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Encyclopedia > Georgette Heyer
Georgette Heyer

Photo of Georgette Heyer
Born: 16 August 1902
Wimbledon, London, England
Died: 4 July 1974
London, England
Occupation: Writer
Nationality: English
Writing period: 1921-1974
Genres: Historical romance, detective fiction
Debut works: The Black Moth

Georgette Heyer (pronounced "hair") (16 August 19024 July 1974) was an English Historical romance and detective fiction novelist. Her first novel, The Black Moth, began as a story spun to amuse her younger brother and was published in 1921, when Heyer was only nineteen. The success of her novel, These Old Shades, released in the midst of a General Strike, solidified Heyer's opinion that publicity was not necessary to good sales. For the rest of her life, she refused to grant interviews. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Wimbledon (pronounced ) is a suburb of London, part of the London Borough of Merton and located seven miles (11. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Historical romance is a subgenre of the romance novel literary genre. ... Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes Detective fiction is a branch of crime fiction that centers upon the investigation of a crime, usually murder, by a detective, either professional or amateur. ... The Black Moth (1921) is a Georgian (set around 1751) romance novel by Georgette Heyer. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Historical romance is a subgenre of the romance novel literary genre. ... Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes Detective fiction is a branch of crime fiction that centers upon the investigation of a crime, usually murder, by a detective, either professional or amateur. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... The Black Moth (1921) is a Georgian (set around 1751) romance novel by Georgette Heyer. ... These Old Shades (1926) is a Georgian (set around 1756) romance novel written by British novelist Georgette Heyer (1902-1974). ... The Subsidised Mineowner - Poor Beggar! from the Trade Union Unity Magazine (1925) Foraging for coal in the strike Tyldesley miners outside the Miners Hall during the strike The UK General Strike of 1926 lasted nine days, from 3 May 1926 to 12 May 1926, and was called by the General...


In the 1930s, Heyer branched out from her Regency romances. The Conqueror, released in 1930, was her first historical novel. The following year she released her first thriller, Footsteps in the Dark. For the next decade, she released one historical romance and one thriller each year. The Conqueror is a novel written by Georgette Heyer. ... Look up historical fiction in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television. ... Historical romance is a subgenre of the romance novel literary genre. ...


As Heyer's success grew, she had repeated problems with both the tax inspector and plagiarists. She refused to file a lawsuit against the alleged plagiarists, but tried multiple ways of minimizing her tax liability. A limited liability company to administer the rights to her novels, but after Heyer was accused multiple times of taking an overly large salary from the company, she finally sold it, and the rights to the seventeen of her novels that the company owned, to Booker-McConnell. Plagiarism refers to the use of anothers information, language, or writing, when done without proper acknowledgment of the original source. ... Booker-McConnell was the former sponsor of the Booker Prize for fiction established in 1968. ...

Contents

Early years

Heyer was born in Wimbledon, London in 1902. She was named for her father, George Heyer, a professor who sometimes wrote for The Granta. Her mother, Sylvia Watkins, was "an outstanding student" at the Royal College of Music who studied both cello and piano. Heyer was the eldest of three children; her brother George Boris was four years younger than she and Frank was five years younger than Boris.[1] Wimbledon (pronounced ) is a suburb of London, part of the London Borough of Merton and located seven miles (11. ... This article is about the literary magazine and publisher. ... // This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


While Heyer was a child, her father took a position in Paris, France. Shortly after World War I broke out in 1914, the family returned to England.[2] Although the family's surname had been pronounced similarly to "higher", with the advent of war her father changed the pronunciation to "hair" so that they family would not be mistaken for Germans.[3] Her father soon returned to France to serve as a requisitions officer for the British military. After the war ended he was given an O.B.E..[2] The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions, in order of seniority: Knight or Dame Grand Cross...


George Heyer strongly encouraged his children to read, and never forbade any book. Heyer read widely. As a teenager she became friends with two young women who enjoyed books as much as she. Joanna Cannan and Carola Oman often met with Heyer to discuss books they had read. Both Cannan and Oman were determined to be writers, and both would eventually be published.[4] Joanna Cannan (1898-1961) was a writer of pony books and detective books, aimed primarily at children. ...


