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Encyclopedia > Geraldine Fitzgerald
Geraldine Fitzgerald
Geraldine Fitzgerald

Geraldine Fitzgerald (24 November 1913 - 17 July 2005) was an Irish-American actress. Image File history File links DVD cover for Beyond the Horizon showing actress Geraldine Fitzgerald This is a DVD cover. ... Image File history File links DVD cover for Beyond the Horizon showing actress Geraldine Fitzgerald This is a DVD cover. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... July 17 is the 198th day (199th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 167 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ...


Fitzgerald was born in Greystones, County Wicklow, south of Dublin, Ireland. Inspired by her aunt, the actress Shelah Richards, Fitzgerald began her acting career in 1932 in theatre in her native Dublin before moving to London in 1934 to appear in British films. She quickly came to be regarded as one of the British film industry's most promising young performers and her most successful film of this period was The Mill on the Floss (1937). Greystones (Na Clocha Liatha in Irish) is a coastal town in County Wicklow, Ireland, just south of Bray. ... Wicklow (Cill Mhantáin in Irish) is a county on the east coast of Ireland, immediately south of Dublin. ... This article is about the city in Ireland. ... 1932 is a leap year starting on a Friday. ... Dublin (Irish: Baile Átha Cliath),is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Ireland, located near the midpoint of Irelands east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey and at the centre of the Dublin region. ... St. ... 1934 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Mill on the Floss is a novel by George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans), first published in three volumes in 1860. ...


Her success led her to America and Broadway in 1938, and while appearing opposite Orson Welles in the Mercury Theatre production of Heartbreak House, she was seen by the film producer Hal B. Wallis who signed her to a seven-year film contract. She achieved two significant successes in 1939; she received a nomination for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role as Isabella Linton in Wuthering Heights and had an important role in Dark Victory, with both films achieving great box office success. This article is about the street in New York City. ... 1938 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Orson Welles, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) is generally considered one of Hollywoods greatest directors, as well as a fine actor, broadcaster and screenwriter. ... The Mercury Theatre was a theatre company founded in New York City by Orson Welles and John Houseman. ... ... Hal B. Wallis (September 14, 1898 – October 5, 1986) was an American motion picture producer. ... 1939 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Wuthering Heights is Emily Brontës only novel. ... Dark Victory is a 1939 film which tells the story of a young woman who falls in love with, and marries, the doctor who has operated on her for a brain tumor. ...


She appeared in Watch on the Rhine (1943) for Warner Bros. and Wilson (1944) for Fox, but her career was hampered by her frequent clashes with the management of the studio, and the suspensions that resulted. She lost the role of 'Brigid O'Shaughnessy', the villainess of The Maltese Falcon due to her clashes with Jack Warner. Although she continued to work frequently throughout the 1940s the quality of her roles diminished and her career began to lost momentum. She became a U.S. citizen during World War 2 in a display of solidarity with her adopted country. In 1946 she left Hollywood to return to New York where she married her second husband Stuart Scheftel, a grandson of Isidor Straus. She returned to Britain to film So Evil My Love (1948) and received strong reviews for her performance as an alcoholic adultress. In 1951 she appeared in The Late Edwina Black before returning to America. Watch on the Rhine is a 1943 film which tells the story of a man who, in attempting to return to the United States during World War II, is blackmailed by a Nazi sympathiser. ... Warner Bros. ... Wilson is a 1944 biographical film about President Woodrow Wilson. ... 20th Century Fox logo Fox Plaza, the company headquarters. ... Poster of the 1941 Warner Brothers film version, directed by John Huston The Maltese Falcon is a detective novel by Dashiell Hammett, made into a quintessential film noir movie. ... Jack Warner Jack Warner (August 2, 1892 – September 9, 1978), born John Leonard Eichelbaum in London, Ontario, Canada, was the president and driving force behind the highly successful development of Warner Brothers Studios in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California. ... // Events and trends The 1940s were dominated by World War II, the most destructive armed conflict in history. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Isidor Straus (February 6, 1845–April 15, 1912) was owner of the Macys department store and served as a Congressional Representative. ... Polish propaganda poster saying: Stop drinking! Come with us and build happy tomorrows. ... Adultery is generally defined as consensual sexual intercourse by a married person with someone other than their lawful spouse. ... 1951 was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ...


