FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Germaine Greer
Germaine Greer
Born: January 29, 1939
Melbourne, Australia
Occupation: academic writer
Nationality: Australian
Writing period: 1970-present
Subjects: English literature, feminism, art history

Germaine Greer (born January 29, 1939) is an Australian-born writer, broadcaster and retired academic, widely regarded as one of the most significant feminist voices of the 20th century.[1][2][3] The City of Melbournes coat of arms The central business district of Melbourne, viewed from the north Alternate meanings: Melbourne (disambiguation) Melbourne is the capital and largest city of the state of Victoria, and the second largest city in Australia, with a population of 52,117 in the Central... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Note: broadcasting is also the old term for hand sowing. ... Feminists redirects here. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999...


Greer's ideas have created controversy ever since her ground-breaking The Female Eunuch became an international best-seller in 1970, turning her overnight into a household name and bringing her both adulation and criticism. She is also the author of Sex and Destiny: The Politics of Human Fertility (1984); and The Change: Women, Ageing and the Menopause (1991).

Contents

Biography

Greer was born in Melbourne in 1939, growing up in the bayside suburb of Mentone. Her father was a leading Australian insurance executive, who served as a Wing Commander in the wartime RAAF. After attending a private convent school, Star of the Sea College, in Gardenvale, Melbourne, she won a teaching scholarship in 1956 and enrolled at the University of Melbourne. After graduating with a degree in English and French language and literature, she moved to Sydney, where she became involved with the Sydney Push, a group of intellectual left-wing anarchists who practised non-monogamy. The writer Christine Wallace describes Greer at that time: Melbourne (pronounced ) is the second most populous city in Australia, with a metropolitan area population of approximately 3. ... Mentone is a bayside suburb in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. ... Star of the Sea College is an Australian Roman Catholic high school located in Gardenvale, Victoria. ... The University of Melbourne, is a public university located in Melbourne, Victoria. ... A B.A. issued as a certificate A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... The Sydney Opera House on Sydney Harbour Sydney (pronounced ) is the most populous city in Australia, with a metropolitan area population of approximately 4. ... The Sydney Push was a predominantly left-wing intellectual sub-culture in Sydney from the late 1940s to the early 70s. ... Anarchism is a political philosophy or group of philosophies and attitudes which reject any form of compulsory government[1] and support its elimination,[2] often because of a wider rejection of involuntary authority. ...

For Germaine, [the Push] provided a philosophy to underpin the attitude and lifestyle she had already acquired in Melbourne. She walked into the Royal George Hotel, into the throng talking themselves hoarse in a room stinking of stale beer and thick with cigarette smoke, and set out to follow the Push way of life — 'an intolerably difficult discipline which I forced myself to learn'. The Push struck her as completely different from the Melbourne intelligentsia she had engaged with in the Drift, 'who always talked about art and truth and beauty and argument ad hominem; instead, these people talked about truth and only truth, insisting that most of what we were exposed to during the day was ideology, which was a synonym for lies — or bullshit, as they called it.' Her Damascus turned out to be the Royal George, and the Hume Highway was the road to it. 'I was already an anarchist,' she says. 'I just didn't know why I was an anarchist. They put me in touch with the basic texts and I found out what the internal logic was about how I felt and thought'.[4]

By 1972 she would identify as an "anarchist communist" close to Marxism. [5] The notion of an intellectual elite as a distinguished social stratum can be traced far back in history. ... The Bath, a painting by Mary Cassatt (1844–1926). ... A common dictionary definition of truth is agreement with fact or reality.[1] There is no single definition of truth about which the majority of philosophers agree. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up ad hominem in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Political Ideologies Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      An ideology is an organized collection of ideas. ...


