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Encyclopedia > Germanic tribe

The term Germanic tribes applies to the ancient Germanic peoples of This article is about the continente. For alternative meanings, see: Europe (disambiguation) World map showing location of Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is Geology (from Greek γη- (ge-, the earth) and λογος (logos, word, reason)) is the science and study of the... Europe.


The Germanic tribes spoke mutually intelligible A dialect (from the The word Greek has a number of meanings relating to Greece, including: Architecture of Ancient Greece Art in Ancient Greece Greek alphabet Greek colonies Cuisine of Greece Ethnic Greek Greco-Turkish relations Greece Hellenes History of Greece History of Mycenaean Greece History of Ancient Greece History... dialects and shared a common This article is about a system of myths. For the 1942 book Mythology, see its author Edith Hamilton. A mythology is a relatively cohesive set of myths: stories that comprise a certain religion or belief system. Contents // 1 What is mythology? 2 Modern mythology 3 Mythologies by region 3.1... mythology (see Topics in Norse mythology Aesir (gods) Balder, Bor, Brage, Bure, Byleist, Dagr, Delling, Forseti, Heimdall, Hermod, Höder, Hönir, Kvasir, Lodur, Magni, Meili, Modi, Odr, Odin, Ríg, Thor, Tyr, Vali, Ve, Vidar, Vile Ásynjur (goddesses) Bil, Eir, Frigg, Fulla, Gefjon, Gna, Idun, Jord, Lin, Lofn, Nanna, Natt, Rind... Norse Mythology) and storytelling as testified by, for example, The first page of Beowulf This article describes Beowulf, the epic poem. For the person Beowulf, see Beowulf (hero) For other uses, see Beowulf (disambiguation). Beowulf is a traditional heroic epic poem in Old English alliterative verse. At 3182 lines, it is far more substantial than any similar work in... Beowulf and the The Ramsund carving depicting the Saga of the Völsungs The Volsunga saga is a late 13th century Icelandic prose rendition of the story of Sigurd and Brynhild, and the destruction of the Burgundians. It is largely based on epic poetry. The Nibelungenlied is another telling of some of the... Volsunga saga. The existence of a common identity is testified by the fact that they had a name for non-Germanic peoples, Walha, from which the local names For alternate meanings, see Wales (disambiguation) Wales (English) Cymru (Welsh) Y Ddraig Goch royal coat-of-arms National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Official languages: English and Welsh Capital: Cardiff First Minister: Rhodri Morgan AM Area  - Total:  - % water: Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² xx... Welsh, Canton of Valais Flag of the canton Capital: Sion (Sitten) Abbr.: VS Joined: 1815 Population: 278,200 Area: 5224 km² Languages: French, German The Valais (also known in German as Wallis) is one of the 26 cantons of Switzerland in the south-western part of the country, in the Pennine... Wallis, The term Walloon may refer to either the Walloon language, or to the ethnic people of the same name. Walloon people — inhabitants of Wallonia who speak Belgian French or Walloon. Walloon language — a romance language spoken in Wallonia. This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which... Walloon, and Map of Romania with Wallachia in yellow. Wallachia (also spelt Walachia; Romanian: Ţara Românească - literally Romanian country; also Vlahia or Valahia; Turkish: Iflak) formed a Romanian principality in eastern Europe from the late Middle Ages until the mid-19th century. The capital city changed over time, from... Wallachia have been derived.


In the absence of large-scale political unification, such as that imposed forcibly by the Roman or Romans has several meanings, primarily related to the Roman citizens, but also applicable to typography, math, and a commune. Contents // 1 Roman 1.1 See also 2 Geometry 3 Typography 4 Christianity 5 Geography Roman The noun Roman means a citizen of For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation... Romans upon the peoples of For other uses, see Italy (disambiguation). The Italian Republic or Italy (Italian: Repubblica Italiana or Italia) is a southern European country, comprising a boot-shaped peninsula and two large islands in the Mediterranean Sea: Sicily and Sardinia. It shares its nothern alpine boundary with France, Switzerland, Austria and Slovenia. The... Italy, the various tribes remained free, led by their own hereditary or chosen leaders.

Contents

History

Origin

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Map of the The Nordic Bronze Age is the name given by Oscar Montelius (1843-1921) to a period in Scandinavian pre-history, ca 1700 BC -500 BC, with sites that reached as far east as Estonia [1] (http://www.bronzeage.net/page10.html) Petroglyphs from Scandinavia (Häljesta, Västmanland in... Nordic Bronze Age culture, ca (Redirected from 1200 BC) Centuries: 14th century BC - 13th century BC - 12th century BC Decades: 1250s BC 1240s BC 1230s BC 1220s BC 1210s BC - 1200s BC - 1190s BC 1180s BC 1170s BC 1160s BC 1150s BC Events and Trends 1204 BC - Theseus, legendary King of Athens is deposed after... 1200 BC

Regarding the question of ethnic origins, evidence developed by both archaeologists and linguists suggests that a people or group of peoples sharing a common material culture dwelt in northern Bundesrepublik Deutschland (In Detail) National motto: Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit (German: Unity and Justice and Freedom) Official language German1 Capital Berlin Largest City Berlin Chancellor Gerhard Schröder President Horst Köhler Area - Total - % water Ranked 61st 349,223 km² 2.416% Population - Total (2004) - Density Ranked 13th 82... Germany and southern This article is part of the Scandinavia series Viking Age Ting Kalmar Union Denmark-Norway Sweden-Norway Monetary Union Defense union Languages Mountains Peninsula Varangian Viking History of Sweden History of Norway History of Denmark For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). Scandinavia is the cultural and historic region of the... Scandinavia during the late European The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. The Bronze Age is part of the Three-age system for prehistoric societies and follows the Neolithic in... Bronze Age ( (Redirected from 1000 BC) Centuries: 12th century BC - 11th century BC - 10th century BC Decades: 1050s BC 1040s BC 1030s BC 1020s BC 1010s BC - 1000s BC - 990s BC 980s BC 970s BC 960s BC 950s BC Events and Trends 1006 BC - David becomes king of the ancient Israelites (traditional... 1000 BC- Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC Events and Trends 509 BC - Foundation of the Roman Republic 508 BC - Office of pontifex maximus created... 500 BC). This culture group is called the The Nordic Bronze Age is the name given by Oscar Montelius (1843-1921) to a period in Scandinavian pre-history, ca 1700 BC -500 BC, with sites that reached as far east as Estonia [1] (http://www.bronzeage.net/page10.html) Petroglyphs from Scandinavia (Häljesta, Västmanland in... Nordic Bronze Age and had spread from southern Scandinavia into northern Germany. The long presence of Germanic tribes in southern Scandinavia (an Indo-European Indo-European languages Anatolian | Indo-Iranian | Greek | Italic Celtic | Germanic | Armenian Balto-Slavic | Tocharian | Albanian Proto-Indo-European Language | Society | Religion Kurgan | Yamna | BMAC | Aryan Indo-European studies Indo-European is originally a linguistic term, referring to the Indo-European language family. By extension, it became a collective... Indo-European language probably arrived ca (Redirected from 2000 BC) (21st century BC - 20th century BC - 19th century BC - other centuries) (3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC) Events 2064 - 1986 BC -- Twin Dynasty wars in Egypt 2000 BC -- Farmers and herders travel south from Ethiopia and settle in Kenya. 1991 BC -- Egypt: End... 2000 BC) is also testified by the fact that no pre-Germanic place names have been found in this area.


Linguists, working backwards from historically-known Indo-European Indo-European languages Anatolian | Indo-Iranian | Greek | Italic Celtic | Germanic | Armenian Balto-Slavic | Tocharian | Albanian Proto-Indo-European Language | Society | Religion Kurgan | Yamna | BMAC | Aryan Indo-European studies The Germanic languages form one of the branches of the Indo-European (IE) language family, spoken by the Germanic peoples... Germanic languages, suggest that this group spoke Proto-Germanic, the proto-language believed by scholars to be the common ancestor of the Germanic languages, includes among its descendants Dutch, Yiddish, German, English, Afrikaans, Norwegian, Old Norse, Swedish, Icelandic and Danish. There are no extant documents in Proto-Germanic, which was unwritten, and virtually all our knowledge of... proto-Germanic, a distinct branch of the Indo-European Indo-European languages Anatolian | Indo-Iranian | Greek | Italic Celtic | Germanic | Armenian Balto-Slavic | Tocharian | Albanian Proto-Indo-European Language | Society | Religion Kurgan | Yamna | BMAC | Aryan Indo-European studies Indo-European is originally a linguistic term, referring to the Indo-European language family. By extension, it became a collective... Indo-European language family. Cultural features at that time included small, independent settlements and an economy strongly based on the keeping of livestock.