The 1950s provided her with very few opportunities in film, but in the 1960s she asserted herself as a character actress, and her career enjoyed a revival. Among her successful films of this period were Ten North Frederick (1961), The Pawnbroker (1964) and Rachel, Rachel (1968). Her other films include The Mango Tree (1977), for which she received an Australian Film Institute "Best Actress" nomination, Arthur (1981) and Poltergeist II: The Other Side (1986). // Events and trends The 1950s in Western society was marked with a sharp rise in the economy for the first time in almost 30 years and return to the 1920s-type consumer society built on credit and boom-times, as well as the height of the baby-boom from returning... The 1960s, or The Sixties, in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. ... The Pawnbroker is a novel by Edward Lewis Wallant which tells the story of a concentration camp survivor who suffers flashbacks of his past Nazi imprisonment as he tries to cope with his daily life. ... Rachel, Rachel is a 1968 film which tells the story of a repressed school teacher, living with her mother, who suddenly gets a man in her life. ... The Australian Film Institute (AFI) was established in 1958. ... Arthur is a common name, believed to possibly be descended from the Roman surname Artorius or the Celtic bear-goddess Artio. ... The Poltergeist movies are a trilogy of horror films produced in the 1980s. ...


From the 1940s she began to act more on stage and she won acclaim for her performance in the 1971 revival of Long Day's Journey Into Night. She also achieved success as a theatre director. Among her accomplishments on Broadway is a Tony Award nomination in 1982 for the production Mass Appeal, one of the first women to receive a nomination for directing. Long Days Journey into Night is a dramatic play in four acts by Eugene ONeill, generally considered to be his masterwork. ... This article is about the street in New York City. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater. ...


She also appeared frequently on television in such series as Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Robert Montgomery Presents, Naked City, St. Elsewhere and Cagney and Lacey. She received an Emmy Award nomination for a guest role in The Golden Girls in 1989. She starred in a pilot for her own television series, produced by Barbra Streisand and titled Mabel and Max, but it was not a success. Alfred Hitchcock Presents was a half-hour anthology series hosted by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Robert Montgomery Presents was a dramatic television series which was produced by NBC from January 30, 1950 until June 24, 1957. ... Naked City was a John Zorn-led avant-garde music group that incorporated recognizable elements of jazz, surf music, metal, punk rock and literally dozens of other music genres. ... St. ... Cagney and Lacey was an American television series, which aired on CBS for six seasons from 1982 to 1988. ... An Emmy Award. ... Getty as Sophia, McClanahan as Blanche, White as Rose, and Arthur as Dorothy The Golden Girls was a popular sitcom that originally aired Saturday nights in primetime on the NBC network from September 14, 1985 to September 7, 1992. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Barbra Streisand - The Movie Albumcover. ...


In 1990 she began a career as a cabaret singer with the show Streetsongs which played three successful runs on Broadway and was the subject of a PBS television special. 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cabaret is a form of entertainment featuring comedy, song, dance, and theatre, distinguished mainly by the performance venue - a restaurant or nightclub with a stage for performances and the audience sitting around the tables (often dining or drinking) watching the performance. ... This article is about the street in New York City. ... PBS re-directs here; for alternate uses see PBS (disambiguation) PBS logo The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) is a non-profit public broadcasting television service with 349 member TV stations in the United States. ...


Geraldine Fitzgerald has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for her contributions to television, at 6353 Hollywood Boulevard. An example of a Hollywood Walk of Fame star, for the film actress Carole Lombard. ...


Fitzgerald died in Manhattan, New York, on 17 July 2005, following a long battle with Alzheimer's Disease. Manhattan is an island bordering the lower Hudson River. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... July 17 is the 198th day (199th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 167 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ...


She was the mother of the film director Michael Lindsay-Hogg (Let It Be and Brideshead Revisited) and a daughter, Susan Scheftel. She was also a great-aunt of the actress Tara Fitzgerald, and a cousin of the Australian novelist Nevil Shute. The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... The album Let It Be, released by The Beatles on May 8, 1970, was actually recorded in early 1969, before the Abbey Road album, but was the last album released before the group broke up. ... Brideshead Revisited is a novel by Evelyn Waugh, first published in 1945. ... Tara Fitzgerald (born September 18, 1967) is a British actress most widely known for her film roles in Sirens (opposite Hugh Grant) and the 1996 film Brassed Off . ... Nevil Shute (London, January 17, 1899 - Melbourne, January 12, 1960) (full name Nevil Shute Norway) was one of the most popular novelists of the mid-20th century. ...


External links

  • Geraldine Fitzgerald at the Internet Movie Database
  • Portrait of Geraldine Fitzgerald c. 1936 by George Hurrell.
  • Portrait of Geraldine Fitzgerald c. 1939 by George Hurrell.
  • Independent's obituary
  • CNN.com 'Wuthering' actress Fitzgerald dead

  Results from FactBites:
 
Geraldine Fitzgerald - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (644 words)
Geraldine Fitzgerald (24 November 1913 - 17 July 2005) was an Irish-American actress.
Fitzgerald was born in Greystones, County Wicklow, south of Dublin, Ireland.
Inspired by her aunt, the actress/director Shelah Richards, Fitzgerald began her acting career in 1932 in theatre in her native Dublin before moving to London in 1934 to appear in British films.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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