In her first teaching job, Greer lectured at the University of Sydney, where she also gained a first class M.A. in romantic poetry in 1963 with a thesis titled The Development of Byron's Satiric Mode. A year later, the thesis won her a Commonwealth Scholarship, which she used to fund her doctorate at the University of Cambridge in England, where she became a member of the all-women's Newnham College. The University of Sydney, established in Sydney in 1850, is the oldest university in Australia. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... Romantic poetry was part of the Romantic movement of European literature during the 18th-19th centuries. ... Lord Byron, English poet Lord Byron (1803), as painted by Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, (January 22, 1788 – April 19, 1824) was the most widely read English language poet of his day. ... The Commonwealth Scholarship and Fellowship Plan, established in 1959, was designed by Commonwealth governments to enable students of high intellectual promise to pursue studies in Commonwealth countries other than their own, so that on their return they could make a distinctive contribution in their own countries while fostering mutual understanding... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... Full name Newnham College Motto - Named after Its location in the village of Newnham Previous names Newnham Hall Established 1871 Sister College(s) Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford Principal Dame Patricia Hodgson Location Sidgwick Avenue Undergraduates 396 Postgraduates 120 Homepage N/A A view of the Clough and Kennedy buildings of...


Professor Lisa Jardine, who was at Newnham with her, recalled the first time she met Greer, at a college formal dinner: Lisa Jardine is a British historian of the early modern period. ...

The principal called us to order for the speeches. As a hush descended, one person continued to speak, too engrossed in her conversation to notice, her strong Australian accent reverberating around the room. At the graduates' table, Germaine was explaining that there could be no liberation for women, no matter how highly educated, as long as we were required to cram our breasts into bras constructed like mini-Vesuviuses, two stitched white cantilevered cones which bore no resemblance to the female anatomy. The willingly suffered discomfort of the Sixties bra, she opined vigorously, was a hideous symbol of male oppression ... [W]e were ... astonished at the very idea that a woman could speak so loudly and out of turn and that words such as "bra" and "breasts' — or maybe she said "tits" — could be uttered amid the pseudo-masculine solemnity of a college dinner.[6]

Greer joined the student amateur acting company, the Cambridge Footlights, which launched her into the London arts and media scene. Using the nom de plume Rose Blight, she wrote a gardening column for the satirical magazine Private Eye, and as Dr. G, became a regular contributor to the underground London OZ magazine, owned by Australian writer Richard Neville. [2] The July 29, 1970 edition was guest-edited by Greer, and featured an article of hers on the hand-knitted Cock Sock, "a snug corner for a chilly prick." Cambridge University Footlights Dramatic Club, commonly referred to simply as the Footlights, is an amateur theatrical club in Cambridge, England, run by the students of Cambridge University. ... Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... Oz Number 3 Oz was a satirical humour magazine first published between 1963–69 in Sydney, Australia and, in its second and more famous incarnation, from 1967 to 1973 in London, England. ... Richard Neville can be: Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, also known as Warwick the Kingmaker, a English noble who fought in the Wars of the Roses. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ...


In 1968 she received her Ph.D. in Elizabethan drama with a thesis titled The Ethic of Love and Marriage in Shakespeare's early comedies, and accepted a lectureship in English at the University of Warwick. The same year, in London, she married Australian journalist Paul du Feu, but the marriage lasted only three weeks, during which, as she later admitted, Greer was unfaithful several times.[7] The marriage ended in divorce in 1973. Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Elizabethan theatre is a general term covering the plays written and performed publicly in England during the reign (1558 - 1603) of Queen Elizabeth I. The term can be used more broadly to also include theatre of Elizabeths immediate successors, James I and Charles I, until the closure of public... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Shakespearean comedies are one of the three (sometimes four) genres of plays by William Shakespeare. ... The University of Warwick is a British campus university located on the outskirts of Coventry, West Midlands, England. ...


Following her 1970 success with The Female Eunuch, Greer left Warwick in 1972 after flying around the world to promote her book. She co-presented a Granada Television comedy show called Nice Time with Kenny Everett and Jonathan Routh, bought a house in Italy, wrote a column for The Sunday Times, then spent the next few years travelling through Africa and Asia, which included a visit to Bangladesh to investigate the situation of women who had been raped during the conflict with Pakistan. On the New Zealand leg of her tour in 1972, Greer was arrested for using the words "bullshit" and "fuck" during her speech, which attracted major rallies in her support. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kenny Everett Kenny Everett (born Maurice Cole in Crosby, Merseyside, 25 December 1944, died 4 April 1995), was a popular English radio DJ and television entertainer. ... Jonathan Routh (born 1927) co-starred in the British version of the television show Candid Camera (1960-67) and co-starred with Germaine Greer and Kenny Everett in Nice Time. ... The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... World map showing the location of Asia. ...


