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Encyclopedia > George H. W. Bush
George Herbert Walker Bush


In office
January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993
Vice President(s)   J. Danforth Quayle
Preceded by Ronald Reagan
Succeeded by William Jefferson Clinton

In office
January 20, 1981 – January 20, 1989
President Ronald Reagan
Preceded by Walter Mondale
Succeeded by J. Danforth Quayle

Born June 12, 1924 (age 82)
Milton, Massachusetts
Political party Republican
Spouse Barbara Bush
Religion Episcopal
Signature

George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. Before his presidency, Bush was the 43rd Vice President of the United States in the administration of Ronald Reagan. He has also served as the member of the United States House of Representatives for the 7th district of Texas (1967–1971), the United States Ambassador to the United Nations (1971–1973), Chairman of the Republican National Committee (1973–1974), Chief of the United States Liaison Office in the People's Republic of China (1974–1976), and Director of Central Intelligence (1976–1977). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2072x2392, 584 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): George H. W. Bush List of Presidents of the United States ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States of America is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... James Danforth Quayle III (born February 4, 1947) was the 44th Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989-1993). ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... Order: 42nd President Term of Office: January 20, 1993–January 20, 2001 Preceded by: George H. W. Bush Succeeded by: George W. Bush Date of birth: August 19, 1946 Place of birth: Hope, Arkansas Date of death: Place of death: First Lady: Hillary Rodham Clinton Political party: Democratic Vice... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... James Danforth Quayle III (born February 4, 1947) was the 44th Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989-1993). ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Milton is a suburban Boston town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Democratic Party. ... White House Portrait Barbara Pierce Bush (born June 8, 1925) is the wife of the 41st President of the United States, George H. W. Bush, and was First Lady of the United States from 1989 to 1993. ... The arms of the Episcopal Church are based on the St Georges Cross, a symbol of England (mother of world Anglicanism), with a saltire reminiscent of the Cross of St Andrew in the canton in reference to the historical origins of the American episcopate in the Scottish Episcopal Church. ... Image File history File links George_Bush_signature. ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States of America is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... The current boundaries of Texas District 7. ... United States Ambassador to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... Bush/Cheney, 2004 campaign manager Ken Mehlman is the current chairman of the RNC. The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the Republican Party of the United States. ... The Ambassador to China is the chief American diplomat to China. ... The Office of Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) was established on January 23rd 1946 with Adm. ...


Bush is the son of Prescott Bush, who served in the United States Senate from 1953 to 1963. He is the father of George W. Bush, the 43rd and current President of the United States, and Jeb Bush, the 43rd Governor of Florida. He is the oldest living United States president. Prescott Sheldon Bush (May 15, 1895 — October 8, 1972) was a United States Senator from Connecticut and a Wall Street executive banker with Brown Brothers Harriman. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... John Ellis Jeb Bush (born February 11, 1953), a Republican, is the forty-third and current Governor of Florida. ... List of Governors of Florida: Florida Governors Military Government Territorial Government Statehood Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Florida | Government of Florida ... This is a chronology of who was the oldest living President of the United States, former or current, at any given time. ...

Contents

Early years

George Herbert Walker Bush was born at 173 Adams Street in Milton, Massachusetts[1] on June 12, 1924. Adams Street is named for the family of Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams, who lived on the same street just a few miles south in the neighboring community of Quincy, Massachusetts. The Victorian house where he was born is privately owned and not open to the public. The Bush Family soon afterward moved from Milton to Greenwich, Connecticut. Milton is a suburban Boston town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. ... John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) served as the nations first Vice President (1789–1797) and as its second President (1797–1801). ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ...   Settled: 1625 â€“ Incorporated: 1792 Zip Code(s): 02169, 02170, 02171 â€“ Area Code(s): 617 / 857 Official website: http://ci. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Western Region Settled 1640 Joined Connecticut 1656 Government type Representative town meeting  - First selectman James A. Lash  - Town administrator Edward Gomeau  - Town meeting moderator Thomas J. Byrne Area    - City 174. ...


George began his formal education at the Greenwich Country Day School in Greenwich. Beginning in 1936, Bush attended Phillips Academy[2] in Andover, Massachusetts, where he held a large number of leadership positions including being the president of the senior class and secretary of the student council, president of the community fund-raising group, the Society of Inquiry, a member of the editorial board of the school newspaper, the Philippian, captain of both the varsity baseball and soccer teams.[3] It is said that he was a member of A.U.V., or "Auctoritas, Unitas, Veritas" (Latin for "Authority, Unity, Truth"), an exclusive fraternity. Greenwich Country Day School is a co-educational, independent day school in Greenwich, Connecticut, founded in 1926. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Andover, Phillips Andover, or simply P.A.) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Essex County Settled 1642 Incorporated 1646 Government  - Type Open town meeting  - Town Manager Reginald Buzz Stapczynski  - Board of    Selectmen Ted Teichert (2009) Mary Lyman (2008) Alexander Vispoli (2007) John Hess (2007) Brian Major (2009) Area  - Town  32. ...


World War II

George Bush met Babe Ruth as a student at Yale.
George Bush met Babe Ruth as a student at Yale.

After graduating from Phillips Academy in June 1942, he joined the U.S. Navy on his 18th birthday to become an aviator. After completing the 10-month course, he was commissioned as an ensign in the U.S. Naval Reserve at Corpus Christi, Texas on June 9, 1943, just three days before his 19th birthday, which made him the youngest naval aviator to that date.[4] Image File history File links Babe_Ruth_George_Bush. ... Image File history File links Babe_Ruth_George_Bush. ... For the eponymous band, see Babe Ruth (band). ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... A childs first birthday party. ... For other uses, see Aviator (disambiguation). ... Ensign of the Imperial Japanese Navy. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Nickname: Sparkling City by the Sea Location in the state of Texas Counties Nueces County Government  - Mayor Henry Garrett Area  - City 1,192. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ...


After finishing flight training, he was assigned to Torpedo Squadron (VT-51) as photographic officer in September 1943. As part of Air Group 51, his squadron was based on the USS San Jacinto (CVL-30) in the spring of 1944. San Jacinto was part of Task Force 58 that participated in operations against Marcus and Wake Islands in May, and then in the Marianas during June. On June 19, the task force triumphed in one of the largest air battles of the war.[5] Shortly after takeoff Bush's aircraft made a forced water landing. A destroyer rescued the young pilot and his crew, although the plane was lost.[6] On July 25, Bush and another pilot received credit for sinking a small cargo ship off Palau. The second USS San Jacinto (CVL-30) of the United States Navy was an Independence-class light aircraft carrier. ... The Fast Carrier Task Force, known at different times as Task Force 38 and Task Force 58, was the main striking force of the United States Navy in the latter half of the Pacific War. ... Minami Torishima (南鳥島) or Marcus Island is a very small isolated island in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, located at latitude 24°18′ N and longitude 153°58′ E. It is only 1 sq km in size. ... Mariana Islands (sometimes called The Marianas; up to the early 20th century sometimes called the Ladrone Islands) are a group of islands made up by the summits of 15 volcanic mountains in the Pacific Ocean. ... June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... July 25 is the 206th day (207th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 159 days remaining. ...

