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Encyclopedia > Germanic calendar
Calendars
v  d  e
Common use Chinese · Islamic · Gregorian · ISO · Astro · Julian
Calendar Types
Lunisolar · Solar · Lunar

Selected usage Armenian · Bahá'í · Bengali · Berber · Buddhist · Coptic · Ethiopian · Germanic · Hebrew · Hindu · Indian · Iranian · Irish · Japanese · Javanese · Malayalam · Maya · Nanakshahi · Nepali · Nepal Sambat · Tamil · Thai: LunarSolar · Tibetan · Zoroastrian
Calendar Types
Original Julian · Runic
see also Runic calendar

The Germanic calendars were the regional agricultural almanacs in use amongst the Germanic peoples, prior to the adoption of the Julian and later the Gregorian calendar.[citation needed] A Tunisian calendar showing Gregorian, Islamic and Berber dates // Afghan calendar (Afghan Calendar Project) Armenian calendar Astronomical year numbering Baháí calendar Bengali calendar Berber calendar Buddhist calendar Chinese calendar Coptic calendar Ethiopian calendar Fiscal year Germanic calendar (still in use by Ásatrúar) Gregorian calendar Hebrew calendar Hindu calendars Indian... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwīm al-hijrī; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwīm-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate... The Gregorian calendar is the most widely used calendar in the world. ... The ISO week date system is a leap week calendar system that is part of the ISO 8601 date and time standard. ... Astronomical year numbering is based on BCE/CE (or BC/AD) year numbering, but follows normal decimal integer numbering more strictly. ... The Revised Julian calendar is a calendar that was considered for adoption by the Eastern Orthodox churches at a synod in Istanbul in May 1923. ... A lunisolar calendar is a calendar whose date indicates both the moon phase and the time of the solar year. ... A solar calendar is a calendar whose dates indicate the position of the earth on its revolution around the sun (or equivalently the apparent position of the sun moving on the celestial sphere). ... A lunar calendar is a calendar oriented at the moon phase. ... The Baháí calendar, also called the Badí‘ calendar, used by the Baháí Faith, is a solar calendar with regular years of 365 days, and leap years of 366 days. ... The Bengali calendar (Bengali: , Assamese: Vaskar), is the traditional calendar used in Bangladesh and eastern regions of India in the state of West Bengal, Assam and Tripura. ... The Berber calendar is the annual calendar used by Berber people in North Africa. ... The Buddhist calendar is used on mainland southeast Asia in the countries of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar (formerly Burma) in several related forms. ... The Coptic calendar, also called the Alexandrian calendar, is used by the Coptic Orthodox Church. ... The Hebrew calendar (Hebrew: ‎) or Jewish calendar is the annual calendar used in Judaism. ... A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ... The Javanese calendar is a calendar used by the Javanese people. ... Malayalam calendar (also known as Malayalam Era or Kollavarsham) is a solar Sideral calendar used in the state of Kerala in South India. ... The Maya calendar is actually a system of distinct calendars and almanacs used by the Maya civilization of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, and by some modern Maya communities in highland Guatemala. ... The Nanakshahi (Punjabi: , ) calendar is a solar calendar that was adopted by the Shiromani Gurdwara Prabhandak Committee to determine the dates for important Sikh events. ... Bikram Samwat (Bikram Sambat, Devnagari:बिक्रम संवत, abbreviated B.S.) is the calendar established by Indian emperor Vikramaditya. ... Nepal Sambat (Nepal Bhasa: नेपाल सम्बत) is a lunar calendar. ... The Tamil Calendar is followed by the Tamil speaking state of Tamil Nadu and Kerala in India, and by the Tamil population in Malaysia, Singapore & Sri Lanka. ... The Thai lunar calendar or Patitin Chantarakati (Thai: ปฏิทินจันทรคติ) was replaced by the Patitin Suriyakati (ปฎิทินสุริยคติ) Thai solar calendar in AD 1888 2431 BE for most purposes, but the Chantarakati still determines most Buddhist feast or holy days, as well as a day for the famous Loy Krathong festival. ... The Thai solar, or Suriyakati (สุริยคติ), calendar is used in traditional and official contexts in Thailand, although the Western calendar is sometimes used in business. ... The Tibetan calendar is a lunisolar calendar, that is, the Tibetan year is composed of either 12 or 13 lunar months, each beginning and ending with a new moon. ... The Zoroastrian calendar is a religious calendar used by members of the Zoroastrian faith, and it is an approximation of the (tropical) solar calendar. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... The Runic calendar (or Rune staff) appears to have been a medieval Swedish invention, whereas clog almanacs appear in several European countries. ... The Runic calendar (or Rune staff) appears to have been a medieval Swedish invention, whereas clog almanacs appear in several European countries. ... An almanac (also spelled almanack, especially in Commonwealth English) is an annual publication containing tabular information in a particular field or fields often arranged according to the calendar. ... The term Germanic peoples may refer to: the Germanic tribes that in the first millennium were seen as a barbarian threat by the Roman Empire and its successors; the Germanic Christianity that in the second millennium came to dominate much of Northern Europe, politically organized in the Holy Roman Empire... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... The Gregorian calendar is the most widely used calendar in the world. ...