In 1989, Greer returned to Newnham College, Cambridge as a special lecturer and fellow, but left after attracting negative publicity in 1996 for allegedly "outing" Dr. Rachel Padman, a transsexual colleague. Greer unsuccessfully opposed Padman's election to a fellowship, on the grounds that Padman had been born a man, and Newnham was a women's college. A June 25, 1997 article by Clare Longrigg in The Guardian about the incident, entitled "A Sister with No Fellow Feeling", disappeared from websites on the instruction of the newspaper's lawyers. [3] Look up Transsexuality in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ...


Stephanie Merritt wrote in The Guardian: The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ...

She has been in the business of shaking up a complacent establishment for nearly 40 years now and was employing the most elemental shock tactic of getting naked in public both long before and long after it ever crossed Madonna's mind. She has repeatedly written about her own experiences of lesbian sex, rape, abortion, infertility, failed marriage (she was married for three weeks to a construction worker in the 1960s) and menopause, thereby leaving herself open to claims that she shamelessly extrapolates from her own condition to the rest of womankind and calls it a theory ... In part, her ability to remain so prominently in the public consciousness comes from an astute understanding and well-established symbiotic relationship with a media as eager to be shocked as she is to shock.[6]

Greer's last academic appointment had been as a Professor in the Department of English Literature and Comparative Studies at the University of Warwick. A lesbian is a woman who is romantically and sexually attracted only to other women. ... Infertility primarily refers to the biological inability of a man or a woman to contribute to conception. ... Menopause is the physiological cessation of menstrual cycles associated with advancing age in women. ...


The Female Eunuch

See also: The Female Eunuch
The cover to The Female Eunuch
The cover to The Female Eunuch

Greer argued in her book, The Female Eunuch, that women don't realise how much men hate them, and how much they are taught to hate themselves. Christine Wallace writes that, when The Female Eunuch was first published, one woman had to keep it wrapped in brown paper because her husband wouldn't let her read it; arguments and fights broke out over dinner tables; and copies of it were thrown across rooms at unsuspecting husbands (Wallace 1997). It arrived in the stores in London in October 1970. By March 1971, it had nearly sold out its second printing and had been translated into eight languages. Dr. Germaine Greer Germaine Greer (born January 29, 1939) is an Australian academic, writer, and broadcaster, who is widely regarded as one of the most significant feminist voices of the 20th century. ... Image:Femaleeunuch. ... Image:Femaleeunuch. ...


"The title is an indication of the problem," Greer told the New York Times, "Women have somehow been separated from their libido, from their faculty of desire, from their sexuality. They've become suspicious about it. Like beasts, for example, who are castrated in farming in order to serve their master's ulterior motives — to be fattened or made docile — women have been cut off from their capacity for action. It's a process that sacrifices vigour for delicacy and succulence, and one that's got to be changed." (March 22, 1971).


Two of the book's themes already pointed the way to her later book Sex and Destiny, namely that the nuclear family is a bad environment for women and for the raising of children; and that the manufacture of women's sexuality by Western society was demeaning and confining. Girls are feminised from childhood by being taught rules that subjugate them, she argued. Later, when women embrace the stereotypical version of adult femininity, they develop a sense of shame about their own bodies, and lose their natural and political autonomy. The result is powerlessness, isolation, a diminished sexuality, and a lack of joy: This article is about the issues and phenomena pertaining to sexual function and behavior of human females. ... It has been suggested that the section Shame campaign from the article Smear campaign be merged into this article or section. ...

The ignorance and isolation of most women mean that they are incapable of making conversation: most of their communication with their spouses is a continuation of the power struggle. The result is that when wives come along to dinner parties they pervert civilised conversation about real issues into personal quarrels. The number of hostesses who wish they did not have to invite wives is legion.

Greer argued that change had to come about by revolution, not evolution. Women should get to know and come to accept their own bodies, taste their own menstrual blood, and give up celibacy and monogamy. But they should not burn their bras. "Bras are a ludicrous invention," she wrote, "but if you make bralessness a rule, you're just subjecting yourself to yet another repression." The storming of the Bastille, 14 July 1789 during the French Revolution. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Faithfulness redirects here. ...