George Bush in his TBM Avenger on the carrier USS San Jacinto in 1944
George Bush in his TBM Avenger on the carrier USS San Jacinto in 1944

After Bush's promotion to Lieutenant Junior Grade on August 1, the San Jacinto commenced operations against the Japanese in the Bonin Islands. On September 2, 1944, Bush piloted one of four Grumman TBM Avenger aircraft from VT-51 that attacked the Japanese installations on Chichi Jima. For this mission his crew included Radioman Second Class John Delaney and Lieutenant Junior Grade William White, who substituted for Bush's regular gunner. During their attack, four Avengers from VT-51 encountered intense antiaircraft fire. While starting the attack, Bush's aircraft was hit and his engine caught on fire. Despite the fact that his plane was on fire, he completed his attack and released the bombs over his target, scoring several damaging hits. With his engine on fire, Bush flew several miles from the island, where he and one other crew member on the TBM Avenger bailed out of the aircraft. However, the other man's parachute did not open, and he fell to his death. It was never determined which man bailed out with Bush. Both Delaney and White were killed in action. While Bush waited four hours in his inflated raft, several fighters circled protectively overhead until he was rescued by the lifeguard submarine USS Finback. For this action Bush received the Distinguished Flying Cross. During the month he remained on the USS Finback, Bush participated in the rescue of other pilots. Image File history File links TBF_GeorgeBush. ... Image File history File links TBF_GeorgeBush. ... The Grumman TBF Avenger (designated TBM for aircraft manufactured by General Motors) was an American torpedo bomber, developed initially for the United States Navy and Marine Corps and used by a large number of air forces around the world. ... The second USS San Jacinto (CVL-30) of the United States Navy was an Independence-class light aircraft carrier. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... The Ogasawara Islands (小笠原諸島) are an Japan. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, later Grumman Aerospace Corporation, was a leading producer of military and civilian aircraft of the 20th century. ... The Grumman TBF Avenger (designated TBM for aircraft manufactured by General Motors) was an American torpedo bomber, developed initially for the United States Navy and Marine Corps and used by a large number of air forces around the world. ... Chichi-jima (父島, lit. ... The Apollo 15 capsule landed safely despite a parachute failure. ... Finback (SS-230), a Gato-class submarine was launched 25 August 1941 by Portsmouth Navy Yard; sponsored by Mrs. ... The Distinguished Flying Cross. ...


Bush subsequently returned to San Jacinto in November 1944 and participated in operations in the Philippines. When San Jacinto returned to Guam, the squadron, which had suffered 50 percent casualties of its pilots, was replaced and sent to the United States. Through 1944, he had flown 58 combat missions for which he received the Distinguished Flying Cross, three Air Medals, and the Presidential Unit Citation awarded aboard the San Jacinto. The Air Medal is a military decoration of the United States which was established by Executive Order 9158, signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt, on May 11, 1942. ... Please see Presidential Unit Citation for other versions of this award The Presidential Unit Citation is awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and allies for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy on or after 7 December 1941 (the date of the Attack on...


Because of his valuable combat experience, Bush was reassigned to Norfolk Navy Base and put in a training wing for new torpedo pilots. He was later assigned as a naval aviator in a new torpedo squadron, VT-153. With the surrender of Japan, he was honorably discharged in September 1945 and then entered Yale University.-1... “Yale” redirects here. ...


Marriage, Yale, and Skull & Bones

Almost immediately upon his return from the war in December 1944, George Bush married Barbara Pierce. Their marriage later produced six children: George Walker Bush, Pauline Robinson Bush ("Robin", 1949–1953, died of leukemia), John Ellis "Jeb" Bush, Neil Mallon Bush, Marvin Bush, and Dorothy Bush Koch. Barbara Pierce Bush (born June 8, 1925) is the wife of the 41st President of the United States, George H. W. Bush, and was First Lady of the United States from 1989 to 1993. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Pauline Robinson Bush (December 20, 1949 – October 11, 1953) was the second child of George H. W. Bush and Barbara Bush. ... Leukemia or leukaemia (see spelling differences) is a cancer of the blood or bone marrow and is characterized by an abnormal proliferation (production by multiplication) of blood cells, usually white blood cells (leukocytes). ... Jeb Bush John Ellis Jeb Bush (born February 11, 1953) is the forty-third and current Governor of Florida. ... George H. W. and Barbara Bush and their children Neil Mallon Bush (born January 22, 1955 in Midland, Texas, attended St. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Dorothy Bush Koch also known as Doro (born August 18, 1959), is the daughter of the 41st President of the United States George H. W. Bush and former First Lady Barbara Bush and the youngest sibling of George W. Bush, the 43rd President of the United States. ...

Skull and Bones entry from the 1948 Yale Banner. Former President George Herbert Walker Bush is listed fourth down.
Skull and Bones entry from the 1948 Yale Banner. Former President George Herbert Walker Bush is listed fourth down.

While at Yale, he joined the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity and was elected president. He also captained the Yale baseball team, and as a left-handed first baseman, played in the first College World Series. Late in his junior year he was, like his father Prescott Bush (1917), tapped for membership by the Skull and Bones secret society. Some people believe that through this organization, also known as "the Order", Bush made connections with other influential people and families which would shape his career. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (648x1467, 880 KB)Skull and Bones entry from the 1948 Yale Banner. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (648x1467, 880 KB)Skull and Bones entry from the 1948 Yale Banner. ... Emblem of the Skull and Bones society The Order of Skull and Bones, once known as The Brotherhood of Death[1], is a secret society based at Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut, and one of the earliest-established of student secret societies that rival Phi Beta Kappa, also originally... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D K E or Deke) is the oldest secret college mens fraternity of New England origin. ... The position of the first baseman First base redirects here. ... The College World Series is the tournament which determines the NCAA Division I collegiate baseball champion. ... Emblem of the Skull and Bones society The Order of Skull and Bones, once known as The Brotherhood of Death[1], is a secret society based at Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut, and one of the earliest-established of student secret societies that rival Phi Beta Kappa, also originally... A secret society is an organization that conceals its activities from outsiders. ...


Bush graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Yale in 1948 with a B.S. in economics.[7] The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ...

Captain-elect "Poppy" Bush as featured in a 1948 Yale Banner
Captain-elect "Poppy" Bush as featured in a 1948 Yale Banner

Image File history File linksMetadata Baseball_cropped. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Baseball_cropped. ...

Business ventures

After graduating from Yale, Bush went into the Texas oil exploration business. He was given a position with Dresser Industries, a subsidiary of Brown Brothers Harriman, where his father served on the board of directors for 22 years. His son, Neil Mallon Bush, is named after his employer at Dresser, Henry Neil Mallon, who was a close family friend dating back to Skull & Bones at Yale in 1918 along with Prescott. Zapata Corporation was created by Bush and the Liedtke brothers in 1953 as Zapata Oil. (Authors Webster Tarpley, Kevin Phillips, Daniel Yergin, and others suggest that Bush had ties to the Central Intelligence Agency at this time.) Dresser Industries was a multinational corporation headquartered in Dallas, Texas, which provides a wide range of technology, products, and services used for developing energy and natural resources. ... Henry Neil Mallon (1895-1983) was chairman of Dresser Industries and a close friend and business partner of Prescott Bush. ... For the U.S town of Zapata, see Zapata, Texas. ... The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an intelligence agency of the United States government. ...


Campaigns for Senate and Congress

In 1964, Bush won the Republican Party's nomination for the U.S. Senate from Texas. His opponent was the incumbent Democratic Senator Ralph Yarborough. Yarborough made several personal attacks against Bush, calling him a "tool of the eastern kingmakers" and a right-wing extremist.[8] Bush lost the general election. Texas politician Ralph Yarborough Ralph Webster Yarborough (June 8, 1903 – January 27, 1996) was a Texas Democratic politician who served in the United States Senate (1957 until 1971) and was a leader of the progressive or liberal wing of the Democratic Party in Texas in his many races for statewide...


Bush did not give up on elective politics and was elected in 1966 to the United States House of Representatives from the 7th District of Texas, defeating Democrat Frank Briscoe with 57% of the vote. Despite being a first-term congressman, Bush was appointed to the powerful House Ways and Means Committee.[9] Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... The Committee on Ways and Means is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ...


In 1968, Bush briefly lobbied to be Richard Nixon's running mate in the 1968 presidential election. However, once Bush realized that Nixon was looking for someone with more experience than a single term in the U.S. House[citation needed], Bush ran for reelection. Bush was unopposed in the general election. 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... A running mate is a person running for a subordinate position on a joint ticket during an election. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...