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Map of the The Pre-Roman Iron Age (ca 500 BC - ca 1 AD) is the name given by Oscar Montelius to a period in Scandinavian and North German pre-history and a part of the European Iron Age. It evolved out of the Nordic Bronze Age and is characterized by the acquisition... Pre-Roman Iron Age culture(s) associated with Proto-Germanic, the proto-language believed by scholars to be the common ancestor of the Germanic languages, includes among its descendants Dutch, Yiddish, German, English, Afrikaans, Norwegian, Old Norse, Swedish, Icelandic and Danish. There are no extant documents in Proto-Germanic, which was unwritten, and virtually all our knowledge of... Proto-Germanic, ca Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC Events and Trends 509 BC - Foundation of the Roman Republic 508 BC - Office of pontifex maximus created... 500 BC- Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC - 60s BC - 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC Years: 65 BC 64 BC 63 BC 62 BC 61 BC 60 BC 59 BC 58 BC 57... 60 BC. The area south of Scandinavia is the The Jastorf culture is an Iron Age material culture in northern Europe, dated from about 600 BC to 1. It is named after a site near the village of Jastorf, Lower Saxony. Its area is delimited by the Weser in the West, the Aller in the South, and the Danish... Jastorf culture

The southward movement was probably influenced by a deteriorating climate in Scandinavia ca Centuries: 8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 650s BC 640s BC 630s BC 620s BC 610s BC - 600s BC - 590s BC 580s BC 570s BC 560s BC 550s BC Events and Trends Fall of the Assyrian Empire and Rise of Babylon 609 BC _ King Josiah... 600 BC - ca Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC - 300s BC - 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC Years: 305 BC 304 BC 303 BC 302 BC 301 BC - 300 BC - 299 BC 298 BC... 300 BC. The warm and dry climate of southern Scandinavia (2-3 degrees warmer than today) deteriorated considerably, which not only dramatically changed the flora, but forced people to change their way of living and to leave settlements.


At around this time, this culture discovered how to extract Bog iron refers to impure iron deposits that develop in bogs or swamps by the chemical or biochemical oxidation of iron carried in the solutions. ... bog iron from the For other uses, see Ore (disambiguation). An ore is a mineral deposit containing a metal or other valuable resource in economically viable concentrations. Usually, it is used in the context of a mineral deposit from which it is economical to extract its metallic component. Ores are mined. Ore bodies are... ore in peat bogs. Their technology for gaining This heap of iron ore pellets will be used in steel production. Iron ores are minerals from which metallic iron can be extracted. The iron itself is usually found in the form of magnetite (Fe3O4) or hematite (Fe2O3), both of which are iron oxides. However, as much of the pure... iron ore from local sources may have helped them expand into new territories.


The Germanic culture grew to the southwest and southeast, without sudden breaks, and it can be distinguished from the culture of the This article is about the European people. For the tool, see celt (tool). For other uses see Celtic (disambiguation). In ancient times, the Celts were a number of interrelated peoples in central Europe sharing a branch of Indo-European languages indicative of a common origin. Today, Celtic is often used... Celts inhabiting the more southerly For other uses of Danube, see Danube may refer to: The Danube River Danube, New York Danube, Minnesota The Danube class starship from the Star Trek universe A station on the Paris Métro The Blue Danube, a famous waltz composed by Johann Strauss the younger in 1867 Blue Danube... Danube and Alpine regions during the same period.


The details of the expansion are known only generally, but it is clear that the forebears of the This article is about the Germanic tribes. For the late 20th century youth subculture, see This article is about the contemporary goth subculture. For the Germanic peoples, see the Goths. Goth is a modern subculture that gained visibility during the early 1980s within the gothic rock scene, a sub-genre... Goths were settled on the southern Baltic can refer to: The Baltic Sea Council of the Baltic Sea States - an intergovernmental organization Baltic sea countries - countries with access to the Baltic Sea The term Baltic countries is sometimes used more or less synonymously for Northern Europe (Russia not included) The Baltic region (Balticum) Baltic States - the... Baltic shore by (Redirected from 100 AD) For other uses, see number 100. Years: 95 96 97 98 99 - 100 - 101 102 103 104 105 Decades: 70s 80s 90s - 100s - 110s 120s 130s Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century AD - 2nd century Events The Portland Vase is believed to have been made in... 100 AD. Along the lower and middle Rhine The Rhine canyon (Ruinaulta) in Graubünden in Switzerland In general English usage, length (symbol: l) is but one particular instance of distance – an objects length is how long the object is – but in the physical sciences and engineering, the word length is in some contexts... Rhine, previous The name Nordwestblock is applied by historians to a group of Europeans whose homeland was in the western part of present-day Germany during the 1st century, but who were not originally Germanic tribes. They may have been of Old European origin. Scholars include in the Nordwestblock the Chatti, Hermunduri... local inhabitants seem to have come under the leadership of Germanic figures from outside, according to some scholars.


Collision with Rome

By the late 2nd century, B.C., Roman authors recount, History of France Series - This is a timeline of French history. 1850s: 1850 - 1851 - 1852 - 1853 - 1854 - 1855 - 1856 - 1857 - 1858 - 1859 1860s: 1860 - 1861 - 1862 - 1863 - 1864 - 1865 - 1866 - 1867 - 1868 - 1869 1870s: 1870 - 1871 - 1872 - 1873 - 1874 - 1875 - 1876 - 1877 - 1878 - 1879 1880s: 1880 - 1881 - 1882 - 1883 - 1884... Gaul, For other uses, see Italy (disambiguation). The Italian Republic or Italy (Italian: Repubblica Italiana or Italia) is a southern European country, comprising a boot-shaped peninsula and two large islands in the Mediterranean Sea: Sicily and Sardinia. It shares its nothern alpine boundary with France, Switzerland, Austria and Slovenia. The... Italy and The Kingdom of Spain or Spain (Spanish: Reino de España or España; Catalan: Regne dEspanya; Basque: Espainiako Erresuma; Galician: Reino de España; Asturian: Reinu dEspaña) is a country located in the southwest of Europe. It shares the Iberian Peninsula with Portugal, Gibraltar and Andorra... Spain were invaded by migrating Germanic tribes, culminating in military conflict with the armies of the The Roman Empire is not the Holy Roman Empire (843-1806). Roman Empire between AD 60 and 400 with major cities. During this time only Dacia and Mesopotamia were added to the Empire but were lost before 300. The Roman Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman... Roman Empire. Six decades later, This article is about Julius Caesar the Roman dictator. For alternative meanings: Julius Caesar (disambiguation). Bust of Julius Caesar Gaius Julius Caesar (Latin: C·IVLIVS·C·F·C·N·CAESAR¹) (July 13, 100 BC–March 15, 44 BC) was a Roman military and political leader whose conquest of Gallia... Julius Caesar invoked the threat of such attacks as one justification for his annexation of Gaul to Rome.

Tacitus Source: [1] (http://www.graupius.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/calgacus.asp) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. This applies worldwide. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete...
Tacitus Source: [1] (http://www.graupius.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/calgacus.asp) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. This applies worldwide. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete... Enlarge
This article is about the historian Tacitus. For the Emperor Tacitus, see Marcus Claudius Tacitus. Gaius Cornelius Tacitus Publius or Gaius Cornelius Tacitus (c. 55–c. 117), Roman orator, lawyer, and senator, is considered one of antiquitys greatest historians. His major works—the Annals and the Histories... Gaius Cornelius Tacitus, author of the The Germania (Latin title: De Origine et situ Germanorum), written by Gaius Cornelius Tacitus around 98, is an ethnographic work on the diverse set of Germanic tribes outside the Roman Empire. Contents // 1 Purpose and uses 2 Sources of the book 3 References 4 Further reading 5 See also 6... Germania, an Ethnography (from the Greek ethnos = nation and graphe = writing) refers to the qualitative description of human social phenomena, based on months or years of fieldwork. Ethnography may be holistic, describing a society as a whole, or it may focus on specific problems or situations within a larger social scene. The... ethnographic work on the diverse group of Germanic tribes outside of the Roman Empire.

