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Encyclopedia > Georgia (U.S. state)
State of Georgia
Flag of Georgia
Flag of Georgia Seal of Georgia
Nickname(s): Peach State, Empire State of the South
Motto(s): Wisdom, Justice, and Moderation
Official language(s) English
Demonym Georgian
Capital Atlanta
Largest city Atlanta
Largest metro area Atlanta metro area
Area  Ranked 24th in the US
 - Total 59,425 sq mi
(153,909 km²)
 - Width 230 miles (370 km)
 - Length 298 miles (480 km)
 - % water {{{PCWater}}}
 - Latitude 33.762° N
 - Longitude 84.422° W
Population  Ranked 9th in the US
 - Total 8,186,453
 - Density 141.4/sq mi 
54.59/km² (18th in the US)
 - Median income  $43,217 (28th)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Brasstown Bald[1]
4,784 ft  (1,458 m)
 - Mean 591 ft  (180 m)
 - Lowest point Atlantic Ocean[1]
0 ft  (0 m)
Admission to Union  January 2, 1788 (4th)
Governor Sonny Perdue (R)
Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle (R)
U.S. Senators Saxby Chambliss (R)
Johnny Isakson (R)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Abbreviations GA US-GA
Website www.georgia.gov

Georgia (IPA: /ˈdʒɔɹdʒə/) is a state in the Southeastern United States and was one of the original Thirteen Colonies that revolted against British rule in the American Revolution. It was the last of the Thirteen Colonies to be established as a colony, in 1733. It was the fourth state to ratify the United States Constitution, on January 2, 1788. It seceded from the Union on January 21, 1861 and was one of the original seven Confederate states. It was the last state readmitted to the Union, on July 15, 1870. Georgia is the ninth-largest state in the nation by population, with an estimated 9,544,750 residents as of July 1, 2007. It is also the third fastest-growing state in terms of numeric gain and fifth in terms of percent gain, adding 202,670 residents at a rate of 2.2%. From 2006 to 2007, Georgia had 18 counties among the nation's 100 fastest-growing counties, the most of any state. Georgia is also known as the Peach State and the Empire State of the South. Atlanta is the most populous city, and the capital. Image File history File links Flag_of_Georgia_(U.S._state). ... Image File history File links Seal_of_the_State_of_Georgia. ... Current State flag of Georgia The current flag of Georgia was adopted on May 8, 2003. ... Seal of Georgia The Seal of Georgia is yellow in color. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_GA.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Georgia (U.S. state) ... The United States does not have an official language, but English is spoken by about 82% of the population as a native language. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... The Atlanta metropolitan area, commonly referred to as Metro Atlanta in Georgia, is the ninth-largest metropolitan area in the United States and consists of 28 counties in Georgia. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Brasstown Bald is the highest point in the state of USA, with a summit elevation of 4784 feet (1458 metres) above mean sea level. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... George Ervin Sonny Perdue III (born December 20, 1946) is the governor of the U.S. state of Georgia. ... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Lowell S. Casey Cagle (born January 12, 1966 in Gainesville, Georgia) is an American politician, a member of the Republican Party, a conservative, and a former member of the General Assembly in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Clarence Saxby Chambliss (born November 10, 1943) is the senior United States Senator from Georgia. ... John Hardy Johnny Isakson (born December 28, 1944), American politician, has been a Republican United States Senator from Georgia since 2005. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... These are tables of congressional delegations from Georgia to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Motto: áƒ«áƒáƒšáƒ ერთობაშია Strength is in Unity Anthem: áƒ—ავისუფლება Freedom Capital (and largest city) Tbilisi Official languages Georgian1 Demonym Georgian Government Unitary semi-presidential republic  -  President of Georgia Mikheil Saakashvili  -  Prime Minister Lado Gurgenidze Consolidation  -  Georgian kingdoms of Colchis and Iberia c. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... The US Southeast is the eastern portion of the Southern United States, but the Census Bureau does not provide a standard definition of a Southeast region of the United States, and organizations that need to subdivide the US are free to define a Southeast region to fit their needs. ... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Atlanta redirects here. ...


Georgia is bordered on the south by Florida; on the east by the Atlantic Ocean and South Carolina; on the west by Alabama and by Florida in the extreme southwest; and on the north by Tennessee and North Carolina. The northern part of the state is in the Blue Ridge Mountains, a mountain range in the vast mountain system of the Appalachians. The central piedmont extends from the foothills to the fall line, where the rivers cascade down in elevation to the continental coastal plain of the southern part of the state. The highest point in Georgia is Brasstown Bald, 4,784 feet (1,458 m); the lowest point is sea level. This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... For exotic financial options, see Mountain range (options). ... The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... The James River winds its way among piedmont hills in central Virginia. ... Foothills are geographically defined as gradual increases in hilly areas at the base of a mountain range. ... The fall line has meanings in both geographical features and the sport of alpine skiing. ... A coastal plain is an area of flat, low-lying land adjacent to a seacoast and separated from the interior by other features. ... Brasstown Bald is the highest point in the state of USA, with a summit elevation of 4784 feet (1458 metres) above mean sea level. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ...


With an area of 59,424 square miles (153,909 km²), Georgia is ranked 24th in size among the 50 U.S. states. Georgia is the largest state east of the Mississippi River in terms of land area, although it is the fourth largest (after Michigan, Florida, and Wisconsin) in total area, a term which includes expanses of water claimed as state territory.[2] For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...

Contents

Geography

Main article: Geography of Georgia (U.S. state)

The geography of Georgia describes a state in the southeastern United States in North America. ...

Boundaries

Beginning from the Atlantic Ocean, the state's eastern border with South Carolina runs up the Savannah River, northwest to its origin at the confluence of the Tugaloo and Seneca rivers. It then continues up the Tugaloo (originally Tugalo) and into the Chattooga River, its most significant tributary. These bounds were decided in the 1787 Treaty of Beaufort, and tested in the U.S. Supreme Court in the two Georgia v. South Carolina cases in 1922 and 1989. For the Department of Energy facility, see Savannah River Site The Savannah River is a major river in the southeastern United States, forming most of the border between the states of South Carolina and Georgia. ... Look up confluence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Tugaloo River (originally Tugalo River) is a short river bordering Georgia and South Carolina. ... The Seneca River is created by the confluence of the Keowee River and the Little River in northern South Carolina, just downriver from Lake Keowee. ... Note: There is also a Chattooga River in Chattooga County, Georgia and Cherokee County, Alabama. ... Look up tributary in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Treaty of Beaufort, also called the Beaufort Convention, is the treaty that officially set the all-river boundary between the U.S. states of Georgia and South Carolina. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States...


The border then takes a sharp turn around the tip of Rabun County, at latitude 35°N, though from this point it diverges slightly south (possibly due to later resurveying with better accuracy). This originally was the Georgia and North Carolina border all the way back to the Mississippi River, until Tennessee was divided from North Carolina, and Alabama and Mississippi (the Yazoo Lands) were taken from Georgia. Rabun County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Surveyor at work with a leveling instrument. ... In the fields of science, engineering, industry and statistics, accuracy is the degree of conformity of a measured or calculated quantity to its actual (true) value. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Yazoo lands were the sparsely populated central and western areas of the U.S. state of Georgia, when its western border stretched back to the Mississippi River. ...


The state's western border then departs in another straight line south-southeastward, at a point southwest of Chattanooga, to meet the westernmost point of the Chattahoochee River near West Point, Georgia. It continues down to the point where it ends at the Flint River (the confluence of the two forming Florida's Apalachicola River), and goes almost due east and very slightly south, in a straight line to the origin of the Saint Mary's River, which then forms the remainder of the boundary back to the ocean. Chattanooga is a city located in United States of America. ... Map of the Apalachicola River system with the Chattahoochee highlighted. ... West Point is a city located in Harris County, Georgia. ... The Flint River is an approximately 150 mi (240 km) long river, in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... View of the Apalachicola River near Fort Gadsden, Florida. ... The St. ...


It should be noted that the water boundaries are still set to be the original thalweg of the rivers. Since then, several have been inundated by man made lakes, including the Apalachicola/Chattahoochee/Flint point now under Lake Seminole. Thalweg (a German word compounded from Tal, valley, and Weg, way) is a term adopted into English usage for geography. ... The ACF River Basin refers to the watershed of the Apalachicola/Chattahoochee/Flint River Basin, in the USA, which begins in northern Georgia and flows into the Gulf of Mexico at Apalachicola Bay, near Apalachicola, Florida. ... Lake Seminole is a man-made lake located in the southwest corner of Georgia along its border with Florida. ...


In 2008, Georgia state legislators claimed that the state's border with Tennessee had been erroneously placed one mile (1.6 km) further south than intended in an 1818 survey, and proposed that the border should be corrected. This would allow Georgia, in the midst of a significant drought, to access water from the Tennessee River.[3] Fields outside Benambra, Victoria, Australia suffering from drought conditions A drought is an extended period of months or years when a region notes a deficiency in its water supply. ... A riverboat passing under the Henley Street Bridge on the Tennessee River. ...


Geology and terrain

Map of elevations in Georgia
Map of elevations in Georgia

Georgia is divided into five geologic regions. These include the Ridge and Valley, the Blue Ridge, the Piedmont, the Coastal Plain, and the Appalachian Plateau. Each region has its own distinctive characteristics. For instance the Ridge and Valley, which lies in the northwest corner of the state, includes limestone, sandstone, shale and other sedimentary rocks, which have yielded construction-grade limestone, barite, ocher and small amounts of coal. The Blue Ridge Mountains of northeast Georgia are made up of metamorphic rock as well as granite and diabase. The geology of the Piedmont includes schist, amphibolite, gneiss, migmatite, and granite while the primary resource of the Coastal Plain is kaolin.[4] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3131x3500, 2033 KB) USGS map of Georgia elevations. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3131x3500, 2033 KB) USGS map of Georgia elevations. ... Geologic regions in Georgia The Geology of Georgia consists of four distinct geologic regions, beginning in the northwest corner of the state and moving through the state to the southeast: the Valley and Ridge, the Blue Ridge, the Piedmont, and the Coastal Plain. ... Ridges and valleys near Bristol, Tennessee The Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians, also called the Ridge and Valley Province or the Valley and Ridge Appalachians, are a physiographic province of the larger Appalachian division and are also a belt within the Appalachian Mountains extending from northern New Jersey westward into Pennsylvania... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... The James River winds its way among piedmont hills in central Virginia. ... The Atlantic Coastal Plain is the rather flat stretch of land that borders the Atlantic Ocean (including the Gulf of Mexico). ... Appalachian zones in the US - USGS The Appalachian Plateau is the western part of the Appalachian mountains, stretching from New York to Alabama. ... Quartzite, a form of metamorphic rock, from the Museum of Geology at University of Tartu collection. ... For other uses, see granite (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Dolerite. ... Kaolin Kaolinite (Aluminium Silicate Hydroxide) Kaolinite is a mineral with the chemical composition Al2Si2O5(OH)4. ...


Flora and fauna

Main article: Ecology of Georgia (U.S. state)

Georgia has a diverse mix of flora and fauna. The State of Georgia has approximately 250 tree species and 58 protected plants. Georgia's native trees include red cedar, a variety of pines, oaks, maples, sweetgum and scaly-bark and white hickories, as well as many others. Yellow jasmine, flowering quince, and mountain laurel make up just a few of the flowering shrubs in the state.


Regarding fauna, white-tailed (Virginia) deer can be found in approximately 50 counties. The mockingbird and brown thrasher are just two of the 160 bird species that can be found in the state. The eastern diamondback, copperhead, and cottonmouth as well as salamanders, frogs, alligators and toads are among 79 species of reptile and 63 amphibians that make Georgia their home. The most popular freshwater game fish are trout, bream, bass, and catfish, all but the last of which are produced in state hatcheries for restocking. Dolphins, porpoises, whales, shrimp, oysters, and blue crabs are found off the Georgia coast.[5] In biology, a copperhead is any of four species of venomous snake: the American copperhead of eastern North America, and three species of Australian copperhead. ... Binomial name Agkistrodon piscivorous (Lacépède, 1789) The cottonmouth, or water moccasin (Agkistrodon piscivorous), is a venomous snake closely related to the copperhead. ... Families Salamander is the common name applied to approximately 500 amphibian vertebrates with slender bodies, short legs, and long tails (order Caudata or Urodela). ... Genera See text. ... This article refers to the large reptile. ... Genera Ansonia Atelopus Bufo Capensibufo Crepidophryne Dendrophryniscus Didynamipus Frostius Laurentophryne Leptophryne Melanophryniscus Mertensophryne Nectophryne Nectophrynoides Nimbaphrynoides Oreophrynella Osornophryne Pedostibes Pelophryne Peltophryne Pseudobufo Rhamphophryne Werneria Wolterstorffina The true toads are amphibians in the Bufonidae family. ... For other uses, see Trout (disambiguation). ... Bream caught in the Volga River near Kashin, Russia. ... Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) Bass (IPA /bæs/) is a name shared by many different species of popular game fish. ... This article is about the siluriform catfishes; for the Atlantic catfish, see Seawolf (fish); for other uses, see Catfish (disambiguation). ...


