Emily Bradshaw) and Mindship (DAW, 1974, ISBN 0-87997-095-2). He also wrote the Feb. 14 - Dec. 3, 1983 dailies of the syndicated newspaper comic strip Star Trek, based upon the 1960s TV series. Image File history File links Midnightdancers. ... Image File history File links Midnightdancers. ... Science Fiction redirects here. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... Print Syndication is a form of syndication in which news articles, columns, or comic strips are made available to newspapers and magazines. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series. ...


Conway as well moved into screenwriting in the 1980s, starting with the animated feature Fire and Ice (1983), co-written with Roy Thomas, based on characters created by Ralph Bakshi and Frank Frazetta. Screenwriting refers to the art and craft of writing screenplays. ... Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ... Frank Frazetta (born February 9, 1928) is one of the worlds most influential fantasy and science fiction artists. ...


Conway went on to write, and eventually produce, for such TV series as Diagnosis Murder, Matlock, Jake and the Fatman, Father Dowling Mysteries, Hercules: The Legendary Journeys, Baywatch Nights, Pacific Blue, Silk Stalkings, Perry Mason telefilms, Law & Order, The Huntress, Law & Order: Criminal Intent, and an episode of Batman: The Animated Series. Conway and Thomas wrote the story basis for Stanley Mann's screenplay for the film Conan the Destroyer (1984). Diagnosis: Murder is a one-hour mystery series, starring Dick Van Dyke as Dr. Mark Sloan, a physician who occasionally works for the police department as a consultant. ... Ben Matlock in court Matlock was an American television legal drama starring Andy Griffith as attorney Ben Matlock. ... Jake and the Fatman was a television crime drama starring William Conrad as prosecutor Jason Lochinvar Fatman McCabe and Joe Penny as investigator Jake Styles. ... Father Dowling Mysteries (also known as Father Dowling Investigates in the UK) is an American television mystery series that appeared between 30 November 1987 and 2 May 1991 on the ABC network. ... Hercules: The Legendary Journeys was a television series produced from 1995 to 1999, very loosely based on the tales of the classical culture hero Hercules. ... Baywatch Nights was a spin-off from the popular television series, Baywatch. ... Pacific Blue can have these meanings: A TV series aired in the United States from 2 March 1996 to 9 April 2000. ... Silk Stalkings logo using Mistral typeface. ... Perry Mason is a fictional defense attorney who originally appeared in detective fiction by Erle Stanley Gardner. ... A television movie (also TV movie, TV-movie, made-for-TV movie, etc. ... Law & Order is an American television police procedural and legal drama set in New York City. ... This series is a spin off of the movie The Hunter. ... Law & Order: Criminal Intent is a United States crime drama television series that began in 2001. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... Conan the Destroyer, directed by action/fantasy veteran Richard Fleischer (20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, The Vikings) as a sequel to Conan The Barbarian, was released worldwide in 1984. ...


Personal

Conway married Karen Britten, a psychologist who works with autistic children, in 1992. The couple have a child, Rachel Conway (born 1995). As of 2006, they reside in the San Fernando Valley near Los Angeles, California. Conway is also the father of Cara Conway, born Nov. 30, 1979; her mother, Carla Conway, has a "story assist" credit in Ms. Marvel #1 (Jan. 1977; reprinted in the trade paperback The Superhero Women by Stan Lee, published by Fireside Books on Nov. 15, 1977, ISBN 0-671-22928-1). A psychologist is a scientist and/or clinician who studies psychology, the systematic investigation of the human mind, including behavior and cognition. ... A boy with autism and his mother Autism refers to a spectrum of disorders, and lies somewhere under the umbrella of a greater encompassing spectrum, that of pervasive developmental disorders that involve the functioning of the brain. ... San Fernando Valley from southwestern edge. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... A trade paperback can refer to any book that is bound with a heavy paper cover that is generally cheaper than the hardcover but more expensive than the regular paperback version. ... Stan Lee (born Stanley Martin Lieber on December 28, 1922[1] New York, New York) is an American writer, editor, Chairman Emeritus of Marvel Comics, and memoirist, who — with several artist co-creators, most notably Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko — introduced complex, naturalistic characters and a thoroughly shared universe into...


