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Encyclopedia > Georgetown University Law Center
Georgetown University Law Center

Motto: Law is but the means - Justice is the end[1]
Established 1870
Type: Private
Dean: T. Alexander Aleinikoff
Students: 2,017
Location Washington D.C., USA
Campus: Urban
Colors:
Website: http://www.law.georgetown.edu

Georgetown University Law Center (Georgetown Law), is Georgetown University's law school, located in Washington, D.C., United States. Princeton Review ranks it in the top ten for "Best Career Prospects" and "Best Overall Academic Experience." Law School 100, a ranking scheme that purports to use qualitative criteria instead of quantitative, ranks the law school seventh overall, tied with Cornell, University of Virginia and others. According to the 2008 edition of U.S. News and World Report, Georgetown Law is the #14 ranked law school in the nation overall, and is #1 in clinical programs, #3 in international law (tied with Harvard), and #3 in tax law. The school is a member of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS). The law school often emphasizes that its location in close proximity to federal government agencies, courts, and the Supreme Court offer a significant advantage in the study of law. The current dean of Georgetown Law is T. Alexander Aleinikoff. Image File history File links Seal_original_200. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ... T. Alexander Aleinikoff is Dean of the Georgetown University Law Center, Washington, DC, USA, since 2004. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Georgetown University is an elite private research university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., United States. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... The Association of American Law Schools (AALS) is a non-profit organization of 166 law schools in the United States. ... T. Alexander Aleinikoff is Dean of the Georgetown University Law Center, Washington, DC, USA, since 2004. ...

Contents

History

The school's original sign, preserved on the north quad of the present-day campus.

Opened as Georgetown Law School in 1870, it was the first law school run by a Jesuit institution within the U.S. Georgetown Law has been separate from the main Georgetown campus (in the neighborhood of Georgetown) since 1890, when it moved near what is now Chinatown. The Georgetown Law campus is located on New Jersey Avenue, several blocks north of the Capitol, and a few blocks due west of Union Station. Original sign of the Georgetown University Law Center. ... Original sign of the Georgetown University Law Center. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Georgetown is a neighborhood of Washington, DC, the capital of the United States. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Map of Washington, D.C., with Chinatown highlighted in red Chinatowns Friendship Archway, as seen looking west on H St. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... Burnhams Union Station: the central block of the immense front façade of Union Station Union Station is the grand ceremonial train station designed to be the entrance to Washington, DC when it opened in 1907. ...


Campus

The column identifying the Law Center campus
The column identifying the Law Center campus
The Georgetown University Law Center campus, viewed across I-395 looking east. From left to right, the Edward Bennett Williams Law Library, McDonough Hall, and Gewirz Student Center.
The Georgetown University Law Center campus, viewed across I-395 looking east. From left to right, the Edward Bennett Williams Law Library, McDonough Hall, and Gewirz Student Center.

The law campus is located in the Capitol Hill area of Washington, D.C. It is bounded by 1st St. NW to the west, E St. NW to the south, and New Jersey Avenue to the northeast, forming a triangle. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,588 × 3,888 pixels, file size: 4. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,588 × 3,888 pixels, file size: 4. ... Campus of the Georgetown University Law Center; photo taken by User:Postdlf, 12-13-04. ... Campus of the Georgetown University Law Center; photo taken by User:Postdlf, 12-13-04. ... Interstate 395 in Virginia is a 13 mile long spur route that begins at a junction with Interstate 95 in Springfield, Virginia and ends in downtown Washington, District of Columbia. ... Fordham Law School Library, also a Government Document Depository. ...


The campus consists of five buildings. Bernard P. McDonough Hall (1971, expanded in 1997), houses classrooms and Law Center offices and was designed by Edward Durrell Stone. The Edward Bennett Williams Law Library building (1989) houses most of the school's library collection. The Eric E. Hotung International Law Center (2004) includes two floors of library space housing the international collection, and also contains classrooms, offices, and meeting rooms. The Bernard S. and Sarah M. Gewirz Student Center (1993), provides housing mostly for first year law students. A four-level Sport and Fitness Center (2004) includes a pool, fitness facilities, and cafe, and connects the Hotung Building to the Gewirz Student Center. Edward Durrell Stone (1902 Fayetteville Arkansas - 1978 New York City), American modernist twentieth century American architect. ...