Climate

Main article: Climate of Georgia (U.S. state)
Map of Georgia
Map of Georgia

The majority of Georgia is primarily a humid subtropical climate tempered somewhat by occasional polar air masses in the winter. Hot and humid summers are typical, except at the highest elevations. The entire state, including the north Georgia mountains, receives moderate to heavy precipitation, which varies from 45 inches (1143 mm) in central Georgia[6] to approximately 75 inches (1905 mm) around the Northeast part of the state.[7] The degree to which the weather of a certain area of Georgia is subtropical depends not just on the latitude, but also on how close it is to the Atlantic Ocean or Gulf of Mexico and the altitude. This is especially true in the mountainous areas in the northern part of the state, which are further away from ocean waters and can be up to 4500 feet (1350 m) or higher above sea level. File links The following pages link to this file: Georgia (U.S. state) Categories: Georgia (U.S. state) maps | National Atlas images ... File links The following pages link to this file: Georgia (U.S. state) Categories: Georgia (U.S. state) maps | National Atlas images ... The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... The Georgia Mountains Region is an area in Northeast Georgia, United States, spreading westward. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ...


The areas near the Florida/Georgia border, extending from the entire Georgia coastline west to the Florida panhandle, experiences the most subtropical weather, similar to that of Florida: hot, humid summers with frequent afternoon thunderstorms and mild, somewhat drier winters. These areas experience snow much less frequently than other parts of Georgia. The Georgia Piedmont area is somewhat cooler in winter than the coastal areas. The southern areas of the Piedmont may receive snow every other year, while areas close to the foothills get snow several times a year. This part of Georgia is especially vulnerable to ice storms. The mountains of Georgia have the coolest climate and most frequent snowfall in the state, although snowfall is less than any other part of the Appalachian Mountains. Freezing Rain is a type of precipitation that begins as snow at higher altitude, falling from a cloud towards earth, melts completely on its way down while passing through a layer of air above freezing temperature, and then encounters a layer below freezing at lower level to become supercooled. ...


In spite of having moderate weather compared to many other states, Georgia has occasional extreme weather. The highest temperature ever recorded is 112 °F (44.4 °C),[8] while the lowest ever recorded is -17 °F (-27.2 °C).[9] Georgia is one of the leading states in incidents of tornadoes. The areas closest to the Florida border get the same small F0 and F1 tornadoes associated with summer afternoon thunderstorms. However, it is very uncommon for tornadoes to become severe (over F3). A tornado hit downtown Atlanta, Georgia on Friday March 14, 2008 causing moderate to severe damage due to all the broken glass on the skyscrapers. As of April 10th parts of Peachtree Street, the main thourghfare in Atlanta, is still closed because of the damage. The SEC basketball tournament and a few conventions were ongoing at the time of impact and some injuries occurred due to the amount of people downtown. As it is on the Atlantic coast, Georgia is also vulnerable to hurricanes, although the Georgia coastline only rarely experiences a direct hurricane strike. More common are hurricanes which strike the Florida panhandle, weaken over land, and bring strong tropical storm winds and heavy rain to the Georgia interior, as well as hurricanes that come close to the Georgia coastline, brushing the coast on their recurvature on the way up to hit The Carolinas. F-scale redirects here. ... This article is about weather phenomena. ... This article is about weather phenomena. ... The Carolinas is a term used in the United States to refer collectively to the states of North and South Carolina. ...


In 2006 and 2007, however, Georgia has had severe droughts, especially in 2007. Temperatures over 100 degrees have been recorded.

Monthly average daily high and low temperatures for major Georgia cities
City Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Athens 51/11
33/1
56/13
35/2
65/18
42/6
73/23
49/9
80/27
58/14
87/31
65/18
90/32
69/21
88/31
68/20
82/28
63/17
73/23
51/11
63/17
42/6
54/12
35/2
Atlanta 52/11
34/1
57/14
36/2
65/18
44/7
73/23
50/10
80/27
60/16
86/30
67/19
89/32
71/22
88/31
70/21
82/28
64/18
73/23
53/12
63/17
44/7
55/13
36/2
Augusta 56/13
33/1
61/16
36/4
69/21
42/6
77/25
48/9
84/29
57/14
90/32
65/18
92/33
70/21
90/32
68/20
85/29
62/17
76/24
50/10
68/20
41/5
59/15
35/2
Columbus 57/14
37/3
62/17
39/4
69/21
46/8
76/24
52/11
83/28
61/16
90/32
69/21
92/33
72/22
91/32
72/22
86/30
66/19
77/25
54/12
68/20
46/8
59/15
39/4
Macon 57/14
34/1
61/16
37/3
68/20
44/7
76/24
50/10
83/28
59/15
90/32
67/19
92/33
70/21
90/32
70/21
85/29
64/18
77/25
51/11
68/20
42/6
59/15
36/2
Savannah 60/16
38/3
64/18
41/5
71/22
48/9
78/26
53/12
84/29
61/16
90/32
68/20
92/33
72/22
90/32
71/22
86/30
67/19
78/26
56/13
70/21
47/8
63/17
40/4
Temperatures are given in °F/°C format, with highs on top of lows. [3]

Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... The degree Celsius (°C) is a unit of temperature named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701–1744), who first proposed a similar system in 1742. ...

Protected lands

Main article: Protected areas of Georgia (U.S. state)

Georgia is home to 63 parks, 48 of which are state parks and 15 that are historic sites, and numerous state wildlife preserves, under the supervision of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.[10] Other historic sites and parks are supervised by the National Park Service and include the Andersonville National Historic Site in Andersonville; Appalachian National Scenic Trail; Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area near Atlanta; Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park at Fort Oglethorpe; Cumberland Island National Seashore near Saint Marys; Fort Frederica National Monument on St. Simons Island; Fort Pulaski National Monument in Savannah; Jimmy Carter National Historic Site near Plains; Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park near Kennesaw; Martin Luther King Jr National Historic Site in Atlanta; Ocmulgee National Monument at Macon; Trail of Tears National Historic Trail.[11] The Georgia Department of Natural Resources is the Georgia administrative agency charged with the responsibility of regulating hunting, fishing, boating, and nongame plants and animals. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... The Andersonville prison, located at Camp Sumter, was the largest Confederate military prison during the American Civil War. ... Andersonville is a city in Sumter County, Georgia, United States. ... The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, generally known as the Appalachian Trail, is a 2,174 mile (3500 km) marked hiking trail in the eastern United States, running from Springer Mountain in Georgia to Mt. ... Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area preserves a series of sites between Atlanta, Georgia and Lake Sidney Lanier along the Chattahoochee River. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, located in northern Georgia and eastern Tennessee, preserves the sites of two major battles of the American Civil War. ... Fort Fort Oglethorpe is located at 34°5644 North, 85°1444 West (34. ... Marsh on Cumberland Island, nearby Plum Orchard Plum Orchard Cumberland Island National Seashore is a unit of the National Park Service (NPS), authorized by Congress on October 23, 1972. ... St. ... Fort Frederica today Fort Frederica National Monument is a unit of the National Park Service located on St. ... St. ... Fort Pulaski National Monument is located between Savannah and Tybee Island, Georgia. ... Savannah redirects here. ... Jimmy Carter National Historic Site Visitor Center (formerly Plains High School) The Jimmy Carter National Historic Site, located in Plains, Georgia, preserves sites associated with James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... Plains is a city located in Sumter County, Georgia. ... Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park is a 2,888 acre (12 km²) in Atlanta, Georgia area that preserves a Civil War battleground of the Atlanta Campaign, and also contains Kennesaw Mountain. ... Kennesaw is a city in Cobb County, Georgia, United States. ... Martin Luther King, Jr. ... The earthlodge at Ocmulgee Ocmulgee National Monument is a U.S. National Monument located just east of Macon, Georgia. ... Macon is a city located in central Georgia, USA. It is among the largest metropolitan areas in Georgia, and the county seat of Bibb County, It lies near the geographic center of Georgia, approximately 75 miles (129 km) south of Atlanta, hence the citys nickname as the Heart of... The Trail of Tears refers to the forced removal of the Cherokee American Indian tribe by the U.S. federal government, which resulted in the deaths of thousands of Cherokee Indians. ...


History

Main article: History of Georgia (U.S. state)

The History of Georgia spans Pre-Columbian time to the present day. ...

Early history

The local moundbuilder culture, described by Hernando de Soto in 1540, completely disappeared by 1560. Early on, in the course of European exploration of the area, a number of Spanish explorers visited the inland region of Georgia. For other uses, see Mound builder (disambiguation). ... For the Peruvian economist, see Hernando de Soto (economist). ... Inland can mean: Inland Fräkne Hundred - a hundred of Bahusia in Sweden Inland Northern Hundred - a hundred of Bahusia in Sweden Inland Southern Hundred - a hundred of Bahusia in Sweden Inland Torpe Hundred - a hundred of Bahusia in Sweden This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other...


The conflict between Spain and England over control of Georgia began in earnest in about 1670, when the English founded the Carolina colony in present-day South Carolina. Nearly a century earlier, the Spanish of Spanish Florida had established the missionary provinces of Guale and Mocama on the coast and Sea Islands of present-day Georgia. After decades of fighting, the Carolinians and allied Indians permanently destroyed the Spanish mission system during the invasions of 1702 and 1704. After 1704, Spanish control was limited to St. Augustine and Pensacola, both in nowaday's Florida. The Florida peninsula was subjected to raids as far as the Florida Keys. The coast of Georgia was occupied by now British-allied Indians such as the Yamasee until the Yamasee War of 1715-1717, after which the region was depopulated, opening up the possibility of a new British colony. In 1724, it was first suggested the British colony there be called Province of Georgia in honor of King George II. Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... The Carolina Colony grants Haystack of 1663 and 1665 The Province of Carolina from 1663 to 1729, was a North American British colony. ... Spanish Florida (Florida Española) refers to the Spanish colony of Florida. ... Guale was a Native American chiefdom that became part of Spanish Floridas missionary system in the late 16th century. ... Mocama was a Native American chiefdom that became part of Spanish Floridas missionary system in the late 16th century. ... The Sea Islands are an archipelago in the Atlantic Ocean. ... Nickname: Location in St. ... Nickname: Motto: Enhancing the Quality of Life for all Citizens Location in Escambia County and the state of Florida Coordinates: , Country United States State Florida County Escambia Government  - Mayor John Fogg (R) Area  - City 39. ... Palm trees in Islamorada The Florida Keys is an archipelago of about 1700 islands in the southeast United States. ... The Yamasee were a Muskogean Native American tribe that lived in coastal region of present-day northern Florida and southern Georgia near the Savannah River. ... The Yamasee War (1715–1716) was a conflict between Native Americans, principally of the Yamasee tribe, and British colonists, which occurred in South Carolina. ... Savannah, Georgia colony, Early 1700s The Province of Georgia (also Georgia Colony) was one of the Southern colonies in British North America. ... George II (George Augustus; 10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ...


British interest in establishing a colony below South Carolina came from varied sources. Spanish Florida was a threat to South Carolina and a haven for runaway slaves. The French in the 1720s established a fort near present-day Montgomery, Alabama, also a threat to British interests in the region. Traders from Charleston, South Carolina, had established trading posts as far west as the Ocmulgee River, near present-day Macon, Georgia. The British trading network kept the Creek Indians allied with them; the French move threatened to wrest these Indians' trade away from the British. These strategic interests made the British government interested in establishing a new colony that would reinforce the British influence in the border country that had been open to Spanish and French penetration. Spanish Florida (Florida Española) refers to the Spanish colony of Florida. ... Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Montgomery Incorporated December 3, 1819 Government  - Mayor Bobby Bright Area  - City  156. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... A trading post is a place where trading of goods takes place. ... The Ocmulgee River near Macon The Ocmulgee River (ok-MUHL-gee) is a tributary of the Altamaha River, approximately 255 mi (410 km) long, in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Macon is a city located in central Georgia, USA. It is among the largest metropolitan areas in Georgia, and the county seat of Bibb County, It lies near the geographic center of Georgia, approximately 75 miles (129 km) south of Atlanta, hence the citys nickname as the Heart of... The Creek are an American Indian people originally from the southeastern United States, also known by their original name Muscogee (or Muskogee), the name they use to identify themselves today. ...