As For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). The Roman Colosseum Rome (Italian and Latin Roma) is the capital city of Italy, and of its Lazio region. It is located on the lower Tiber river, near the Mediterranean Sea, at 41°50N, 12°15E. The Vatican City State, a sovereign... Rome advanced her borders to the Rhine The Rhine canyon (Ruinaulta) in Graubünden in Switzerland In general English usage, length (symbol: l) is but one particular instance of distance – an objects length is how long the object is – but in the physical sciences and engineering, the word length is in some contexts... Rhine and For other uses of Danube, see Danube may refer to: The Danube River Danube, New York Danube, Minnesota The Danube class starship from the Star Trek universe A station on the Paris Métro The Blue Danube, a famous waltz composed by Johann Strauss the younger in 1867 Blue Danube... Danube, incorporating many The word Celtic can refer to: the This article is about the European people. For the tool, see celt (tool). For other uses see Celtic (disambiguation). In ancient times, the Celts were a number of interrelated peoples in central Europe sharing a branch of Indo-European languages indicative of a... Celtic societies into the Empire, the tribal homelands to the north and east emerged collectively in the records as Germanía or jerigonza is the term used in Spanish to refer to the argot used by criminals or in jails. Its purpose is to keep outsiders out of the conversation. We already have some documentation in picaresque works from the Spanish Golden Century. Some writers used it in poetry... Germania, whose peoples were sometimes at war with the Empire but who also engaged in complex and long-term trade relations, military alliances and cultural exchanges with their neighbours to the south.


The wars against the The Cimbri lived on the a bay near Heligoland and near Elbe. The Cimbri disappeared after a flood some 2000 years ago. There is debate as to whether they were a Celtic or Germanic people. More than 100 years before the birth of Christ, many of the Cimbri, as well... Cimbri and This entry is about the Teutonic people, not to be confused with the Teutonic Knights. The Teutons (Teutones) were mentioned as a Germanic people in early historical writings by Greek and Roman authors. Their homeland was given as Thy in Jutland, the top of the western peninsula of modern Denmark... Teutoni whose military incursion into Roman Italy was thrust back in 101 BC were written up by Caesar and others as historical prototypes of a Northern danger for the Empire to be controlled. In the Augustean period there was - as a result of Roman activity as far as the Elbe River - a first definition of the "Germania magna": from Rhine and Danube in the West and South to the Vistula and the Baltic Sea in the East and North.


Caesar's ethnographic excurses finally established the term Germania. The initial purpose of the Roman campaigns was to protect Gaul by controlling the area between the Rhine and the Elbe. In 9 AD a revolt of their subject Germanics headed by For the Protestant theologian, see Jacobus Arminius (also spelt Jacob Arminius, James Arminius, Jacob Harmenszoon, Jakob Hermann) (1560-1609) was a Dutch Reformed theologian and (until 1603) professor in theology at de University of Leiden. He wrotes many books about theological problems. Life Arminius was born at Oudewater, Utrecht, on... Arminius (decisive defeat of Quintilius Varus can refer to: in anatomy, a varus deformity an ancient Roman politician, Publius Quinctilius Varus (46 BC - 9 AD) Varus, a Roman cognomen This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. If an article link referred you... Varus in the View over the Teutoburg Forest The Teutoburg Forest (German: Teutoburger Wald) is a range of low, forested mountains in the German states of Lower Saxony and North Rhine-Westphalia, which is believed to be the environ of a decisive battle in AD 9. Contents // 1 Geography 2 History 3 The... Teutoburg Forest) ended in the withdrawal of the Roman frontier to the Rhine. At the end of the 1st century two provinces west of the Rhine called The Roman province of Germania Inferior, 120 AD Germania Inferior (in English Lower Germany) was a Roman province, located along the west margin of the Rhine, on todays southern Netherlands and western Germany. The principal settlements of the province were todays Bonn (Bona), Xanten (Vetera), Utrecht (Trajectum ad... Germania inferior and Categories: Historical stubs | Ancient Roman provinces | German history | Germany | History of the Germanic peoples ... Germania superior were established. Important medieval cities like Map of Germany showing Aachen Aachen is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, on the border with Belgium and the Netherlands, 65 km to the west of Cologne, and the westernmost city in Germany, at 50°46 N, 6°6 E. Population: 256,605 (2003). The RWTH Aachen University... Aachen, The article about perfume can be found at Eau de Cologne. Map of Germany showing Cologne Cologne (German: Köln [kœln]) (population 965,954 as of December 31, 2003), is the fourth largest city in Germany and largest city of the North Rhine-Westphalia state. It is the... Cologne, Trier: The Porta Nigra, viewed from outside Trier (French: Trèves), is Germanys oldest city. It is situated on the western bank of the Moselle River in a valley between low vine-covered hills of ruddy sandstone. It is located in the state of Rhineland-Palatinate near the German... Trier, Map of Germany showing Mainz Mainz (French Mayence) is a city in Germany, which is the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. Contents // 1 Introduction 2 History 3 Twinning 4 Sights 5 Miscellaneous 6 External Links Introduction Mainz is located on the left bank of the river... Mainz, Worm can refer to: The worm, a collection of animal phyla. A computer worm. worm (analysis) — worms in market research. Wyrm, an alternative name for a Dragon in European legend, sometimes spelled as worm. Ringworm, so-called, is a fungus disease of the skin. A worm gear. A song... Worms and Speyer (English formerly Spires) is a city in Germany (Rhineland-Palatinate) with approx. 50000 inhabitants, located on the Rhine river. It neighbours Worms and Mainz. Speyer cathedral History Archaeological data suggests that the site of the city was originally inhabited by Celts around 500 BC. Under the Romans the city... Speyer were part of these Roman structures.


Migration period (Völkerwanderung)

During the (4th century - 5th century - 6th century - other centuries) Contents // 1 Events 2 Significant persons 3 Inventions, discoveries, introductions 4 Decades and years Events Rome sacked by Visigoths in 410. Attila the Hun conquers large parts of Europe, threatens to attack Rome in 452 Vandals conquer Carthage in 439, sack Rome... 5th century, as the Roman Empire drew toward its end, numerous Germanic tribes, under pressure from invading Asian peoples and/or population growth and The term climate change is used to refer to changes in the Earths climate. In the most general sense, it can be taken to mean changes over all timescales and in all of the components of climate, including precipitation and clouds as well as temperature. Climate changes can be... climate change, began migrating en masse in far and diverse directions, taking them to England (In detail) (In detail) Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Official language None; English is de facto Capital London Capitals coordinates 51° 30 N, 0° 10 W Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001... England and as far south through present day Continental Europe is the continent of Europe, explicitly excluding the European islands and peninsulae. In British usage, Great Britain and Ireland are excluded. In the English-speaking mind, Continental Europe (often simply called the Continent by the British) is foremost represented by the Benelux, Germany and especially France. In Scandinavian... Continental Europe to the The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2.5 million km². Contents // 1 Name 2 Geography 3 Bordering countries 4 Subdivisions 5 Geology 6 See also 7 External links... Mediterranean and northern ... World map showing location of Africa Download high resolution version (741x800, 113 KB) This image page contains items that originally came from a NASA website or publication. All works created by NASA are in the public domain, with the exception of the usage-restricted NASA logo, because works created by... Africa. Over time, this wandering meant intrusions into other tribal territories, and the ensuing wars for land escalated with the dwindling amount of unoccupied territory. Wandering tribes then began staking out permanent homes as a means of protection. Much of this resulted in fixed settlements from which many, under a powerful leader, expanded outwards. A defeat meant either scattering or merging with the dominant tribe, and this continued to be how A nation is an imagined community of people created by a national ideology, to which certain norms and behavior are usually attributed. Added to this is usually the idea that a national (a person of the national ideology) should speak a certain language. The language itself might however be a... nations were formed. In For other uses, see Denmark (disambiguation). The Kingdom of Denmark is the geographically smallest Nordic country. It is located in Scandinavia, which is in northern Europe. Denmark borders the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, and consists of a peninsula attached to Northern Germany named Jutland (Jylland in Danish) and... Denmark the The Jutes were a Germanic people who are believed to have originated in Jylland (Jutland) in modern Denmark and part of the Frisian coast. The Jutes, along with the Angles, Saxons and Frisians, were amongst the Germanic peoples who sailed across the North Sea to raid and eventually invade England... Jutes merged with the The Danish nation is a concept closely connected to 19th century ethnic nationalism. It relates to self-identification rather than to laws. The terms use is relevant chiefly in historical contexts of debate on the status of Schleswig and Holstein vis-à-vis a Danish nation-state. The Danish nation... Danes, in The Kingdom of Sweden ( Swedish (svenska) Spoken in: Sweden (Swedish: Sverige) is a Nordic country in Scandinavia, in Northern Europe. It is bordered by Norway on the west, Finland on the northeast, the Skagerrak and the Kattegat on the southwest, and the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Bothnia on... Sweden the Geats (Gautar Old Norse or Götar in Swedish) is the Old English spelling of the name of a Scandinavian people living in Götaland, land of the Geats, currently within the borders of modern Sweden. The name of the Geats lives on in the Swedish counties of Västerg... Geats merged with the Swede (turnip /neep in Scotland) is also the Diagram showing the geographical locations of selected languages and dialects of the British Isles. British English (or UK English) (en-GB according to RFC 3066) is a collective term for the forms of English spoken in the British Isles. When used by... Swedes. In England, for example, we now most often refer to the The Anglo-Saxons refers collectively to the groups of Germanic tribes who achieved dominance in southern Britain from the mid-5th century, forming the basis for the modern English nation. Contents // 1 Origins of the word 2 The Anglo-Saxon Invasions 3 Controversies regarding the nature of the arrival of... Anglo-Saxons rather than the two separate tribes.


