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Encyclopedia > Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Philadelphia Portal

Germantown was originally the Borough of Germantown, a town in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, and is today a neighborhood in the Northwest Philadelphia section of the city of Philadelphia, about six miles northwest from the center of the city. The neighborhood is rich in historic sites and buildings that have been preserved. Many of these are open to the public. Liberty Bell; public domain. ... This article refers to the largest city of Pennsylvania. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Map of Philadelphia County with Northewst Philadelphia highlighted. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ...


Germantown stretches for about two miles along Germantown Avenue northwest from Windrim and Roberts Avenues. The boundaries of Germantown borough at the time it was absorbed into the city of Philadelphia were Wissahickon Avenue, Roberts Avenue, Wister Street, Stenton Avenue and Washington Lane. The next neighborhood to the northwest, Mount Airy, starts around Johnson Street, though there is no universally recognized exact boundary. Map of Philadelphia County prior to the Act of Consolidation. ... Mount Airy is a neighborhood in the Northwest Philadelphia section of the United States city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ...


In 2005, the median home sale price in the 19144 zip code, which contains most of Germantown, was $95,000, an increase of 23% over the median price in 2004. The median home sale price in the 19138 zip code, which contains part of East Germantown, was $82,050. This was an increase of 37%.[citation needed]

Contents

History

Map of Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania highlighting Germantown Borough prior to the Act of Consolidation, 1854
Map of Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania highlighting Germantown Borough prior to the Act of Consolidation, 1854
Pictures from Old-Germantown. The top two houses are that of the Pastorius family, the on on the left around 1683 on the right around 1715. The center structure is that of the house and printing buiness of the Caurs family, shown around 1735. The bottom structure is the market place show around 1820.
Pictures from Old-Germantown. The top two houses are that of the Pastorius family, the on on the left around 1683 on the right around 1715. The center structure is that of the house and printing buiness of the Caurs family, shown around 1735. The bottom structure is the market place show around 1820.

Although the town's name indicates otherwise, Germantown was founded not by Germans, but by Dutch settlers[1], augmented with a much smaller number of people from present-day Germany, in 1681. Most were Quakers who came over in response to the appeal of William Penn. (Penn had carefully courted Dutch Quakers for his colony, and his mother was Dutch.[2]) Germantown (whose original name seems to have been lost) remained almost exclusively Dutch until the beginning of the eighteenth century. Only then did German immigration gain momentum, and soon dominated the area.[3] Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x621, 40 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x621, 40 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ... Philadelphia County is a county located in the U.S. State of Pennsylvania. ... Map of Philadelphia County prior to the Act of Consolidation. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 420 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (623 × 888 pixel, file size: 539 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) {{Information |Description=Bilder aus Alt-Germantown um 1715 bis 1820 |Source=selbst eingescannt |Date=1895 |Author= |Permission= |other_versions File historyClick on a date/time to... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 420 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (623 × 888 pixel, file size: 539 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) {{Information |Description=Bilder aus Alt-Germantown um 1715 bis 1820 |Source=selbst eingescannt |Date=1895 |Author= |Permission= |other_versions File historyClick on a date/time to... The Dutch (Ethnonym: Nederlanders meaning Lowlanders) are the dominant ethnic group[1] of the Netherlands[2]. They are usually seen as a Germanic people. ... For other uses, see William Penn (disambiguation). ...


On August 12, 1689, William Penn at London signed a charter constituting some of the inhabitants a corporation by the name of "the bailiff, burgesses and commonalty of Germantown, in the county of Philadelphia, in the province of Pennsylvania." Pastorius was the first bailiff. Jacob Telner, Dirck Isaacs Opdagraaf, Herman Isaacs Opedegraaf, Reynier Tyson, and Tennis Coender were burgesses, besides six committeemen. They had authority to hold "the general court of the corporation of Germantowne," to make laws for the government of the settlement, and to hold a court of record. This court went into operation in 1690, and continued its services for sixteen years. Sometimes, to distinguish Germantown from the upper portion of German township, outside the borough, the township portion was called Upper Germantown. is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1689 (MDCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


In 1688, Pastorius drew up the first written protest against African slavery in American history.