Bush with President Dwight D. Eisenhower.
Bush with President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

In 1970, President Nixon convinced Bush to relinquish his House seat to again run for the Senate against Democratic Senator Ralph Yarborough, a fierce Nixon critic. In the Republican primary, Bush easily defeated conservative Robert Morris, a defeated 1964 candidate, by a margin of 87.6 percent to 12.4 percent. However, former Congressman Lloyd Bentsen, a native of Mission, Texas, defeated Yarborough in the Democratic primary, 816,641 votes (53 percent) to 724,122 (47 percent). Yarborough then endorsed Bentsen. With Yarborough defeated in the primary, Nixon's support for Bush's campaign waned. Image File history File links George_Herbert_Walker_Bush_and_Eisenhower_1. ... Image File history File links George_Herbert_Walker_Bush_and_Eisenhower_1. ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 - March 28, 1969) was an American soldier and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953-1961). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... Mission is a city located in Hidalgo County, Texas. ...


Because there was no presidential election in 1970, turnout in Texas was unusually low in the general election. Bentsen defeated Bush by a margin similar to that in his primary victory over Yarborough. Ironically, Bentsen later became the Democratic Party nominee for Vice President in the 1988 presidential election on a ticket with Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis and lost to Bush. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ...


1970s

George H. W. Bush

In office
1971 – 1973
Under President Richard Nixon
Preceded by Charles W. Yost
Succeeded by John A. Scali

Born June 12, 1924
Milton, Massachusetts, USA
Political party Republican
Spouse Barbara Bush

After the 1970 election loss, President Richard Nixon appointed Bush to United States Ambassador to the United Nations, at which he served from 1971 to 1973. United States Ambassador to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Nations. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States of America is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Charles W. Yost (born in Watertown, NY in 1907 – died in Washington, DC in 1981), educated at Hotchkiss School and Princeton University, was a Career U.S. Ambassador and ambassador to the United Nations from 1967 to 1971. ... John A. Scali (US Ambassador to the United Nations) ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Milton is a suburban Boston town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Democratic Party. ... White House Portrait Barbara Pierce Bush (born June 8, 1925) is the wife of the 41st President of the United States, George H. W. Bush, and was First Lady of the United States from 1989 to 1993. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... United States Ambasadors to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the...


After Nixon was re-elected President in 1972, he asked Bush to become Chairman of the Republican National Committee. Bush held this position during the Watergate scandal, when the popularity of both Nixon and the Republican Party plummeted. Bush defended Nixon steadfastly, but later as Nixon's complicity became clear he focused more on defending the Republican Party while still maintaining loyalty to Nixon. Bush/Cheney, 2004 campaign manager Ken Mehlman is the current chairman of the RNC. The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the Republican Party of the United States. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


After Nixon's resignation in 1974, Vice President Gerald R. Ford became President, and Bush was one of the two leading contenders to be appointed vice president by Ford, but he lost to the other leading contender, Nelson Rockefeller. Bush had the support of many conservative elements in the Republican Party, particularly Barry Goldwater, against Rockefeller for the Vice Presidency.[1] Ford appointed Bush to be Chief of the U.S. Liaison Office in the People's Republic of China. (Since the United States at the time maintained official relations with the Republic of China on Taiwan and not the People's Republic of China, the Liaison Office did not have the official status of an embassy and Bush did not formally hold the position of "ambassador" even though he unofficially acted as one.) Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ... Motto Three Principles of the People (三民主義 San-min Chu-i) Anthem National Anthem of the Republic of China Capital Taipei (de facto)  Nanjing (de jure)1  Largest city Taipei Official languages Mandarin (GuóyÇ”) Government Semi-presidential system  -  President Chen Shui-bian  -  Vice President Annette Lu  -  Premier Su Tseng-chang...


In 1976, Ford brought Bush back to Washington to become Director of Central Intelligence. Bush claimed the appointment was "a real shocker" and denied any prior involvement with the agency. The Office of Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) was established on January 23rd 1946 with Adm. ...


On January 8, 2007, newly released internal CIA documents revealed that Zapata had in fact emerged from Bush’s collaboration with a covert CIA officer in the 1950’s. According to a CIA internal memo dated November 29, 1975, Zapata Petroleum began in 1953 through Bush’s joint efforts with Thomas J. Devine, a CIA staffer who had resigned his agency position that same year to go into private business, but who continued to work for the CIA under commercial cover. Devine would later accompany Bush to Vietnam in late 1967 as a “cleared and witting commercial asset” of the agency, acted as his informal foreign affairs advisor, and had a close relationship with him through 1975.[2],[3],[4] January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ...


Interestingly, initially Bush's confirmation as Director of Central Intelligence was opposed by many pundits and politicians still reeling from the Watergate scandal (when Bush was head of the RNC, and a steadfast defender of Nixon) and the Church Committee investigating whether CIA-ordered foreign assassinations were being directed towards domestic officials, including President Kennedy. Many arguments against Bush's initial confirmation were that he was too partisan for the office. The Washington Post, George Will, and Senator Frank Church were some notable figures opposed to Bush's nomination. After a pledge by Bush not to run for either President or Vice President in 1976, opposition to his nomination died down. The Office of Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) was established on January 23rd 1946 with Adm. ... RNC can mean. ... Nixon is the surname of some prominent people: Richard Nixon - 37th President of the United States Patricia Nixon - First Lady to President Richard Nixon Tricia Nixon Cox - older daughter to Richard and Pat Nixon Julie Nixon Eisenhower - younger daughter to Richard and Pat Nixon John B. Nixon - oldest inmate executed... The Church Committee is the common term referring to the United States Senate Select Committee to Study Governmental Operations with Respect to Intelligence Activities, a U.S. Senate committee chaired by Senator Frank Church (D-ID) in 1975. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... George Frederick Will (born May 4, 1941) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning, conservative American newspaper columnist, journalist, and author. ... Frank Forrester Church III (July 25, 1924 – April 7, 1984) was a four-term U.S. Senator representing Idaho as a Democrat (1957-1981). ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ...


Bush served in this role for 355 days, from January 30, 1976 to January 20, 1977.[10] The CIA had been rocked by a series of revelations, including revelations based on investigations by the Senate's Church Committee, about the CIA's illegal and unauthorized activities, and Bush was credited with helping to restore the agency's morale.[11] January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... The Church Committee is the common term referring to the United States Senate Select Committee to Study Governmental Operations with Respect to Intelligence Activities, a U.S. Senate committee chaired by Senator Frank Church (D-ID) in 1975. ...


After a Democratic administration took power in 1977, Bush became Chairman of the First International Bank in Houston. He also became an adjunct professor of Administrative Science at Rice University in the Jones School of Business in 1978, the year it opened. The course, Organization Theory, involved lectures from Bush regarding the organizations he headed—the Central Intelligence Agency, the National Republican Party, a U.S. congressional office, the USA Representative Office to China, and an oil exploration company. Just months before Bush hit the presidential campaign trail, he was also candid about his internal debate to enter the primaries.[12] Lovett Hall William Marsh Rice University, commonly called Rice University and opened in 1912 as The William Marsh Rice Institute for the Advancement of Letters, Science and Art, is a private, comprehensive research university located in Houston, Texas near the Museum District and adjacent to the Texas Medical Center. ...


He also became a board member of the Committee on the Present Danger. The Committee on the Present Danger (CPD) was an American bi-partisan, conservative, anti-communist, militarist lobbying group. ...


1980 presidential campaign

In the 1980 presidential election, Bush ran for the presidency, stressing his wide range of government experience. In the contest for the Republican Party nomination, despite Bush's establishment backing, the front-runner was Ronald Reagan, former Governor of California who was now running for the third time for President. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Gray Davis with President George W. Bush (2003) Seal of the Governor of California (without the Roman numerals designating the governors sequence) See also: List of pre-statehood governors of California, List of Governors of California The Governor of California is the highest executive authority...