Meanwhile, many members of the British Parliament had become concerned about the plight of England's debtors. A parliamentary committee investigated and reported on conditions in Britain's debtor prisons. A group of philanthropists organized themselves to establish a colony where the "worthy poor" of England could reestablish themselves as productive citizens. This goal was seen as both philanthropic, helping these distressed people, and patriotic, simultaneously relieving Britain of the burden of the imprisoned debtors and augmenting Britain's vital mercantile empire by planting new, industrious subjects to strengthen her trade. This goal went unfulfilled as Georgia was ultimately not settled by debtors or convicts. The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ...


In 1732, a group of these philanthropists were granted a royal charter as the Trustees of the Province of Georgia. They carefully selected the first group of colonists to send to the new colony. On 12 February 1733, 113 settlers landed in the Anne at what was to become the city of Savannah. This day is now known as Georgia Day, which is not a public holiday but is mainly observed in schools and by some local civic groups. James Edward Oglethorpe, one of the trustees of the colony, traveled with the first group of colonists, laid out the design of the town of Savannah, and acted as governor of the colony, although technically under the trustees there was no "governor." Oglethorpe acted as the only trustee present in the colony. When he returned to Britain, a series of disputes ended his tenure governing the colony; Georgia was then led by a series of presidents named by the trustees. In 1752, after the government failed to renew subsidies that had helped support the colony, the Trustees turned over control to the crown. Georgia became a crown colony, with a governor appointed by the British king.[12] is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 12 - British colonist James Oglethorpe founds Savannah, Georgia. ... Savannah redirects here. ... Georgia Day is the holiday which the U.S. state of Georgia recognizes in honor of its colonial founding as the Province of Georgia, a penal colony. ... The word holiday has related but different meanings in English-speaking countries, with the exception of the United States where usage differs greatly. ... James Edward Oglethorpe (22 December 1696 - 30 June 1785) was an English general and philanthropist, a founder of the state of Georgia. ... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen-in-Parliament) legislative power. ... A United Kingdom overseas territory (formerly known as a dependent territory or earlier as a crown colony) is a territory that is under the sovereignty and formal control of the United Kingdom but is not part of the United Kingdom proper (Great Britain and Northern Ireland). ...


Georgia was one of the thirteen colonies that revolted against British rule in the American Revolution by signing the 1776 Declaration of Independence, despite a large population of people loyal to the crown. During the war, nearly one-third of the slaves, more than 5,000 enslaved African Americans, exercised their desire for independence by escaping and joining British forces, where they were promised freedom. Some went to Great Britain or the Caribbean; others were resettled in Canada provinces.[13] Other estimates show an even greater impact from the war, when slaves escaped during the disruption. "The sharp decline between 1770 and 1790 in the proportion of the population made up of blacks (almost all of whom were slaves) [went] from 45.2 percent to 36.1 percent in Georgia."[14] Betsy Ross purportedly sewed the first American flag with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing each of the 13 colonies. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to...


Following the war, Georgia became the fourth state of the United States of America after ratifying the United States Constitution on 2 January 1788. Georgia established its first state constitution in 1777. The state established new constitutions in 1788, 1799, 1861, 1865, 1868, 1877, 1945, 1976, and 1983, for a total of 10 — more constitutions than any other state, except for Louisiana, which has had 11. Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Confederate history

On January 18, 1861, Georgia joined the Confederacy and became a major theater of the American Civil War. Major battles took place at Chickamauga, Kennesaw Mountain, and Atlanta. In December 1864, a large swath of the state from Atlanta to Savannah was destroyed during General William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea. This event served as the historical background for the 1936 novel Gone with the Wind and the 1939 film of the same name. On July 15, 1870, following Reconstruction, Georgia became the last former Confederate state to be readmitted to the Union. On January 18, 1861, Georgia seceded from the Union, keeping the name State of Georgia and joined the newly-formed Confederacy in February. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... In warfare, a theater or theatre is normally used to define a specific geographic area within which armed conflict occurs. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Chickamauga is several things: Chikamaka Cherokees of the Old South a People in Transition by Henry Thompson Malone, The University of Georgia Press Athens Chickamauga (people), a Native American nation Chickamauga, Georgia The American Civil War Battle of Chickamauga The Rock of Chickamauga a nickname for Gen. ... Kennesaw Mountain is a mountain between Marietta and Kennesaw, Georgia. ... General Sherman redirects here. ... This article is about the historical event. ... For the film, see Gone with the Wind (film). ... For the novel, see Gone with the Wind. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American...


Capitals

Georgia has had five official state capitals: colonial Savannah, which later alternated with Augusta; then for a decade at Louisville (pronounced Lewis-ville), and from 1806 through the American Civil War, at Milledgeville. In 1868, Atlanta became the fifth capital of the state. The state's legislature also met at other temporary sites, including Macon, especially during the Civil War. Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... Augusta is a city in the state of Georgia in the United States of America. ... Louisville is a city located in Jefferson County, Georgia. ... For other uses, see Milledgeville (disambiguation). ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate Casey Cagle, R since November 7, 2006 Speaker of the House Glenn Richardson, R since November 7, 2006 Members 236 Political groups (as of November 7, 2006 elections) Democratic Party Republican Party Meeting place Georgia State Capitol Web site... Macon is a city located in central Georgia, USA. It is among the largest metropolitan areas in Georgia, and the county seat of Bibb County, It lies near the geographic center of Georgia, approximately 75 miles (129 km) south of Atlanta, hence the citys nickname as the Heart of...


Cities

See also: Georgia census statistical areas

The largest city, Atlanta, is located in north-central Georgia, atop a ridge southeast of the Chattahoochee River. The Atlanta metropolitan area has a population of 5,138,223 (2006 census estimate), though the city proper has less than 500,000 people. The city is the central city of the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Gainesville, Ga.-Ala. combined statistical area.[15] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3264x2448, 818 KB) Uploader notified. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3264x2448, 818 KB) Uploader notified. ... Downtown Atlanta refers to the largest financial district for the city of Atlanta. ...  ©  This image is copyrighted. ...  ©  This image is copyrighted. ... Savannah redirects here. ... The United States Census Bureau has defined 5 Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs),[1] 15 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs),[2] and 24 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (μSAs)[3] in the State of Georgia. ... This article is about the use of the term in geography and physical geology. ... Map of the Apalachicola River system with the Chattahoochee highlighted. ... The Atlanta metropolitan area, commonly referred to as Metro Atlanta in Georgia, is the ninth-largest metropolitan area in the United States and consists of 28 counties in Georgia. ...


The state of Georgia has twenty metropolitan and micropolitan areas with populations above fifty-thousand. In descending order, they are Atlanta, Augusta, Savannah, Columbus, Macon, Athens, Gainesville, Albany, Dalton, Warner Robins, Valdosta, Brunswick, Rome, Hinesville, LaGrange, Statesboro, Dublin, Milledgeville, Waycross, and Calhoun.[16] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... United States micropolitan areas, as defined by the Census Bureau and the Office of Management and Budget, are areas in the United States based around a core city or town with a population of 10,000 to 49,999. ... Augusta is a city in the state of Georgia in the United States of America. ... Savannah redirects here. ... Columbus is a city in Muscogee County, Georgia, United States. ... Macon is a city located in central Georgia, USA. It is among the largest metropolitan areas in Georgia, and the county seat of Bibb County, It lies near the geographic center of Georgia, approximately 75 miles (129 km) south of Atlanta, hence the citys nickname as the Heart of... Athens-Clarke County is a unified city-county in Georgia, U.S., in the northeastern part of the state, at the eastern terminus of Georgia 316. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nickname: Location in Dougherty County and the state of Georgia Coordinates: , Country State County Dougherty Government  - Mayor Willie Adams, Jr. ... Dalton is a city in Whitfield County, Georgia, United States. ... Warner Robins is the 9th largest city in Georgia, located in Houston County, Georgia and Peach County. ... The city of Valdosta is the county seat of Lowndes County, Georgia, United States. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Georgia Coordinates: , Country United States State Georgia County Glynn Government  - Mayor Bryan Thompson (R) Area  - City 25. ... Aerial view of downtown Rome Location of Rome and major highways Nestled in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, Rome is the largest city in and the county seat of Floyd County, Georgia, United States. ... Hinesville is a city in Liberty County, Georgia, United States. ... LaGrange is a city in Troup County, Georgia, United States. ... The Bulloch County courthouse in downtown Statesboro Statesboro is a small city in southeast Georgia, United States, the county seat of Bulloch CountyGR6. ... Dublin is a city in Laurens County, Georgia, United States. ... For other uses, see Milledgeville (disambiguation). ... Waycross is a city in Ware County, Georgia, United States. ... Calhoun is a city in Gordon County, Georgia, United States. ...


Ten largest cities

Atlanta redirects here. ... Augusta is a city in the state of Georgia in the United States of America. ... Columbus is a city in Muscogee County, Georgia, United States. ... Savannah redirects here. ... Athens-Clarke County is a unified city-county in Georgia, U.S., in the northeastern part of the state, at the eastern terminus of Georgia 316. ... Macon is a city located in central Georgia, USA. It is among the largest metropolitan areas in Georgia, and the county seat of Bibb County, It lies near the geographic center of Georgia, approximately 75 miles (129 km) south of Atlanta, hence the citys nickname as the Heart of... Sandy Springs (formerly Hammond) is a newly incorporated city, as of December 2005, and a suburb of Atlanta, Georgia. ... Location in Fulton County in the state of Georgia Coordinates: , Country United States State Georgia County Fulton County, Georgia Incorporated February 16, 1854 Government  - Mayor Jere Wood (R) Area  - City 38. ... Nickname: Location in Dougherty County and the state of Georgia Coordinates: , Country State County Dougherty Government  - Mayor Willie Adams, Jr. ... Johns Creek (population approximately 63,000 to 70,000) is an area of Fulton County, Georgia which is proposed to be incorporated as a city (the only type of municipality in the state) in December 2006. ...

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1790 82,548
1800 162,686 97.1%
1810 251,407 54.5%
1820 340,989 35.6%
1830 516,823 51.6%
1840 691,392 33.8%
1850 906,185 31.1%
1860 1,057,286 16.7%
1870 1,184,109 12.0%
1880 1,542,181 30.2%
1890 1,837,353 19.1%
1900 2,216,331 20.6%
1910 2,609,121 17.7%
1920 2,895,832 11.0%
1930 2,908,506 0.4%
1940 3,123,723 7.4%
1950 3,444,578 10.3%
1960 3,943,116 14.5%
1970 4,589,575 16.4%
1980 5,463,105 19.0%
1990 6,478,216 18.6%
2000 8,186,453 26.4%
Est. 2007 9,544,750 16.6%

In 2006, Georgia had an estimated population of 9,363,941 which was an increase of 231,388 from the previous year, and an increase of 1,177,125 since 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 438,939 people (that is 849,414 births minus 410,475 deaths) and an increase from net migration of 606,673 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 228,415 people, and migration within the country produced a net increase of 378,258 people. The United [[States Census of 1790 was the first Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1800 was the second Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


As of 2006, Georgia is the 9th most populous state. Its population has grown 44.5% (2,885,725) since 1990, making it one of the fastest-growing states in the country. Beginning with the 1990s, Georgia took over as the fastest-growing state in the South with a 26% population increase during the decade, surpassing its neighbor Florida which had held the title for every decade in the 20th century prior to the 90s. More than half of the state's population lives in the Atlanta metro area. Nineteen Georgia counties were among the 100 fastest growing counties from 2004 to 2005.[17] The center of population of Georgia is located in Butts County, in the city of Jackson.[18] According to the 2000 census, the 28-county Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area has a United States. ... Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... Butts County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ... Jackson is a city located in Butts County, Georgia. ...

Georgia Population Density Map
Georgia Population Density Map

Image File history File links Georgia_population_map. ... Image File history File links Georgia_population_map. ...

Race, language, and age

Demographics of Georgia (csv)
By race White Black AIAN* Asian NHPI*
2000 (total population) 68.34% 29.38% 0.66% 2.46% 0.12%
2000 (Hispanic only) 4.82% 0.39% 0.10% 0.05% 0.03%
2005 (total population) 67.00% 30.29% 0.67% 3.01% 0.14%
2005 (Hispanic only) 6.57% 0.43% 0.12% 0.07% 0.04%
Growth 2000–05 (total population) 8.65% 14.23% 11.72% 36.02% 25.41%
Growth 2000–05 (non-Hispanic only) 5.43% 14.12% 7.43% 35.82% 21.99%
Growth 2000–05 (Hispanic only) 50.99% 22.30% 36.34% 45.53% 36.55%
* AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native; NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

According to the U.S census, Georgia's population is as follows: 62% White, 28.1% African-American, 2.1% Asian American, 1.2% mixed, and 6% are Hispanics or Latino (of any race). As of 2005, 90% of Georgia residents age 5 and older speak only English at home and 5.6% speak Spanish. French is the third most spoken language at 0.9%, followed by German at 0.8% and Vietnamese at 0.6%. As of 2004, 7.7% of its population was reported as under 5 years of age, 26.4% under 18, and 9.6% were 65 or older. Also as of 2004, females made up approximately 50.6% of the population and African Americans made up approximately 29.6%. Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... This article is about the color. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... Hispanic, as used in the United States, is one of several terms used to categorize US citizens, permanent residents and temporary immigrants, whose background hail either from the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America or relating to a Spanish-speaking culture. ...