Libraries

The Georgetown Law Library supports the research and educational endeavors of the students and faculty of the Georgetown University Law Center. As one of the premier research facilities for the study of law, the Law Library houses the nation's fourth largest law library collection and offers accesses to thousands of online publications.


The mission of the library is to support fully the research and educational endeavors of the students and faculty of the Georgetown University Law Center, by collecting, organizing, preserving, and disseminating legal and law related information in any form, by providing effective service and instructional programs, and by utilizing electronic information systems to provide access to new information products and services.


The collection is split into two buildings. The Edward Bennett Williams Law Library (1989) is named after Washington, DC lawyer Edward Bennett Williams, an alumnus of the Law Center. It houses the Law Center's United States law collection, the Law Center Archives, and the National Equal Justice Library. The Williams library building consists of five floors of collection and study space and provides office space for most of the Law Center's law journals on the Law Library's first level. Edward Bennett Williams (May 31, 1920 – August 13, 1988) was a Washington, D.C. trial attorney who owned several professional sports teams. ...


The John Wolff International and Comparative Law Library (2004) is named after John Wolff, a long-serving member of the adjunct faculty and supporter of the Law Center's international law programs. The library is located on two floors inside the Eric E. Hotung building. It houses the international, foreign, and comparative law collections of the Georgetown University Law Center. Wolff Library collects primary and secondary law materials from Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Mexico, New Zealand, Scotland, and South Africa. English translations of primary and secondary legal materials from other jurisdictions and compilations of foreign law on special topics are also included. This article is about the country. ...


In addition to foreign law, the Wolff Library maintains an extensive collection of public and private international law, focusing on international trade, international environmental law, human rights, arbitration, tax and treaty law. The collection also includes documentation from many international organizations, including the International Court of Justice, the United Nations, the European Union, and the World Trade Organization. The International Court of Justice (known colloquially as the World Court or ICJ; French: ) is the primary judicial organ of the United Nations. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... “WTO” redirects here. ...


Curriculum

McDonough Hall, the main classroom building, facing 2nd St. NW

Georgetown Law's J.D. program can be completed over three years of full-time day study or four years of part-time evening study. The school offers LL.M. programs in Taxation, Securities and Finance Regulation, and Global Health Law, as well as a general LL.M. curriculum for lawyers educated outside the United States. Beginning in the 2007-08 school year, Georgetown will offer a Masters of Studies in Law (M.S.L.) degree for professional journalists. McDonough Hall, the main classroom building at [[Georgetown University Law Center. ... McDonough Hall, the main classroom building at [[Georgetown University Law Center. ... J.D. redirects here; for alternate uses, see J.D. (disambiguation) J.D. is an abbreviation for the Latin Juris Doctor, also called a Doctor of Law or Doctorate of Jurisprudence, and is the law degree typically awarded by an accredited U.S. law school after successfully completing three years... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree that allows someone to specialize in a particular area of law. ... Eat pizza everyday. ... The term ‘global health’ refers to a component of the wider discipline of public health which concerns itself particularly with issues which transcend the geopolitical boarders of the nation-state. ... A M.S.L. is a masters degree offered by some law schools to students who wish to study the law but do not want to become attorneys. ...