While being interviewed about the book in 1971, she told the New York Times that she had been a "supergroupie." "Supergroupies don't have to hang around hotel corridors," she said. "When you are one, as I have been, you get invited backstage. I think groupies are important because they demystify sex; they accept it as physical, and they aren't possessive about their conquests." A groupie is a person who, while he/she may be a fan at some level, seeks intimacy (most often physical, sometimes emotional) with a famous person. ...


Other publications

Her second book, The Obstacle Race: The Fortunes of Women Painters and Their Work, was published in 1979. In the same year, she accepted a post at the University of Tulsa, Oklahoma as the director for the Center of the Study of Women's Literature. The University of Tulsa is a private, comprehensive university awarding bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees located in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ...


Sex and Destiny: The Politics of Human Fertility, published in 1984, continued Greer's critique of Western attitudes toward sexuality, fertility, family, and the imposition of those attitudes on the rest of the world. Greer's target again is the nuclear family, government intervention in sexual behaviour, and the commercialisation of sexuality and women's bodies. Greer's apparent approval of life styles and family values in the developing world — the world is over-populated, she argued, only by Western standards of comfortable living — and of poverty in preference to consumerism, led her to endorse practices frequently at odds with the beliefs of most Western feminists. Female genital mutilation had to be considered in context, she wrote, and might be compared with breast augmentation in the West. The book consequently attracted a great deal of criticism. Pamela Bone wrote in The Australian: Fertility is the natural capability of giving life. ... Female circumcision (including excision) loosely refers to a number of procedures performed on the female genitalia and which are generally of a cultural, rather than medical, nature. ... A breast implant is a prosthesis used to enlarge the size of a womans breasts (known as breast augmentation, breast enlargement or augmentation mammoplasty) for cosmetic reasons; to reconstruct the breast (e. ...

Consider this: a struggling, screaming little girl is held down by several people (usually women) while another woman cuts through her clitoris and inner labia, with the intention of ensuring this girl will never experience sexual pleasure; and the world's most famous feminist, to whom much is owed, I don't deny, can compare this practice to adult women choosing, for whatever silly reason, to decorate their sexual parts with metal. [2]

In 1986, Greer published Shakespeare, a work of literary criticism, and The Madwoman's Underclothes: Essays and Occasional Writings, a collection of newspaper and magazine articles written between 1968 and 1985. In 1989 came Daddy, We Hardly Knew You, a diary and travelogue about her father, whom she described as distant and unaffectionate, weak, craven, and feeble, which led to claims — as she knew it would, according to The Guardian — that in her writing she was projecting her relationship with him onto all other men.


In 1991, The Change: Women, Ageing, and the Menopause, which the New York Times called a "brilliant, gutsy, exhilarating, exasperating fury of a book" became another influential book in the women's movement. In it, Greer tries to dispel myths about the menopause and ill health, advising against the use of hormone replacement therapy. "Frightening females is fun," she wrote in The Age. "Women were frightened into using hormone replacement therapy by dire predictions of crumbling bones, heart disease, loss of libido, depression , despair, disease and death if they let nature take its course." She argues that scaring women is "big business and hugely profitable." It is fear, she wrote, that "makes women comply with schemes and policies that work against their interest" (The Age, July 13, 2002). Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is a system of medical treatment for perimenopausal and postmenopausal women, based on the assumption that it may prevent discomfort and health problems caused by diminished circulating estrogen hormones. ...

The Beautiful Boy, 2003

Slip-Shod Sibyls: Recognition, Rejection and the Woman Poet followed in 1995 and, in 1999, two books: The Female Misogynist, in which she attacked both men and women for what she saw as the lack of progress in the feminist movement, and the whole woman. The chapter titles reveal the theme: "Food," "Breast," "Pantomime Dames," "Shopping," "Estrogen," "Testosterone," "Wives," "Loathing," "Girlpower." Greer wrote in the introduction: "The contradictions women face have never been more bruising than they are now. The career woman does not know if she is to do her job like a man or like herself ... Is motherhood a privilege or a punishment? ... [F]ake equality is leading women into double jeopardy ... It's time to get angry again." Image File history File links Bjorn-Andresen-The-Boy-Cover-by-David-Bailey-1970. ... Image File history File links Bjorn-Andresen-The-Boy-Cover-by-David-Bailey-1970. ...