Historically, about half of Georgia's population was composed of African Americans who, prior to the Civil War, were almost exclusively enslaved. The Great Migration of hundreds of thousands of blacks from the rural South to the industrial North from 1914-1970 reduced the African American population. This population has since increased, with some African Americans returning to the state for new job opportunities.[19] Today, African Americans remain the most populous race in many rural counties in middle, east-central, southwestern, and Low Country Georgia, as well as in the city of Atlanta and in most of its suburbs. According to census estimates, Georgia ranks fourth among the states in terms of the percent of the total population that is African American. The states in blue had the ten largest net gains of African-Americans, while the states in red had the ten largest net losses. ...


As of 2005, approximately 2.7% of Georgia's population was Asian American. Georgia is the nation's third-fastest growing area for Asians, behind only Nevada and North Carolina. Asian buying power in the state was $8.1 billion this year, up from $1.1 billion in 1990, according to statistics from the University of Georgia's Selig Center for Economic Growth.[citation needed] An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ...


White Georgians, like other Southerners, usually describe their ancestry on the census questionnaire as "American", "United States", or simply "Southern". The colonial settlement of large numbers of Scots-Irish Americans in the mountains and piedmont, and coastal settlement by English Americans and African Americans, have strongly influenced the state's culture in food, language and music. Scots-Irish (formerly Scotch-Irish) is a term used to describe inhabitants of the USA and Canada of Scots-Irish (particularly Ulster-Scots) descent, who formed distinctive communities and had distinctive social characteristics. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ...


The concentration of Africans imported to coastal areas in the 18th century repeatedly from rice growing regions of West Africa led to the development of Gullah-Geechee language and culture in the Low Country among African Americans. They share a unique heritage in which African traditions of food, religion and culture were continued more than in some other areas. In the creolization of Southern culture, their foodways became an integral part of all Southern cooking in the Low Country.[20] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Religion

Like most other Southern states, Georgia is largely Protestant Christian. The religious affiliations of the people of Georgia are as follows:[21]

Georgia shares its Protestant heritage with much of the Southeastern United States. However, the number of Roman Catholics is growing in the state because of the influx of Northeasterners resettling in the Atlanta metro area and also because of large Hispanic immigration into the state. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... Presbyterianism is a family of Christian denominations within the Reformed branch of Protestant Western Christianity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Pentecostal... Roman Catholicism in the United States has grown dramatically over the countrys history, from being a tiny minority faith during the time of the Thirteen Colonies to being the countrys largest profession of faith today. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ...


Georgia's Jewish community dates to the settlement of 42 mostly Sephardic Portuguese Jews in Savannah in 1733. Atlanta also has a large, old, and established Jewish community. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... In the strictest sense, a Sephardi (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Səfardim, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardîm) is a Jew original to the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal: ספרד, Standard Hebrew Səfárad, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄áraḏ / Səp̄āraḏ), or whose ancestors were among the Jews expelled from...


Economy

Savannah's River Street is a popular destination among tourists visiting coastal Georgia.
Savannah's River Street is a popular destination among tourists visiting coastal Georgia.
Map showing land use in Georgia

Georgia's 2006 total gross state product was $380 billion.[22] Its per capita personal income for 2005 put it 10th in the nation at $40,155. If Georgia were a stand-alone country, it would be the 28th largest economy in the world.[23] ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 1598 KB) Summary River Street (Savannah, Georgia) Taken on September 10, 2005 by Kmf164 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Savannah, Georgia ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 1598 KB) Summary River Street (Savannah, Georgia) Taken on September 10, 2005 by Kmf164 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Savannah, Georgia ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3086x3450, 1534 KB)Map showing historical land use in Georgia (1972-1976). ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3086x3450, 1534 KB)Map showing historical land use in Georgia (1972-1976). ... Gross state product is a measurment of the economic output of a U.S. state or an Australian state. ... Per capita personal income in the United States was $29,469 in the year 2000. ...


There are 15 Fortune 500 companies and 26 Fortune 1000 companies with headquarters in Georgia, including such names as Home Depot, UPS, Coca Cola, Delta Air Lines, AFLAC, Southern Company, and SunTrust Banks. Georgia has over 1,700 internationally headquartered facilities representing 43 countries, employing more than 112,000 Georgians with an estimated capital investment of $22.7 billion.


Agriculture and industry

Georgia's agricultural outputs are poultry and eggs, pecans, peaches, peanuts, rye, cattle, hogs, dairy products, turfgrass, and vegetables. Its industrial outputs are textiles and apparel, transportation equipment, food processing, paper products, chemical products, electric equipment. Tourism also makes an important contribution to the economy. Georgia is home to the Granite Capital of the World (Elberton). Atlanta has been the site of enormous growth in real estate, service, and communications industries. Farming, ploughing rice paddy, in food, feed, fiber and other desired products by cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals (livestock). ... Ducks amongst other poultry The Poultry-dealer, after Cesare Vecellio Poultry is the category of domesticated birds kept for meat, eggs, and feathers. ... Chicken egg (left) and quail eggs (right), the types of egg commonly used as food An egg is a body consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing of some type, which acts to nourish and protect a developing embryo. ... Binomial name Carya illinoinensis Reference: [1] as of 2003-03-13 The Pecan is a deciduous tree native to North America of the species Carya illinoinensis. ... Binomial name (L.) Batsch Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... This article is about the legume. ... Binomial name Secale cereale M.Bieb. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... Hog is a domestic or feral adult swine. ... Dairy products are generally defined as foodstuffs produced from milk. ... Turfgrass is a type of grass. ... For other uses, see Vegetable (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation). ... Girls wearing formal attire for dancing, an example of one of the many modern forms of clothing. ... For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ... A chemical substance is any material substance used in or obtained by a process in chemistry: A chemical compound is a substance consisting of two or more chemical elements that are chemically combined in fixed proportions. ... The article on electrical energy is located elsewhere. ... Tourist redirects here. ... Elberton is the largest city located in Elbert County, Georgia. ...


Atlanta has a very large effect on the state of Georgia and the Southeastern United States. The city is an ever growing addition to communications, industry, transportation, tourism, and government. Food is also a major industry in Georgia.


Industry in Georgia is now quite diverse. Major products in the mineral and timber industry include a variety of pines, clays, stones, and sands. Textile industry is located around the cities of Rome, Columbus, Augusta, and Macon. Atlanta is a leading center of tourism, transportation, communications, government, and industry. Some industries there include automobile and aircraft manufacturing, food and chemical processing, printing, publishing, and large corporations. Some of the corporations headquartered in Atlanta are: Arby's, Chick-fil-A, The Coca-Cola Company, Georgia Pacific, Hooters, ING Americas, Cox, and Delta Air Lines. Major corporations in other parts of the state include: Aflac, CareSouth, Home Depot, Newell Rubbermaid, Primerica Financial Services, United Parcel Service, Waffle House and Zaxby's. Arbys is a fast food restaurant chain in the United States and Canada that is a wholly owned subsidiary of Triarc. ... Chick-fil-A (IPA pronunciation: ) is a chain headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, that specializes in chicken entrees. ... The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is the worlds largest beverage company, largest manufacturer, distributor and marketer of non-alcoholic beverage concentrates and syrups in the world, and one of the largest corporations in the United States. ... Georgia-Pacific LLC. is an American pulp and paper company based in Atlanta, Georgia, and is one of the worlds leading manufacturers and distributors of tissue, pulp, paper, packaging, building products and related chemicals. ... This article is about the two restaurant chains collectively using the shared Hooters brand. ... Cox may mean: hot man Coxswain. ... Delta Air Lines, Inc. ... Aflac Incorporated (NYSE: AFL, TYO: 8686 ) sells supplemental health and life insurance in the United States and Japan. ... The Home Depot (NYSE: HD) is an American retailer of home improvement and construction products and services. ... Rubbermaid redirects here. ... Primerica Financial Services, a wholly owned subsidiary of Citigroup, is a General Agency with a business model that includes some features of multi-level marketing[1]. Its company headquarters are in Duluth, Georgia. ... United Parcel Service, Inc. ... Waffle House is a restaurant chain with over 1700 stores found in 25 states in the United States. ... Zaxbys is a franchised chain of fast casual restaurants that operates in the southeastern United States. ...


Several United States military installations are located in Georgia including Fort Stewart, Hunter Army Airfield, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Fort Benning, Moody Air Force Base, Robins Air Force Base, Naval Air Station Atlanta, Fort McPherson, Fort Gillem, Fort Gordon, Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany and Dobbins Air Reserve Base. However, due to the latest round of BRAC cuts, Forts Gillem and McPherson will be closing and NAS Atlanta will be transferred to the Georgia National Guard. Fort Stewart is a census-designated place and U.S. Army post primarily in Liberty County, Georgia, but also occupying significant portions of Bryan County. ... Hunter Army Airfield (IATA: SVN, ICAO: KSVN), along with Fort Stewart, is a military complex located near Savannah, Georgia, United States. ... Naval Spaghetti Base Kings Bay, Georgia is a base of the United States Navy in Camden County, in southeast Georgia. ... Fort Benning is a United States Army base, located southwest of Columbus in Muscogee and Chattahoochee counties in Georgia and Russell County, Alabama It is part of the Columbus, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area. ... Moody Air Force Base is a United States Air Force base located in Lowndes County, Georgia. ... Robins Air Force Base (Robins AFB) is a base of the United States Air Force located in Houston County, Georgia. ... Naval Air Station Atlanta (NAS Atlanta) is the U.S. Navy air base in metro Atlanta. ... Fort McPherson is a U.S. Army base located in southwest Atlanta, Georgia. ... Fort Gillem is a U.S. Army military base located in Forest Park, Georgia, on the southwest edge of Atlanta. ... Fort Gordon (formerly known as Camp Gordon) is a United States Army Installation and the current home of the United States Army Signal Corps and Signal Center and was once the home of The Provost Marshal General School (Military Police). ... Georgia Rocks Join the Marines . ... Dobbins Air Reserve Base is a U.S. Air Force Reserve base located in Marietta, Georgia, a suburb about 20 miles or 30 kilometers northwest of Atlanta. ... Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) is a process of the United States federal government directed at the administration and operation of the US Armed Forces, used by the United States Department of Defense and Congress to close excess military installations and realign the total asset inventory in order to save... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air...


Energy use and production

Georgia's electricity generation and consumption are among the highest in the United States, with coal being the primary electrical generation of fuel. However, the state also has two nuclear power plants which contribute one fourth of Georgia's electricity generation. The leading area of energy consumption is the industrial sector due to the fact that Georgia "is a leader in the energy-intensive wood and paper products industry".[24]


State taxes

Georgia's personal income tax ranges from 1% to 6% within six tax brackets. There is a 7% state sales tax, which is not applied to prescription drugs, certain medical devices, and groceries. Each county may add up to a 2% SPLOST. Counties participating in MARTA have another 1%; MARTA is the only major metropolitan rapid transit authority in the U.S. not to receive state funding. The city of Atlanta (in two counties, roughly 90% in Fulton and 10% in Dekalb) has the only city sales tax (1%, total 8%) for fixing its aging sewers. Local taxes are almost always charged on groceries but never prescriptions. Up to 1% of a SPLOST can go to homestead exemptions (the HOST). All taxes are collected by the Georgia Department of Revenue and then properly distributed according to any agreements that each county has with its cities. Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... Tax brackets are the divisions at which tax rates change in a progressive tax system (or an explicitly regressive tax system, although this is much rarer). ... A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... Zoloft, an antidepressant and antianxiety medication A prescription drug is a licensed medicine that is regulated by legislation to require a prescription before it can be obtained. ... Supermarket produce section A supermarket is a store that sells a wide variety of goods including food and alcohol, medicine, clothes, and other household products that are consumed regularly. ... In the U.S. state of Georgia, a special-purpose local-option sales tax (SPLOST) can be levied by any county, for the purpose of funding the building and maintenance of parks, schools, roads, and other public facilities. ... Marta redirects here. ... “Mass Transit” redirects here. ... For the art of stitching, see Sewing. ... A homestead exemption is a exemption from property taxes which can be applied to a home. ...