Initial publication

Heyer's brother Boris suffered from a form of hemophilia and was often weak. When she was 17, Heyer began a serial story to amuse her brother. Her father enjoyed listening to her story, and asked her to prepare it for publication. He sent her manuscript to his agent, and they quickly found a publisher for her book. The Black Moth was published in 1921.[4] The novel contained many of the elements that would become standard for Heyer's novels, the "saturnine male lead, the marriage in danger, the extravagent wife, and the group of idle, entertaining young men."[5] Haemophilia or hemophilia is the name of any of several hereditary genetic illnesses that impair the bodys ability to control bleeding. ... The Black Moth (1921) is a Georgian (set around 1751) romance novel by Georgette Heyer. ...


Marriage

While vacationing with her family at Christmas-time in 1920, Heyer met George Ronald Rougier, a young man two years her senior who was also taller than her own 5 ft 10 in.[6] The two became regular dance partner while Rougier studied at the Royal School of Mines to become a mining engineer. In the spring of 1925, shortly after the publication of her fifth novel, the two became engaged. One month later, Heyer's father died of a heart attack. He left no pension, and as his wife soon "subsided into widowhood," Heyer became the sole breadwinner of the family, and assumed responsibility for her brothers, then aged 19 and 14.[7] Two months after her father's death, on 18 August 1925, Heyer and Rougier married in a simple ceremony.[8] Royal School of Mines entrance in Londons Albertopolis. ... Look up spring in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Two months after their marriage, Rougier was sent to the Caucasus Mountains for work. Heyer remained at home and continued to write.[9] In 1926, she released These Old Shades. The book appeared in the midst of a UK General Strike of 1926, which meant that there were no newspapers, reviews, or advertising. Neverthless, the book sold 190,000 copies.[10] Because These Old Shades was so successful despite the lack of publicity, for the rest of her life Heyer refused to do any publicity, even though her publishers often asked her to give a few interviews.[11] She once wrote to a friend that "as for being photographed At Work or In my Old World Garden, that is the type of publicity which I find nauseating and quite unnecessary. My private life concerns no one but myself and my family."[12] The Caucasus Mountains are a mountain system between the Black and Caspian seas in the Caucasus region, usually considered the southeastern limit of Europe. ... These Old Shades (1926) is a Georgian (set around 1756) romance novel written by British novelist Georgette Heyer (1902-1974). ... The Subsidised Mineowner - Poor Beggar! from the Trade Union Unity Magazine (1925) Foraging for coal in the strike Tyldesley miners outside the Miners Hall during the strike The UK General Strike of 1926 lasted nine days, from 3 May 1926 to 12 May 1926, and was called by the General...


Rougier returned home in the summer of 1926, but with in months he was sent to Tanganyika. Heyer joined him there the following year. There, she lived in a compound in the bush, where she was the object of much speculation, as her servants had never seen a white woman before. In 1928, Heyer followed her husband to Macedonia, where she almost died from an improperly given anesthetic during a visit to the dentist. The couple returned to England in 1929, with the agreement that Heyer would support the family while Rougier looked for a different line of work. After a failed experiment running a gas, coke, and lighting company, Rougier purchased a sports shop in Horsham with money they borrowed from Heyer's aunts. Heyer's brother Boris lived above the shop and helped Rougier, while Heyer continued to provide the bulk of the family's earnings with her writing.[13] This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Flag of Tanganyika Tanganyika was an East African republic within the Commonwealth of Nations, named after Lake Tanganyika, which formed its western border. ... , Horsham is a market town in West Sussex, England with a population of roughly 50,000. ...


Thrillers

In 1931, Heyer released her first historical novel, The Conqueror. She researched the biography thorougly, even replicating William the Conqueror's crossing into England.[14] The following year, Heyer's writing took an even more drastic departure from her early historical romances, as she released her first thriller, Footsteps in the Dark. The publication of the novel coincided with the birth of her only child, Richard George Rougier, who she called her "most notable (indeed peerless) work."[15] Later in her life, Heyer requested that her publishers not reprint Footsteps in the Dark, saying "This work, published simultaneously with my son...was the first of my thrillers and was perpetuated while I was, as any Regency character would have said, increasing. One husband and two ribald brothers all had fingers in it, and I do not claim it as a Major Work."[16] Look up historical fiction in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Conqueror is a novel written by Georgette Heyer. ... William I ( 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ... Historical romance is a subgenre of the romance novel literary genre. ... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television. ...