In the contest Bush represented the centrist wing in the GOP, whereas Reagan represented the conservative wing of the Republican Party. Bush labeled Reagan's supply side-influenced plans for massive tax cuts "voodoo economics." During the election, Reagan once famously described Bush as a "Brooks Brothers Republican," in response to which Bush opened his jacket at a press conference, smiling, to reveal a J. Press logo. Supply-side economics often referred to as Voodoo Economicsis a school of macroeconomic thought which emphasizes the supply part of supply and demand. ... A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. ... Supply-side economics often referred to as Voodoo Economicsis a school of macroeconomic thought which emphasizes the supply part of supply and demand. ... Brooks Brothers is the oldest surviving mens clothier in the United States. ... J. Press is a mens clothier in the United States. ...


Bush won the Iowa caucus to start the primary season, then told the press that he had "Big Mo" (or momentum). However, Reagan came back to decisively win the New Hampshire primary, and Bush's "mo" was gone.[13] With a growing popularity among the Republican voting base, Reagan won most of the remaining primaries and the nomination. Since 1976, the Iowa caucus has been the first indication of which candidate for President of the United States would win the nomination of his or her political party at that partys national convention. ... In classical mechanics, momentum (pl. ... The New Hampshire primary marks the opening of the quadrennial U.S. presidential election. ...


After some preliminary discussion of choosing former President Gerald Ford as his running mate, Reagan selected Bush as his Vice President, placing him on the winning Republican presidential ticket of 1980. Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ...


Vice Presidency

The Reagan/Bush ticket won again by a huge landslide in 1984 against the Democrats' Walter Mondale/Geraldine Ferraro ticket. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Geraldine Anne Ferraro (born August 26, 1935) is a Democratic politician and former member of the U.S. House of Representatives. ...


During his second term as Vice President, Bush became the first Vice President to become Acting President when, on July 13, 1985, President Reagan underwent surgery to remove polyps from his colon. Bush served as Acting President for approximately eight hours, most of which he passed playing tennis. Acting President of the United States is a temporary office in the government of the United States, established under the auspices of the Constitution of the United States, particularly its 25th Amendment (ratified in 1967). ... July 13 is the 194th day (195th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 171 days remaining. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ...


When the Iran-Contra Affair broke in 1986, Bush stated that he had been "out of the loop" and unaware of the Iran initiatives related to arms trading.[14] The Iran-Contra Affair was the largest political scandal in the United States during the 1980s, considered by some to be one of the largest political scandals in history. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


1988 presidential campaign

1988 presidential electoral votes by state.
1988 presidential electoral votes by state.

In 1988, after nearly eight years as Vice President, Bush again ran for President. His challengers for the Republican presidential nomination included U.S. Senator Bob Dole and Conservative Christian televangelist Pat Robertson. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1182x635, 110 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: United States presidential election, 1988 ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1182x635, 110 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: United States presidential election, 1988 ... Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ... Marion Gordon Pat Robertson (born March 22, 1930) is a televangelist from the United States. ...


Though considered the early frontrunner for the Republican nomination, Bush came in third in the Iowa caucus, beaten by winner Dole and runner-up Robertson. However, Bush rebounded to win the New Hampshire primary, partly because of television commercials portraying Dole as a tax raiser. Once the multiple-state primaries such as Super Tuesday began, Bush's organizational strength and fundraising lead were impossible for the other candidates to match, and the nomination was his.


Leading up to the 1988 Republican National Convention, there was much speculation as to Bush's choice of running mate. In a move anticipated by few and later criticized by many, Bush chose little-known U.S. Senator Dan Quayle of Indiana. On the eve of the convention, Bush trailed Democratic nominee Michael Dukakis, then Massachusetts governor, by double digits in most polls. Ronald and Nancy Reagan at the podium on August 15, 1988. ... James Danforth Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the 44th Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989-1993). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...

President-elect George Bush, President Ronald Reagan, and Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev at New York City in 1988
President-elect George Bush, President Ronald Reagan, and Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev at New York City in 1988

Bush, often criticized for his lack of eloquence when compared to Reagan, surprised many by giving perhaps the best speech of his public career, widely known as the "Thousand points of light" speech[15] for his use of that phrase to describe his vision of American community. Bush's acceptance speech and a generally well-managed Convention catapulted him ahead of Dukakis in the polls, and he held the lead for the rest of the race. Bush's acceptance speech at the convention included the famous pledge, Read my lips: no new taxes. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (516x750, 63 KB) President Reagan, Vice-President Bush meet with Soviet General Secretary Gorbachev on Governors Island, New York, 1988. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (516x750, 63 KB) President Reagan, Vice-President Bush meet with Soviet General Secretary Gorbachev on Governors Island, New York, 1988. ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev (Russian: , Michail Sergeevič Gorbačëv), IPA: , surname more accurately romanized as Gorbachyov; born March 2, 1931) is a Russian politician. ... New York, NY redirects here. ... Bush delivering the famous line at the 1988 convention Read my lips: No new taxes was a famous pledge made by Republican Presidential candidate George H.W. Bush at the 1988 Republican convention in his acceptance speech on August 18. ...


The campaign was noted for its highly negative television advertisements. One advertisement run by the Bush campaign showed Dukakis awkwardly riding in a U.S. Army tank. Bush blamed Dukakis for polluting the Boston Harbor as the Massachusetts governor. Bush also pointed out that Dukakis was opposed to the law that would require all students to say the pledge of allegiance. Another, produced and placed by an independent group supporting Bush, referred to murderer Willie Horton, a man who had committed a rape and assault while on a weekend furlough from a life sentence being served in Massachusetts. The United States Army is one of the armed forces of the United States and has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Categories: Stub | Massachusetts geography | Boston ... Willie Hortons mugshot on the Weekend Passes ad William R. Horton (born August 12, 1951 in Chesterfield, South Carolina) is a convicted felon who was the subject of a Massachusetts weekend furlough program that released him while serving a life sentence for murder, without the possibility of parole, providing...


Dukakis's unconditional opposition to capital punishment also led to a pointed question during the U.S. presidential debates. Moderator Bernard Shaw asked Dukakis hypothetically if Dukakis would support the death penalty if his wife were raped and murdered. Dukakis's response appeared to many oddly wooden and technical, and helped characterize him as "soft on crime." These images helped enhance Bush's stature as a possible Commander-in-Chief compared to the Massachusetts governor. Capital punishment (also known as the Death Penalty) in the United States is officially sanctioned by 38 of the 50 states, as well as by the federal government and the military. ... Commander-in-Chief (in NATO-lingo often C-in-C or CINC pronounced sink) is the commander of all the military forces within a particular region or of all the military forces of a state. ...


Bush beat Michael Dukakis and Lloyd Bentsen soundly in the Electoral College, by 426 to 111 (Bentsen received one vote). In the nationwide popular vote, Bush took 53.4% of the ballots cast while Dukakis gained 45.6%. Bush was the first serving Vice President to be elected President since Martin Van Buren in 1836. The United States Electoral College is the electoral college that chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the 8th President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ...


Presidency 1989-1993

Chief Justice William Rehnquist administering the oath of office to President George Bush during Inaugural ceremonies at the United States Capitol. January 20, 1989.
Chief Justice William Rehnquist administering the oath of office to President George Bush during Inaugural ceremonies at the United States Capitol. January 20, 1989.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3696x2453, 1055 KB) Chief Justice William Rehnquist administering the oath of office to President George H. W. Bush during Inaugural ceremonies at the United States Capitol. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3696x2453, 1055 KB) Chief Justice William Rehnquist administering the oath of office to President George H. W. Bush during Inaugural ceremonies at the United States Capitol. ... William Hubbs Rehnquist (October 1, 1924 – September 3, 2005) was an American lawyer, jurist, and a political figure, who served as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States and later as the Chief Justice of the United States. ... The entire front of the Capitol Building. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Policies

Foreign policy drove the Bush Presidency from its first days. In his January 20, 1989, Inaugural Address upon taking the Presidency, Bush said, "I come before you and assume the Presidency at a moment rich with promise. We live in a peaceful, prosperous time, but we can make it better. For a new breeze is blowing, and a world refreshed by freedom seems reborn; for in man's heart, if not in fact, the day of the dictator is over. The totalitarian era is passing, its old ideas blown away like leaves from an ancient, lifeless tree. A new breeze is blowing, and a nation refreshed by freedom stands ready to push on. There is new ground to be broken, and new action to be taken."[16] January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Leading up to the first Gulf War, on September 11, 1990, President Bush addressing a joint session of Congress stated: "Out of these troubled times, our fifth objective — a New World Order — can emerge: a new era"[17] September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ...