The months were probably lunar; the Old English "mónaþ", Old Norse "mānaðr, and Old High German "mānōd" [1], as well as the modern English "month", modern Icelandic "mánuður" ,modern Swedish "månad", and the German "Monat" [2], are all cognate with the word "moon". In lunar calendars, a lunar month is the time between two successive similar syzygies (new moons or full moons). ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... The term Old High German (OHG, German: Althochdeutsch) refers to the earliest stage of the German language and it conventionally covers the period from around 500 to 1050. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Apparent magnitude: up to -12. ...


The Germanic peoples had their own names for the months which varied by region and dialect, which were later replaced with local adaptations of the Roman month names. However, Germanic languages have largely kept the old Germanic names for the days of the week, most of which are named after Germanic gods. The Roman calendar changed its form several times in the time between the foundation of Rome and the fall of the Roman Empire. ... Proto-Indo-European Indo-European studies The Germanic languages form one of the branches of the Indo-European (IE) language family, spoken by the Germanic peoples who settled in northern Europe along the borders of the Roman Empire. ... In English the days of the week are, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday. ... Thor, god of thunder, one of the major figures in Germanic mythology. ...


Our main source of reference for Old English month names comes from the Venerable Bede (ca.672 - 735). He recorded the pre-Christian Anglo-Saxon month names in his Latin work known as De temporum ratione (De mensibus Anglorum) [3]. Bede, commonly known as the Venerable Bede, (c. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging toRaedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... De Temporum Ratione is a treatise on the reckoning of time written in Latin by the Northumbrian Anglo-Saxon monk Bede. ...


Charlemagne (ca.742 or 747 - 814) modified the established Julian Calendar to use the agricultural Old High German names of the months in areas under his influence. (See Julian Calendar:Month names for other examples.) They were used until the 15th century, and with some modifications until the late 18th century in Germany and in the Netherlands (sensu lato). Some of these more recent German month names are given in the table below. Charlemagne and Pippin the Hunchback. ... The (Late Old High) German speaking area of the Holy Roman Empire around 950. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ...


Month names

Modern English Old English (Anglo-Saxon) Old Norse Old High German (and the New High German equivalent) Poetic German / Carolingian
January Æftera Géola (After Yule) or Giuli Morsugr or Jól (Yule) (the first half of the month) and Þorri (Thor) (the latter half) Harti-mānōd (New High German: Härte monat, English: Hard Month, Month of Severe Frost) Hartung (Severeness, Harding), Eis-mond (Ice Month), or Schnee-mond (Snow Month)
February Sol-mónaþ (Sol Month) or Fillibrook (Brook-Filling) Þorri and Gói (Thor, Possibly Winter); Kyndilsmessa (candle/kindle-mass) Hornung (Hornung, Hornets) Hornung (Time of Hornets)[4])
March Hréð-mónaþ (Month of the Goddess Hréð or Month of Wildness [5]) Gói and Ein-mánuðr (???, and Single month) Lenzin-mānōd (Lenz monat, Lent Month, Spring Month) Lenzing(Springing) or Lenz-mond (Springtime Month[Lent month])
April Eostur-mónaþ("Easter Month", "Spring month", "month the son/sun rises from the East many times") (see also: Goddess Eostre) Ein-mánuðr (Single month) and ??? (???) Ōstar-mānōd (Oster monat) ("Ostern(Easter) Month", see also Oster) Oster-mond (see also: Goddess Eostre)
May Þrimilci-mónaþ (Month of Three Milkings)  ??? Drīmilki (Three Milkings)[6] (no common NHG equivalent), Winni-mānōd (Wonne monat) Wonne-mond (Graze Month [later interpretation: Blissfulness Month])
June Ærra Líða (Before Midsummer)  ??? (and) and Sól-mánuðr (Sol month, Summer month) Brāh-mānōd (Brach monat) Brachet (Fallows) or Brach-mond (Fallow Month)
(None; leap month) Þrilíða (Third Midsummer) (none) (none) (none)
July Æftera Líða (After Midsummer) Sól-mánuðr and Heyannir (Sol's month, Haying) Hewi-mānōd or Hou-mānōd (both Heu monat, hay month) Heuert or Heu-mond (Hay Month)
August Weod-mónaþ (Plant month) Heyannir (Hay month)and Tví-mánuðr (Double month) Aran-mānōd (Ernte monat, Month of Harvest) Ernting or Ernte-mond (Harvesting, Crop Month / Harvest Month)
September Hálig-mónaþ (Holy Month) or Hærfest-mónaþ (Harvest Month) Tví-mánuðr and Haust-mánuðr (Double month and Harvest/autumn month) Witu-mānōd (Holz monat, Holy month, Month of Wood); or Herbist-mānōd (Leaves month, Herbst monat, Month of Harvest) Scheiding (Separating) or Herbst-mond (Leaves month, Autumn Month)
October Winterfylleþ (Winterfilled) or Rugern (Rye harvest) Haust-mánuðr and Gor-mánuðr (Harvest/autumn month and Dread month, Dirty month, Gore month) Windume-mānōd (Weinlese monat, Window month, Month of Vintage) Gilbhart / Gilbhard (Forest Yellowing, ) or Wein-mond (Wine Month)
November Blót-mónaþ (Blót Month, Dread month, Blood month, Gore month) Gor-mánuðr and Frer-mánuðr (Dread month, Dirty month, Gore month and Frost month) Wintar-mānōd (Winter monat) Nebelung (Nebuling as in "Cloudy month" ,Fogging) or Nebel-mond (Fog Month) or Winter-mond (Winter Month)
December Ærra Géola (Before Yule) or Giuli (Yule) Frer-mánuðr (Frost month) and Morsugr or Jól (Yule month) (Jul monat) Jul-mond (Yule Month) or Heil-mond (Holy Month) or Christ-mond (Christ Month)