Heyer's husband was unhappy running the shop, and with Heyer's encouragement he began studying to fulfill his long-time dream of becoming a barrister. At about this same time her novels began to feature fewer athletic heroes and instead included more solicitors and barristers.[17] // Artists impression of an English and Irish barrister A barrister is a lawyer found in many common law jurisdictions which employ a split profession (as opposed to a fused profession) in relation to legal representation. ... In the United Kingdom and countries having a similar legal system the legal profession is divided into two kinds of lawyers: the solicitors who contact and advise clients, and barristers who argue cases in court. ...


For the next several years Heyer published one historical romance and one thriller each year. The historical romances were by far her more popular, as they usually sold 115,000 copies, while her thrillers sold 16,000 copies.[18] Heyer involved her husband in both her historical romances and the thrillers. Rougier often read the proofs of her historical romances to catch any errors that she might have missed, and served as a collaborator for her thrillers. He provided the plots of the detective stories, describing the actions of characters "A" and "B."[19] Heyer would then create the characters and the relationships between them and bring the plot points to life. She found it difficult at times to rely on someone else's plots; on at least one occasion before writing the last chapter of the book she asked Rougier to explain once again how the murder was really committed.[19]


In 1935, Heyer's thrillers began following the same pair of detectives, Superintendant Hannassyde and Sergeant Hemingway. The two were never as popular as other contemporary fictional detectives such as Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot and Dorothy L. Sayers's Lord Peter Wimsey.[20] One of the books featuring these characters, Death in the Stocks, was dramatized in New York City, but only played for three nights.[21] Agatha Mary Clarissa, Lady Mallowan, DBE (15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976), mainly known as Agatha Christie, was an English crime fiction writer. ... David Suchet as Hercule Poirot in The Dream Hercule Poirot (pronounced in english ) is a fictional Belgian detective created by Agatha Christie. ... Dorothy Leigh Sayers (Oxford, 13 June 1893 – Witham, 17 December 1957) was a renowned British author, translator, student of classical and modern languages, and Christian humanist. ... Early paperback edition cover of Murder Must Advertise Lord Peter Death Bredon Wimsey is a fictional character in a series of detective novels and short stories by Dorothy L. Sayers, in which he solves mysteries — usually murder mysteries. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Regency romances

Now settled into a home with ample space, Heyer began to collect reference works and research materials to use while writing her novels. She often clipped illustrations from magazine article, and jotted down interesting vocabulary or facts onto note cards, but rarely recorded where she found the information.[22] Her notes were sorted into categories, complete with their own bibliographies. The notes she kept for each novel as she was writing often featured "careful sketches of uniforms and hand-drawn maps."[23] In the interests of accuracy, Heyer even purchased a letter written by the Duke of Wellington so that she could accurately describe his style of writing.[24] Her knowledge of the time period was so extensive that Heyer rarely mentioned dates explicitly in her books, instead casually referring to major and minor events to date her plots.[25] Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ...


In 1935, she released Regency Buck, the first of her novels to be set in the Regency period. This bestselling novel essentially established the genre of Regency romances.[26] Regency Buck is a novel written by Georgette Heyer. ... The English Regency, or simply the Regency, is a name given to the period from 1811 to 1820 in the history of England. ... Regency romances are a subgenre of romance novels set during the period of the English Regency or early 19th century. ...