Students are offered the choice of two tracks for their first year of study. "Curriculum A" is similar to the traditional law curriculum taught at many schools, including courses in contracts, constitutional law, torts, property, criminal procedure, civil procedure, and legal research and writing. "Curriculum B" is a more interdisciplinary, theoretical approach to legal study, but covers largely the same content in order to prepare students to take the same upper-level classes as their Curriculum A peers. The Curriculum B courses are Bargain, Exchange and Liability (contracts and torts), Democracy and Coercion (constitutional law and criminal procedure), Government Processes (administrative law), Legal Justice (jurisprudence), Legal Practice (legal research and writing), Legal Process and Society (civil procedure, criminal procedure, and ethics), and Property in Time (property). Students in both curricula participate in a week-long introduction to international law between the fall and spring semesters. A contract is any promise or set of promises made by one party to another for the breach of which the law provides a remedy. ... In the United States, constitutional law generally refers to the provisions of the United States Constitution, as interpreted by the United States Supreme Court. ... In the common law, a tort is a civil wrong for which the law provides a remedy. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Criminal procedure refers to the legal process for adjudicating claims that someone has violated the criminal law. ... Civil procedure is the body of law that sets out the process that courts will follow when hearing cases of a civil nature (a civil action, as opposed to a criminal action). ... Legal writing is a type of technical writing used by legislators, lawyers, judges, and others in law to express legal analysis and legal rights and duties. ... A contract is any promise or set of promises made by one party to another for the breach of which the law provides a remedy. ... In the common law, a tort is a civil wrong for which the law provides a remedy. ... In the United States, constitutional law generally refers to the provisions of the United States Constitution, as interpreted by the United States Supreme Court. ... Criminal procedure refers to the legal process for adjudicating claims that someone has violated the criminal law. ... Administrative law in the United States often relates to, or arises from, so-called independent agencies- such as the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Here is FTCs headquarters in Washington D.C. Administrative law (or regulatory law) is the body of law that arises from the activities of administrative agencies... For the jurisprudence of courts, see Case law. ... Legal writing is a type of technical writing used by legislators, lawyers, judges, and others in law to express legal analysis and legal rights and duties. ... Civil procedure is the body of law that sets out the process that courts will follow when hearing cases of a civil nature (a civil action, as opposed to a criminal action). ... Criminal procedure refers to the legal process for adjudicating claims that someone has violated the criminal law. ... Professional responsibility is the area of legal practice that encompasses the duties of attorneys to act in a professional manner, obey the law, avoid conflicts of interest, and put the interests of clients ahead of their own interests. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


JD, JSD, LLM programs

Administrative law in the United States often relates to, or arises from, so-called independent agencies- such as the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Here is FTCs headquarters in Washington D.C. Administrative law (or regulatory law) is the body of law that arises from the activities of administrative agencies... It has been suggested that Adjudication be merged into this article or section. ... Antitrust is also the name for a movie, see Antitrust (movie) Antitrust or competition laws legislate against trade practices that undermine competitiveness or are considered to be unfair. ... A clinic or outpatient clinic is a small medical facility that provides health care for ambulatory patients - as opposed to inpatients treated in a hospital. ... Commercial law (sometimes known as business law) is the body of law which governs business and commerce. ... A contract is any promise or set of promises made by one party to another for the breach of which the law provides a remedy. ... The French Declaration of the Rights of the Man and of the Citizen, whose principles still have constitutional value Constitutional law is the study of foundational or basic laws of nation states and other political organizations. ... Corporations law or corporate law is the law concerning the creation and regulation of corporations. ... Eat pizza everyday. ... The term criminal law, sometimes called penal law, refers to any of various bodies of rules in different jurisdictions whose common characteristic is the potential for unique and often severe impositions as punishment for failure to comply. ... Look up Procedure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Labour law (American English: labor) or employment law is the body of laws, administrative rulings, and precedents which addresses the legal rights of, and restrictions on, working people and their organizations. ... Environmental law is a body of law, which is a system of complex and interlocking statutes, common law, treaties, conventions, regulations and policies which seeks to protect the natural environment which may be affected, impacted or endangered by human activities. ... Family Law was a television drama starring Kathleen Quinlan as a divorced lawyer who attempted to start her own law firm after her lawyer husband took all their old clients. ... Legal topics related to health and the health profession. ... Look up policy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Bioethics is the ethics of biological science and medicine. ... In law, particularly in common law jurisdictions, intellectual property is a form of legal entitlement which allows its holder to control the use of certain intangible ideas and expressions. ... Entertainment law or media law is a general term for a mix of more traditional categories of law with a focus on providing legal services to the entertainment industry. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... National Security Act can refer to National Security Act of 1947, a United States law that established the Central Intelligence Agency; National Security Act (South Korea), regarding seditious activities This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... For the jurisprudence of courts, see Case law. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Legal history is a term that has at least two meanings. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Professional responsibility is the area of legal practice that encompasses the duties of attorneys to act in a professional manner, obey the law, avoid conflicts of interest, and put the interests of clients ahead of their own interests. ... Write redirects here. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in order to recover a right, obtain damages for an injury, obtain an injunction to prevent an injury, or obtain a declaratory judgment to prevent future legal disputes. ... Legal procedure is the body of law and rules used in the administration of justice in the court system, including such areas as civil procedure, criminal procedure, appellate procedure, administrative procedure, labour procedure, and probate. ... Public interest litigation means litigation for the protection of public interest. ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... Land use is the pattern of construction and activity land is used for. ... Urban, city, or town planning, deals with design of the built environment from the municipal and metropolitan perspective. ... Look up trust in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up estate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Faculty