With these words President Bush gave the order to start the military action which would later be known as the Gulf War. Combatants UN Coalition Republic of Iraq Commanders Norman Schwarzkopf, Peter de la Billière, Khalid bin Sultan, Saleh Al-Muhaya, Mohamed Hussein Tantawi Saddam Hussein Strength 883,863 360,000 Casualties 378 dead, 1,000 wounded 25,000 dead, 75,000 wounded The Gulf War or the Persian Gulf War...


Manuel Noriega

Operation Just Cause was the U.S. military invasion of Panama that deposed General Manuel Noriega in December 1989. Involving an expeditionary force of 25,000 troops and state-of-the-art military equipment, the invasion was the largest American military operation since the Vietnam War. General Manuel Noriega was at one time a U.S. ally, who was increasingly using Panama to facilitate the drug traffic from South America to the United States. In the 1980s, dictator Manuel Noriega was one of the most recognizable names in the United States, being constantly covered by the press. The deteriorating situation in Panama, supposedly an American protectorate,[citation needed] was a growing embarrassment for the Reagan Administration, which President Bush inherited. The military implementation took place under supervision of Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman General Colin Powell who—as National Security Advisor for President Reagan—knew well the Panama situation and dictator Noriega. The invasion was preceded by massive protests in Panama against Noriega. Bush's Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney visited American troops in Panama right after the invasion. President Bush visited Panama with his wife in June 1992, to give support to the first post-invasion Panamanian government. Combatants United States Panama Commanders Carl W. Stiner Manuel Noriega Strength 27,684+ 16,000+ Casualties 24 Dead, 325 Wounded 450 Military, 514-4,000 Civilian Rangers from Charlie Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment prepare to take La Comandancia in the El Chorrillo neighborhood of Panama City, December 1989. ... General Manuel Antonio Noriega Moreno (born February 11, 1938) is a Panamanian general, the de facto military leader of Panama from 1983 to 1989. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ...


Gulf War

President Bush visited American troops in Saudi Arabia on Thanksgiving Day, 1990
President Bush visited American troops in Saudi Arabia on Thanksgiving Day, 1990

As President, Bush is perhaps best known internationally for leading the United Nations coalition in the 1990–1991 Gulf War. In 1990, Iraq, led by Saddam Hussein invaded its oil-rich neighbor to the south, Kuwait. The broad coalition, in an operation known as Desert Shield, sought to remove Iraqi forces from Kuwait and ensure that Iraq did not invade Saudi Arabia. Bush claimed that his position was summed up succinctly when he said, "This aggression will not stand," and, "This is not a war for oil. This is war against aggression." On November 29, the UN passed a resolution establishing a deadline that authorized the nations allied with Kuwait 'to use all necessary means' if Iraq did not withdraw from Kuwait by January 15, 1991. Fighting began on January 17, 1991, when U.S.-led air units launched a devastating series of air attacks against Iraq, with this operation referred to as Desert Storm.[18] George H.W. Bush talks with the troops in Saudi Arabia, November 22, 1990 http://bushlibrary. ... George H.W. Bush talks with the troops in Saudi Arabia, November 22, 1990 http://bushlibrary. ... Thanksgiving, or Thanksgiving Day, is an annual one-day holiday to give thanks, traditionally to God, for the things one has at the end of the harvest season. ... Combatants UN Coalition Republic of Iraq Commanders Norman Schwarzkopf, Peter de la Billière, Khalid bin Sultan, Saleh Al-Muhaya, Mohamed Hussein Tantawi Saddam Hussein Strength 883,863 360,000 Casualties 378 dead, 1,000 wounded 25,000 dead, 75,000 wounded The Gulf War or the Persian Gulf War... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (Arabic: [1]; April 28, 1937[2] – December 30, 2006[3]), was the President of Iraq from July 16, 1979, until April 9, 2003. ... See also: 2003 invasion of Iraq and Gulf War (disambiguation) C Company, 1st Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, 1st UK Armoured Division The Persian Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of 34 nations led by the United States. ... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 2003 invasion of Iraq and Gulf War (disambiguation) C Company, 1st Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, 1st UK Armoured Division The Persian Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of 34 nations led by the United States. ...


In a foreign policy move that would later be questioned, President Bush achieved his stated objectives of liberating Kuwait and forcing Iraqi withdrawal, then ordered a cessation of combat operations —allowing Saddam Hussein to stay in power. His Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney noted that invading the country would get the United States "bogged down in the quagmire inside Iraq." Bush later explained that he did not give the order to overthrow the Iraqi government because it would have "incurred incalculable human and political costs... We would have been forced to occupy Baghdad and, in effect, rule Iraq".[19][20]


In explaining to Gulf War veterans why he chose not to pursue the war further, President Bush said, "Whose life would be on my hands as the commander-in-chief because I, unilaterally, went beyond the international law, went beyond the stated mission, and said we're going to show our macho? We're going into Baghdad. We're going to be an occupying power — America in an Arab land — with no allies at our side. It would have been disastrous."[21]


President Bush's popularity rating in America soared during and immediately after the apparent success of the military operations, but it later fell dramatically because of an economic recession in combination with perceived failures about the end of the war.[citation needed]


Post-Soviet breakup

As the Soviet Union was unraveling, President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev declared a U.S.-Soviet strategic partnership at the summit of July 1991, decisively marking the end of the Cold War. President Bush declared that U.S.-Soviet cooperation during the Persian Gulf War in 1990–1991 had laid the groundwork for a partnership in resolving bilateral and world problems. The rise of Gorbachev Although reform stalled between 1964–1982, the generational shift gave new momentum for reform. ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev (Russian: , Michail Sergeevič Gorbačëv), IPA: , surname more accurately romanized as Gorbachyov; born March 2, 1931) is a Russian politician. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...

  • Arms control: START I, Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction
See also: Collapse of the Soviet Union, Brent Scowcroft, New World Order (political), A World Transformed, and History of the United States (1988-present)#The end of the Cold War

This page is a candidate to be copied to Wikisource. ... START, officially the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, is a treaty, originally signed by the United States and the Soviet Union, that barred its signatories from deploying more than 6,000 warheads atop a total of 1,600 ICBMs, submarine-launched ballistic missiles, and bombers. ... The Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction Program is a 1991 U.S. law sponsored by Senators Richard Lugar and Sam Nunn. ... The rise of Gorbachev Although reform stalled between 1964–1982, the generational shift gave new momentum for reform. ... Lieutenant General Brent Scowcroft KBE (born March 19, 1925 in Ogden, Utah), USAF (Ret. ... The term new world order has been used to refer to a new period of history evidencing a dramatic change in world political thought and the balance of power. ... A World Transformed is a book by George H. W. Bush in which he explains why he didnt have the US conquer Iraq at the end of the earlier Gulf war: Extending the ground war into an occupation of Iraq . ... This article covers the history of the United States from 1988 through present. ...

NAFTA

NAFTA Initialing Ceremony, October 1992. From left to right: (standing) President Carlos Salinas, President Bush, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney; (seated) Jaime Serra Puche, Carla Hills, Michael Wilson.
NAFTA Initialing Ceremony, October 1992. From left to right: (standing) President Carlos Salinas, President Bush, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney; (seated) Jaime Serra Puche, Carla Hills, Michael Wilson.