In 2003, The Beautiful Boy was published, an art history book about the beauty of teenage boys, which is illustrated with 200 photographs of what The Guardian called "succulent teenage male beauty", alleging that Greer had appeared to reinvent herself as a "middle-aged pederast." [4] Greer described the book as an attempt to address women's apparent indifference to the teenage boy as a sexual object and to "advance women's reclamation of their capacity for, and right to, visual pleasure" (Greer 2003). The boy pictured on the cover was Björn Andresen, who has said that the use of his picture is "distasteful", and he was not consulted about its use. [5] [6] Cover of The Beautiful Boy, showing Björn Andresen in 1970 by David Bailey The Beautiful Boy[1] is a book, ISBN 0847825868, by Germaine Greer, published in 2003. ... This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... Pederastic courtship scene Athenian black-figure amphora, 5th c. ... Björn Johan Andresen was born in Stockholm, Sweden on 26 January 1955. ...


Other media

Greer's biography, Greer, The Untamed Shrew, was published in 1997 by Christine Wallace. Greer responded that biographies of living persons are morbid and worthless, because incomplete. She said: "I don't write about any living women ... because I think that's invidious; there is no point in limiting her by the achievements of the past because she's in a completely different situation, and I figure she can break the moulds and start again."[8]


Greer is an avowed Catholic, and despite her many attacks on patriarchy, has never criticised the masculine priesthood of the Roman Church. She has written of defeating the Protestant man.[citation needed]


Belinda Luscombe in Time Magazine called Greer "the ultimate Trojan Horse, gorgeous and witty, built to penetrate the seemingly unassailable fortress of patriarchy and let the rest of us foot soldiers in," describing her as "a joy to read, an eloquent maniac." Angela Carter described her as "a clever fool", while former British MP Edwina Currie called her "a great big hard-boiled prat".[6][opinion needs balancing] (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Angela Carter (May 7, 1940 – February 16, 1992) was an English novelist and journalist, known for her post-feminist magical realist and science fiction works. ... Edwina Currie Edwina Currie Jones née Cohen, (born 13 October 1946) is a former British Member of Parliament. ... POV, as opposed to NPOV, in an article means that it is affected by an editors point of view. ...


"[Her] mind provokes us like no other," journalist Catherine Keenan wrote in The Sydney Morning Herald, "but for all the wrong reasons." [9] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In early 2000, Greer claimed at a press gathering in London that she never set foot in Australia before receiving the permission of the "traditional owners of the land" at Sydney Airport. In an embarrassing turn of events, New South Wales Aboriginal Land Council spokesman Paul Molloy later claimed that she had never asked permission, despite visiting Sydney several times in recent years, and in any case there was no single group of elders that could give such permission to enter Australia. [7]


On April 23, 2000, Greer was harassed in her home by a nineteen-year-old student from the University of Bath who had been writing to Greer. The student broke into her home in Essex, tied Greer up in the kitchen, and caused damage to Greer's home. Dinner guests eventually found Greer lying in a distressed state on the floor, with the student hanging onto her legs. BBC News reported that the student was originally charged with assault occasioning actual bodily harm and with false imprisonment, but those charges were dropped and replaced with the harassment charge. She admitted harassing Greer and was sentenced to two years' probation and ordered to undergo psychiatric treatment.[10] Greer was not hurt and told reporters: "I am not angry, I am not upset, I am not hurt. I am fine. I haven't lost my sense of humour. I am not the victim here."[11] April 23 is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Bath is a campus university located near Bath, England. ... Essex is a county in the East of England. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ...


In 2001, she attracted publicity again for a proposed treaty with Aboriginal Australia. In 2004, Australian Prime Minister John Howard called her "elitist" and "condescending" after she criticised Australians as "too relaxed to give a damn" and derided her native country as being "defined by suburban mediocrity."[12]She called Australia a sports-obsessed suburban wasteland devoid of cerebral stimulation. This prompted a lot of reaction, including reaction from Prime Minister John Howard who called her comments "pathetic". John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ... Elitism is a belief or attitude that an elite — a selected group of persons whose personal abilities, specialized training or other attributes place them at the top of any field (see below) — are the people whose views on a matter are to be taken most seriously, or who are alone...