Culture

Main article: Culture of Georgia (U.S. state)

Fine and performing arts

Georgia's major fine art museums include the Georgia Museum of Art, the High Museum of Art, the Michael C. Carlos Museum, the Morris Museum of Art and the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art.[25] The Atlanta Opera is a full time company that brings opera to Georgia stages.[26] The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra is the most widely recognized orchestra and largest arts organization in the southeastern United States.[27] Moreover, almost all of the universities, colleges, and junior colleges in Atlanta provide some musical instruction.[28] High Museum, Atlanta. ... The Michael C. Carlos Museum is administered by Emory University on its campus in DeKalb County near Atlanta, Georgia. ... The Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, Georgia, is dedicated to the collection and exhibition of art and artists of the American South. ... Atlanta has always had a sordid love affair with opera. ... The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra (ASO) is an American orchestra based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... The US Southeast is the eastern portion of the Southern United States, but the Census Bureau does not provide a standard definition of a Southeast region of the United States, and organizations that need to subdivide the US are free to define a Southeast region to fit their needs. ...


Literature

Georgia literature is distinct among the literature of other places in the world in its historical and geographical context and the values it imparts. Dramas such as the play (on which a successful movie was also based) Driving Miss Daisy are one example of Georgia's literary culture. The most popular and famous novel has probably been Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind, also the basis of a wildly successful movie. Other authors who challenged popular ideas were Carson McCullers and Flannery O'Connor. Contemporary authors such as Alice Walker have also used Georgia's complex past as subjects for fiction, as in her The Color Purple. For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ... Driving Miss Daisy is a 1987 play by Alfred Uhry about the relationship of an elderly Southern Jewish lady and her African-American chauffeur, Hoke Colburn, from 1948 to 1973. ... Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell (November 8, 1900 – August 16, 1949), popularly known as Margaret Mitchell was an American author, who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 for her novel, Gone with the Wind, published in 1936. ... For the film, see Gone with the Wind (film). ... Carson McCullers, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1959 Carson McCullers (February 19, 1917 – September 29, 1967) was an American writer. ... Mary Flannery OConnor (March 25, 1925 – August 3, 1964) was an American novelist, short-story writer and essayist. ... Alice Malsenior Walker (born February 9, 1944) is an American author and feminist (although she prefers the word Womanist). ... This article is about about the novel. ...


Georgia's poets, such as James Dickey and Sidney Lanier, and nonfiction writers like humorist Lewis Grizzard also have a place in the state's literary life.[29] This article is about the art form. ... James Dickey (February 2, 1923 – January 19, 1997) was a popular United States poet and novelist. ... Sidney Lanier (February 3, 1842 – September 7, 1881) was an American musician and poet. ... Non-fiction is a truthful account or representation of a subject which is composed of facts. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Entertainment

Music

Music in Georgia ranges from folk music to rhythm and blues, rock and roll, country music and hip hop. The Georgia Music Hall of Fame, located in Macon is the state's museum of music. Georgia's folk musical traditions include important contributions to the Piedmont blues, shape note singing and African American music. The Sacred Harp, compiled and produced by Georgians Benjamin Franklin White and Elisha J. King, was published in 1844. The Sacred Harp system use notes expressed with shapes to make it easy for people to learn to sight-read music and performed complex pieces without a lot of training.[30] Georgias musical output includes Southern rap groups like Outkast and Goodie Mob, as well as a wide variety of rock, pop and country artists. ... Folk song redirects here. ... R&B redirects here. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ... Macon is a city located in central Georgia, USA. It is among the largest metropolitan areas in Georgia, and the county seat of Bibb County, It lies near the geographic center of Georgia, approximately 75 miles (129 km) south of Atlanta, hence the citys nickname as the Heart of... The Piedmont blues is a type of blues music characterized by a unique fingerpicking method on the guitar in which a regular, alternating-thumb bass pattern supports a melody using treble strings. ... Shape notes are a system of music notation designed to facilitate congregational singing. ... An African American man gives a piano lesson to a young African American woman, in 1899 or 1900, in Georgia, USA. Photograph from a collection of W.E.B. DuBois. ...


The city of Athens, Georgia, home to the University of Georgia has been a fertile field for alternative rock bands since the late 1970s. Notable bands from Athens include R.E.M.,[31] The B-52s, Widespread Panic, Drive-By Truckers, as well as bands from the Elephant 6 Recording Company most notably Neutral Milk Hotel. R.E.M. is an American rock band formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 by Bill Berry (drums), Peter Buck (guitar), Mike Mills (bass guitar), and Michael Stipe (vocals). ... The B-52s are a rock band from Athens, Georgia, the first of many from the college town that has become one of the most important centers in alternative rock. ... Widespread Panic is a southern jam band from Athens, Georgia. ... Drive-By Truckers are a rock/alt-country/cowpunk (their website actually calls them a psychobilly band) band based in Athens, Georgia, though three out of five members (Mike Cooley, Patterson Hood, and Shonna Tucker) originally hail from The Shoals region of Northern Alabama. ... The Elephant Six Recording Company was a musical collective founded in Athens, Georgia, USA, by Bill Doss, Will Cullen Hart (both, now formerly, of Olivia Tremor Control), Jeff Mangum (of Neutral Milk Hotel), and Robert Schneider (of the Apples in Stereo), the four of whom grew up making music in... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Rhythm and Blues is another important musical genre in Georgia. Augusta native James Brown and Macon native Little Richard, two important figures in R&B history, started performing in Georgia clubs on the Chitlin' Circuit, fused gospel music with blues and boogie-woogie to lay the foundations for R&B and soul music, and rank among the most iconic musicians of the 20th century. In the 1960s, Atlanta native Gladys Knight proved one of the most popular Motown recording artists, while Otis Redding, born in the small town of Dawson but raised in Macon, defined the grittier Southern soul sound of Memphis-based Stax Records.[32] Opera singer Jessye Norman is native to Augusta.[33] Augusta is a city in the state of Georgia in the United States of America. ... Richard Wayne Penniman (born December 5, 1932), better known by the stage name Little Richard, is an African-American singer, songwriter, and pianist, who began performing in the 1940s and was a key figure in the transition from rhythm & blues to rock and roll in the mid-1950s. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ... Blues music redirects here. ... Boogie woogie has two different meanings: a piano based music style, boogie woogie (music) a dance that imitates the rocknroll of the 50s, boogie woogie (dance) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Gladys Maria Knight (born May 28, 1944 in Atlanta, Georgia, USA) is a seven-time Grammy Award-winning American R&B/soul singer, actress and author. ... Motown Records, Inc. ... Otis Ray Redding, Jr. ... Dawson is a city located in Terrell County, Georgia. ... Southern soul is a style of music that falls within the larger soul music and r&b Music genres. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... Stax Records is an American record label, originally based out of Memphis, Tennessee. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Collective Soul, a hard rock band known for their song "Shine", are from Stockbridge, Georgia. Collective Soul is an American rock band from Stockbridge, Georgia. ... Shine is the first hit single by post-grunge band Collective Soul. ... Stockbridge is a city located in Henry County, Georgia. ...


Film

Hundreds of feature films have been located in Georgia. By 2007 more than $4 billion had been generated for the state's economy by the film and television industry since the 1970s.[34] Such films include Deliverance; Smokey and the Bandit; Driving Miss Daisy and Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, with settings ranging from Appalachia to the manicured squares of Savannah.[34] Due to the success of Deliverance, as governor Jimmy Carter established a state film commission, now known as the Georgia Film, Video and Music Office, in 1973 to market Georgia as a shooting location for future projects. The commission had recruited more than 550 major projects to the state by 2007.[34] Actress Julia Roberts is one of the most well-known natives of Georgia. This article is about the film. ... Smokey and the Bandit is a 1977 movie starring Burt Reynolds, Sally Field, Jackie Gleason, Jerry Reed, Pat McCormick, Paul Williams, and Mike Henry. ... Driving Miss Daisy is a 1987 play by Alfred Uhry about the relationship of an elderly Southern Jewish lady and her African-American chauffeur, Hoke Colburn, from 1948 to 1973. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... This article is about the film. ...


Popular culture

Stereotypical Georgian traits include manners known as "Southern hospitality", a strong sense of community and shared culture, and a distinctive Southern dialect. Georgia's Southern heritage makes turkey and dressing a traditional holiday dish during both Thanksgiving and Christmas. Movies like Gone with the Wind and the book If I Ever Get Back to Georgia, I'm Gonna Nail My Feet to the Ground by Lewis Grizzard lampoon (and celebrate) Georgia culture, speech and mannerisms. For other uses, see Stereotype (disambiguation). ... For the Ludacris single, see Southern Hospitality. ... In cooking, stuffing is usually a mixture of various ingredients used to fill a cavity in another food item. ... For the novel, see Gone with the Wind. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Girl Scouting in the United States of America began on March 12, 1912 when Juliette "Daisy" Gordon Low organized the first Girl Scout troop meeting of 18 girls in Savannah, Georgia. is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Savannah redirects here. ...


Health care and education

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x733, 58 KB)http://img. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x733, 58 KB)http://img. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France, Shanghai, China, and Singapore. ... A closeup of Tech Tower The Lettie Pate Whitehead Evans Administration Building, commonly known as Tech Tower, is an historic building located on the central campus of the Georgia Institute of Technology. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Health care

See also: List of hospitals in Georgia (U.S. state)

Georgians can find medical and dental care "via 151 general hospitals, more than 15,000 doctors and nearly 6,000 dentists."[35] The state is ranked forty-first in the percentage of residents who engage in regular exercise.[36] List of hospitals in Georgia (U.S. state), sorted by hospital name. ...


Education

See also: List of colleges and universities in Georgia (U.S. state), List of high schools in Georgia, and List of school districts in Georgia

Georgia high schools (grades nine through twelve) are required to administer a standardized, multiple-choice End of Course Test, or EOCT, in each of eight core subjects including Algebra I, Geometry, U.S. History, Economics, Biology, Physical Science, Ninth Grade Literature and Composition, and American Literature and Composition. The official purpose of the tests is to assess "specific content knowledge and skills." Although a minimum test score is not required for the student to receive credit in the course, completion of the test is mandatory. The EOCT score comprises 15% of a student's grade in the course.[37] The following is a list of colleges and universities in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... // This is a list of high schools in the state of Georgia. ... List of school districts in Georgia Appling County Atkinson County Atlanta Public Schools Bacon County Baker County Baldwin County Banks County Barrow County Bartow County Ben Hill County Berrien County Bibb County Bleckley County Brantley County Bremen City Brooks County Bryan County Buford City Bulloch County Burke County Butts County... High school, or secondary school, is the last segment of compulsory education in Hong Kong, United States, Australia, Canada, China, Korea and Japan. ... A standardized test is a test administered and scored in a consistent manner. ... Multiple choice (MCQ) questions or items are a form of assessment item for which respondents are asked to select one or more of the choices from a list. ... The End of Course Test (EOCT) is an academic assessment conducted in many states by the State Board of Education. ... This article is about the branch of mathematics. ... For other uses, see Geometry (disambiguation). ... Pre-Colonial America For details, see the main Pre-Colonial America article. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: Βιολογία - βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ... == Headline text ==cant there be some kind of picture somewhere so i can see by picture???? Physical science is a encompassing term for the branches of natural science, and science, that study non-living systems, in contrast to the biological sciences. ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... The term Composition, in written language, refers to the process and study of creating written works or pieces of literature. ... American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ... The Carnegie Unit and the Student Hour (also called a Credit Hour) are strictly time-based references for measuring educational attainment used by American universities and colleges; the Carnegie Unit assesses secondary school attainment, and the Student Hour, derived from the Carnegie Unit, assesses collegiate attainment. ...


High school students must also receive passing scores on four Georgia High School Graduation Tests (GHSGT) and the Georgia High School Writing Assessment in order to receive a diploma. Subjects assessed include Mathematics, Science, Language Arts, and Social Studies. These tests are initially offered during students' eleventh-grade year, allowing for multiple opportunities to pass the tests before graduation at the end of twelfth grade.[38] For other uses, see Graduation (disambiguation). ...


Georgia is home to almost 70 public colleges, universities, and technical colleges in addition to over 45 private institutes of higher learning.


The HOPE scholarship, funded by the state lottery, is available to all Georgia residents who have graduated from high school with a 3.0 or higher grade point average and who attend a public college or university in the state. The scholarship covers the cost of tuition and provides a stipend for books for up to 120 credit hours. If the student does not maintain a 3.0 average while in college they may lose the scholarship in which case they will have the chance to get it back by bringing their grade point average above a 3.0 within a period of 30 credit hours. This scholarship has had a significant impact on the state university system, increasing competition for admission and increasing the quality of education.