The Hotung International Law Center and the GULC fitness center, seen across the south quad.
Gewirz Student Center provides student housing for mostly first-year law students.

Notable current faculty include (the following is a non-exhaustive list): The Hotung International Law Building and fitness center at Georgetown University Law Center, looking across the south quad. ... The Hotung International Law Building and fitness center at Georgetown University Law Center, looking across the south quad. ... Gewirz Student Center at the Georgetown University Law Center. ... Gewirz Student Center at the Georgetown University Law Center. ...

The roster of current professors also includes many former Supreme Court clerks and other notable legal academics and professionals. Charles F. Abernathy is a professor at Georgetown University Law Center. ... Randy Barnett Randy E. Barnett (born February 5, 1952) is a lawyer, a law professor at Georgetown University Law Center, and a legal theorist in the United States. ... The supreme court functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be challenged, in some countries, provinces and states. ... Warren Earl Burger (September 17, 1907 – June 25, 1995) was Chief Justice of the United States from 1969 to 1986. ... Viet D. Dinh This is a Vietnamese name; the surname is Dinh. ... The supreme court functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be challenged, in some countries, provinces and states. ... Sandra Day OConnor (born March 26, 1930) is an American jurist who served as the first female Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1981 to 2006. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933, Brooklyn, New York) is an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. ... Michael H. Gottesman is a lawyer and is a law professor at Georgetown University Law Center, specializing in the fields of labor law, constitutional law, and civil rights. ... Neal Katyal is the John Carroll Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law School. ... For the case involving a United States citizen, see Hamdi v. ... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ... Martin Marty S. Lederman is an attorney in private practice specializing in constitutional and appellate litigation. ... Mari Matsuda is a lawyer, is an activist, and is a law professor at Georgetown University Law Center, specializing in the fields of torts, constitutional law, legal history, feminist theory, critical race theory, and civil rights law. ... The supreme court functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be challenged, in some countries, provinces and states. ... Sandra Day OConnor (born March 26, 1930) is an American jurist who served as the first female Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1981 to 2006. ... Eleanor Holmes Norton (born June 13, 1937) is the non-voting Delegate from the District of Columbia to the United States House of Representatives (map). ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Julie OSullivan has been a professor at the Georgetown University Law Center since joining the faculty in November 1994 from her position in the Office of Independent Counsel (Little Rock, Arkansas), where she worked on the Whitewater investigation. ... The supreme court functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be challenged, in some countries, provinces and states. ... Sandra Day OConnor (born March 26, 1930) is an American jurist who served as the first female Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1981 to 2006. ... John Podesta John David Podesta (b. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Joshua B. Bolten, the current White House Chief of Staff. ... Robert Pitofsky was the 54th chairman of the Federal Trade Commission of the United States from April 11, 1995 to May 31, 2001. ... | logo_caption = | seal = US-FederalTradeCommission-Seal. ... Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz (born November 28, 1970) is an Associate Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center. ... The supreme court functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be challenged, in some countries, provinces and states. ... Justice Anthony Kennedy For other people of the same name, see Anthony Kennedy (disambiguation). ... Judge Laurence H. Silberman was appointed United States Circuit Judge for the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in October 1985, and took senior status on November 1, 2000. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, known informally as the D.C. Circuit, is the federal appellate court for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. ... Law clerks have assisted Supreme Court Justices in various capacities since the first one was hired by Justice Horace Gray in the 1880s. ...