Since 1990 she has made eight appearances on the British television panel show Have I Got News For You, a record she holds jointly with Will Self. Her most memorable appearance was in 1995 when Ian Hislop quoted Greer's spat with a fellow broadsheet columnist, Suzanne Moore, which included a reference to Moore wearing "fuck me shoes". Have I Got News for You is a British television panel show; produced by Hat Trick Productions and a flagship programme for the BBC. It is based loosely on the BBC Radio 4 show The News Quiz, and has been running since 1990. ... Will Self William Self (born September 26, 1961) is an English novelist, reviewer and columnist. ... Ian Hislop (born 13 July 1960) is the editor of British satirical magazine Private Eye, a team captain on the popular satirical current affairs quiz Have I Got News for You and a comedy scriptwriter. ...


Greer was one of nine contestants in the 2005 series of Celebrity Big Brother UK. She had previously said that the show was "as civilised as looking through the keyhole in your teenager's bedroom door". She walked out of the show after five days inside the "Big Brother house", citing the psychological cruelty and bullying of the show's producers, the dirt of the house, and the publicity-seeking behaviour of her fellow contestants.[13] However since then she has appeared on spin-off shows Big Brother's Little Brother and Big Brother's Big Mouth. // Big Brother is a reality TV show broadcast on Channel 4, and S4C in Wales, in which a number of contestants live in an isolated house trying to avoid being evicted by the public with the aim of winning a large cash prize at the end of the run. ... Bullying is the tormenting of others through verbal harassment, physical assault, or other more subtle methods of coercion such as manipulation. ... Big Brothers Little Brother (BBLB; also known as Big Brothers Little Breakfast during the run of Celebrity Big Brother 4) is a magazine television programme shown on Channel 4 and its sister digital channel E4 during a series of Big Brother in the UK. Presented by Dermot O... Big Brothers Big Mouth (formerly Big Brothers EFourum) is a discussion programme based around the reality television series Big Brother, hosted by comedian Russell Brand. ...


In September 2006, Greer's column[14] in The Guardian newspaper about the death of Australian Steve Irwin attracted criticism for what was reported as a "distasteful tirade".[15][16] Greer said that "The animal world has finally taken its revenge on Irwin". In an interview with the Nine Network's A Current Affair about her comments, Greer said "I really found the whole Steve Irwin phenomenon embarrassing and I'm not the only person who did"[17] and that she hoped that "exploitative nature documentaries" would now end.[18] Queensland Premier Peter Beattie labelled her comments "stupid" and "insensitive",[19] one of a number of Australian political leaders to make similar comments. While several Australian newspapers reproduced part of her column they also published letters from readers incensed by her comments the following day. Other Australian commentators, such as P. P. McGuinness, the current editor of Quadrant, supported her comments.[20] In a mixed newspaper opinion piece she repeated her criticism of Irwin while saying that it was "disgraceful that it has taken the Australian national portrait gallery six months to" exhibit a portrait of "this most famous Australian". [8] The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Stephen Robert Steve Irwin (February 22, 1962 – September 4, 2006), nicknamed The Crocodile Hunter, was an Australian wildlife expert and television personality. ... The Nine Network, or Channel Nine, is an Australian television network based in Willoughby, a suburb on the North Shore of Sydney. ... A Current Affair host:Tracy Grimshaw A Current Affair (or ACA) is an Australian television current affairs programme, broadcast on the Nine Network. ... Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Peter Beattie (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd)  - Product per capita  $40,170/person (6th) Population (End of November 2006)  - Population  4,164,590 (3rd)  - Density  2. ... List of Premiers of Queensland Before the 1890s there was no formal party system in Queensland. ... Peter Douglas Beattie (born, New South Wales 18 November 1952), Australian politician, is the Premier of the Australian state of Queensland and leader of the Australian Labor Party in that state. ... Quadrant is an Australian literary and cultural journal founded in 1956 by Richard Krygier, a Polish-Jewish refugee who had been active in social-democrat politics in Europe, James McAuley, a Catholic poet. ...


In October 2006 Greer appeared twice in an episode of Ricky Gervais' Extras playing herself. Extras is a British television sitcom about extras working on film sets and in theatre. ...


In the same month she presented a BBC Radio 4 documentary on the life of American composer and rock guitarist Frank Zappa.[21] She confirmed that she had been a friend of Zappa since the early 1970s and that his orchestral work "G-Spot Tornado" would be played at her funeral. BBC Radio 4 is a UK domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ...