When Philadelphia was occupied by the British during the American Revolutionary War, several units were housed in Germantown. In the Battle of Germantown, in 1777, the Continental Army attacked this garrison. During the battle, a party of citizens fired on the British troops, as they marched up the Avenue, and mortally wounded British Brigadier General Agnew. The Americans withdrew after firing on one another in the confusion of the battle, leading to the determination that the battle resulted in a defeat of the Americans. However, the inspirational battle was considered an important victory by the feisty Americans. The American loss was 673; the British loss was 575. The battle is called a victory by the Americans because along with the Army's success under Brigadier General Horatio Gates at Saratoga on October 17 when Burgoyne surrendered, it led to the official recognition of the Americans by France, which formed an alliance with the Americans afterwards. This article is about military actions only. ... , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania|Germantown]] || result = inconclusive || combatant1 = Continental Army || combatant2 = Great Britain|Hessian Forces || commander1 = George Washington || commander2 = William Howe || strength1 = 13,000 || strength2 = 8,000 || casualties1 = 152 killed, 521 wounded, 400 captured || casualties2 = 71 killed, 450 wounded, 14 missing |}} |- | |} The Battle of Germantown was a battle in the American Revolutionary... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... AGNEW, James, British soldier, killed in the battle of Germantown, 4 October 1777. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


For a time after the war, George Washington rented the Deshler-Morris House in Germantown to escape the central city and the yellow fever epidemic of 1793. The first bank of the United States was also located here during his administration. George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Independence National Historical Park preseves several sites associated with the American Revolution in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ...

5442 Germantown Avenue, The Deshler-Morris House (1773)
6308 Germantown Avenue, The Concord School (1775)
6308 Germantown Avenue, The Concord School (1775)

Louisa May Alcott, the author of the novel Little Women, was born in Germantown in 1832. Germantown proper, and the adjacent German Township, were incorporated into the City of Philadelphia in 1854 by the Act of Consolidation. Image File history File linksMetadata 28-5442GTA-DeshlerMorris. ... Image File history File linksMetadata 28-5442GTA-DeshlerMorris. ... Image File history File linksMetadata 42-ConcordSchool. ... Image File history File linksMetadata 42-ConcordSchool. ... Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 – March 6, 1888) was an American novelist. ... Little Women is a novel published in 1868 and written by American author Louisa May Alcott. ... Map of Philadelphia County prior to the Act of Consolidation. ...


Bright April, a 1946 book written and illustrated by Marguerite de Angeli, is illustrated with scenes of Germantown of the 1940s while addressing the divisive issue of racial prejudice experienced by African Americans, a daring topic for a children's book of that time. Selected digital images of this book are available here Bright April is a 1946 childrens story book written and illustrated by Marguerite de Angeli, who later won the Newbery Medal for excellence in American childrens literature for another book, her 1950 The Door in the Wall. ... Marguerite de Angeli (March 14, 1889 - June 16, 1987) was a bestselling author and illustrator of childrens books including the 1950 Newbery Award winning book The Door in the Wall. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


Education

Germantown, as with all areas of Philadelphia, is zoned to schools in the School District of Philadelphia. Germantown High School is in Germantown. School District of Philadelphia logo The School District of Philadelphia is a school district based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, that includes all public schools in the city of Philadelphia. ... Germantown High School is a secondary school located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ...


Germantown is the location of the private Germantown Friends School as well as Greene Street Friends School. (A third Quaker school, the William Penn Charter School, is in adjacent neighborhood East Falls. The Pennsylvania School for the Deaf currently inhabits the land that formerly housed Germantown Academy, which moved to Fort Washington, Pennsylvania in 1965. Germantown Friends School (GFS) is a co-educational K-12 school in the Germantown neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA under the supervision of Germantown Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). ... The William Penn Charter School The William Penn Charter School, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was established in 1689 by William Penn as a day school and is the oldest Quaker school in the world. ... East Falls at Ridge Avenue and Midvale Avenue The East Falls section of Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania East Falls is a neighborhood in the Northwest section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Germantown Academy is Americas oldest nonsectarian day school, founded on December 6, 1759 (originally named the Germantown Union School). Germantown Academy (also referred to as GA) is now a K-12 school in the Fort Washington suburb of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, having moved from its original Germantown campus in... Hillside houses in Fort Washington, Pennsylvania Fort Washington is an unincorporated census-designated place and suburb of Philadelphia in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, United States. ...


Notable Historic Sites

Benjamin Chew (November 19, 1722 – January 20, 1810) was the Chief Justice of colonial Pennsylvania. ... , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania|Germantown]] || result = inconclusive || combatant1 = Continental Army || combatant2 = Great Britain|Hessian Forces || commander1 = George Washington || commander2 = William Howe || strength1 = 13,000 || strength2 = 8,000 || casualties1 = 152 killed, 521 wounded, 400 captured || casualties2 = 71 killed, 450 wounded, 14 missing |}} |- | |} The Battle of Germantown was a battle in the American Revolutionary... Independence National Historical Park preseves several sites associated with the American Revolution in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... The clubhouse of the Germantown Cricket Club in 1893 The Germantown Cricket Club was a cricket club in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Grumblethorpe, in Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was the home of the Wister family. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Mennonites are a group of... Connie Mack baseball card, 1910 Cornelius Alexander Mack (December 22, 1862 – February 8, 1956), born Cornelius Alexander McGillicuddy, was an American professional baseball player, manager, and team owner. ...