Former professors include:

William Joseph Brennan, Jr. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Father Robert Drinan Father Robert Frederick Drinan (November 15, 1920 - January 28, 2007) was a Jesuit Catholic priest, lawyer, human rights activist, and a former Democratic U.S. Congressman from Massachusetts. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... The Honorable John Glover Roberts, Jr. ... Antonin Gregory Scalia (born March 11, 1936[1]) is an American jurist and the second most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Mark Tushnet (born 1945 -) is a prominent critical legal studies proponent, constitutional law scholar, and author of many books. ... Critical legal studies refers to a movement in legal thought that applied methods similar to those of critical theory (the Frankfurt School) to law. ... The French Declaration of the Rights of the Man and of the Citizen, whose principles still have constitutional value Constitutional law is the study of foundational or basic laws of nation states and other political organizations. ...

Publications

Edward Bennett Williams Law Library, viewed from the campus north quad.

Georgetown University Law Center has ten student-run law journals and a weekly student-run newspaper, the Georgetown Law Weekly. The journals are: Edward Bennett Williams Library at the Georgetown University Law Center. ... Edward Bennett Williams Library at the Georgetown University Law Center. ... Fordham Law School Library, also a Government Document Depository. ... The Georgetown Law Weekly is a weekly newspaper published by students at Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C. The Law Weekly has a circulation of 1,500 and is printed each Tuesday of the school year. ...

  • Georgetown Law Journal
  • American Criminal Law Review
  • Georgetown Immigration Law Journal
  • Georgetown International Environmental Law Review
  • Georgetown Journal of Gender and the Law
  • Georgetown Journal of International Law
  • Georgetown Journal of Law and Public Policy
  • Georgetown Journal of Legal Ethics
  • Georgetown Journal on Poverty Law and Policy
  • The Tax Lawyer

The Georgetown Law Journal is a student-edited law review published at Georgetown University Law Center. ... The Georgetown Journal on Poverty Law and Policy is a student-edited law review published at Georgetown University Law Center. ...