Role of the Germanics in the Fall of Rome

Some of the Germanic tribes are frequently blamed in popular conceptions for the "Fall" of the The Roman Empire is not the Holy Roman Empire (843-1806). Roman Empire between AD 60 and 400 with major cities. During this time only Dacia and Mesopotamia were added to the Empire but were lost before 300. The Roman Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman... Roman Empire in the late (4th century - 5th century - 6th century - other centuries) Contents // 1 Events 2 Significant persons 3 Inventions, discoveries, introductions 4 Decades and years Events Rome sacked by Visigoths in 410. Attila the Hun conquers large parts of Europe, threatens to attack Rome in 452 Vandals conquer Carthage in 439, sack Rome... 5th century. Professional Historiography is writing about rather than of history. Historiography is meta-analysis of descriptions of the past. The analysis usually focuses on the narrative, interpretations, worldview, use of evidence, or method of presentation of other historians. Contents // 1 Historians definition of historiography 2 An example 3 Basic issues studied in... historians and Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes... archaeologists have since the This article is in need of attention. Please see its listing on Pages needing attention and improve it (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=1950s&action=edit) in any way you see fit. When the issues regarding this page have been resolved, remove this notice and... 1950s shifted their interpretations in such a way that the Germanic peoples are no longer seen as invading a decaying empire but as being co-opted into helping defend territory the central government could no longer adequately administer. Individuals and small groups from Germanic tribes had long been recruited from the territories beyond the For other meanings see lime. A limes is a Roman wall marking the boundaries of the Roman Empire. The most notable examples of limes are: Hadrians Wall Antonine Wall Upper Germanic or Rhaetian Limes The Latin word limes underlies the abbreviation lim, used in mathematics to designate the limit... limes (i.e., the regions just outside the Roman Empire), and some of them had risen high in the command structure of the army; Odoacer, also known as Odovacar (435-493) was the half Hunnish, half Scirian chieftain of the Germanic Heruli. He is best known to history as the man who deposed the last Roman emperor in the West, Romulus Augustus, in 476. Romulus Augustus was sent to retirement at Lucullanum at the... Odoacer, who deposed Romulus Augustus (460s/470s - after 511) was the last of the Western Roman Emperors. He was born Flavius Romulus to Flavius Orestes, a Roman politician considered to be at least partly of Germanic descent. Orestes was appointed master of soldiers by Western Roman Emperor Julius Nepos in 475. On August... Romulus Augustulus, is an example. Later the government of the Empire began to recruit entire tribal groups under their native leaders as officers. Assisting with defense eventually shifted into administration and then outright rule, as Roman traditions of government passed into the hands of Germanic may refer to Germanic languages: A language family, the languages of which are spoken in northern and northwestern Europe, and in many places colonized since around 1500 Germanic peoples: Collective name of a number of tribes and peoples, originating from northern Europe, several of which invaded the Roman Empire... Germanic leaders.


The presence of successor This article discusses states as sovereign political entities. For other meanings, see state (disambiguation). In international law and international relations, a state is a geographic political entity possessing politicial sovereignty, i.e. not being subject to any higher political authority. In casual language, the idea of a state and a... states controlled by a The Lords and Barons prove their Nobility by hanging their Banners and exposing their A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. Coat... nobility from one of the Germanic tribes is evident in the (5th century — 6th century — 7th century — other centuries) Contents // 1 Events 2 Significant persons 3 Inventions, discoveries, introductions 4 Decades and years Events The first academy of the east the Academy of Gundeshapur founded in Persia by the Persian Shah Khosrau I. Irish colonists and invaders, the... 6th century - even in Italy, the former heart of the Empire, where Odoacer, also known as Odovacar (435-493) was the half Hunnish, half Scirian chieftain of the Germanic Heruli. He is best known to history as the man who deposed the last Roman emperor in the West, Romulus Augustus, in 476. Romulus Augustus was sent to retirement at Lucullanum at the... Odoacer was followed by Theodoric the Great (454 - August 30, 526) was king of the East Goths, the Ostrogoths (488-526), ruler of Italy (493-526), and regent of the Visigoths (511-526). The man who ruled under the name of Theodoric (Gothic Thiudareiks, meaning King of the People) was born in 454, a... Theodoric the Great, king of the Ostrogoths, who was regarded by Roman citizens and Gothic settlers alike as legitimate successor to the rule of For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). The Roman Colosseum Rome (Italian and Latin Roma) is the capital city of Italy, and of its Lazio region. It is located on the lower Tiber river, near the Mediterranean Sea, at 41°50N, 12°15E. The Vatican City State, a sovereign... Rome and For other uses, see Italy (disambiguation). The Italian Republic or Italy (Italian: Repubblica Italiana or Italia) is a southern European country, comprising a boot-shaped peninsula and two large islands in the Mediterranean Sea: Sicily and Sardinia. It shares its nothern alpine boundary with France, Switzerland, Austria and Slovenia. The... Italy.


Culture

Thors battle against the giants (1872), by Mårten Eskil Winge. This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the...
Thors battle against the giants (1872), by Mårten Eskil Winge. This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the... Enlarge
This article is about Thor, the god of Norse mythology. For other meanings see Thor (disambiguation). Thors battle against the giants, by Marten Eskil Winge, 1872 Thor, Þór (ON), Thunor (OE), Donar or Donner (German) is the red-haired and bearded god of thunder and lightning in Germanic and... Thor, god of thunder, one of the major figures in Germanic mythology is a comprehensive term for Norse mythology, Anglo-Saxon mythology and other versions of the mythologies of the Germanic peoples. Since Norse mythology is the best known version of, and a source of knowledge for Germanic mythology, the two terms are usually interchangeable, but are not the same... Germanic mythology.

See: Germanic mythology is a comprehensive term for Norse mythology, Anglo-Saxon mythology and other versions of the mythologies of the Germanic peoples. Since Norse mythology is the best known version of, and a source of knowledge for Germanic mythology, the two terms are usually interchangeable, but are not the same... Germanic mythology, Germanic Paganism


Conversion to Christianity

The Ostrogoths, The Visigoths, originally Tervingi, or Vesi (the noble ones), one of the two main branches of the Goths (of which the Ostrogothi were the other), were one of the loosely-termed Germanic peoples that disturbed the late Roman Empire. After the fall of the western Roman Empire, the Visigoths continued... Visigoths, and For other uses, see Vandal (disambiguation). The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe that entered the late Roman Empire, and created a state in North Africa, centered on the city of Carthage. The Vandals probably gave their name to the province of Andalusia (originally, Vandalusia), in Spain, where they temporarily... Vandals were The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once (a political shift as much as a spontaneous mass shift in individual consciences), also includes the practice of converting pagan cult practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar... Christianized while they were still outside the bounds of the Empire; however, they converted to This article is about the theological doctrine of Arius. See Aryan, Aryan race for the ethnic concept. Arianism was a Christological view held by followers of Arius in the early Christian Church, claiming that Jesus Christ and God the Father were not of the same fundamental essence, seeing the Son... Arianism rather than to orthodox This article considers Catholicism in the broadest ecclesiastical sense. See Catholicism (disambiguation) for alternative meanings Catholicism has two main ecclesiastical meanings, described in Websters Dictionary as: a) the whole orthodox christian church, or adherence thereto; and b) the doctrines or faith of the Roman Catholic church, or adherence thereto... Catholicism, and were soon regarded as Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the ‘catholic’ or orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox... heretics. The one great written remnant of the Gothic (𐌲𐌿𐍄𐌹𐍃𐌺) Spoken in: Extinct Region: Total speakers: Extinct Ranking: Not in top 100 Genetic classification: Indo-European  Germanic   East Germanic    Gothic Official status Official language of: - Regulated by: - Language codes ISO 639-1 - ISO 639-2 got SIL... Gothic language is a translation of portions of the A Bible handwritten in Latin, on display in Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. This Bible was transcribed in Belgium in 1407 AD, for reading aloud in a monastery. The Bible (From Greek (Ελληνικά) Spoken in: Greece, Cyprus, Albania and surrounding countries Region: The Balkans... Bible made by Representation of Ulfilas surrounded by the Gothic alphabet Ulfilas or Wulfila (perhaps meaning little wolf) (c. 310 - 383), bishop, missionary, and translator, was a Goth or half-Goth who had spent time inside the Byzantine Empire at a time when Arianism was dominant. Ulfilas was ordained a bishop by Eusebius... Ulfilas, the A missionary is a propagator of religion, often an evangelist or other representative of a religious community who works among those outside of that community. The English word missionary is derived from Latin, the equivalent of the Greek-derived word, apostle. Contents // Jehovahs Witnesses are known for their missionary... missionary who converted them. The The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, from which the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Scandinavia that entered the late Roman Empire. They were known to the Romans from as early as AD 98, when the historian Tacitus mentioned them in his Germania. Their... Lombards were not converted until after their entrance into the Empire, but received Christianity from Arian Germanic groups.