Transportation

Atlanta is still a major railroad hub for CSX and Norfolk Southern, in addition to being a major airport hub now as well; Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport is the principal airport for the state and it's only major one. It is a Hub for AirTran Airways and Delta Air Lines. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport is the world's busiest passenger airport, serving over 84 million passengers in 2006. Several highways and short line railroads also traverse the state. This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Categories: Companies traded on NYSE | Railway companies of the United States | Alabama railroads | Connecticut railroads | Delaware railroads | Florida current railroads | Georgia railroads | Illinois railroads | Indiana railroads | Kentucky railroads | Louisiana railroads | Maryland railroads | Massachusetts railroads | Michigan railroads | Mississippi railroads | New Jersey railroads | New York railroads | North Carolina railroads | Ohio railroads | Pennsylvania... Norfolk Southern Corporation (AAR reporting mark NS) NYSE: NSC is a US publicly-traded stock corporation based in Norfolk, Virginia. ... Atlanta Airport redirects here. ... AirTran Airways is a low-cost airline that is a Delaware corporation with headquarters in Orlando, Florida, USA and is a subsidiary of AirTran Holdings. ... Delta Air Lines, Inc. ... For other uses, see Highway (disambiguation). ... A short line is an independent railroad company that operates over a relatively short distance. ...

Interstate highways

United States highways

North-south routes East-west routes

Image File history File links I-16. ... Interstate 16 (abbreviated I-16), or Georgia State Route 404, is an intrastate interstate highway located entirely within the state of Georgia, United States. ... Image File history File links I-516. ... Interstate 516 (Georgia state route 421) runs near the southeastern, coastal Georgia city of Savannah and crosses Interstate 16. ... Image File history File links I-20. ... “I-20” redirects here. ... Image File history File links I-520. ... Interstate 520 (abbreviated I-520) partly encircles Augusta, Georgia. ... Image File history File links I-59. ... Interstate 59 (abbreviated I-59) is an interstate highway in the southern United States. ... Image File history File links I-24. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 24 Interstate 24 (abbreviated I-24) is an interstate highway in the eastern United States. ... Image File history File links I-75. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Image File history File links I-475. ... Interstate 475 (abbreviated I-475) is an interstate highway in Georgia begins at Interstate 75 and bypasses Macon, Georgia. ... Image File history File links I-575. ... Interstate 575 (abbreviated I-575) is an Interstate highway spur route in the United States, which branches off Interstate 75 in Kennesaw and connects the metro Atlanta area with the north Georgia mountains. ... Image File history File links I-675. ... Interstate 675 is the designation of several Interstate Highways in the United States, all of which are related to Interstate 75: Interstate 675 (Georgia), a connection south of Atlanta, Georgia. ... Image File history File links I-85. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 85 Interstate 85 (abbreviated I-85) is an interstate highway in the southeastern United States. ... Image File history File links I-185. ... This article is about Interstate 185 in Georgia. ... Image File history File links I-985. ... Interstate 985 (abbreviated I-985) begins at Interstate 85 mile 113 near Suwanee and continues northward to the north Georgia city of Gainesville. ... Image File history File links I-95. ... Interstate 95, the main Interstate Highway on the east coast of the United States, serves the Atlantic coast of Georgia. ... Image File history File links I-285. ... Interstate 285 (abbreviated I-285) is a beltway interstate highway encircling Atlanta, Georgia, for 63. ... Image File history File links I-3. ... [edit] Interstate 3 Interstate 3, the Third Infantry Division Highway, was proposed in the 2005 highway funding bill (Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users) to run from Savannah, Georgia north to Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Image File history File links I-14. ... The Interstate Highway system is still being expanded. ... Image File history File links US_1. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: U.S. Route 1 U.S. Route 1 (also called U.S. Highway 1, and abbreviated US 1) is a United States highway which parallels the east coast of the United States. ... Image File history File links US_301. ... U.S. Route 301 is a spur of U.S. Route 1. ... Image File history File links US_11. ... U.S. Route 11 is a north-south United States highway extending 1,645 miles[1] (2,647 km) across the eastern United States. ... Image File history File links US_411. ... U.S. Highway 411 is a spur of U.S. Highway 11. ... Image File history File links US_17. ... United States Highway 17 (also known as the Ocean Highway) is a north-south United States highway. ... Image File history File links US_19. ... U.S. Route 19 is a north-south United States highway. ... Image File history File links US_319. ... U.S. Highway 319 is a spur of U.S. Highway 19. ... Image File history File links US_221. ... U.S. Highway 221 is a spur of U.S. Highway 21. ... Image File history File links US_23. ... U.S. Highway 23 is a long north-south U.S. highway between Mackinaw City, Michigan and Jacksonville, Florida. ... Image File history File links US_123. ... U.S. Highway 123 is a spur of U.S. Highway 23. ... Image File history File links US_25. ... U.S. Route 25 is a north-south US highway in the eastern United States of America that now connects Cincinnati, Ohio, at the Ohio River to Brunswick, Georgia, near the Atlantic Ocean. ... Image File history File links US_27. ... This U.S. Highway article needs to be cleaned up to conform to both a higher standard of article quality and accepted design standards outlined in the WikiProject U.S. Highways. ... Image File history File links US_29. ... United States Highway 29 is a north-south United States highway that runs for 1,036 miles (1,667 km) from the western suburbs of Baltimore to Pensacola, Florida. ... Image File history File links US_129. ... Tail of the Dragon on U.S. 129 U.S. Highway 129 is a spur of U.S. Highway 29. ... Image File history File links US_41. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: U.S. Route 41 U.S. Route 41 is a north-south United States Highway that runs from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to Miami, Florida. ... Image File history File links US_341. ... U.S. Highway 341 is a spur of U.S. Highway 41. ... Image File history File links US_441. ... U.S. Highway 441 is a spur route of US Highway 41. ... Image File history File links US_76. ... U.S. Highway 76 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 548 miles (882 km) from southeast North Carolina to Chattanooga, Tennessee. ... Image File history File links US_78. ... U.S. Highway 78 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 715 miles (1,151 km) from Memphis, Tennessee, to Charleston, South Carolina. ... Image File history File links US_278. ... U.S. Highway 278 is a spur of U.S. Highway 78. ... Image File history File links US_378. ... U.S. Highway 378 is a spur of U.S. Highway 78. ... Image File history File links US_80. ... A section of old U.S. Route 80 west of Descanso Junction, California that is now closed to vehicular traffic. ... Image File history File links US_280. ... U.S. Highway 280 is a spur of U.S. Highway 80. ... Image File history File links US_82. ... U.S. Highway 82 is an east-west United States highway. ... Image File history File links US_84. ... U.S. Highway 84 is an east-west United States highway. ...

Law and Government

State government

The Georgia State Capitol Building in Atlanta with the distinctive gold dome.
The Georgia State Capitol Building in Atlanta with the distinctive gold dome.

The capital of Georgia is Atlanta. As with all other U.S. States and the federal government, Georgia's government is based on the separation of legislative, executive and judicial power.[39] Executive authority in the state rests with the governor, currently Sonny Perdue (until 2011) (Republican). Perdue is the first Republican governor since Reconstruction.[40] (See List of governors of Georgia). Both the governor and lieutenant governor are elected on separate ballots to four-year terms of office. Unlike the federal government, but like many other U.S. States, most of the executive officials who comprise the governor's cabinet are elected by the citizens of Georgia rather than appointed by the governor. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2936x1940, 457 KB)Georgia State Capitol building in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2936x1940, 457 KB)Georgia State Capitol building in Atlanta, Georgia. ... East side (back) of the The Georgia State Capitol The Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta, Georgia is an architecturally and historically significant building listed on the National Register of Historic Places. ... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states which have membership of the federation known as the United States of America (USA or U.S.). The separate state governments and the U.S. federal government share sovereignty. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Separation of powers is a term coined by French political Enlightenment thinker Baron de Montesquieu[1][2], is a model for the governance of democratic states. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... George Ervin Sonny Perdue III (born December 20, 1946) is the governor of the U.S. state of Georgia. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... This is a list of Governors of the state of Georgia, including governors of the British colony of Georgia. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ...


Legislative authority resides in the General Assembly, composed of the Senate and House of Representatives. The Lieutenant Governor presides over the Senate, while the House of Representatives selects their own Speaker. The Georgia Constitution mandates a maximum of 56 senators, elected from single-member districts, and a minimum of 180 representatives, apportioned among representative districts (which sometimes results in more than one representative per district); there are currently 56 senators and 180 representatives. The term of office for senators and representatives is two years.[41] Seal of the Georgia Senate The Georgia Senate is the upper house of the Georgia General Assembly (the state legislature of Georgia). ... The Georgia House of Representatives is the lower house of the General Assembly (the state legislature) of Georgia. ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... The Georgia Constitution, which was ratified in 1983, is the governing document of the U.S. state of Georgia. ...


State judicial authority rests with the state Supreme Court and Court of Appeals, which have statewide authority.[42] In addition, there are smaller courts which have more limited geographical jurisdiction, including State Courts, Superior Courts, Magistrate Courts and Probate Courts. Justices of the Supreme Court and judges of the Court of Appeals are elected statewide by the citizens in non-partisan elections to six-year terms. Judges for the smaller courts are elected by the state's citizens who live within that court's jurisdiction to four-year terms. The Supreme Court of Georgia is the highest judicial authority of the U.S. State of Georgia. ...


See also: List of governors of Georgia and Georgia elected officials This is a list of Governors of the state of Georgia, including governors of the British colony of Georgia. ... Elected officials serving the U.S. state of Georgia: Senators Saxby Chambliss (Republican) Johnny Isakson (Republican) State officials ...


Local government

Georgia has 159 counties, the most of any state except Texas (with 254).[43] Before 1932, there were 161, with Milton and Campbell being merged into Fulton at the end of 1931. Counties have been named for prominent figures in both American and Georgian history. Counties in Georgia have their own elected legislative branch, usually called the Board of Commissioners, which usually also has executive authority in the county.[44] Several counties have a Sole Commissioner government, with legislative and executive authority vested in a single person. Georgia is the only state with Sole Commissioner counties. Georgia's Constitution provides all counties and cities with "home rule" authority, and so the county commissions have considerable power to pass legislation within their county as a municipality would. Originally, a county was the land under the jurisdiction of a count (in Great Britain, an earl, though the original earldoms covered larger areas) by reason of that office. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Milton County in the U.S. state of Georgia was created on December 18, 1857 from parts of northeastern Cobb, southeastern Cherokee, and southwestern Forsyth counties. ... Georgia legislature in 1828 on December 20th. ... Fulton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Originally, a county was the land under the jurisdiction of a count (in Great Britain, an earl, though the original earldoms covered larger areas) by reason of that office. ... Devolution or Home rule is the pooling of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... A municipality is an administrative entity composed of a clearly defined territory and its population and commonly referring to a city, town, or village, or a small grouping of them. ...

Further information: list of Georgia counties

Besides the counties, Georgia only defines cities as local units of government. Every incorporated town, no matter how small, is legally a city. Georgia does not provide for townships or independent cities (though there is a movement in the Legislature to provide for townships) but does allow consolidated city-county governments by local referendum. So far, only Columbus, Augusta, Athens, and Cusseta have done this. Conyers is studying possibly becoming consolidated with Rockdale County. Recently, Savannah has consolidated its police department with the county police department and is currently studying possible consolidation with Chatham County. Georgia has the second highest number of counties of any state in the United States, behind Texas (254). ... A township in the United States refers to a small geographic area, ranging in size from 6 to 54 square miles (15. ... An independent city is a city in the United States of America that does not belong to any county, but rather interacts directly with the state government. ... In American local government, a consolidated city-county, metropolitan municipality or regional municipality is a city and county that have been merged into one jurisdiction. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural referendums or referenda), ballot question, or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Columbus is a city in Muscogee County, Georgia, United States. ... Augusta is a city in the state of Georgia in the United States of America. ... Athens-Clarke County is a unified city-county in Georgia, U.S., in the northeastern part of the state, at the eastern terminus of Georgia 316. ... Cusseta is a city located in Chattahoochee County, Georgia. ... Conyers is a city in Rockdale County, Georgia, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 10,689. ... Rockdale County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Consolidation is the act of merging many things into one. ... Chatham County is the name of several counties in the United States: Chatham County, Georgia, the states easternmost, including Savannah Chatham County, North Carolina, in the middle of the state, and mostly rural This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share...