Bush's government, along with the Progressive Conservative Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, spearheaded the negotiations of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which Bill Clinton signed in 1993. NAFTA Initialing Ceremony, October 1992 From left to right (standing) President Salinas, President Bush, Prime Minister Mulroney (Seated) Jaime Serra Puche, Carla Hills, Michael Wilson. ... NAFTA Initialing Ceremony, October 1992 From left to right (standing) President Salinas, President Bush, Prime Minister Mulroney (Seated) Jaime Serra Puche, Carla Hills, Michael Wilson. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... Jaime José Serra Puche (b. ... Carla Anderson Hills (born January 3, 1934) is an American lawyer and public figure. ... Hon. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... The North American Free Trade Area is the trade bloc created by the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and its two supplements, the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation (NAAEC) and the North American Agreement on Labor Cooperation (NAALC), whose members are Canada, Mexico and the United States. ...


Pardons

Bush's last controversial act in office was his pardon, on December 24, 1992, of six former government employees implicated in the Iran-Contra scandal - most prominently former Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger. Weinberger had been scheduled to stand trial on January 5, 1993, for allegedly lying to Congress regarding his knowledge of arms sales to Iran and concealing 1700 pages of his personal diary detailing discussions with other officials about the arms sales. The following is a list of pardons and commutations by President George H. W. Bush. ... December 24 is the 358th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (359th in leap years). ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... Caspar Willard Cap Weinberger, GBE (August 18, 1917 – March 28, 2006), was an American politician and Secretary of Defense under President Ronald Reagan from January 21, 1981, until November 23, 1987, making him the third longest-serving defense secretary to date, after Robert McNamara and Donald Rumsfeld. ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ...


As Weinberger's private notes contained references to Bush's endorsement of the secret shipments to Iran, some believe that Bush's pardon was an effort to prevent an order for Bush to appear before a grand jury or possibly to avoid an indictment. Weinberger's indictment stated that Weinberger's notes contradicted Bush's assertions that he had only peripheral knowledge of the arms for hostages deal. Lawrence Walsh, the Independent Counsel assigned to the case, charged that "the Iran-contra cover-up, which has continued for more than six years, has now been completed." Walsh likened the pardons to President Richard Nixon's Saturday Night Massacre. Bush responded that the Walsh probe constituted an attempt to criminalize a policy dispute between the legislative and executive branches. In addition to Weinberger, Bush pardoned Duane R. Clarridge, Clair E. George, Robert C. McFarlane, Elliott Abrams, and Alan G. Fiers Jr., all of whom had been indicted and/or convicted of charges by the Independent Counsel. He is also known to have given executive clemency to Aslam P. Adam, a convicted heroin dealer. Additionally, Bush pardoned Orlando Bosch, a known anti-Castro terrorist who was linked to the bombing of Mackey Airlines in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and had been previously convicted of firing a bazooka at a Polish freighter in Miami harbor. [5][6]
A grand jury is a type of jury, in the common law legal system, which determines if there is enough evidence for a trial. ... United States Office of the Independent Counsel was an independent prosecutor — distinct from the Attorney General of the United States Department of Justice — that provided reports to the Congress under Title 28 of the United States Code, Section 595. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... The Saturday night massacre (October 20, 1973) was the term given by political commentators to U.S. President Richard Nixons executive dismissal of independent special prosecutor Archibald Cox, and the forced resignations of Attorney General Elliot Richardson and Deputy Attorney General William Ruckelshaus during the controversial and drawn-out... Robert Carl Bud McFarlane (born 1937), was a U.S. Marine Corps officer assigned to the post of United States National Security Advisor in 1983, ceasing to hold it in 1985. ... Elliot Abrams Elliott Abrams (born January 24, 1948) is an American lawyer who has served in foreign policy positions for a number of U.S. Presidents, most recently George W. Bush. ... Orlando Bosch is a Cuban exile and former CIA-backed terrorist, head of CORU organization, which the FBI has described as an anti-Castro terrorist umbrella organization. He has been accused of having taken part in Operation Condor and of a variety of terrorist attacks. ... // Castro is a Romance (Spanish, Galician, Portuguese and Italian) word coming from Latin castrum, a fortification (cf: Greek: kastron; Proto-Celtic: *Kassrik; Breton: kaer, *kastro). ... This article is becoming very long. ... Mackey Airlines, also known as Mackey International Airlines, was an airline which was mainly served Florida and The Bahamas. ... Fort Lauderdale, known as the Venice of America, is a city located in Broward County, Florida. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... For other meanings, see Bazooka (disambiguation) The bazooka was a man-portable anti-tank rocket launcher made famous during World War II where it was one of the United States Armed Forces primary infantry anti-tank weapons. ... Cargo ship or freighter is any sort of ship that carries goods and materials from one port to another. ... This article is about the city in Florida. ...


Administration and Cabinet

The official White House portrait of President George H.W Bush
The official White House portrait of President George H.W Bush
OFFICE NAME TERM
President George H. W. Bush 1989–1993
Vice President J. Danforth Quayle 1989–1993
State James A. Baker III 1989–1992
  Lawrence Eagleburger 1992–1993
Treasury Nicholas F. Brady 1989–1993
Defense Richard B. Cheney 1989–1993
Justice Richard L. Thornburgh 1989–1991
  William P. Barr 1991–1993
Interior Manuel Lujan, Jr. 1989–1993
Commerce Robert A. Mosbacher 1989–1992
  Barbara Hackman Franklin 1992–1993
Labor Elizabeth Hanford Dole 1989–1990
  Lynn Martin 1991–1993
Agriculture Clayton K. Yeutter 1989–1991
  Edward Madigan 1991–1993
HHS Louis W. Sullivan 1989–1993
Education Lauro Cavazos 1989–1990
  Lamar Alexander 1991–1993
HUD Jack F. Kemp 1989–1993
Transportation Samuel K. Skinner 1989–1992
  Andrew H. Card 1992–1993
Energy James D. Watkins 1989–1993
Veterans Affairs Edward J. Derwinski 1989–1993


Image File history File links Download high resolution version (522x660, 185 KB) Portrait of George H. W. Bush Source See http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (522x660, 185 KB) Portrait of George H. W. Bush Source See http://www. ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States of America is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of... James Danforth Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the 44th Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989-1993). ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... James Addison Baker III (born 28 April 1930 in Houston, Texas) served as the Chief of Staff in President Ronald Reagans first administration, United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1985 to 1988 in the second Reagan administration, and Secretary of State in the administration of President George H... Lawrence Sidney Eagleburger (born August 1, 1930), is an American statesman and diplomat who served as The United States Secretary of State under President George H. W. Bush. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Nicholas F. Brady Nicholas Frederick Brady (born April 11, 1930, in New York City) was United States Secretary of the Treasury under Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush, and is also known for articulating the Brady Plan in March 1989. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and The role of the Secretary of Defense is to be the principal defense policy advisor to the President and is responsible for the formulation of general defense... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Richard L. Dick Thornburgh (born July 16, 1932) is a lawyer and Republican politician who served as the Governor of Pennsylvania from 1979 to 1987, and then as the U.S. Attorney General from 1988 to 1991. ... William Pelham Barr (born May 23, 1950) is an American attorney who served as the 77th Attorney General of the United States. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Categories: People stubs | 1928 births | U.S. Secretaries of the Interior ... The office of the U.S. Secretary of Commerce in the mid-20th century. ... Robert Adam Mosbacher Robert Adam Mosbacher shaking hands with Boris Yeltsin Robert Adam Mosbacher (born March 11, 1927) is a U.S. businessman. ... External link Barbara Hackman profile, NNDB. Categories: People stubs | U.S. Secretaries of Commerce | 1940 births ... Elizabeth Hanford Liddy Dole, (born July 29, 1936) was elected to the United States Senate in 2002 to represent North Carolina for a term ending in 2009. ... The official portrait of Lynn Martin hangs in the Department of Labor Lynn Morley Martin was a United States politician. ... Clayton Keith Yeutter (born December 10, 1930) in Eustis, Nebraska. ... Edward Rell Madigan (January 13, 1936 - December 7, 1994) was a politician in the United States. ... The United States Secretary of Health and Human Services is the head of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Louis Wade Sullivan (born November 3, 1933) is an American physician. ... Lauro Fred Cavazos (born January 4, 1927) is a U.S. educator. ... Andrew Lamar Alexander (born July 3, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Tennessee and a member of the Republican Party. ... The United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development is the head of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Jack French Kemp Jr. ... Samuel Knox Skinner (born June 10, 1938) is an American politician and businessman. ... Andy Card Andrew Hill Card Jr. ... Admiral James David Watkins (March 7, 1927-) is a retired U.S. Navy officer and former Chief of Naval Operations. ... The United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs is the head of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, the department concerned with veterans benefits and related matters. ... Edward Joseph Derwinski (b. ...