The Statue of Charlemagne (also called Karl der Große, Charles the Great) in Frankfurt, Germany. The Franks formed one of several west Germanic tribes who entered the late Roman Empire from Frisia as foederati and established a lasting realm in an area that covers most of modern-day France and... Franks were converted directly from Paganism is a catch-all term which has come to bundle together (by extension from its original classical meaning of a pre-Christian religion) a very broad set of not necessarily compatible religious beliefs and practices that are usually, but not necessarily, characterized by polytheism and, less commonly, animism. Contents... paganism to This article considers Catholicism in the broadest ecclesiastical sense. See Catholicism (disambiguation) for alternative meanings Catholicism has two main ecclesiastical meanings, described in Websters Dictionary as: a) the whole orthodox christian church, or adherence thereto; and b) the doctrines or faith of the Roman Catholic church, or adherence thereto... Catholicism without an intervening time as Arians. Several centuries later, Anglo-Saxon and Frankish missionaries and warriors undertook the conversion of their -1... Saxon neighbours. A key event was the felling of Thor's Oak near Fritzlar, a small German town (pop. 10,000) in northern Hesse, 160 km north of Frankfurt, with a storied history. It can reasonably be argued that the town was the birthplace both of Christianity in Germany (north of the Roman Limes) and of the German nation as a political entity... Fritzlar by For the Roman general of this name, see Bonifacius. Saint Boniface (Latin: Bonifacius), (c. 672 - June 5, 754 or 755), the Apostle of the Germans, born Winfrid or Wynfrith at Crediton in Devonshire. He was of good family, and it was somewhat against his fathers wishes that he devoted... Boniface, apostle of the Germans, in Years: 719 720 721 722 - 723 - 724 725 726 727 Decades: 690s 700s 710s - 720s - 730s 740s 750s Centuries: 7th century - 8th century - 9th century Events The worlds first mechanical clock is allegedly built in China. See celestial globe. Saint Boniface manages to proselytize most of the Germanic tribes... 723. Eventually, the conversion was forced by armed force, successfully completed by Statue of Charlemagne in Frankfurt, a Romantic interpretation of his appearance from the 19th century Charlemagne (c. 742 or 747 – 28th of January, 814) (or Charles the Great, in German Karl der Große, in Latin Carolus Magnus, giving rise to the adjective form Carolingian), was king of the... Charlemagne, in a series of campaigns (the Saxon Wars), that also brought Saxon lands into the Frankish empire.


Languages

See: Indo-European Indo-European languages Anatolian | Indo-Iranian | Greek | Italic Celtic | Germanic | Armenian Balto-Slavic | Tocharian | Albanian Proto-Indo-European Language | Society | Religion Kurgan | Yamna | BMAC | Aryan Indo-European studies The Germanic languages form one of the branches of the Indo-European (IE) language family, spoken by the Germanic peoples... Germanic languages