There is no true metropolitan government in Georgia, though the Atlanta Regional Commission and Georgia Regional Transportation Authority do provide some services, and the ARC must approve all major land development projects in metro Atlanta. In the United States the term metropolitan government is most frequently used to describe a system of municipal government in which most or all of the functions of a government of a county are combined with those of its principal city. ... The Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC) is the regional planning and intergovernmental coordination agency for the Atlanta, Georgia, region, as defined as a 10-county area including Cherokee, Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Douglas, Fayette, Fulton, Gwinnett, Henry and Rockdale counties, as well as the City of Atlanta. ... The Georgia Regional Transportation Authority or GRTA (pronounced like the name Greta) is a government agency in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... According to the 2000 census, the 28-county Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area has a population of 4,247,981 making it the eleventh largest metropolitan area in the United States. ...


Politics

Presidential elections results
Year Republican Democratic
2004 57.97% 1,914,254 41.37% 1,366,149
2000 54.67% 1,419,720 42.98% 1,116,230
1996 47.01% 1,080,843 45.84% 1,053,849
1992 42.88% 995,252 43.47% 1,008,966
1988 59.75% 1,081,331 39.50% 714,792
1984 60.17% 1,068,722 39.79% 706,628
1980 40.95% 654,168 55.76% 890,733
1976 32.96% 483,743 66.74% 979,409
1972 75.04% 881,496 24.65% 289,529
1968* 30.40% 380,111 26.75% 334,440
1964 54.12% 616,584 41.15% 522,557
1960 37.43% 274,472 62.54% 458,638
*State won by George Wallace
of the American Independent Party,
at 42.83%, or 535,550 votes

Until recently, Georgia's state government had the longest unbroken record of single-party dominance of any state in the Union. This record was established partly by disfranchisement of most blacks and many poor whites in the early 20th century, lasting into the 1960s. GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Presidential election results map. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This article is about the politician, former governor of Alabama and former presidential candidate. ... The American Independent Party is a California political party. ...


After Reconstruction, white Democrats regained power, especially by legal disfranchisement of most African Americans and many poor whites through erection of barriers to voter registration. In 1900, shortly before Georgia adopted a disfranchising constitutional amendment in 1908, blacks comprised 47% of the state's population.[45] A "clean" franchise was linked by Progressives to electoral reform. [46] White, one-party rule was solidified. To escape the oppression, tens of thousands of black Georgians left the state, going north in the Great Migration for jobs, better education for their children and the chance to vote. Disfranchisement or disenfranchisement is the revocation of, or failure to grant, the right of suffrage (the right to vote) to a person or group of people. ...


For over 130 years, from 1872 to 2003, Georgians only elected white Democratic governors, and white Democrats held the majority of seats in the General Assembly. Most of the Democrats elected throughout these years were Southern Democrats or Dixiecrats who were very conservative by national standards. This continued after the segregationist period, which ended legally in the 1960s. According to the 1960 census, the proportion of Georgia's population that was African American had decreased to 28%.[47] After civil rights legislation under President Johnson secured voting and civil rights in the mid-1960s, most African Americans in the South joined the Democratic Party. The States Rights Democratic Party, usually known as the Dixiecrat Party, was a short-lived splinter group that broke from the Democratic Party in 1948. ...


During the 1960s and 1970s, Georgia made significant changes in civil rights, governance, and economic growth focused on Atlanta. It was a bedrock of the emerging "New South." This characterization was solidified with the election of former Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter in 1976 to the U.S. Presidency. New South is a term that has been used intermittently since the American Civil War to describe the American South, in whole or in part. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...


The political dominance of Democrats ended in 2003, when then-Governor Roy Barnes was defeated by Republican Sonny Perdue, a state legislator and former Democrat himself. It was regarded as a stunning upset. While Democrats retained control of the State House, they lost their majority in the Senate when four Democrats switched parties. They lost the House in the 2004 election. Republicans now control all three partisan elements of the state government. Roy Eugene Barnes (born March 11, 1948) was the governor of the U.S. state of Georgia from January 1999 until January 2003. ... George Ervin Sonny Perdue III (born December 20, 1946) is the governor of the U.S. state of Georgia. ...


In recent years, many conservative Democrats, including former U.S. Senator and governor Zell Miller, have decided to support Republicans. The state's socially conservative bent results in wide support for such measures as restrictions on abortion. One of the State's most conservative political figures of the past had been Cong. Larry McDonald. Zell Bryan Miller (born February 24, 1932) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Lawrence Patton McDonald (April 1, 1935 – September 1, 1983) was an American statesman and a member of the United States House of Representatives, representing the seventh congressional district of Georgia as a Democrat. ...


Lawrence Patton McDonald ( b. April 1, 1935), a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives, represented the seventh congressional district of Georgia. He was onboard Korean Air Lines Flight 007 when it was shot down by Soviet interceptors just west of Sakhalin Island on Sept. 1, 1983. He was a cousin of General George S. Patton. Korean Air Lines Flight 007, also known as KAL 007 or KE007, was a Korean Air Lines civilian airliner shot down by Soviet jet interceptors on September 1, 1983 just west of Sakhalin island. ...


McDonald was consistent in a conservative voting record in Congress and one of the most outspoken opponents of Communism in Congress. He also opposed what he believed to be a conspiratorial attempt by powerful elements within U.S government and business circles to further a one world socialist society within America. A major highway in the state has been named after him


Even before 2003, the state had become increasingly supportive of Republicans in Presidential elections. It has supported a Democrat for president only three times since 1960. In 1976 and 1980, native son Jimmy Carter carried the state; in 1992, the former Arkansas governor Bill Clinton narrowly won the state. Generally, Republicans are strongest in the predominantly white suburban (especially the Atlanta suburbs) and rural portions of the state[4]. Many of these areas were represented by conservative Democrats in the state legislature well into the 21st century. Democrats do best in the areas where black voters are most numerous[5], mostly in the cities (especially Atlanta) and the rural Black Belt region that travels through the central and southwestern portion of the state. William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... For other uses, see Black Belt. ...


As of the 2001 reapportionment, the state has 13 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, which are currently held by 7 Republicans and 6 Democrats. 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of the Volunteer The United Nations Year of Dialogue Among Civilizations Events January January 1 - A black monolith measuring approximately nine feet tall appears in Seattles Magnuson Park, placed by an anonymous... Reapportionment is the reallocation of seats in a legislature to the regions from which legislators are elected, following changes in population. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party...

See also: United States presidential election, 2004, in Georgia

Georgias electoral votes went to the incumbent president, Republican George W. Bush. ...

Media

Television

See also: List of television stations in Georgia

Georgia is home to Ted Turner, who founded TBS, TNT, TCM, Cartoon Network, CNN and Headline News, among others. The CNN Center, which houses the news channel's world headquarters, is located in downtown Atlanta, facing Marietta Street, while the home offices of the Turner Entertainment networks are located in midtown, near the Georgia Tech campus, on Techwood Drive. A third Turner building is on Williams Street, directly across Interstate 75 and Interstate 85 from the Techwood Drive campus and is the home of Adult Swim and Williams Street Studios. This is a list of broadcast television stations serving cities in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... For other persons named Ted Turner, see Ted Turner (disambiguation). ... TBS Superstation is a popular American cable TV network that shows sports and variety programming. ... Turner Network Television, usually referred to as TNT, is an American cable TV network created by media mogul Ted Turner and currently owned by the Turner Broadcasting System division of Time Warner. ... Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... This article is about the cable television network. ... The CNN Center is the world headquarters of the Cable News Network (CNN). ... Midtown Atlanta is a district in Atlanta, Georgia situated between the commercial and financial district of downtown to the south and the affluent residential, shopping, and nightlife district of Buckhead to the north. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France, Shanghai, China, and Singapore. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 85 Interstate 85 (abbreviated I-85) is an interstate highway in the southeastern United States. ... Adult Swim is the name for an adult-oriented television programming network. ... Williams Street studios produces the animated series Aqua Teen Hunger Force, The Brak Show, Harvey Birdman, Attorney at Law, Sealab 2021, Space Ghost Coast to Coast, Tom Goes To The Mayor (with Dipshot Films), Robot Chicken (with Seth Greens Stoopid Monkey and Sony Pictures Digital) and Squidbillies. ...


The Weather Channel's headquarters are located in the Smyrna area of metropolitan Atlanta in Cobb County. The Weather Channel (TWC) is a cable and satellite television network that broadcasts weather and weather-related news 24 hours a day. ... Atlanta from southern Smyrna on a clear day; the large nearby tower is Plant Atkinson. ... Cobb County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ...


WSB-TV was the state's first television station, and the southeastern United State's second. WSB-TV signed on Channel 8 in 1948, and moved to its present day location on Channel 2 in 1952. WSB-TV is the ABC affiliate in Atlanta, Georgia. ...


Georgia Public Broadcasting (GPB) operates nine major educational television stations across the state as Georgia Public Broadcasting Television.[48] Georgia Public Broadcasting (GPB) is the public radio and television network in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... This article is about a television transmitting location or company. ...


Radio

See also: List of radio stations in Georgia

WSB-AM in Atlanta was the first radio station in the southeastern United States, signing on in 1922. The station currently broadcasts a news/talk format. WSB-FM signed on in 1948 on 104.5 FM, and moved to 98.5 FM in 1952. The station broadcasts today, still with the WSB-FM callsign, but is known as "B98.5FM". Atlanta FM WRAS 88. ... WSB AM (NewsTalk 750) is an AM radio station in the city of Atlanta, Georgia with a frequency of 750kHz. ... WSB-FM (B98. ...


Georgia Public Radio has been in service since 1984 and, with the exception of Atlanta, it broadcasts daily on several FM (and one AM) stations across the state. 1984.[49][50] Georgia Public Radio reaches nearly all of Georgia (with the exception of the Atlanta area, which is served by WABE), as well as portions of Alabama, Florida, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Georgia Public Broadcasting (GPB) is the statewide network of Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) and National Public Radio (NPR) affiliates in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... WABE 90. ...


Newspapers and periodicals

See also: List of newspapers in Georgia (U.S. state)

There are several major newspapers in Georgia. Among them are the Atlanta Journal Constitution and the Augusta Chronicle. Other media publications in the state include business magazines; entertainment media such as Southern Voice; and various sports magazines.[51] Below is a list of newspapers published in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper in Atlanta, Georgia, USA and its suburbs. ... The Augusta Chronicle, founded in 1785, is one of the oldest newspapers in the United States and serves Augusta, Georgia. ... Southern Voice is the main lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender newspaper in Atlanta, Georgia and the Southeast United States. ...


Sports and recreation

Main article: Sports in Georgia (U.S. state)
See also: Tour de Georgia and The Masters Tournament

Sports in Georgia include professional teams in all major sports, Olympic Games contenders and medalists, collegiate teams in major and small-school conferences and associations, and active amateur teams and individual sports. The State of Georgia has a team in eight major professional leagues (MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL, ABA, AFL, IL, and ECHL). Georgia has an abundance of outdoor recreational activities. Outdoor activities include, but are not limited to, hiking along the Appalachian Trail; Civil War Heritage Trails; rock climbing and whitewater paddling.[52][53][54][55] Other outdoor activities include hunting and fishing. Less rustic activities are trips to Callaway Gardens; circuses; Rattlesnake Roundups; and Zoo Atlanta.[56][57][58][59] The Tour de Georgia is a U.S. professional cycling stage race across the state of Georgia. ... This article is about the golf tournament. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... NFL redirects here. ... NBA redirects here. ... NHL redirects here. ... For the league that began in 1999, see American Basketball Association (2000-). The American Basketball Association (ABA) was a professional basketball league founded in 1967, and eventually merged, in part, with the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... The Arena Football League (AFL) was founded in 1987 as an American football indoor league. ... The International League (IL) is a minor league baseball league which operates in the eastern United States and Canada. ... The ECHL is a professional minor-league double-A hockey association based in the United States and Canada. ... The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, generally known as the Appalachian Trail or simply The A.T., is a marked hiking trail in the eastern United States, extending between Springer Mountain in Georgia and Mount Katahdin in Maine. ... Climbers on Valkyrie at the Roaches. ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... For the computer security term, see Phishing. ... The Callaway Gardens is a 13,000 acre garden complex located near Pine Mountain, Georgia. ... For other uses, see Circus (disambiguation). ... Zoo Atlanta is an Association of Zoos and Aquariums-accredited wildlife park and major attraction in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. The 40 acre (16 hectare) zoo, founded in 1889, is located in Atlantas Grant Park and attracts around one million visitors a year. ...


