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Encyclopedia > Gerard, Archbishop of York
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Gerard, Preceptor of Rouen (d. 21 May 1108) was an English clergyman who eventually became Archbishop of York and Lord Chancellor of England. Jump to: navigation, search May 21 is the 141st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (142nd in leap years). ... Events May - Battle of Ucles Consecration of Chichester cathedral Saint Magnus becomes the first earl of Orkney In Pistoia, Italy, Cathedral of San Zeno burned to the ground. ... Jump to: navigation, search Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK... Jump to: navigation, search A church building is a building used in Christian worship. ... The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ... Jump to: navigation, search Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK...


He was a nephew of Walkelin, Bishop of Winchester, of Simon, Abbot of Ely, and connected with the royal family. Originally a precentor in Rouen cathedral, he served as Lord Chancellor from 1085 to 1092, and he became clerk in the chapel of William Rufus, who employed him in 1095 on a diplomatic mission to the pope. His success was rewarded with the Bishopric of Hereford, and he was consecrated by St. Anselm on 8 June 1096, having been ordained deacon and priest on the previous day. On the accession of Henry I, in 1100, he was made Archbishop of York and began a long contest with St. Anselm, in which he claimed equal primacy with Canterbury and refused to make his profession of canonical obedience before him. When he journeyed to Rome for the pallium, he was entrusted with the mission of representing the king against Anselm in the controversy about investitures. The pope's decision was against the king, but Gerard professed to have received private assurances that the decrees would not be enforced. This was denied by the monks who represented St. Anselm; and the pope, when appealed to, repudiated the statement and excommunicated Gerard till he confessed his error and made satisfaction. Jump to: navigation, search Arms of the Bishop of Winchester The diocese of Winchester is one of the oldest and most important in England. ... A Precentor is a person, usually a clergy member, who is in charge of preparing worship services. ... Location within France Rouen (pronounced in French, sometimes also ) is the historical capital city of Normandy, in northern France, and presently the capital of the Upper Normandy région. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ... Events May 25 - Alfonso VI of Castile takes Toledo, Spain back from the Moors. ... Events May 9 - Lincoln Cathedral is consecrated. ... William II (called Rufus, perhaps because of his red-faced appearance, or maybe his bloody reign) (c. ... Events The county of Portugal is established for the second time. ... Jump to: navigation, search The pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Catholic Church. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Bishop of Hereford is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Hereford in the Province of Canterbury. ... To consecrate an inanimate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. ... Saint Anselm of Canterbury (1033 or 1034 - April 21, 1109), a widely influential medieval philosopher and theologian, held the office of Archbishop of Canterbury from 1093 to 1109. ... Jump to: navigation, search June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... Events Bernhard becomes Bishop of Brandenburg First documented teaching at the University of Oxford Beginning of the Peoples Crusade, the German Crusade, and the First Crusade Vital I Michele is Doge of Venice Peter I, King of Aragon, conquers Huesca Phayao, now a province of Thailand, is founded as... Henry I of England (c. ... Jump to: navigation, search Events William II of England dies in a hunting accident - Henry I becomes King of England King Henry I proclaims the Charter of Liberties, one of the first examples of a constitution. ... The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Jump to: navigation, search City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,546,807 almost... A Pallium The Pallium or Pall (derived, so far as the name is concerned, from the Roman pallium or palla, a woollen cloak) is an ecclesiastical vestment in the Roman Catholic Church, originally peculiar to the Pope, but for many centuries past bestowed by him on metropolitans and primates as... INVESTITURE, from the Latin (preposition in and verb vestire, dress from vestis robe) is a rather general term for the formal installation of an incumbent (heir, elect of nominee) in his public office, especially by talking possession of its insignia. ... Jump to: navigation, search Excommunication is a religious censure which is used to deprive or suspend membership in a religious community. ...


Eventually he professed obedience to St. Anselm, but continued to assert the independence of York. When Anselm refused to consecrate three bishops, two of whom had received investiture from the king, Gerard attempted to do so, but two refused to accept consecration at his hands. The pope reprimanded him for his opposition to the primate, and finally the two prelates were reconciled. Gerard carried out many reforms in York, though by his action against St. Anselm he incurred great unpopularity, and the writers of the time charge him with immorality, avarice, and the practice of magic. He died suddenly on the way to London to attend a council, and his death without sacraments was regarded as a Divine judgment. The canons refused to bury him within the cathedral, and the people pelted the hearse with stones. Some Latin verses by him are preserved in the British Museum. A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... Morality is a complex of principles based on cultural, religious, and philosophical concepts and beliefs, by which an individual determines whether his or her actions are right or wrong. ... Greed is a desire to obtain more money or material possessions or bodily satisfaction than one is considered to need. ... Look up magic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... A sacrament is a Christian rite that mediates divine grace. ... Jump to: navigation, search Latin is an Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The main entrance to the British Museum The British Museum in London is the United Kingdoms - and one of the worlds - largest and most important museums of human history and culture. ...

Preceded by:
Maurice
Lord Chancellor
1085–1092
Succeeded by:
Robert Blouet

This article incorporates text from the Catholic Encyclopedia, which is in the public domain. Maurice, Archdeacon of Le Mans was the third Lord Chancellor and Lord Keeper of England, from 1078 to 1085. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ... Robert Blouet was the fifth Lord Chancellor of England, from 1092 to 1093. ... The Catholic Encyclopedia is an English-language encyclopedia published in 1913 by the Roman Catholic Church, designed to give authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine. // History The writing of the encyclopedia began on January 11, 1905 under the supervision of five editors: Charles G... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Archbishop of York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (457 words)
The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury.
The archbishop's throne is in York Minster in central York and his official residence is Bishopthorpe Palace in that village outside York.
In the 11th century, for instance, there was an arrangement which lasted until 1118 that the archbishops of York must be consecrated in Canterbury cathedral and swear allegiance to the Archbishop of Canterbury.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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