Yule is the winter solstice celebration of the Scandinavian Norse mythology and Germanic pagans. ... Hretha is often separated from Hrethmonath, the third month of the Anglo-Saxon calendar, corresponding to March, as reported by Bede, writing in De Tempore Ratione 725 (On the Reckoning of Time), Ch. ... It has been suggested that Cuaresma be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Cuaresma be merged into this article or section. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Easter, the Sunday of... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Standards Of Learning SOL stands for The Standards Of Learning. ... The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST, internally called HT-7U) is a project being undertaken to construct an experimental superconducting tokamak magnetic fusion energy reactor in Hefei, the capital city of Anhui Province, in eastern China. ... Eostre (Easter) and Ostara are the name of a putative Germanic goddess. ... The Ostern (Eastern) or Red Western was the Soviet Union and Iron Curtain countries take on the Western movie. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Easter, the Sunday of... The coat of arms of Oster of the Russian Empire was confirmed on the 4th of June 1782 on the basis of an older coat of arms—in a vert field there was an argent town gate with three small towers. ... Eostre (Easter) and Ostara are the name of a putative Germanic goddess. ... Grazing is the regular consumption of part of one organism without killing it by another organism. ... Growing the same crop repeatedly in the same place eventually depletes the soil of various nutrients. ... Standards Of Learning SOL stands for The Standards Of Learning. ... Stacked hay in Romania Haystacks on stilts in Paddy fields, North Kanara, India Hay is dried grass or legumes cut, stored, and used for animal feed, particularly for grazing animals like cattle, horses, goats and sheep. ... A crop is any plant that is grown in significant quantities to be harvested as food, livestock fodder, or for another economic purpose. ... Look up Harvest in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Dirty is an album by Sonic Youth that was originally released on July 21, 1992. ... Gore may refer to: Kensington Gore, English theatre slang for stage blood The depiction of graphic violence in film, TV and theatre, especially the realistic depiction of serious physical injuries involving blood, flesh and bone matter (see splatter film) A triangular segment: Gore (road), a triangular point of land often... The Blót was the pagan Germanic sacrifice to Norse gods and Elves. ... Human blood smear: a - erythrocytes; b - neutrophil; c - eosinophil; d - lymphocyte. ... Gore may refer to: Kensington Gore, English theatre slang for stage blood The depiction of graphic violence in film, TV and theatre, especially the realistic depiction of serious physical injuries involving blood, flesh and bone matter (see splatter film) A triangular segment: Gore (road), a triangular point of land often... Dirty is an album by Sonic Youth that was originally released on July 21, 1992. ... Gore may refer to: Kensington Gore, English theatre slang for stage blood The depiction of graphic violence in film, TV and theatre, especially the realistic depiction of serious physical injuries involving blood, flesh and bone matter (see splatter film) A triangular segment: Gore (road), a triangular point of land often... The Triangulum Emission Nebula NGC 604 The Pillars of Creation from the Eagle Nebula For other uses, see Nebula (disambiguation). ... Cloudy has worked for such promotions as Combat Zone Wrestling, Chikara Pro Wrestling, UWA Hardcore Wrestling, International Wrestling Syndicate, Northeast Wrestling and NWA Upstate. ... Golden Gate Bridge in Fog Evening fog obscures Londons Tower Bridge from passers by. ... Golden Gate Bridge in Fog Evening fog obscures Londons Tower Bridge from passers by. ... Winter is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. ... Yule is the winter solstice celebration of the Scandinavian Norse mythology and Germanic pagans. ... Yule is the winter solstice celebration of the Scandinavian Norse mythology and Germanic pagans. ...

References

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Of Two Calendars: Julian and Gregorian (2309 words)
This new calendar was synchronized with the traditional seasons again and was not applied to dates in the past, which caused a leap of at least ten days from the final day the Julian calendar was in effect.
The 19-year cycle used for the lunar calendar was also to be corrected by one day every 300 or 400 years (8 times in 2500 years) along with corrections for the years (1700, 1800, 1900, 2100 et cetera) that are no longer leap years.
Sweden started to make the change from the OS calendar and towards the NS calendar in 1700, but it was decided to make the (then 11 day) adjustment gradually, by excluding the leap days (29 February) from each of 11 successive leap years, 1700 to 1740.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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