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Encyclopedia > Germanic mythology
Thor, god of thunder, one of the major figures in Germanic mythology.

Germanic mythology is a comprehensive term for Norse mythology, Anglo-Saxon mythology and other versions of the mythologies of the Germanic peoples. Since Norse mythology is the best known version of, and a source of knowledge for Germanic mythology, the two terms are usually interchangeable, but are not the same mythology. It is a common misconception. The close similarities in these mythologies are due to their being derived from a common Proto-Germanic mythology, dating roughly to the last few centuries BC, in turn ultimately derived from Indo-European mythology, but also due to the persistent cultural contact between the various tribes and peoples. Thors battle against the giants (1872), by Mårten Eskil Winge. ... Thors battle against the giants (1872), by Mårten Eskil Winge. ... Thors battle against the giants, by Marten Eskil Winge, 1872 Thor, Þór (ON), Þunor (OE), Donar or Donner (German) is the red-haired and bearded god of thunder and lightning in Germanic and Norse Mythology, the son of Odin and Jord. ... Norse mythology, Viking mythology or Scandinavian mythology refer to the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... The Anglo-Saxons arrived in Britain from southern Scandinavia, the Netherlands and northern Germany, thus the Anglo-Saxon gods were originally the same gods as those in Germanic mythology and in the better-known version Norse mythology. ... The term Germanic peoples may refer to: the Germanic tribes that in the first millennium were seen as a barbarian threat by the Roman Empire and its successors; the Germanic Christianity that in the second millennium came to dominate much of Northern Europe, politically organized in the Holy Roman Empire... Norse mythology, Viking mythology or Scandinavian mythology refer to the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... Map of the Pre-Roman Iron Age culture(s) associated with Proto-Germanic, ca 500 BC-50 BC. The area south of Scandinavia is the Jastorf culture Proto-Germanic, the proto-language believed by scholars to be the common ancestor of the Germanic languages, includes among its descendants Dutch, Yiddish... The Common Era (CE), also known as current era, is the period beginning with the year 1 onwards. ... Proto-Indo-European Indo-European studies The existence of similarities among the gods and religious practices of the Indo-European peoples suggests that whatever population they actually formed had some form of polytheistic religion. ...


Most sources have been lost, and it is only from Iceland that there is a substantial literature. The Frankish emperor Charlemagne is said to have made a substantial collection of Germanic pre-Christian writings, which was deliberately destroyed after his death. Some information is found in the Nibelungenlied, and in Beowulf. Limited information also exists in Germania by the roman Tacitus. See: The Germanic tribe known as the Franks; One of various currencies known as Francs; Franking as a postal device; Frankfurter; Frank, the LiveJournal. ... A Frankish king, like Charlemagne, (center) depicted in the Sacramentary of Charles the Bald (about 870) Charlemagne (c. ... The Nibelungenlied is an epic poem in Middle High German that takes Burgundian kings as its subject matter. ... The first page of Beowulf This article describes Beowulf, the epic poem. ... The Germania (Latin title: De Origine et situ Germanorum), written by Gaius Cornelius Tacitus around 98, is an ethnographic work on the diverse set of Germanic tribes outside the Roman Empire. ... Roman or Romans has several meanings, primarily related to the Roman citizens, but also applicable to typography, math, and a commune. ... This article is about the historian Tacitus. ...


Unfortunately, even less is known about mythology or religion of the East Germanic peoples, separated from the remaining Germanic tribes during the Migration period. Such knowledge would be suited to distinguish Proto-Germanic elements from later developments present in both North and West Germanic. The tribes referred to as East Germanic constitute a wave of migrants who moved from Scandinavia into the area between the Oder and Vistula rivers between 600 - 300 BC. In historical times these tribes were differentiated as Goths, Burgundians and Vandals among others. ... Human migration denotes any movement of groups of people from one locality to another, rather than of individual wanderers. ...


There are certain differences between the mythology of the North Germanic Scandinavian people as it has come down to us and what is known about the West Germanic mythology: Scandinavian can mean: A resident of, or relating to Scandinavia A North Germanic language A music genre, Scandinavian metal This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

  1. In Scandinavia, Frigg and Freya were two different, but clearly related, goddesses, whereas they seem to have been one and the same in the other Germanic mythologies. In Norse mythology there are certain vestiges of an early stage where they were one and the same, e.g. Odr/Odin, their shamanistic skills and Freya/Frigga's infidelity. See Frige.
  2. In Anglo-Saxon mythology, we find the goddess Eostre who does not appear in Norse mythology.
  3. In the Merseburger formulae appear a Sinthgunt who is a sister of the sun's (Sol). She is not known by name in Norse mythology, and if she refers to the moon, she is then different from the male moon (Mani) of Scandinavian mythology.
  4. In the present day Netherlands a pre-Germanic goddess named Nehalennia was worshiped.

See also : In Norse mythology, Frigg or Frigga was said to be foremost among the goddesses, 1 the wife of Odin, queen of the Aesir, and goddess of the sky. ... Freyja in Wagners operas See Freya radar for German World War II radar. ... Ódr is described in Snorri Sturlusons Edda as follows: Freyja is most gently born (together with Frigg): she is wedded to the man named Ódr. ... Odin, Icelandic/Old Norse Óðinn, Swedish Oden, Anglo-Saxon and Old Saxon Woden, Old Franconian Wodan, Alemannic Wuodan, German Wotan or Wothan Lombardic Godan. ... Frige (Anglo-Saxon, Friia (Germany) or Frea (Langobard)) was the love goddess of Germanic mythology, and the wife of Wotan (Odin). ... Eostre is widely said to be an Anglo-Saxon goddess, but her existence in any authentic pre-Christian Germanic mythology is undocumented, save in one ambiguous reference in Bede (see below). ... In Norse mythology, Sol was the goddess of the sun, a daughter of Mundilfari and Glaur and the wife of Glen. ... In Norse mythology, Mani was the god of the moon and a son of Mundilfari and Glaur. ... Nehalennia is a goddess venerated in Roman times, and nowadays by Heathens, in and around the Netherlands. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Germanic paganism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1672 words)
Germanic paganism refers to the religion and mythology of the Germanic nations preceding Christianization, including Norse and Anglo-Saxon mythologies, and remnants of pre-Christian beliefs in the folklore of medieval and modern Germanic peoples.
The living remnants of the Germanic pre-Christian religion may be regarded as an indigenous ancestral faith, as Shinto is for the Japanese.
She is not known by name in Norse mythology, and if she refers to the moon, she is then different from the male moon (Mani) of Scandinavian mythology.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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