Notable residents

Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 – March 6, 1888) was an American novelist. ... Little Women is a novel published in 1868 and written by American author Louisa May Alcott. ... Martin Grove Brumbaugh (April 14, 1862–March 14, 1930) was Pennsylvanias 25th Governor, a Republican. ... James Barron (1769- 21 april 1851) is in the us navy. ... Chubby Checker is the stage name of Ernest Evans (born October 3, 1941), an American Rock and Roll singer best known for popularizing the dance The Twist with his 1960 song The Twist. He was born in Spring Gulley, South Carolina,[1] and raised in South Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and attended... Benjamin Chew (November 19, 1722 – January 20, 1810) was the Chief Justice of colonial Pennsylvania. ... Charles Brace Darrow (August 10, 1889–August 29, 1967), has been credited, erroneously, as having invented the poopMonopoly. ... This article is about the board game. ... Nelson Zwinglius Graves (10 August 1880–31 March 1918) was an American cricketer, active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... Philadelphian Christie Morris at Haverford College around 1900 The Philadelphian cricket team was a team that represented Philadelphia in first-class cricket between 1878 and 1913. ... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ... Connie Mack baseball card, 1910 Cornelius Alexander Mack (December 22, 1862 – February 8, 1956), born Cornelius Alexander McGillicuddy, was an American professional baseball player, manager, and team owner. ... Rufus Harley (born May 20, 1936 in Raleigh, North Carolina) is a U.S. jazz musician of mixed Cherokee and African ancestry. ... // Bernard Hopkins was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, growing up in the Raymond Rosen housing projects and later in Germantown, where he became involved in crime and gang activity at a young age. ... James Logan (1674-1751) was an Ireland-born American of Scottish descent. ... G. Love on the cover of 2001s Electric Mile Garrett Dutton III (born October 3, 1972), better known as G. Love, is the front man for the band, G. Love & Special Sauce. ... George T. Morgan (1845- February 1925) Born in Birmingham, England, Morgan studied in England, and worked for many years as a die engraver at Messrs. ... Seal of the U.S. Mint The United States Mint primarily produces circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. ... Francis Daniel Pastorius, (September 26, 1651 - January 1, 1720), was the founder of Germantown, Pennsylvania, now part of Philadelphia. ... Sun Ra (Born Herman Poole Blount; legal name Le Sonyr Ra;[1] born May 22, 1914 in Birmingham, Alabama, died May 30, 1993 in Birmingham, Alabama) was an innovative jazz composer, bandleader, piano and synthesizer player, poet and philosopher known for his cosmic philosophy, musical compositions and performances. ... Edmund Jennings Randolph (August 10, 1753 – September 12, 1813) was an American attorney, Governor of Virginia, Secretary of State, and the first United States Attorney General. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... David Rittenhouse (April 8, 1732 – June 26, 1796) was a renowned American astronomer, inventor, mathematician, surveyor, scientific instrument craftsman, and public official. ... Francis A. Schaeffer (30 January 1912 – 15 May 1984), an American Evangelical theologian, philosopher, and Presbyterian pastor, is most famous for his writings and his establishment of the LAbri community in Switzerland. ... Self portrait, 1778 Gilbert Charles Stuart (né Stewart) (December 3, 1755 - July 9, 1828) was an American painter. ... Frederick Winslow Taylor Frederick Winslow Taylor (March 20, 1856 to March 21, 1915) was an American mechanical engineer who sought to improve industrial efficiency. ... Owen Wister, author of the Western novel, The Virginian and friend of Theodore Roosevelt Owen Wister (July 14, 1860 – July 21, 1938) was an American writer of western novels. ...

See also

German Americans are citizens of the United States of German ancestry. ... German-American Day is a holiday of the United States of America, observed annually on October 6. ...

References

External links

Resources

Coordinates: 40°02′37″N, 75°10′55″W Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x621, 39 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Kingsessing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Northern Liberties, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania User:Boothy443/Sandbox... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - Definition, explanation (697 words)
Germantown was a town in Pennsylvania and is today primarily a neighborhood in Philadelphia, about six miles northwest from the center of the city.
During the Battle of Germantown in 1777 the Continental Army attacked this garrison.
Germantown proper, and the adjacent German Township, were incorporated into the City of Philadelphia in 1854.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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