Notable alumni

Name Degree and year received Accomplishments
Thomas L. Ambro 1975 Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit
Bob Barr 1977 U.S. Congressman from Georgia (1995-2003)
Gary Bauer 1973 Conservative activist and Reagan Administration official
William W. Belknap 1851 United States Secretary of War (1869-76)
Francisco Besosa 1979 Judge, United States District Court for the District of Puerto Rico
J. Caleb Boggs 1937 U.S. Senator from Delaware (1961-73), Governor of Delaware (1953-60), U.S. Congressman from Delaware (1947-53)
Thomas Hale Boggs, Jr. 1965 Chairman of the law firm Patton Boggs LLP
Richard C. Bosson J.D., 1969 Chief Justice of the New Mexico Supreme Court
Michael N. Castle J.D., 1964 U.S. Congressman from Delaware
Dennis Chavez 1920 U.S. Senator from New Mexico
George Cortelyou 1895 U.S. Secretary of Commerce and Labor (1903-04), U.S. Postmaster General (1905-07), U.S. Secretary of the Treasury (1907-09)
Mitch Daniels 1979 Governor of Indiana, director of Office of Management and Budget (OMB)
Robert E. Davis LL.B., 1964 Kansas Supreme Court Justice
John Dean 1965 White House Counsel to President Richard Nixon and key figure in Watergate scandal
John Dingell J.D., 1952 U.S. Congressman from Michigan
Richard Durbin J.D., 1969 U.S. Senator from Illinois, Democratic Whip
John A. Durkin 1965 U.S. Senator from New Hampshire
Lane Evans J.D., 1978 U.S. Congressman from Illinois (1983-2007)
Douglas Feith J.D., 1978 Former Undersecretary of Defense for Policy in the George W. Bush Administration
D. Michael Fisher 1969 Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit
Martin Frost 1970 U.S. Congressman from Texas
Thomas Hardiman 1990 Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit
Mazie Hirono J.D., 1978 U.S. Congressman from Hawaii
Thomas Hogan 1966 Chief Judge, U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia
Nancy Hogshead-Makar 1997 1984 Summer Olympics swimming champion; Law Professor, Florida Coastal School of Law
Jeffrey R. Howard 1981 Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit
Steny Hoyer J.D., 1966 U.S. Congressman from Maryland; House Majority Leader
Bill Jefferson LL.M., 1995 U.S. Congressman from Louisiana
Mickey Kantor 1968 U.S. Secretary of Commerce (1996-97)
Mark Kirk J.D., 1992 U.S. Congressman from Illinois
Rives Kistler J.D., 1981 Oregon Supreme Court Justice
Patrick Leahy J.D., 1964 U.S. Senator from Vermont; Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman
Dan Lungren J.D., 1971 U.S. Congressman from California
Hall S. Lusk 1907 U.S. Senator from Oregon (1960), Chief Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court
Gov. John Lynch J.D., 1984 Governor of New Hampshire
Terry McAuliffe 1984 Chairman of the Democratic National Committee
Jim McGreevey 1981 Governor of New Jersey
Marilyn Milian J.D., 1984 Host of The People's Court, former Florida circuit court judge
George Mitchell 1961 U.S. Senator from Maine, Democratic Senate Majority Leader (1989-95); chairman of the board of the Walt Disney Co., board of directors of the Boston Red Sox
John Podesta 1976 White House Chief of Staff under President Bill Clinton
Michael Powell J.D., 1993 Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
Francis Rooney J.D., 1978 United States Ambassador to the Holy See, 2005-present
Stephanie Herseth Sandlin J.D., 1997 U.S. Congressman from South Dakota
Don Siegelman 1972 Governor of Alabama
John Sirica 1926 Chief Judge, U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia
Michael Slive 1966 Commissioner of the Southeastern Conference; first commissioner of Conference USA and Great Midwest Conference
Van P. Smith 1955 Chairman of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce
John D. Spellman 1953 Governor of Washington
Ricardo M. Urbina J.D., 1970 Judge, U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia
Chris Van Hollen J.D., 1990 U.S. Congressman from Maryland
Greta Van Susteren J.D., 1979
LL.M., 1983
Anchor of On the Record on the Fox News Channel
Peter Visclosky LL.M., 1982 U.S. Congressman from Indiana
James H. Webb 1975 U.S. Senator from Virginia, former U.S. Secretary of the Navy; noted author
Rick White 1980 U.S. Congressman from Washington
Edward Bennett Williams 1944 Former owner of the Washington Redskins and Baltimore Orioles; founder of law firm Williams & Connolly LLP
Frank Wolf J.D., 1965 U.S. Congressman from Virginia
Albert Wynn J.D., 1977 U.S. Congressman from Maryland