Conway's ancestral family background is Irish, as he described in his since-discontinued blog: To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

In my case, on my mother's side, I'm a second-generation immigrant. My grandparents were born in Ireland. They came to America in the late 'teens of the last century and lived a life not very different from the life my housekeeper and her husband live today. My grandfather was a day laborer in the Brooklyn ship yards. My (step)-grandmother washed floors at Hunter College in Manhattan. (My biological grandmother died when my mother was eight years old, so I've no idea what she did to earn a living, but I assume it was either piece work or domestic work of some kind.) Because they were lower-class Irish, they were the Hispanics of their day — tolerated, but not embraced, by the larger society, and viewed with scorn by the WASP upper class. ... Even my father felt that anti-Irish prejudice, real or imagined. In the 1950s he once spoke, rather bitterly, about being one of the two 'token Irishmen' working at his company.[3]

See also: Hunter College High School Hunter College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as simply Hunter College) is a senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY), located on Manhattans Upper East Side. ... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... Hispanic, as used in the United States, is one of several terms used to categorize US citizens, permanent residents and temporary immigrants, whose background hail either from the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America or relating to a Spanish-speaking culture. ... Suborder Apocrita See text for explanation. ...

Trivia

A letter from Conway appears in Fantastic Four #50 (May 1966). The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics first comic book superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ Conway's autobiographical capsule] on the Internet Movie Database says he was 15; his [since-discontinued blog said 16 . Conway's earliest recorded credit bears a September 1969 cover date, meaning newsstand availability in summer 1969 and a typical deadline of two to three months earlier. This gives the age of 16 more credence; however, it is not unusual for a novice's story to be held indefinitely before being published (c.f. comics writer Mike Friedrich).
  2. ^ Sources disagree on the spelling, sometimes even within the same source: The cover of the single issue itself appears to spell it "NightGlider". The cover of Victory #1 likewise spells it as one word, though in an all-caps typeface. The Jack Kirby Museum site spells it "Night Glider". The Grand Comics Database entry spells it as both "Nightglider" and "Night Glider".
  3. ^ Gerry Conway blog, last accessed May 29, 2006; site discontinued sometime between then and Nov. 29, 2006.

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Mike Friedrich is an American comic book writer and publisher best known for his work at Marvel and DC Comics, and for publishing the anthology series Star*Reach one of the first independent comics. ...

References

  • Gerry Conway interview, Alter Ego #14 (April 2002)
  • Women in Refrigerators: "Gerry Conway Responds"
  • Grand Comic Book Database: Gerry Conway
  • The New York Times- Movies: Gerry Conway

External links

  • Internet Movie Database: Gerry Conway
  • Star Trek Comics Checklist
Preceded by
Marv Wolfman
Marvel Comics Editor-in-Chief
1976
Succeeded by
Archie Goodwin
Preceded by
Roy Thomas
Daredevil writer
1971–1973
Succeeded by
Steve Gerber
Preceded by
Marv Wolfman
Daredevil writer
1977
(with Jim Shooter)
Succeeded by
Jim Shooter
Preceded by
Allyn Brodsky
Iron Man writer
1971–1972
(with Allyn Brodsky in early 1971)
Succeeded by
Gary Friedrich
Preceded by
Archie Goodwin
Iron Man writer
1976–1977
(with Herb Trimpe in late 1976 and early 1977)
(with Bill Mantlo in late 1977)
Succeeded by
Bill Mantlo
Preceded by
None
Man-Thing writer
1971
Succeeded by
Len Wein
Preceded by
Roy Thomas
Man-Thing writer
1972
Succeeded by
Steve Gerber
Preceded by
Gary Friedrich
Captain America writer
1972
Succeeded by
Steve Englehart
Preceded by
Stan Lee
Thor writer
1972–1975
Succeeded by
Bill Mantlo
Preceded by
Roy Thomas
Fantastic Four writer
1973–1974
Succeeded by
Roy Thomas
Preceded by
Stan Lee
Amazing Spider-Man writer
1973–1975
Succeeded by
Len Wein
Preceded by
Steve Englehart
Incredible Hulk writer
1974
(with Roy Thomas)
Succeeded by
Len Wein
Preceded by
Steve Englehart
Avengers writer
1976–1977
Succeeded by
Jim Shooter

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gerry Conway - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (380 words)
Gerry Conway (September 10, 1952 -) is an American writer of comic books and television shows.
He is best known for co-creating The Punisher (with Ross Andru) and the atomic-powered superhero Firestorm (with Al Milgrom) as well as for long runs on Amazing Spider-Man in the 1970s (which included the death of Gwen Stacy) and on Justice League of America in the 1970s and 1980s.
Conway moved into television writing in the 1980s, starting with Matlock and Jake and the Fatman.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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