State facts and symbols

Georgia State Symbols
Living Symbols
 -Amphibian American Green Tree Frog
 -Bird Brown Thrasher
 -Butterfly Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
 -Fish Largemouth bass
 -Flower Cherokee Rose
 -Insect European honey bee
 -Mammal Right whale
 -Reptile Gopher tortoise
 -Tree Live oak
Dance Square Dance
Food Grits, Peach, Vidalia Sweet Onion
Fossil Shark Tooth
Gemstone Amethyst
Mineral Staurolite
Rock Quartz
Shell Knobbed Whelk
Soil Tifton
Song(s) Georgia on My Mind
Tartan Georgia State Tartan
Route Marker(s)
Georgia Route Marker
Quarter
Georgia quarter
1999
See Also

Georgia's nicknames include Peach State and Empire State of the South .The state song, "Georgia On My Mind" by Hoagy Carmichael, was originally written about a woman of that name, but after Georgia native Ray Charles sang it, the state legislature voted it the state song on 24 April 1979. Ray Charles sang it on the legislative floor when the bill was passed. This act was significant in that it symbolized to many the move away from segregation and racism. The state commemorative quarter was released on 19 July 1999.[60] The first houses in Georgia to be designated historic state landmarks are the Owens Thomas House and the Sorrel Weed House, in the Savannah historic district. The state 'possum is Pogo Possum[61] This is a list of official U.S. state amphibians. ... It has been suggested that Pet frog be merged into this article or section. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) The Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum) is a species of thrasher, part of a family of New World birds (Mimidae) that includes New World catbirds and mockingbirds. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into List of U.S. state insects. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Eastern tiger swallowtail, Papilio glaucus, is a large (12 cm wingspan) swallowtail butterfly. ... This is a list of official U.S. state fish: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Binomial name The largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) is a species of fish in the sunfish family. ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: List of U.S. state trees Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ State Flower of Alabama. ... Binomial name Rosa laevigata Michx. ... It has been suggested that List of U.S. state butterflies be merged into this article or section. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies North-west of Europe South-west of Europe Middle East Africa Synonyms Apis mellifica Linnaeus, 1761 The Western honey bee or European honey bee (Apis mellifera) is a species of honey bee. ... A state mammal is the official or representative animal of a U.S. state. ... It has been suggested that Balaenidae be merged into this article or section. ... This is a list of official U.S. state reptiles: Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ Official Alabama Reptile. ... Binomial name Gopherus polyphemus Daudin, 1802 The gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus), sometimes called the Florida gopher tortoise is a species tortoise native to the coastal plains of the United States. ... This List of U.S. state trees includes official trees of the following states and U.S. possessions: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia National Grove of State Trees External link USDA list of state trees and flowers Categories: | | ... Binomial name Quercus virginiana Mill. ... This is a list of official U.S. state dances:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Square dance is often used as a general term for modern Western square dance. ... This article is about the corn-based Southern U.S. food. ... Binomial name (L.) Batsch Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... A Vidalia onion is a sweet onion of certain varieties, grown in a production area defined by law in Georgia and by the United States Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). ... Though every state in the United States has a State Bird and a State Flower, not every state in the United States has a State Fossil. ... For other uses, see Shark (disambiguation). ... Teeth redirects here. ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... For other uses, see Amethyst (disambiguation). ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... Staurolite Staurolite is a red brown to black mostly opaque nesosilicate mineral with a white streak. ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... For other uses, see Quartz (disambiguation). ... This is a list of official state shells:[1] References ^ List of all state shells http://www. ... Binomial name Busycon carica Gmelin, 1791 The Knobbed whelk, Busycon carica (Gmelin, 1791), is the largest species of whelk, ranging up to 16 in (406 mm). ... This is a list of official U.S. state soils: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Forty-nine states of the United States (all except New Jersey) have one or more state songs, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... Georgia on My Mind is a song written in 1930 by Stuart Gorrell (lyrics) and Hoagy Carmichael (music). ... This is a list of official U.S. state tartans: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Highways in the United States are split into at least four different types of systems. ... Image File history File links Georgia_3. ... Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program (Pub. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (771x768, 915 KB) Source http://www. ... These are lists of U.S. state insignia as designated by tradition or the respective state legislatures List of U.S. state amphibians List of U.S. state beverages List of U.S. state birds List of U.S. state butterflies List of U.S. state colors List of U... Each state in the United States (except New Jersey) has a state song, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... Georgia on My Mind is a song written in 1930 by Stuart Gorrell (lyrics) and Hoagy Carmichael (music). ... Hoagland Howard Hoagy Carmichael (November 22, 1899 – December 27, 1981) was an American composer, pianist, singer, actor, and bandleader. ... For Ray Charles, the composer and conductor of the Ray Charles Singers, see Ray Charles (composer). ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program (Pub. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... The Sorrel Weed House, or the Francis Sorrel House, was designed by Charles Clusky in 1835, and the home was completed in 1840. ... Pogo as drawn by Walt Kelly. ...


See also

  • List of Georgia-related topics
Georgia (U.S. state) Portal

Image File history File links Flag_of_Georgia_(U.S._state). ...

References

  1. ^ a b Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on November 3, 2006.
  2. ^ States Ranked for Total Area, Land Area, and Water Area - NETSTATE.com, accessed December 26, 2006
  3. ^ Drought-stricken Georgia eyes Tennessee's border -- and river water Los Angeles Times.
  4. ^ For an overview of Georgia's geology, see "Geologic Regions of Georgia: Overview" in The New Georgia Encyclopedia. Retrieved September 9, 2007.
  5. ^ Georgia - Flora and fauna - city-data.com, accessed February 3, 2007
  6. ^ Monthly Averages for Macon, GA The Weather Channel.
  7. ^ Monthly Averages for Clayton, GA The Weather Channel.
  8. ^ Each state's high temperature record USA Today, last updated August 2006.
  9. ^ Each state's low temperature record USA Today, last updated August 2006
  10. ^ Georgia Department of Natural Resources gadnr.org, accessed May 13, 2007
  11. ^ National Park Service nps.gov, accessed May 13, 2007
  12. ^ Trustee Georgia, 1732-1752
  13. ^ Digital History
  14. ^ Peter Kolchin, American Slavery: 1619-1877, New York: Hill and Wang, 1994, p. 73
  15. ^ [1] Accessed May 15, 2007
  16. ^ [2] Accessed February 1, 2008.
  17. ^ 100 fastest growing counties, accessed November 30, 2006
  18. ^ Population Centers by State
  19. ^ William H. Frey, "The New Great Migration: Black Americans' Return to the South, 1965-2000", The Brookings Institution, May 2004, accessed 19 May 2008
  20. ^ Early Mountain Life, Who are Americans
  21. ^ Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life
  22. ^ Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by State, 2005
  23. ^ BEA statistics for 2005 GSP - October 26, 2006, Accessed May 9, 2008
  24. ^ Energy Information Administration, Accessed December 30, 2007
  25. ^ Willamette, Accessed December 8, 2007
  26. ^ Atlanta Opera, Accessed December 8, 2007
  27. ^ Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Accessed December 8, 2007
  28. ^ Classical Music in Atlanta, Accessed December 8, 2007
  29. ^ Literature: Overview, Accessed December 5, 2007
  30. ^ The Sacred Harp, Accessed December 7, 2007
  31. ^ R.E.MAccessed December 7, 2007
  32. ^ Rhythm and Blues Music: Overview, Accessed December 7, 2007
  33. ^ Jessye Norman, Accessed December 7, 2007
  34. ^ a b c Film industry in GeorgiaAccessed December 8, 2007
  35. ^ Georgia.org, Accessed May 16, 2007
  36. ^ Statemaster.com, Accessed May 16, 2007
  37. ^ |GA DOE - Testing - EOCT Accessed 24 April 2008.
  38. ^ |GA DOE - Testing - GHSGT Accessed 24 April 2008.
  39. ^ Senate Kids, Accessed December 30, 2007
  40. ^ Sonny Perdue, Accessed December 30, 2007
  41. ^ Constitution of Georgia Article III Section II, Accessed December 30, 2007
  42. ^ Supreme Court Brochure, Accessed December 30, 2007
  43. ^ A Brief History of Georgia Counties, Accessed December 30, 2007
  44. ^ Georgia's County Governments, Accessed December 31, 2007
  45. ^ [fisher.lib.virginia.edu/collections/stats/histcensus/php/state.php Historical Census Browser, 1900 US Census, University of Virginia], accessed 15 Mar 2008
  46. ^ Charles Crowe, "Racial Violence and Social Reform - Origins of the Atlanta Riot of 1906", The Journal of Negro History: Vol.53, No.3, Jul 1968, accessed 23 Mar 2008
  47. ^ [fisher.lib.virginia.edu/collections/stats/histcensus/php/state.php Historical Census Browser, 1960 US Census, University of Virginia], accessed 13 Mar 2008
  48. ^ Georgia Public Broadcasting Accessed, May 19, 2007
  49. ^ Georgia Public Radio Accessed, May 19, 2007
  50. ^ Georgia Public Radio Accessed, May 19, 2007
  51. ^ Mondotimes.com, Accessed, May 19, 2007
  52. ^ Appalachian Trail, Accessed December 8, 2007
  53. ^ Civil War Heritage Trails, Accessed December 8, 2007
  54. ^ Rock climbing, Accessed December 8, 2007
  55. ^ Whitewater paddling, Accessed December 8, 2007
  56. ^ Callaway Gardens, Accessed December 8, 2007
  57. ^ Circues, Accessed December 8, 2007
  58. ^ Rattlesnake Roundups, Accessed December 8, 2007
  59. ^ Zoo Atlanta, Accessed December 8, 2007
  60. ^ State symbols and emblems
  61. ^ Georgia Secretary of State - State 'Possum. Georgia Secretary of State. Retrieved on 2008-01-15.
  • Walker, V. (2005). "Organized resistance and black educators' quest for school equality", 1878-1938. Teachers College Record, 107, 355-388.

is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • New Georgia Encyclopedia (2005).
  • Bartley, Numan V. The Creation of Modern Georgia (1990). Covers 1865-1990 period. ISBN 0-8203-1183-9.
  • Coleman, Kenneth. ed. A History of Georgia (1991). ISBN 0-8203-1269-X.
  • London, Bonnie Bullard. (2005) Georgia and the American Experience Atlanta, Georgia: Clairmont Press ISBN 1-56733-100-9. A middle school textbook.
  • Peirce, Neal R. The Deep South States of America: People, Politics, and Power in the Seven Deep South States (1974). Information on politics and economics 1960-72. ISBN 0-393-05496-9.

External links

Find more about Georgia (U.S. state) on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
Textbooks
Quotations
Source texts
Images and media
News stories
Learning resources
  • Georgia state government website
  • Georgia State Databases - Annotated list of searchable databases produced by Georgia state agencies and compiled by the Government Documents Roundtable of the American Library Association.
  • Georgia Constitution Web Page, Carl Vinson Institute of Government at The University of Georgia (includes historical Constitutions of Georgia)
  • Summary of duties, powers and responsibilities of the branches of Georgia state government (Georgia Secretary of State website)
  • USGS real-time, geographic, and other scientific resources of Georgia
  • U.S. Census Bureau
  • The New Georgia Encyclopedia
  • Digital Library of Georgia


Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ...

Preceded by
New Jersey
List of U.S. states by date of statehood
Ratified Constitution on January 2, 1788 (4th)
Succeeded by
Connecticut

Coordinates: 33° N 83.5° W Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Dakotan Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) English Demonym South Dakotan Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th in the US  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... Motto Samoa, Muamua Le Atua(Samoan) Samoa, Let God Be First Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner, Amerika Samoa Capital Pago Pago; Fagatogo (seat of government) Official languages English, Samoan Government  -  Governor Togiola Tulafono United States unincorporated territory  -  Treaty of Berlin 1899   -  Deed of Cession of Tutuila 1900   -  Deed of Cession... Anthem: Gi Talo Gi Halom Tasi(Chamorro) Satil Matawal Pacifiko(Carolinian) Capital Saipan Official languages English, Chamorro, Carolinian Government Presidential representative democracy  -  Governor Benigno R. Fitial  -  Lt. ... For the board game, see Puerto Rico (board game). ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands Map showing the location of the islands in the Pacific Ocean (highlighted with red boxes) The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular... Bajo Nuevo Bank, also called the Petrel Islands, is located in the western United States and Jamaica. ... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′N 176°31′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Howland Island Howland Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°48′N 176°38′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 130 km² atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 16°45′N 169°30′W, about one-third of the way from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands. ... The flag of the US is used for Kingman Reef Kingman Reef Kingman Reef—NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24... Orthographic projection centred over Midway. ... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Palmyra Atoll - Landsat Image N-03-05_2000 (1:50,000) Palmyra Atoll - Marplot Map (1:50,000) Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll Palmyra Atoll, is an incorporated atoll administered by the United States government. ... Serranilla Bank is a western Caribbean island located about 210 miles north-northeast of Nicaragua. ... USGS Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite image of Wake Island. ... Historic Southern United States. ... The South Atlantic States form one of the nine divisions within the United States that are formally recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... The East South Central States constitute one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The West South Central States form one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by the United States Census Bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links Confederate_National_Flag_since_Mar_4_1865. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America and is... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


 
 

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