Thomas L. Ambro (born 1949 in Cambridge, Ohio) is a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. ... Robert L. (Bob) Barr, Jr. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Gary L. Bauer (born May 4, 1946, in Covington, Kentucky)[1] is a conservative American politician notable for his ties to several evangelical Christian groups and campaigns. ... William Worth Belknap (September 22, 1829 – October 13, 1890) was a United States Army general, government administrator, and United States Secretary of War. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... After a long career as a corporate attorney, Francisco Besosa was appointed by President George W. Bush to the federal bench, as a Federal district judge in the District of Puerto Rico. ... James Caleb Cale Boggs (1909–1993) was an American lawyer and politician from Claymont, Delaware in New Castle County. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... Michael Newbold Mike Castle (born July 2, 1939) is an American lawyer and politician from Wilmington, in New Castle County, Delaware. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... All states are invited to contribute two statues for display in the Statuary Hall of the U.S. Capitol. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... G.B. Cortelyou George Bruce Cortelyou (July 26, 1862–October 23, 1940) was an American Presidential Cabinet secretary of the early 20th century. ... The United States Secretary of Commerce and Labor was the head of the short-lived United States Department of Commerce and Labor, which was concerned with business, industry, and labor. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the finance minister of the Federal Government of the United States. ... Mitchell Elias Mitch Daniels, Jr. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Justice Robert E. Davis Robert E. Davis is a Kansas Supreme Court Justice. ... The Kansas Supreme Court is the highest judicial authority in the state of Kansas. ... John Dean, May 7, 1972. ... The White House Counsel is a staff appointee of the President of the United States. ... Nixon redirects here. ... Watergate redirects here. ... Rep. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Richard Joseph Dick Durbin, (born November 21, 1944) is currently the senior United States Senator from Illinois and Democratic Whip, the second highest position in the party leadership in the Senate. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office For the professor at the University of Akron, see John Durkin. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Lane Evans Lane Allen Evans (born August 4, 1951), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1983, representing the 17th District of Illinois (map). ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Douglas Feith. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Congressman Martin Frost Jonas Martin Frost III (born January 1, 1942) is an American politician, who was the Democratic representative to the U.S. House of Representatives for the Texas 24th Congressional District from 1979 to 2005. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Thomas Michael Hardiman (born July 8, 1965 in Winchester, Massachusetts) is a federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. ... Mazie Keiko Hirono (Japanese: 広野 慶子) , born November 3, 1947 in Fukushima, Japan, is an American politician who was the second Asian immigrant elected lieutenant governor of a state of the United States. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Chief Judge Thomas F. Hogan Chief Judge Thomas F. Hogan was appointed to the United States District Court for the District of Columbia in August 1982 by Republican President Ronald Reagan and became Chief Judge on June 19, 2001. ... The United States District Court for the District of Columbia is the United States District Court that hears cases originating in the District of Columbia under Federal law. ... Nancy Lynn Hogshead (born April 17, 1962 in Iowa City, Iowa) is a retired freestyle swimmer from the United States, who won the gold medal in the womens 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, California. ... Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme ( file info) — composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... The Florida Coastal School of Law is an ABA accredited law school located in Jacksonville, FL. Founded in 1996, the school received its full accreditation in 2002. ... Jeffrey R. Howard (born November 5, 1955 in Claremont, New Hampshire) is a federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. ... Steny Hamilton Hoyer (born June 14, 1939) is a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives, representing the Marylands 5th congressional district since 1981. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... William Jefferson William Jennings Jefferson (born March 14, 1947), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1991, representing the 2nd District of Louisiana, which includes much of the Greater New Orleans area (map) On July 30, 2005, he was caught on video... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Michael Mickey Kantor (born August 7, 1939 in Nashville, Tennessee) is an American politician and lawyer. ... The office of the U.S. Secretary of Commerce in the mid-20th century. ... Mark Steven Kirk (born September 15, 1959) has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 2001, representing Illinoiss 10th congressional district (map). ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Rives Kistler election photograph The Honorable Rives Kistler joined the Oregon Supreme Court as an Associate Justice in August 2003, after serving four years as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals. ... The Oregon Supreme Court is the highest state court in the Oregon judicial department (branch of government). ... Patrick Joseph Leahy (born March 31, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Vermont. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... Dan Lungren Daniel Edward Lungren (born September 22, 1946), a Republican from California, was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 2004, representing the states 3rd Congressional district (map). ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Hall Stoner Lusk (September 21, 1883 - May 15, 1983) was a United States Senator from Oregon. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... The Oregon Supreme Court is the highest state court in the Oregon judicial department (branch of government). ... For other persons named John Lynch, see John Lynch (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Terry McAuliffe opening the 2004 Democratic National Convention Terrence Richard Terry McAuliffe (born 1957) is an American political leader from the Democratic Party; he served as Chairman of the Democratic National Committee from February 2001 to February 2005. ... Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... James Edward Jim McGreevey (born August 6, 1957) is an American Democratic politician. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Judge Marilyn Milian, the current judge of The Peoples Court, has presided over cases since 2001. ... Judge Joseph Wapner, who presided over cases from 1981 to 1993. ... For other persons with a similar name, see George Mitchell George John Mitchell, GBE (born August 20, 1933) is a former Democratic Party politician and United States Senator from the state of Maine, and currently serves as Chairman of the global law firm DLA Piper US LLP and also as... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... A Senate Majority Leader is a politician within a Senate who leads the majority party, or majority coalition, of sitting senators. ... Alternate meanings: Disney (disambiguation) The Walt Disney Company (also known as Disney Enterprises, Inc. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... John Podesta John David Podesta (b. ... Michael Powell Michael Kevin Powell (born March 23, 1963) is an American Republican politician. ... FCC redirects here. ... L. Francis Rooney III (born December 4, 1953) is the current American Ambassador to the Vatican. ... Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (born December 3, 1970) is an American lawyer and Democratic politician, currently serving as the sole member of the House of Representatives from South Dakota. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Donald Eugene Don Siegelman (born February 24, 1946, in Mobile, Alabama) is an American Democratic politician. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Judge John Joseph Sirica (March 19, 1904 – August 14, 1992) was the Chief Judge for the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. ... The United States District Court for the District of Columbia is the United States District Court that hears cases originating in the District of Columbia under Federal law. ... Michael L. Slive is the current commissioner of the SEC. Michael Lawrence Slive (born July 26, 1940) (sometimes shortened to Mike Slive) is the current commissioner of the Southeastern Conference (SEC), an American college athletics association. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ... The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is the worlds largest not-for-profit business federation, representing 3,000,000 businesses 2,800 state and local chambers 830 business associations They are staffed with policy specialists, lobbyists and lawyers. ... John D. Spellman (Born December 29, 1926) was the Governor of Washington between 1981 and 1985. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Christopher Chris Van Hollen, Jr. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Greta Van Susteren (born June 11, 1954 in Appleton, Wisconsin) is an American journalist and television personality on the Fox News Channel where she hosts On the Record, the highest rated program on cable news at 10 p. ... Fox News redirects here. ... Peter J. Visclosky (born August 13, 1949), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1985, representing the 1st District of Indiana. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... James H. Webb, Jr. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Richard Alan White (born 6 November 1953), an American politician, served in the United States House of Representatives from 1995 to 1999. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Edward Bennett Williams (May 31, 1920 – August 13, 1988) was a Washington, D.C. trial attorney who owned several professional sports teams. ... For other uses, see Redskins (disambiguation). ... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... Williams & Connolly LLP is a prominent litigation firm based in Washington, D.C. The firm was founded by legendary trial lawyer Edward Bennett Williams. ... Frank Rudolph Wolf, born January 30, 1939, American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1981. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Albert Wynn Albert Russell Wynn (born September 10, 1951) is a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives representing the 4th district of the State of Maryland (map) since 1992. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N...