Financial issues

In 1939, Rougier was called to the Bar, and the family moved first to Brighton, then to Hove, so that Rougier could easily commute to London. The following year, their son was sent to prep school, creating an additional expense for Heyer to pay. During World War II, her brothers were in the armed forces, alleviating one of her monetary worries. Her husband served in the British Home Guard.[27] As he was new to his career, Rougier was not earning a great deal of money, and paper rationing during the war meant that Heyer's books did not sell as well as before. To meet their expenses Heyer was forced to sell the rights to three of her back titles outright to her publisher, Heinemann. She received £750 for the Commonwealth rights to These Old Shades, Devil's Cub, and Regency Buck. Her contact at the publishing house, close friend A.S. Frere, later offered to return the rights to her for the same amount of money which she was paid. Heyer refused to accept the deal, explaining that she had given her word to transfer the rights.[28] Brighton is located on the south coast of England, and together with its immediate neighbour Hove forms the city of Brighton and Hove. ... Floral Clock, Palmeira Square Hove promenade facing towards Brighton Hove is a town on the south coast of England immediately to the west of its larger neighbour, Brighton. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The armed forces of the United Kingdom, commonly known as the British Armed Forces or Her Majestys Armed Forces, and sometimes legally the Armed Forces of the Crown[1], encompasses a navy, army, and an air force. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The symbol £ represents the pound currency which Britain uses. ... Flag of the Commonwealth of Nations The Commonwealth of Nations is a voluntary association of independent sovereign states, most of which were once governed by the United Kingdom and are its former colonies. ... Devils Cub is a novel written by Georgette Heyer, and is the sequel to These Old Shades. ... Regency Buck is a novel written by Georgette Heyer. ...


After attending a lunch with a representative from Hodder & Stoughton, who published her detective stories, Heyer felt that her host had patronized her. The company had an option on her next book, and to convince them to break her contract she wrote Penhallow. Hodder & Stoughton turned the book down, thus ending their association, and Heinemann agreed to publish it instead. Her American publisher, Doubleday, also disliked the book, and, after publishing it, ended their relationship with Heyer.[29] Hodder & Stoughton is a British publishing house, now an imprint of Hodder Headline. ... Doubleday is one of the largest book publishing companies in the world. ...


The Blitz made train travel uncertain at times, making it difficult for Rougier to commute. In 1942, the family moved to London. To earn more money, Heyer would review books for Heinemann, earning 2 guineas for each review.[30] She also allowed her novels to be serialized in Women's Journal, earning £1000 for the rights to serialize The Foundling prior to its publication in hardback. Women's Journal usually sold out completely when it carried one of Heyer's novels, but she complained that they "always like[d] my worst work."[31] For other uses, see Blitz. ... The Foundling is a novel written by Georgette Heyer. ...


To minimize her tax liability, Heyer formed a limited liability company. Heron Enterprises, around 1950. Royalties from any new titles would be paid to the company, which would then furnish Heyer with a salary and pay director's fees to her family. Royalties from her previous titles would continue to come to her directly, and even for new works, the foreign royalties, except for those from the United States, would go to her mother.[32] Within several years, however, a tax inspector found that Heyer was withdrawing too much money from the company. The inspector foundd that the extra money should be considered undisclosed dividents, meaning that she would owe an additional £3000 in taxes. For an additional source of income to pay the tax bill, Heyer wrote several articles, including two, "Books about the Brontës" and "How to be a Literary Writer", that were published in Punch.[33] Punch was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire published from 1841 to 1992 and from 1996 to 2002. ...


The limited liability company continued to vex Heyer, and in 1966, she finally fired her accountants after tax inspectors found that she owed the company £20,000. Deciding to end the company, Heyer asked her publishers to make out the rights to new newest book, The Black Sheep, in her personal name.[34] The Black Sheep was different from other Heyer novels in that it did not focus on members of the aristocracy. Instead, it followed "the moneyed middle class," with money a dominant theme in the novel.[35]


Heyer's new accountants advised that she sell Heron Enterprises, and, after two years of their badgering, she finally agreed to sell the company to Booker-McConnell, which already owned the rights to the estates of novelists Ian Fleming and Agatha Christie. Booker-McConnell paid her approximately £85,000 for the rights to the 17 of her titles that were owned by the company. This amount was taxed at the lower capital transfer rate rather than the higher income tax rate.[36] Booker-McConnell was the former sponsor of the Booker Prize for fiction established in 1968. ... Ian Lancaster Fleming (May 28, 1908 – August 12, 1964) was a British author, journalist and Second World War Navy Commander. ... Agatha Mary Clarissa, Lady Mallowan, DBE (15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976), mainly known as Agatha Christie, was an English crime fiction writer. ...