List of Germanic tribes

  • The Alamanni, Allemanni or Alemanni, are a Germanic tribe, first mentioned by Dio Cassius, under the year 213. They apparently dwelt in the basin of the Main River, to the south of the Chatti. According to Asinius Quadratus their name -- all men -- indicates that they were a conglomeration of various... Alamanni, Ambrones, The Ampsivarii were a Germanic tribe mentioned by the Roman author Gaius Cornelius Tacticus, writing in the 1st century C.E. Their homeland was located in what is now northwestern Germany around the river Ems, which flows into the North Sea. Tacitus name for them is a Latin rendering of... Ampsivarii, For other uses, see Angles (disambiguation). Angles (German: Angeln, Old English: Englas, Latin: singular Anguls, plural Anglii) were a Germanic people, from German conquest by the Danevirke until the 19th century — to East Anglia in the 5th century. Eastern Britain was later called Engla_lond (in Old English, Land of... Angles, Angrivarii, Astingi, Aviones
  • The Batavii (or Batavi, Batavians) were a Germanic, or possibly Celtic tribe reported by Julius Caesar and Tacitus to have lived around the Rhine delta, in the area which is currently the Netherlands. This led to the Latin name of Batavia. They were mentioned by Julius Caesar in his commentary... Batavii, Bavarii was a large and powerful tribe which emerged late in Teutonic tribal times, in what is now the Czech Republic (Bohemia). They replaced, or perhaps are simply another phase of, the previous inhabitants - the Rugians. They swiftly expanded their influence southward, and occupied Austria and the area which still... Bavarii, The Bructeri, an ancient Germanic tribe whose people were located in northwestern Germany (Soester Boerde), south of the Teutoburg Forest, in present-day North Rhine-Westphalia around 100 BC through 350 AD. Later absorbed into the larger Frankish community, and reportedly allies with Cherusci and others in defeating the Roman... Bructeri, Burgundiones, Burii
  • Canninefates, Chamavi, Charudes, Chasuarii, Chattuarii, The Chauci was a numerous tribe inhabiting the extreme northwestern shore of Germany during Roman times - basically the stretch of coast between Frisia in the west to the Elbe estuary in the east. By the end of the 3rd century CE, they had merged with the Saxons : whether this... Chauci, The Cherusci was a nation inhabiting the Rhine valley and the forests of western Germany (near modern Hanover) during the 1st century BC and 1st century CE. They were first allies of, and then enemies of, Rome. They are most famous for the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest, when a... Cherusci, The Chatti (also Catti)were an ancient German tribe that lived along the upper reaches of the Weser, Eder, Fulda and Werra rivers, a district approximately corresponding to Hesse-Cassel, though probably somewhat more extensive. The Chatti successfully resisted incorporation into the Roman Empire, and Rome eventually responded to the... Chatti, The Cimbri lived on the a bay near Heligoland and near Elbe. The Cimbri disappeared after a flood some 2000 years ago. There is debate as to whether they were a Celtic or Germanic people. More than 100 years before the birth of Christ, many of the Cimbri, as well... Cimbri
  • The Daner were an ancient North Germanic tribe residing in Terra Scania and on the Danish islands. They were not mentioned by Tacitus, whose famous work Germania mentions the Gothones (Geats and/or Goths?) and the Suiones (Swedes). They seem to be, however, mentioned by Jordanes, as the Dani, and... Dani, Diduni, Dulgubnii
  • Eudoses
  • Fosi, Statue of Charlemagne (also called Karl der Große, Charles the Great) in Frankfurt, Germany. The Franks formed one of several west Germanic tribes who entered the late Roman Empire from Frisia as foederati and established a lasting realm in an area that covers most of modern-day France and... Franks, The Roman historian Tacitus, in his Germania, mentioned the Frisians among people he grouped together as the Ingvaeones. Their territory followed the coast of the North Sea from the mouth of the Rhine river up to that of the Ems, their eastern border according to Ptolemys Geographica. Pliny the... Frisians
  • Geats (Gautar Old Norse or Götar in Swedish) is the Old English spelling of the name of a Scandinavian people living in Götaland, land of the Geats, currently within the borders of modern Sweden. The name of the Geats lives on in the Swedish counties of Västerg... Geats, The Gepids (Latin Gepidae) were a Germanic tribe most famous in history for defeating the Huns after the death of Attila. The Gepids were first mentioned around A.D. 260, when they participated with the Goths in an invasion in Dacia, where they were settled in Jordanes time, the mid... Gepidae, This article is about the Germanic tribes. For the late 20th century youth subculture, see This article is about the contemporary goth subculture. For the Germanic peoples, see the Goths. Goth is a modern subculture that gained visibility during the early 1980s within the gothic rock scene, a sub-genre... Goths
  • Harii, Helisii, Helvecones, The Helvetii (in Latin) were the Celtic inhabitants of the current Switzerland. They were described by Julius Caesar in his De Bello Gallico. Caesar was called upon by the Gauls which had already been conquered to defend them from the invading Helvetii, who were attempting to migrate into Gaul with... Helvetii, The Heruli (spelled variously in Latin and Greek) were a nomadic Germanic people, who were subjugated by the Ostrogoths and Huns in the 3rd to 5th centuries. The original home of the Heruli is unknown, although their own mythology placed it in the Maeotian Swamp at the confluence of the... Heruli, An ancient tribe of Germanic people who occupied the area around what is now Thuringia, Saxony, and Northern Bavaria, from roughly around 1 AD, to 400 AD. -Alternate spellings: Hermunduri, Hermunduli, Hermonduri, Hermonduli ... Hermunduri
  • Also referred to as Ingaevones, North Sea Germans (Ingwäonen, Nordsee-Germanen in German). West Germanic cultural group or proto-tribe along the North Sea coast. Their name comes from Tacitus’ Germania (c. 98 CE) who categorized them as one of the three tribes descended from the three sons... Ingvaeones (North Sea Germans), Also referred to as Herminones, Hermiones, Elbe Germans (Irminonen, Elb-Germanen in German), a West Germanic proto-tribe or cultural group who dwelt in eastern Germany, roughly between the Elbe and Oder Rivers from perhaps 500 BCE or 1000 BCE until the differentiation of localized Teutonic tribes (Alamanni, Hermunduri, Marcomanni... Irminones (Elbe Germans), The Istvaeones (also called Istaevones, Istriaones, Istriones, Sthraones, Thracones, Rhine Germans or Weser-Rhine Germans (Istwäonen, Weser-Rhein-Germanen in German)) were a West Germanic cultural group or proto-tribe. Their name comes from Tacitus’ Germania (c. 98 CE) who categorized them as one of the tribes of... Istvaeones (Rhine-Weser Germans)
  • The Jutes were a Germanic people who are believed to have originated in Jylland (Jutland) in modern Denmark and part of the Frisian coast. The Jutes, along with the Angles, Saxons and Frisians, were amongst the Germanic peoples who sailed across the North Sea to raid and eventually invade England... Jutes
  • Lacringi, Landi, The Lemovii was a Germanic tribe which was only named by Tacitus. He noted that they lived near the Goths and that they had short swords and round shields. ... Lemovii, The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, from which the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Scandinavia that entered the late Roman Empire. They were known to the Romans from as early as AD 98, when the historian Tacitus mentioned them in his Germania. Their... Lombards or The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, from which the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Scandinavia that entered the late Roman Empire. They were known to the Romans from as early as AD 98, when the historian Tacitus mentioned them in his Germania. Their... Langobardes, The Lugii, Lygii or Ligii (also Lygians, Lugians) were a tribe of likely Celtic or Germanic origin living in modern Poland north of the Sudetes mountains between Oder and Vistula rivers. The connection between the Lugii and the Slavs is controversial. Some recent authors connect them with Slavs, some with... Lugii
  • Manimi, The Marcomanni were a Germanic people, probably related to the Suebi or Suevi. Their name derives from old Germanic forms of March (frontier) and Men. Drusus attacked them in 9 BC, forcing them into present-day Bohemia. In that region their king Maroboduus established a powerful kingdom that Augustus perceived... Marcomanni, Marsi (Germanic), Marsigni, Mattiaci
  • Nahanarvali, Nemetes, The Nervii were one of the most powerful Belgic tribes living east of the Scheldt in north-eastern Gaul in the 1st century BC. The exact date of their inception and destruction is not known. They were considered the most warlike of the Belgic tribes. Their culture was a spartan... Nervii, Ancient name for the inhabitants of Nericia. The root nari, neri is cognate to English narrow and refers to the narrow inlets that caracterized the geography. The north-eastern (Kvismaren-Hjälmaren) has disappeared artificially, but the southern part of the province still has a large fjord (Alsen), a tribe... Njars
  • Ostrogoths
  • The Quadi were a smaller Germanic tribe, about which little definitive information is known. The history of non-literate peoples is written by their opponents, and we can only know the Germanic tribe the Romans called the Quadi through Roman eyes. No pottery style or other remains of material culture... Quadi
  • Racatae, The Rugians (Latin rugii) were an East Germanic tribe whose ultimate origins have been traced to Rogaland in Norway, whose population probably was the Rugii that Jordanes mentioned as a tribe that still remained in Scandza. The connection is further supported by the fact that an old name for the... Rugii
  • This article is about the Saxons, a Germanic people. For other uses of the term, see Saxon (disambiguation). The Saxons were a large and powerful Germanic people located in what is now northwestern Germany and the eastern Netherlands (but not in the area that is known as Saxony today). They... Saxons, Scirians (cf. Shire) were the collective name for a number of Germanic groups in Eastern Europe. During the 4th century, they were living in the Carpathians, where they were defeated by the Huns. Thereafter, they were part of the Ostrogoths. Source: Nationalencyklopedin Categories: Ancient Germanic peoples ... Scirii, The Semnoni were a Germanic tribe which was settled between the Elbe and the Oder in the 1st century when they were described by Tacitus. In the 3rd century, they probably joined the Alamannian federation. Source: Nationalencyklopedin Categories: Ancient Germanic peoples ... Semnoni, Sigulones, Silingi, The Sitones were mysterious, or mythical, Germanic people. They are only mentioned in Tacitus (unless the name is connected with the Swedish Sithun): Bordering on the Suiones are the nations of the Sitones. They resemble them in all respects but one - woman is the ruling sex. That is the measure... Sitones, The Suebi or Suevi were a Germanic people whose origin was near the Baltic Sea . History 2000 years ago the Baltic Sea was known to the Romans as the Mare Suebicum. Partially because of his unfamiliarity with the various Germanic peoples interacting with Rome at the time, the historian Tacitus... Suebi, Suiones, Swedes, Svíar or Svear, were an ancient Germanic tribe in Scandinavia. They are usually only referred to as Swedes in English. In modern Scandinavian, but not in Icelandic, the adjectival form svensk and its plural svenskar/svensker have replaced the name svear and is, today, used to denote... Suiones, This article or section should include material from Sigambrer The Sugambri, Sigambrer or Sicambri were a west Germanic tribe which existed during the time of the Roman Empire. Their original homeland was located in what is now the region of Gelderland in the Netherlands, on the lower Rhine river. Historians... Sugambri
  • Tencteri, This entry is about the Teutonic people, not to be confused with the Teutonic Knights. The Teutons (Teutones) were mentioned as a Germanic people in early historical writings by Greek and Roman authors. Their homeland was given as Thy in Jutland, the top of the western peninsula of modern Denmark... Teutons, Treviri, Triboci, Tubantes, Turcilingi
  • The Ubii were a Germanic tribe first encountered dwelling on the right bank of the Rhine in the time of Julius Caesar, who formed an alliance with them in 55 BC in order to launch attacks across the river. They were transported in 39 BC by Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa to... Ubii, The Usipetes were a Germanic tribe which existed during the 1st century. Tacitus records that a cohort of Usipetes took part as auxiliaries in the military campaigns of the general Agricola in Brittania. Categories: Historical stubs | Ancient Roman enemies and allies ... Usipetes
  • For other uses, see Vandal (disambiguation). The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe that entered the late Roman Empire, and created a state in North Africa, centered on the city of Carthage. The Vandals probably gave their name to the province of Andalusia (originally, Vandalusia), in Spain, where they temporarily... Vandals, Vangiones, Varini, Varisci, The Visigoths, originally Tervingi, or Vesi (the noble ones), one of the two main branches of the Goths (of which the Ostrogothi were the other), were one of the loosely-termed Germanic peoples that disturbed the late Roman Empire. After the fall of the western Roman Empire, the Visigoths continued... Visigoths

Classification

The concept of "Germanic" as a distinct This article or section should be merged with ethnic group Ethnicity is the cultural characteristics that connect a particular group or groups of people to each other. Ethnicity is sometimes used as a euphemism for race, or as a synonym for minority group. While ethnicity and race are related concepts... ethnic identity was hinted at by the early Greek geographer Strabo (squinty) was a term employed by the Romans for anyone whose eyes were distorted or deformed. The father of Pompey was called Pompeius Strabo. A native of Sicily so clear sighted that he could see things at great distance as if they were nearby was also called Strabo. Strabo... Strabo [1]  (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.01.0198;query=section%3D%2341;chunk=section;layout=;loc=7.1.1), who distinguished a Barbarian was originally a Greek term applied to any foreigner, one not sharing a recognized culture or degree of polish with the speaker or writer employing the term. The word expressed with mocking duplication (bar-bar) alleged attempts by outsiders to speak a real language. A barbarism in language, especially... barbarian group in northern Europe similar to, but not part of, the This article is about the European people. For the tool, see celt (tool). For other uses see Celtic (disambiguation). In ancient times, the Celts were a number of interrelated peoples in central Europe sharing a branch of Indo-European languages indicative of a common origin. Today, Celtic is often used... Celts. Posidonius (c. 135 BC - c. 51 BC), was a Greek philosopher, astronomer, geographer, and historian. Nicknamed the Athlete, he was born in Apamea, northern Syria, and probably died in Rome or Rhodes. Posidonius was a student of Panaetius of Rhodes. He was a stoic with many influential friends. His pupils... Posidonius, to our knowledge, is the first to have used the name.