Supreme Court appointments

Bush appointed the following Justices to the Supreme Court of the United States: Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the...

David Hackett Souter (born September 17, 1939) has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1990. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...

1992 re-election campaign

1992 presidential electoral votes by state.
1992 presidential electoral votes by state.

The tail end of the late 1980s recession, that had plagued most of Bush's term in office, was a contributing factor to his defeat in the 1992 Presidential election to Governor Bill Clinton of Arkansas. The coalition victory in the Persian Gulf War led to a feeling that Bush's re-election was almost assured, but the economic recession coupled with a perceived failure to end the war properly reduced his popularity. Bush was also perceived as being "out of touch" with the American worker. One incident that was said to lend credence to this suspicion occurred during a technology trade show in which Bush appeared "amazed" upon seeing a demonstration of a supermarket scanner. However, Andrew Rosenthal, the reporter who broke the story was not present during the demonstration. He had relied on his own interpretation of a pool report by Gregg McDonald. The New York Times stood by its interpretation of the event, but Newsweek and Mark Duffy of Time Magazine, as well as the man who demonstrated the product for Bush, all took issue with Rosenthal's characterization.[23] Nevertheless, media outlets reported the story as it tied in with and supported the notion that the president was out of touch with the common man. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1182x635, 110 KB) This map image (or all images in this article or category) should be recreated using vector graphics as an SVG file. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1182x635, 110 KB) This map image (or all images in this article or category) should be recreated using vector graphics as an SVG file. ... The recession of the late nineteen-eighties was an economic recession that hit much of the world beginning in 1987. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... Exterior of a typical British supermarket (a Tesco Extra) Exterior of typical North American supermarket (a Safeway) This Flagship Randalls store in Houston, Texas is an example of an upscale supermarket. ... A typical barcode scanner. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ...


Several other factors were key in his defeat, including agreeing in 1990 to raise taxes despite his famous "Read my lips: no new taxes" pledge not to institute any new taxes. In doing so, Bush alienated many members of his conservative base, losing their support for his re-election. Bush raised taxes in an attempt to address an ever-increasing budget deficit, which some at the time attributed the to the Reagan tax cuts of the 1980s. Despite these tax cuts, overall tax revenues had doubled in the 1980s, from $517 billion to $1.031 trillion.[7]. During the same period, however, growth in domestic spending had outpaced the increase in revenue. George Bush had been supported in 1988 by conservatives to continue the Reagan revolution, and was seen as a failure in this regard. Ironically, Bush had previously admonished Reagan's supply side tax cuts in the 1980 presidential primary when he referred to Reagan's tax proposals as "voodoo economics." MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... Bush delivering the famous line at the 1988 convention Read my lips: No new taxes was a famous pledge made by Republican Presidential candidate George H.W. Bush at the 1988 Republican convention in his acceptance speech on August 18. ...


Ross Perot won 19% of the popular vote, the highest total for a third-party candidate since Theodore Roosevelt on the ticket of the Bull-Moose Party. In early 1992 a Gallup poll found the President's approval rating to be at an all-time low, 29%. Despite his defeat, George H. W. Bush left office in 1993 with a 56 percent job approval rating.[24] Henry Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is a billionaire American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ... Theodore (Teddy) Roosevelt, Jr. ... The United States Progressive Party of 1912 was a political party created by a split in the Republican Party in the presidential election 1912. ...


Post-Presidency

President George W. Bush talks about the Tsunami disaster in Indonesia as former Presidents Bill Clinton and George H. W. Bush look on.
President George W. Bush talks about the Tsunami disaster in Indonesia as former Presidents Bill Clinton and George H. W. Bush look on.

Since his final election campaign, Bush has mostly retired from public life. He and his wife live most of the year at their home in the exclusive neighborhood of Tanglewood in Houston, with a presidential office nearby, and the remainder at their summer home Walker's Point in Kennebunkport, Maine. He holds his own fishing tournament in Islamorada, an island in the Florida Keys. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (514x760, 74 KB) Summary http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (514x760, 74 KB) Summary http://www. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The tsunami that struck Malé in the Maldives on December 26, 2004. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... A sign indicating Tanglewood Tanglewood is a neighborhood out of Houston, Texas. ... Nickname: Space City Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: Country United States State Texas Counties Harris County Fort Bend County Montgomery County Incorporated June 5, 1837 Government  - Mayor Bill White Area  - City  601. ... View of the Bush Compound The Bush Compound is located near the Atlantic Ocean in southern Maine near the town of Kennebunkport. ... Boats on the Kennebunk River between Kennebunk and Kennebunkport Kennebunkport is a town located in York County, Maine. ... Official language(s) None (English de facto; French is also an administrative language) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Islamorada, Village of Islands is a village located in Monroe County, Florida, on an island of the same name in the Florida Keys. ... Palm trees in Islamorada The Florida Keys is an archipelago of about 1700 islands in the southeast United States. ...


Health

On January 8, 1992, Bush vomited in the lap of Prime Minister of Japan Kiichi Miyazawa during a state dinner. He then fainted. The incident, which Bush claimed was nothing more than the flu, was caught on camera and raised questions about his health, in addition to being a major source of embarrassment. The Japanese coined a verb for this incident: "bushu-suru", meaning "to commit an instance of embarrassing public vomiting", or literally "to do [a] Bush".[25] At a subsequent state dinner for Japan in Washington D.C., Bush quipped that "this time, dinner is on me". January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... The Prime Minister of Japan (内閣総理大臣 Naikaku sōri daijin) is the usual English-language term used for the head of government of Japan, although the literal translation of the Japanese name for the office is Prime Minister of the Cabinet. ... Kiichi Miyazawa Kiichi Miyazawa (宮澤 喜一 Miyazawa Kiichi) (born 1919) is a Japanese politician and was the 78th Prime Minister from November 5, 1991 to August 9, 1993. ... State dinners in different countries follow different rules and are governed by different protocols. ... Respiratory disease properly named influenza(say: in-floo-en-zah ). Some specific varities of influenza with a vaccination available are: A-New Caledonia, A-California, B-Shanghai. ... Embarrassment is an unpleasant emotional state experienced upon having a socially or professionally unacceptable act or condition witnessed by or revealed to others. ...


Bush was diagnosed with Graves disease in 1991. Barbara Bush was subsequently diagnosed with Graves, as was his White House pet, Millie, a Springer Spaniel, although it remains undetermined whether the multiple diagnoses are a coincidence or more.[26] Graves-Basedow disease or known simply as Graves disease is a medical disorder that may manifest several different conditions including goitre and hyperthyroidism (over-activity of thyroid hormone production), infiltrative exophthalmos (protruberance of one or both eyes and associated problems) and infiltrative dermopathy (a skin condition usually of the lower...


The former President was hospitalized on March 10, 2007 following his collapse on a golf course in Palm Springs, California. He was overcome from the heat and lack of fluids. After brief treatment, he was released on Monday, March 12. [8] March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (70th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... Palm Springs is a famed Riverside County, California, desert resort city, approximately 110 miles east of Los Angeles. ... March 12 is the 71st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (72nd in leap years). ...