Imitators

As Heyer's popularity increased, other authors began to imitate her style. Around 1950, one of her readers sent her a letter informing her that another author had written several novels that were very similar to Heyer's. The offending novelist even reused the names and characterizations of some of Heyer's characters. Heyer seriously considered filing a lawsuit, but dismissed the idea when no new works by the other author were forthcoming. [37]


In 1961, another reader wrote to tell her of similarities found in a different author's works. This time, the other author's novels borrowed plot incidents, characters, some surnames, and much of Heyer's use of Regency slang. After fans accused Heyer of "publishing shoddy stuff under a pseudonym," Heyer wrote to the other publisher to complain.[38] The author denied the accusations, so Heyer made a thorough list of the borrowings and historical mistakes in the other books. In several instances, the other author used the phrase "to make a cake of oneself", which Heyer had discovered in a privately printed memoir that was unavailable to the public. In another case, the author referenced a historical incident that Heyer had invented in an earlier novel. Heyer sought a lawyer's opinion, but ultimately chose not to sue.[38]


The plaigarism continued in 1974 with the publication of a new book by the author of the 1940 offending works. The new novel combined plot elements and proper names from multiple Heyer novels and lifted much of her phrasing. Heyer's lawyers again counselled restraint. Rather than file a lawsuit, they suggested that she leak the copying to the press. Heyer refused.[39]


Later years

In 1959, Rougier became a Queen's Counsel.[40] The following year, their son Richard fell in love with the estranged wife of one of his acquaintances. Richard assisted the woman, Susanna Flint, in leaving her husband, and, after her divorce was final, the couple married. Heyer was shocked at the impropriety, but soon came to love her daughter-in-law, later describing her as "the daughter we never had and thought we didn't want."[41] Richard and Flint raised her two sons from her first marriage, and provided Heyer with her only biological grandchild in 1966 when their son Nicholas Rougier was born.[42] For information about The Times satire Queens Counsel, see Queens Counsel (comic strip). ...


As Heyer aged she began to suffer more frequent health problems. In June 1964, she underwent surgery to remove a kidney stone. Although the doctors initially predicted a six week recovery, after two months they predicted that it might be a year or longer before she felt like herself. The following year, she suffered a mosquito bite which turned septic, prompting the doctors to offer to perform skin grafts.[43] In July 1973 she suffered a slight stroke and was forced to spend three weeks in a nursing home. Later that year her brother Boris died, but Heyer was still too ill to travel to his funeral. She suffered another stroke in February 1974. Three months later, she was diagnosed with lung cancer, probably caused by the 60–80 cork-tipped cigarettes that she smoked each day (although she claimed not to inhale). On July 4, 1974, Heyer died. Her fans learned her married name for the first time from her obituaries.[44] Lung cancer is the malignant transformation and expansion of lung tissue, and is the most lethal of all cancers worldwide, responsible for 1. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ...


Works

Eight of Heyer’s early historical romances were set in 18th century Georgian England. These works include The Black Moth, These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub. Heyer later wrote twenty-six novels set in the 19th century English Regency, a period which is strongly identified with her novels. Novels from this period include Regency Buck, An Infamous Army, Sylvester, Frederica and Black Sheep. The English Regency, or simply the Regency, is a name given to the period from 1811 to 1820 in the history of England. ...


Heyer is credited with inventing the historical romance and creating the entire subgenre of the Regency romance. Her Regencies were inspired by the writings of Jane Austen, whose novels were also set in the Regency period. Austen's works, however, were contemporary novels, describing the times in which she lived. Because Heyer's writing was set in the midst of events that had occurred over 100 years previously, she had to include more detail on the time period in order for her readers to understand.[45] Unlike the other romance novels of the time period, Heyer's novels used the setting as a plot device. Her characters often contained more modern-day sensibilities, and more conventional characters in the novels would point out the heroine's eccentricities, such as wanting to marry for love.[46] Historical romance is a subgenre of the romance novel literary genre. ... Regency romances are a subgenre of romance novels set during the period of the English Regency or early 19th century. ... 1873 engraving of Jane Austen, based on a portrait drawn by her sister Cassandra. ...