By the (1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century - other centuries) The 1st century was that century which lasted from 1 to 99. Contents // 1 Events 2 Significant persons 3 Inventions, discoveries, introductions 4 Decades and years Events Beginning of Christianity Spread of the Roman Empire Masoretes adds vowel pointings to the... 1st century A.D., the writings of Caesar, This article is about the historian Tacitus. For the Emperor Tacitus, see Marcus Claudius Tacitus. Gaius Cornelius Tacitus Publius or Gaius Cornelius Tacitus (c. 55–c. 117), Roman orator, lawyer, and senator, is considered one of antiquitys greatest historians. His major works—the Annals and the Histories... Tacitus and other Roman or Romans has several meanings, primarily related to the Roman citizens, but also applicable to typography, math, and a commune. Contents // 1 Roman 1.1 See also 2 Geometry 3 Typography 4 Christianity 5 Geography Roman The noun Roman means a citizen of Rome. The adjective Roman means pertaining... Roman and The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2.5 million km². Contents // 1 Name 2 Geography 3 Bordering countries 4 Subdivisions 5 Geology 6 See also 7 External links... Mediterranean writers indicate a division of Germanic-speaking peoples into tribal groupings centred on:

  • the rivers The Oder (or Odra) River (German: Oder, Polish/Czech: Odra, Ancient Latin: Viadua, Viadrus, Medieval Latin: Odera, Oddera) is a river in Central Europe (mostly in Poland). It begins in the Czech Republic and flows through western Poland, later forming the northern 187 km of the border between Poland and... Oder and Vistula river basin Vistula (Polish Wisła), is the longest river in Poland. It is 1,047 kilometers (678 miles) long and drains about 192,000 square kilometers (74,000 sq. miles), or almost two thirds of Polands surface. The Vistula has its source in the south of... Vistula ( For other uses, see Poland is a country in Central Europe. Poland is also the name of some places in the United States of America: Poland, Maine Poland, New York Poland, Ohio This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the... Poland) ( The tribes referred to as East Germanic constitute a wave of migrants who moved from Scandinavia into the area between the Oder and Vistula rivers between 600 - 300 BC. In historical times these tribes were differentiated as Goths, Burgundians and Vandals among others. The East Germanic languages are contrasted with... East Germanic tribes),
  • the lower Rhine The Rhine canyon (Ruinaulta) in Graubünden in Switzerland In general English usage, length (symbol: l) is but one particular instance of distance – an objects length is how long the object is – but in the physical sciences and engineering, the word length is in some contexts... Rhine river ( The Istvaeones (also called Istaevones, Istriaones, Istriones, Sthraones, Thracones, Rhine Germans or Weser-Rhine Germans (Istwäonen, Weser-Rhein-Germanen in German)) were a West Germanic cultural group or proto-tribe. Their name comes from Tacitus’ Germania (c. 98 CE) who categorized them as one of the tribes of... Istvaeones),
  • the river The Elbe River (Czech Labe, Sorbian/Lusatian Łobjo, Polish Łaba, German Elbe) is one of the major waterways of central Europe. It originates in the North West Czech Republic before traversing much of Germany and finally emptying into the North Sea. the Elbe Contents // 1 Geography 2 Cities... Elbe ( Also referred to as Herminones, Hermiones, Elbe Germans (Irminonen, Elb-Germanen in German), a West Germanic proto-tribe or cultural group who dwelt in eastern Germany, roughly between the Elbe and Oder Rivers from perhaps 500 BCE or 1000 BCE until the differentiation of localized Teutonic tribes (Alamanni, Hermunduri, Marcomanni... Irminones),
  • Jutland Peninsula Jutland (Danish: Jylland, German: Jütland) is a peninsula in northern Europe that forms the continental part of Denmark and a northern part of Germany, dividing the North Sea from the Baltic Sea. Its terrain is relatively flat, with low hills and peat bogs. It has an area... Jutland and the Danish islands ( Also referred to as Ingaevones, North Sea Germans (Ingwäonen, Nordsee-Germanen in German). West Germanic cultural group or proto-tribe along the North Sea coast. Their name comes from Tacitus’ Germania (c. 98 CE) who categorized them as one of the three tribes descended from the three sons... Ingvaeones).

The The Istvaeones (also called Istaevones, Istriaones, Istriones, Sthraones, Thracones, Rhine Germans or Weser-Rhine Germans (Istwäonen, Weser-Rhein-Germanen in German)) were a West Germanic cultural group or proto-tribe. Their name comes from Tacitus’ Germania (c. 98 CE) who categorized them as one of the tribes of... Istvaeones, Also referred to as Herminones, Hermiones, Elbe Germans (Irminonen, Elb-Germanen in German), a West Germanic proto-tribe or cultural group who dwelt in eastern Germany, roughly between the Elbe and Oder Rivers from perhaps 500 BCE or 1000 BCE until the differentiation of localized Teutonic tribes (Alamanni, Hermunduri, Marcomanni... Irminones, and Also referred to as Ingaevones, North Sea Germans (Ingwäonen, Nordsee-Germanen in German). West Germanic cultural group or proto-tribe along the North Sea coast. Their name comes from Tacitus’ Germania (c. 98 CE) who categorized them as one of the three tribes descended from the three sons... Ingvaeones are collectively called West Germanic tribes. In addition to this those Germanic people who remained in Scandinavia are referred to as This article is part of the Scandinavia series Viking Age Ting Kalmar Union Denmark-Norway Sweden-Norway Monetary Union Defense union Languages Mountains Peninsula Varangian Viking History of Sweden History of Norway History of Denmark Language classification Indo-European languages Germanic languages North Germanic languages A North Germanic language is... North Germanic. These groups all developed separate dialects, the basis for the differences among Germanic may refer to Germanic languages: A language family, the languages of which are spoken in northern and northwestern Europe, and in many places colonized since around 1500 Germanic peoples: Collective name of a number of tribes and peoples, originating from northern Europe, several of which invaded the Roman Empire... Germanic languages down to the present day.


The divison of peoples into west-Germanic, east-Germanic, and north-Germanic was a 19th century hypothesis of linguists. Many Greek scholars only classified Celts and Scyths in the Northwest and Northeast of the Mediterranean and this classification was widely maintained in Greek literature until Late Antiquity. Latin-Greek ethnographers (Tacitus, There are two famous persons named Pliny: Pliny the Elder, a Roman nobleman, scientist and historian who died in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD The great-nephew of the former, Pliny the Younger, a statesman, orator, and writer who lived between 62 AD and 113 AD. This... Pliny, This article is about the geographer and astronomer Ptolemy. For Alexander the Greats general, see Ptolemy I of Egypt. For others named Ptolemy or Ptolemaeus, see Ptolemy (disambiguation). Claudius Ptolemaeus, given contemporary German styling, in a 16th century engraved book frontispiece Claudius Ptolemaeus (Greek: Κλαύδ... Ptolemy, and Strabo (squinty) was a term employed by the Romans for anyone whose eyes were distorted or deformed. The father of Pompey was called Pompeius Strabo. A native of Sicily so clear sighted that he could see things at great distance as if they were nearby was also called Strabo. Strabo... Strabo) mentioned in the first two centuries AD the names of peoples they classified as Germanic along the Elbe, the Rhine, and the Danube, the Vistula and on the Baltic Sea. Tacitus mentioned 40, Ptolemy 69 peoples. Classical ethnography applied the name Suebi to many tribes in the first century. It appeared that this native name had all but replaced the foreign name Germanic. After the Marcomannic wars the Gothic name steadily gained importance. Some of the ethnic names mentioned by the ethnographers of the first two centuries AD on the shores of the Oder and the Vistula (Gutones, Vandali) reappear from the 3rd century on in the area of the lower Danube and north of the Carpathian Mountains. Modern scholarship has no explanation for the ethnic processes causing this continuity. For the end of the 5th century the Gothic name can be used - according to the historical sources - for such different peoples like the This article is about the Germanic tribes. For the late 20th century youth subculture, see This article is about the contemporary goth subculture. For the Germanic peoples, see the Goths. Goth is a modern subculture that gained visibility during the early 1980s within the gothic rock scene, a sub-genre... Goths in Gaul, Spain and Italy, the For other uses, see Vandal (disambiguation). The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe that entered the late Roman Empire, and created a state in North Africa, centered on the city of Carthage. The Vandals probably gave their name to the province of Andalusia (originally, Vandalusia), in Spain, where they temporarily... Vandals in Africa, the The Gepids (Latin Gepidae) were a Germanic tribe most famous in history for defeating the Huns after the death of Attila. The Gepids were first mentioned around A.D. 260, when they participated with the Goths in an invasion in Dacia, where they were settled in Jordanes time, the mid... Gepids along the Tisza and the Danube, the The Rugians (Latin rugii) were an East Germanic tribe whose ultimate origins have been traced to Rogaland in Norway, whose population probably was the Rugii that Jordanes mentioned as a tribe that still remained in Scandza. The connection is further supported by the fact that an old name for the... Rugians, Sciri and The Burgundians or Burgundes were an East Germanic tribe which may have emigrated from Scandinavia to the island of Bornholm, whose old form in Old Norse still was Burgundarholmr (the Island of the Burgundians), and from here to mainland Europe. In the Thorstein saga Víkingssonar, Veseti settled in an... Burgundians, even the Iranian The Alans or Alani were an Iranian nomadic group among the Sarmatian people, warlike nomadic pastoralists of mixed backgrounds, who spoke an Iranian language and shared, in a broad sense, a common culture. Contents // 1 Early Alans 2 The western Alans and Vandals 3 Alans and Slavs 4 The eastern... Alans. These peoples were classified as Scyths and often deducted from the ancient The Getae was the name by which the pre-Roman ancient writers reffered to the tribes that will become the later Dacians. The Romans used predominantly the name Dacus (pl. Daci) to reffer to the Getae, but the name Getae was also employed. The Getae appears to have been a... Getae (most important: Cassiodor/Jordanes, Getica approx. 550 AD).