In August 2007 Greer made comments regarding Princess Diana, calling her a "devious moron", a "desperate woman seeking applause", "disturbingly neurotic" and "guileless". [22]


In popular culture

  • Greer is the subject of a song called "Mother Greer" by Australian band Augie March. [9]
  • She is referenced in Bridget Jones's Diary.
  • Greer is quoted in track one of Sinéad O'Connor's album Universal Mother. The track is called "Germaine" and quotes a Greer oratory about matriarchy and fraternity.
  • Greer was also featured in the 1992 Frank Sidebottom song, Germaine's a Pain, which featured the rhyming couplet, her lips pursed with a sneer, I'm forever troubled by Greer. It did not chart, but quickly sold out its first vinyl pressing of 36[citation needed]. Every 7" sleeve contained a different glossy black and white photo of those in the public eye,past and present, that Greer disliked. All were daubed with derogatory words and deliberately misplaced phalli. Greer is said to enjoy the track, and neighbours often comment that she plays it at full volume when on her big trampoline.

Augie March is the name of an Australian rock band. ... Bridget Joness Diary is a 1996 novel by Helen Fielding. ... Sinéad Marie Bernadette OConnor (born December 8, 1966) is a Grammy Award winning Irish singer and songwriter. ... Universal Mother is the fourth album by Irish singer Sinéad OConnor. ... Matriarchy is a gynocentric form of society, in which power is with the female and especially with the mothers of a community. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Books

  • Whitefella Jump Up: The Shortest Way To Nationhood (2004), Profile Books, ISBN 1-86197-739-5
  • Chico, El - El Efebo En Las Artes (2004), Grupo Oceano, ISBN 84-494-2600-6
  • The Beautiful Boy (2003), Rizzoli, ISBN 0-8478-2586-8
  • Libraries (2003), Lemon Tree Press, ASIN B0006S84S6
  • Shakespeare: A Very Short Introduction (2002), Very Short Introductions series, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-280249-6
  • One Hundred Poems by Women (2001), Faber and Faber, ISBN 0-571-20734-0
  • the whole woman (1999), this edition 2000, ISBN 0-385-72003-3
  • The Change: Women, Aging and the Menopause, this edition 1993, Ballantine Books, ISBN 0-449-90853-4
  • Daddy, We Hardly Knew You, 1989
  • The Madwoman's Underclothes: Essays and Occasional Writings (1986), this edition 1990, Atlantic Monthly Press, ISBN 0-87113-308-3
  • Shakespeare (1986), Past Masters series, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-287539-6
  • Sex and Destiny: The Politics of Human Fertility (1984), this edition 1985, Olympic Marketing Corp, ISBN 0-06-091250-2
  • The Obstacle Race:The Fortunes of Women Painters and Their Work (1980), this edition 2001, Tauris Parke Paperbacks, ISBN 1-86064-677-8
  • The Female Eunuch (1970), this edition, Farrar Straus Giroux (2002), ISBN 0-374-52762-8