Her books were very popular during the Great Depression and World War II. Her novels, which provided "derring–do, dashing blades, and maids in peril", allowed readers to escape from their own mundane and perhaps difficult lives.[26] In a letter describing her novel Friday's Child, Heyer commented, "'I think myself I ought to be shot for writing such nonsense....But it's unquestionably good escapist literature and I think I should rather like it if I were sitting in an air-raid shelter or recovering from flu."[26] For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


She wrote six lesser-known historical novels. Half were set in her favourite period Medieval Europe – what she would call ‘armour’.[47] Of her six historical novels The Conqueror, My Lord John and Royal Escape are centred around the lives of ruling monarchs in England. Heyer’s other three novels Simon the Coldheart, Beauvallet and The Great Roxhythe are more fictionalised.


Additionally, Heyer wrote four contemporary romance novels and twelve contemporary mysteries. These stories achieved less popular success than her Georgian and Regency tales.


In total, Heyer had 56 novels published, the last of which, My Lord John, was published posthumously. She also published 16 short stories.


Bibliography

Georgian & Regency Novels

The Black Moth (1921) is a Georgian (set around 1751) romance novel by Georgette Heyer. ... Powder and Patch is a novel written by Georgette Heyer. ... These Old Shades (1926) is a Georgian (set around 1756) romance novel written by British novelist Georgette Heyer (1902-1974). ... The Masqueraders is a 1928 novel written by Georgette Heyer. ... Devils Cub is a novel written by Georgette Heyer, and is the sequel to These Old Shades. ... The Convenient Marriage is a Georgian romance novel by Georgette Heyer. ... Regency Buck is a novel written by Georgette Heyer. ... This 1930s novel is a stub. ... An Infamous Army is a novel by Georgette Heyer. ... The Spanish Bride is a novel by Georgette Heyer. ... The Corinthian is a novel by Georgette Heyer. ... This 1940s novel is a stub. ... Fridays Child is a novel written by Georgette Heyer. ... The Reluctant Widow is a novel by Georgette Heyer. ... The Foundling is a novel written by Georgette Heyer. ... Arabella is a novel written by Georgette Heyer. ... The Grand Sophy is a historical novel set in Regency England. ... The Quiet Gentleman is a Regency novel by Georgette Heyer. ... Cotillion is a Regency novel by Georgette Heyer that was released in 1953. ... The Toll-Gate is a Regency novel by Georgette Heyer. ... Bath Tangle is a novel written by Georgette Heyer. ... Sprig Muslin is a novel written by Georgette Heyer. ... April Lady is a Regency novel by Georgette Heyer. ... Sylvester, or the Wicked Uncle is a novel written by Georgette Heyer. ... Venetia is a novel by Georgette Heyer. ... The current version of this article or section is written in an informal style and with a personally invested tone. ... A Civil Contract is a 1961 romance novel by English author Georgette Heyer. ... Categories: | | | | ... Categories: | | | | ... Frederica is a Regency romance novel by Georgette Heyer. ... Black Sheep is a Regency romance novel by Georgette Heyer which was first published in 1966. ... Cousin Kate is a novel by Georgette Heyer. ... Charity Girl is a novel by Georgette Heyer. ... Lady of Quality is a novel written by Georgette Heyer, first published in 1972 Spoiler warning: The novel begins when Annis Wychwood leaves her family home for her own house in Bath. ...

Medieval, Elizabethan, Cromwellian & Restoration Novels

The Great Roxhythe is a novel written by Georgette Heyer. ... Simon the Coldheart is a novel by Georgette Heyer In the year 1400 14-year-old Simon the illegitimate son of Geoffrey of Malvallet fends for himself after his mother’s death. ... Beauvallet is a 1929 novel written by Georgette Heyer. ... The Conqueror is a novel written by Georgette Heyer. ... Royal Escape is a novel written by Georgette Heyer. ... My Lord John is a novel by Georgette Heyer. ...