Also attended

Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is a businessman, a U.S. Republican politician, the 13th Secretary of Defense under President Gerald Ford from 1975 to 1977, and the 21st Secretary of Defense under President George W. Bush from 2001 to 2006. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ...

Notes

  1. ^ Expressed by Joseph A. Cantrel (Class of 1922), at the 50th Anniversary Celebration in December 1920. See official site

External links

  • Georgetown University Law Center official site

  Results from FactBites:
 
Georgetown University Law Center (959 words)
These allow law students to "get their feet wet" and also teach them how to use different methods (each student in the group of four is assigned to use either an article, cartoon or other visual, poll or continuum, or legal document).
Law students also submit monthly reports each month that include journal entries (to reflect on their teaching experiences), all of their lesson plans and handouts, samples of student work, attendance sheets, and a form in which the law students describe the different methods they have used and their greatest challenges and triumphs.
We are planning to develop a four-year Street Law curriculum which would be used in the Thurgood Marshall Academy, a charter school started by former Street Law: High Schools law student teachers (the schools is scheduled to open in Southeast DC in the fall of 2001).
Georgetown Sports & Entertainment Law Society: Georgetown Alumni in Sports & Entertainment Law (7185 words)
He earned a BA from Georgetown University where he was a four-year player and captain of the baseball team and a JD from Fordham University School of Law where he graduated as President of the Student Bar and Commencement Speaker.
University of Connecticut, BA Professor Bershad received his A.B. from the University of Connecticut and his J.D. from Georgetown University.
After graduating from Georgetown University Law School, she was in private practice at Holland and Knight, where her practice included sports and employment law.
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