References

Specific
  1. ^ Jardine, Lisa. "Growing up with Greer", The Guardian, March 7, 1999.
  2. ^ a b Bone, Pamela. "Western sisters failing the fight", The Australian, March 8, 2007.
  3. ^ "Germaine Greer," Encyclopaedia Britannica, 2007.
  4. ^ Wallace, Christine, (1997), Germaine Greer: Untamed Shrew, this edition, Faber & Faber, 1999, ISBN 0-571-19934-8
  5. ^ Greer on Revolution Germaine on Love. Overland 50/51 Autumn 1972 (Recorded February 1972). Retrieved on 2007-08-16. “"I am much more political now than I was then [ie than when a Sydney Libertarian] - I'm an anarchist still, but I'd say now I am an anarchist communist which I wasn't then .....The libertarians may have a good deal of intellectual prestige in Sydney, but seeing that they speak in self-evident truths and tautologies most of the time it's not difficult for them to get intellectual recognition. What disappoints me most about all the radical groups in Australia is that they have not yet managed to make the Marxist dialogue a part of the cultural life of the country as a whole, which it is say for example in India - it's something you expect to see discussed in the daily papers."”
  6. ^ a b c Stephanie Merritt. Danger Mouth, The Guardian, October 5, 2003
  7. ^ Enough Rope Andrew Denton, ABC TV, September 15, 2003, Retrieved on February 8, 2007.
  8. ^ Four Corners, ABC, September 1979.
  9. ^ Catherine Keenan. "A new outbreak of Germ's warfare", Sydney Morning Herald, August 28, 2004.
  10. ^ 'Infatuated' student harassed Greer, BBC News, July 4, 2000. Retrieved on 1 November 2006.
  11. ^ Sapsted, David. "Stalker jumped on Greer crying 'Mummy, Mummy'", The Daily Telegraph, July 5, 2000.
  12. ^ Outrage as Greer brands Australians dull as Neighbours, The Scotsman, January 28, 2004. Retrieved on 1 November 2006.
  13. ^ Germaine Greer: Filth!, The Sunday Times, January 16, 2005. Retrieved on 1 November 2006.
  14. ^ Greer, Germaine. "That sort of self-delusion is what it takes to be a real Aussie larrikin", The Guardian, 2006-09-05. Retrieved on 2006-06-06. 
  15. ^ Hudson, Fiona. "Feminist Greer slams Steve's antics", News Limited, 2006-09-06. Retrieved on 2006-06-06. 
  16. ^ "Greer draws anger over Irwin comments", The Age, 2006-09-06. Retrieved on 2006-06-06. 
  17. ^ "Australian feminist Greer attacks Croc Hunter", Daily News & Analysis, 2006-09-06. Retrieved on 2006-06-06. 
  18. ^ "Greer not surprised Irwin "came to grief"", Reuters, 2006-09-06. Retrieved on 2006-06-06. 
  19. ^ Holloway, Grant. "Storm breaks over attack on Irwin", CNN, 2006-09-07. Retrieved on 2006-06-07. 
  20. ^ McGuinness, P. P. "Germaine Greer is right, Irwin took silly risks", Crikey, 2006-09-07. Retrieved on 2006-09-10. 
  21. ^ Freak Out! The Frank Zappa Story, BBC Radio 4, October 7, 2006. Retrieved on 1 November 2006.
  22. ^ [1]
General
  • Gibson, Owen. "Greer walks out of 'bullying' Big Brother", The Guardian, January 12, 2005
  • Greer, Germaine. "Filth!", The Sunday Times, January 16, 2005
  • Jardine, Lisa. Growing up with Greer, The Guardian, March 7, 1999
  • Pickering, Charlie. "Nasty Creatures Invading Our Habitat; When a recently deceased crocodile hunter meets a reptile of the press, it's hardly a fair contest.", City Weekly, September 14, 2006
  • Shukor, Steven. "From feminist sister to Big Brother housemate", The Guardian, January 7, 2005
  • Weintraub, Judith. "Germaine Greer - Opinions That May Shock the Faithful", New York Times, March 22, 1971

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The ABC or Australian Broadcasting Corporation is the national, Australia. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Four Corners is Australias longest-running and most respected investigative journalism/current affairs television program. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... News Limited was the principal holding for the business interests of Rupert Murdoch until the formation of News Corporation in 1979. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Daily News & Analysis, or DNA, is a popular English language newspaper based in Mumbai, India. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pron. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Look up crikey in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Brilliant Careers - Germaine Greer
  • The genius of Madonna

  Results from FactBites:
 
Germaine Greer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2602 words)
Germaine Greer (born January 29, 1939) is an Australian academic, writer, and broadcaster, who is widely regarded as one of the most significant feminist voices of the 20th century.
Greer unsuccessfully opposed Padman's election to a fellowship, on the grounds that Padman had been born a man, and Newnham was a women's college.
Greer's apparent approval of life styles and family values in the developing world — the world is over-populated, she argued, only by Western standards of comfortable living — and of poverty in preference to consumerism, led her to endorse practices frequently at odds with the beliefs of most Western feminists.
Germaine Greer - MSN Encarta (419 words)
Germaine Greer, born in 1939, Australian writer and feminist, best known for her revolutionary book The Female Eunuch (1970).
She was born near Melbourne and received a bachelor's degree from the University of Melbourne, a master's degree from the University of Sydney, and a doctorate from England's University of Cambridge.
Greer went on a massive publicity tour to promote The Female Eunuch, and her engaging feistiness and the controversy that surrounded her brought her much attention.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     

hewyxx
11th June 2010
I already have

Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m