Contemporary fiction

  • Instead of the Thorn (1923)
  • Helen (1928)
  • Pastel (1929)
  • Barren Corn (1930)

Mysteries

  • Footsteps in the Dark (1932), ISBN 0-09-949369-1
  • Why Shoot a Butler? (1933), ISBN 0-09-949372-1
  • The Unfinished Clue (1934), ISBN 0-09-949373-X
  • Death in the Stocks (1935), ISBN 0-09-949362-4
  • Behold, Here's Poison (1936), ISBN 0-09-949364-0 (AKA Merely Murder in the U.S.)
  • They Found Him Dead (1937), ISBN 0-09-949363-2
  • A Blunt Instrument (1938), ISBN 0-09-949365-9
  • No Wind of Blame (1939), ISBN 0-09-949367-5
  • Envious Casca (1941), ISBN 0-09-949366-7
  • Penhallow (1942), ISBN 0-09-949368-3
  • Duplicate Death (1951), ISBN 0-09-949375-6
  • Detection Unlimited (1953), ISBN 0-09-949374-8

Short stories

  • Pistols for Two (1960), ISBN 0-09-947638-X (short stories)
    • Pistols for Two;
    • A Clandestine Affair (1st appearance);
    • Bath Miss;
    • Pink Domino;
    • A Husband for Fanny;
    • To Have the Honour;
    • Night at the Inn;
    • The Duel;
    • Hazard;
    • Snowdrift;
    • Full Moon
  • "Pursuit" - Text online (in The Queen's Book of the Red Cross, 1939)
  • "A Proposal to Cicely" (1922)
  • "Runaway Match"
  • "The Bulldog and the Beast"
  • "Linckes' Great Case"

The Queens Book of the Red Cross was published in November 1939 in a fundraising effort to aid the Red Cross during World War II. The book was sponsored by Queen Elizabeth, and its contents were contributed by fifty British authors and artists. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 13.
  2. ^ a b Hodge (1984), p. 15.
  3. ^ Hodge (1984), p .14.
  4. ^ a b Hodge (1984), p. 16.
  5. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 17
  6. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 21.
  7. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 22.
  8. ^ Hodge (194), p. 23.
  9. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 27.
  10. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 25.
  11. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 69.
  12. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 70.
  13. ^ Hodge (1984), pp. 27-30.
  14. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 31.
  15. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 35.
  16. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 102.
  17. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 36.
  18. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 38.
  19. ^ a b Hodge (1984), p. 40.
  20. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 42.
  21. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 43.
  22. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 43, 46.
  23. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 51
  24. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 53.
  25. ^ Hoodge (1984), p. 71.
  26. ^ a b c McDowell, Lesley (January 11, 2004), "Cads wanted for taming; Hold on to your bodices: Dorothy L. Sayers and Georgette Heyer are making a comeback this year. Lesley McDowell can't wait.", The Independent on Sunday (London): 17
  27. ^ Hodge (1984), pp. 56, 57, 61.
  28. ^ Hodge (1984), pp. 61, 62.
  29. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 63.
  30. ^ Hodge (1984), pp. 66-67.
  31. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 69.
  32. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 90.
  33. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 106.
  34. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 169.
  35. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 174.
  36. ^ Hodge (1984), pp. 180, 181.
  37. ^ Hodge (1984), pp. 86-87.
  38. ^ a b Hodge (1984), pp. 140-141.
  39. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 206.
  40. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 130.
  41. ^ Hodge (1984), pp. 141, 151.
  42. ^ Hodge (1984), p. 169.
  43. ^ Heyer (1984), pp. 163, 165.
  44. ^ Hodge (1984), pp. 175, 204, 205, 206.
  45. ^ Regis (2003), pp. 125-126.
  46. ^ Regis (2003), p. 127.
  47. ^ Hodge (1984).

is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Independent is a British compact newspaper published by Tony OReillys Independent News & Media. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...

References

This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Bodley Head has been, since 1987, an imprint of Random House. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... The University of Pennsylvania Press (or Penn Press) was originally incorporated with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania on 26 March 1890, and the imprint of the University of Pennsylvania Press first appeared on publications in the closing decade of the nineteenth century--among the earliest such imprints in America. ...

Further reading

  • Georgette Heyer's Regency England by Teresa Chris (1989), ISBN 0-283-99832-6
  • Georgette Heyer: A Critical Retrospective by Mary Fahnestock-Thomas (2001), ISBN 0-9668005-3-2 (includes short stories "A Proposal to Cicely", "Pursuit", and "Runaway Match")
  • Georgette Heyer's Regency World by Jennifer Kloester (2005), ISBN 0-434-01329-3

External links


 
 

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