The concept of For other uses, see Volk (disambiguation). Volk is a German language word meaning people or folk. It is commonly used in words such as Volksmusik or Völkerbund (League of Nations), or the car manufacturer Volkswagen (literally, peoples car). A number of völkisch movements were set up in... Volk

In the Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s 2030s 2040s Years: 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Contents // 1 Events and trends 1.1 Computers, technology 1.2 Science 1.3 War, peace and politics 1.4... last decade of the (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... 20th century and the This article is about the decade starting at the beginning of 2000 and ending at the end of 2009. For the century or millennium starting in 2000, see the links below. Millennia: 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium - 4th millennium Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century Decades: 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s... first decade of the (20th century - 21st century - 22nd century - other centuries) Contents // 1 Definition 2 Important developments, events, achievements 2.1 Five overall largest mass killings of the 21st century as of 2005 3 Influential people in politics as of 2005 4 Influential people in technology as of 2005 5 Influential people in... 21st there has been debate about exactly what "tribe" or "people" meant to these groups, whose fluidity and willingness to sometimes blend is seen while at the same time forced mergers as a result of war were taking place and the tribe as it had been known vanished. The late classical sources are especially clear in the matter of the blended nature of the The Alamanni, Allemanni or Alemanni, are a Germanic tribe, first mentioned by Dio Cassius, under the year 213. They apparently dwelt in the basin of the Main River, to the south of the Chatti. According to Asinius Quadratus their name -- all men -- indicates that they were a conglomeration of various... Alamanni.


The idea of a unified German people, or For other uses, see Volk (disambiguation). Volk is a German language word meaning people or folk. It is commonly used in words such as Volksmusik or Völkerbund (League of Nations), or the car manufacturer Volkswagen (literally, peoples car). A number of völkisch movements were set up in... Volk, was expressed openly in print by Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. In the sense of the Common Era... 19th century Ethnic nationalism is the form of nationalism in which the state derives political legitimacy from historical cultural or hereditary groupings (ethnicities); the underlying assumption is that ethnicities should be politically distinct. This was developed by Johann Gottfried von Herder, who introduced the concept of the Volk (German for Folk). Romantic... Ethnic Nationalist writers and thinkers after the History of France Chronological Gaul Franks Middle Ages Ancien Régime French Revolution First Empire Nineteenth century Third Republic Vichy France Modern France Topical Economic history Military history Social history Timeline The Napoleonic Wars lasted from 1804 until 1815. They were a continuation of the conflicts sparked by the French... Napoleonic Wars. Such an identity, however, had existed more implicitly since the Middle Ages by region Medieval Britain Medieval France Medieval Germany Medieval Italy Medieval Spain Byzantine Empire by topic Art Literature Poetry Music Architecture Philosophy Universities Technology Warfare Fortifications The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of... Middle Ages, helping to fuel the The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. Contents // 1 Roots of the Reformation 2 Reformation begins 2... Protestant Reformation, when many Germanic lands pulled away religiously and politically from the The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. Members generally prefer the term Catholic Church, but this term has multiple meanings (see Catholicism); the term Roman Catholic Church is used in this article to avoid... Roman Catholic Church.


Generalizing economical, social, religious, ethnic or political structures of Germanic people is impossible. The category 'Germanic' is a Roman and educated one; there had never been a Germanic identity. Peoples were classified by the date of their confrontation with Rome. Every 'gens' has to be discussed on its own, considering the specific historical circumstances. Latin gens, genealogia, natio and Greek ethnos refer to a community of biological descent. Our sources, however, show the complex polyethnic character of the gentes and equate the term with exercitus (army) so that its formation is not a matter of common descent but one of political decision. The development of ethnic identities is to be understood as a process strongly connected to the Roman Empire. Prehistoric sociological structures interacted with the urban, mediterranean culture and out of these processes of integration and confrontation lasting for centuries, the transformation of the Roman World, Medieval Europe emerged.


See also

  • This are some historical Germanic Confederations 230 BC - Bastarnae, a mixture of Germanic tribes, at the Black Sea; they participated in the siege of Olbia (modern Odessa) in 220 BC. 109 BC - Huge confederation composed of the Germanic of Cimbri and Teutoni and the Celtic-Germanic Helvetii formed near Miltenberg... Confederations of Germanic Tribes
  • The term Germanic peoples may refer to: the Germanic tribes that in the first millennium were seen as a barbarian threat by the Roman Empire and its successors; the Germanic Christianity that in the second millennium came to dominate much of Northern Europe, politically organized in the Holy Roman Empire... Germanic peoples for present day descendents

Further reading

  • Beck, Heinrich and Heiko Steuer and Dieter Timpe, eds. Die Germanen. Studienausgabe. Reallexikon der germanischen Altertumskunde. Berlin, New York: Walter de Gruyter 1998. Xi + 258 pp. ISBN 3-11-016383-7.
  • Collins, Roger. Early medieval Europe. 300-1000. 2nd ed. Basingstoke: Macmillan 1999. XXV + 533 pp. ISBN 0-333-65807-8.
  • Geary, Patrick J. Before France and Germany. The creation and transformation of the Merovingian world. Oxford: Oxford University Press 1988. Xii + 259 pp. ISBN 0-195-04458-4.
  • Geary, Patrick J. The Myth of Nations. The Medieval Origins of Europe. Princeton: Princeton University Press 2002. X + 199 pp. ISBN 0-691-11481-1.
  • Herrmann, Joachim. Griechische und lateinische Quellen zur Frühgeschichte Mitteleuropas bis zur Mitte des 1. Jahrtausends unserer Zeitrechnung. I. Von Homer bis Plutarch. 8. Jh. v. u. Z. bis 1. Jh. v. u. Z. II. Tacitus-Germania. III. Von Tacitus bis Ausonius. 2. bis 4. Jh. u. Z. IV. Von Ammianus Marcellinus bis Zosimos. 4. und 5. Jh. u. Z. Berlin: Akademie Verlag 1988 -1992. I: 657 pp. ISBN 3-05-000348-0. II: 291 pp. ISBN 3-05-000349-9. III: 723 pp. ISBN 3-05-000571-8. IV: 656 pp. ISBN 3-05-000591-2.
  • Pohl, Walter. Die Germanen. Enzyklopädie deutscher Geschichte 57. München: Oldenbourg 2004. X + 156 pp. ISBN 3-486-56755-1.
  • Pohl, Walter. Die Voelkerwanderung. Eroberung und Integration. Stuttgart: Kohlhammer 2002. 266 pp. ISBN 3-170-15566-0. Monograph, German.
  • Todd, Malcolm. The Early Germans. Oxford: Blackwell 2004. Xii + 266 pp. ISBN 0-631-16397-2.
  • Wolfram, Herwig. History of the Goths. Berkeley: University of California Press 1988. Xii + 613 pp. ISBN 0-520-6983-8.
  • Wolfram, Herwig. The Roman Empire and its Germanic peoples. Berkeley: University of California Press 1997. XX + 361 pp. ISBN 0-520-08511-6.

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