News and Events

In April 1993, the Iraqi Intelligence Service allegedly attempted to assassinate former President Bush via car bomb during a visit to Kuwait. However, Kuwaiti security foiled the car bomb plot. On June 26, 1993, the U.S. launched a missile attack targeting Baghdad intelligence headquarters in retaliation for the alleged attempted attack against Bush. 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... It has been suggested that Extrajudicial Executions and Assasinations be merged into this article or section. ... Car bomb in Iraq, made from a number of concealed artillery shells in the back of a pickup truck. ... Car bomb in Iraq, made from a number of concealed artillery shells in the back of a pickup truck. ... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ...


In 1998, Bush made a speech in Tokyo on behalf of Global Crossing, Ltd., a startup telecommunications company. Bush accepted shares of stock in the company in place of his normal $80,000 speaking fee. Global Crossing made a public offering a few months later. SEC records indicate that Bush sold the stock for $4,505,000 in two sales that occurred on November 16, 1999 and March 13, 2000. In January 2002, Global Crossing declared chapter 11 bankruptcy, making it the fourth largest insolvency in United States history.[9] 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... March 13 is the 72nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (73rd in leap years). ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2002. ...


Bush has never written a memoir of his political life, and says he does not plan to write one. He has, however, published a book containing a series of collected letters (All The Best, George Bush, 1999), and co-authored a book on recent foreign policy issues with his former National Security Advisor, Brent Scowcroft (A World Transformed, 1998). As a literary genre, a memoir (from the Latin memoria, meaning memory) forms a subclass of autobiography, although it is an older form of writing. ... Lieutenant General Brent Scowcroft KBE (born March 19, 1925 in Ogden, Utah), USAF (Ret. ... A World Transformed is a book by George H. W. Bush in which he explains why he didnt have the US conquer Iraq at the end of the earlier Gulf war: Extending the ground war into an occupation of Iraq . ...


He has given numerous speeches and participated in business ventures with the Carlyle Group, a private equity fund with close ties to the government of Saudi Arabia. Additionally, he held the position of Senior Advisor to the Carlyle Group's Asia Advisory Board from April 1998 to October 2003. In January 2006, Bush wrote a letter to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) of the People's Republic of China on behalf of the Carlyle Group. In the letter, Bush urged the Chinese government to approve an impending deal in which the Chinese government would sell 85% share ownership of the troubled Guangdong Development Bank to a consortium led by Citibank. In addition to praising Citibank and the other foreign member of the consortium, the Carlyle Group, Bush also intimated that a successful acquisition would be “beneficial to the comprehensive development of Sino-US relations.” The Carlyle Group is a Washington, D.C. based global private equity investment firm with more than $54. ... A private equity fund is a collaboration of funds that directs a private companys or individuals equity, either in the stock market or in real estate. ...


Robert Parry, an American investigative journalist, and others have criticized Bush's allegedly close relationship with Sun Myung Moon, a controversial religious figure.[10] Robert Parry is an American investigative journalist who has written extensively about the Iran-Contra scandal. ... Sun Myung Moon in 2005. ...

Bush, along with his son President George W. Bush, his daughter-in-law, Laura, and former President Bill Clinton, pay their respects to Pope John Paul II before the pope's funeral.
Bush, along with his son President George W. Bush, his daughter-in-law, Laura, and former President Bill Clinton, pay their respects to Pope John Paul II before the pope's funeral.

On June 12, 2004, he went skydiving in honor of his 80th birthday. It was his third parachute jump since World War II. The day before his 80th birthday jump, he and his son both took part in eulogizing his predecessor, Ronald Reagan, at the latter's state funeral. The Vatican City State released this photo into the public domain, one of few that have been done so, of the President of the United States and two former Presidents of the United States paying homage to Pope John Paul II lying in state at St. ... The Vatican City State released this photo into the public domain, one of few that have been done so, of the President of the United States and two former Presidents of the United States paying homage to Pope John Paul II lying in state at St. ... Laura Lane Welch Bush (born November 4, 1946) is the wife of U.S. President George W. Bush and is the current First Lady of the United States. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II) born   [] (May 18, 1920, Wadowice, Poland – April 2, 2005, Vatican City) reigned as Pope of the Catholic... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Skydiver about to land Parachuting, or skydiving, is a recreational activity, competitive sport and method of deployment of military personnel (and occasionally, firefighters). ... President George W. Bush, his wife, Laura, Vice-President Richard Cheney and his wife, Lynne, and former president Bill Clinton and his wife, Hillary, New York Democratic senator, watch the casket of former president Ronald Reagan carried into the Washington National Cathedral Nancy Reagan was escorted by Army Major General...


On November 22, 2004, New York Republican Governor George Pataki named Bush and the other former Presidents living at the time (Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, and Bill Clinton) as honorary members of the board rebuilding the World Trade Center. November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Elmer Pataki (born June 24, 1945) is the current Governor of New York State, USA serving since January 1995, and as of late 2006 is the longest-serving of all current U.S. governors. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... This article is becoming very long. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... This article is about the former World Trade Center (Twin Towers) in New York City. ...


On January 3, 2005, Bush and Bill Clinton were named by the current President Bush to lead a nationwide campaign to help the victims of the Indian Ocean tsunami. Bush and Clinton both appeared on the Super Bowl XXXIX pre-game show on Fox in support of their bipartisan effort to raise money for relief of the disaster through the USA Freedom Corps, an action which Bush described as "transcending politics." Thirteen days later, they both traveled to the affected areas to see how the relief efforts are going. January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tsunami strikes Ao Nang, Thailand. ... Date February 6, 2005 Stadium ALLTEL Stadium City Jacksonville, Florida MVP Deion Branch, Wide receiver Favorite Patriots by 7 National anthem Combined choirs of the U.S. Military Academy, the U.S. Naval Academy, the U.S. Air Force Academy, and the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, and U.S... The Fox Broadcasting Company is a television network in the United States. ... George W. Bush speaks in front of a USA Freedom Corps display. ...


In August 31, 2005, following the devastation of the Gulf Coast by Hurricane Katrina, Bush again teamed with Clinton to coordinate private relief donations. Reports were common that Bush and Clinton had developed a friendship by now, despite the latter having defeated the former in the 1992 election (such friendships were not unknown, as Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter had developed one despite a similar history). Almost a year later, on May 13, 2006, they received Honorary Diplomas from Tulane University at the school's commencement ceremony. August 31 is the 243rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (244th in leap years), with 122 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gulf of Mexico is a major body of water bordered and nearly landlocked by North America. ... Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (134th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


Bush and his wife Barbara could also be seen sitting in the front row behind home plate at Minute Maid Park in Houston, supporting the Houston Astros during the 2005 World Series. Home plate is the final base in baseball and related games that a player must touch to score. ... Minute Maid Park (formerly Enron Field and Astros Field) is a baseball stadium in Houston, Texas that opened in 2000 to house the Houston Astros. ... Astros redirects here, for other uses see Astros (disambiguation) Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 24, 25, 32, 33, 34, 40, 42, 49 Name Houston Astros (1965–present) Houston Colt . ... The 2005 World Series, the 101st playing of Major League Baseballs championship series, saw the American League champion Chicago White Sox sweep the National League champion Houston Astros 4 games to 0 in the best-of-seven-games series, winning their third championship and first since 1917. ...


On June 3, 2006, an informal group of peace activists filed charges against Bush, implying him in war crimes. The charges were delivered to Icelandic authorities, the day before Bush arrived to catch salmon in Icelandic rivers. The Icelandic authorities do not appear to have followed up on the charges. The charges pertained to Bush's actions in Panama in 1989 and in the Gulf War in 1991 while he was president of the USA. [11] [12] [13] [14] June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants UN Coalition Republic of Iraq Commanders Norman Schwarzkopf, Peter de la Billière, Khalid bin Sultan, Saleh Al-Muhaya, Mohamed Hussein Tantawi Saddam Hussein Strength 883,863 360,000 Casualties 378 dead, 1,000 wounded 25,000 dead, 75,000 wounded The Gulf War or the Persian Gulf War... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On September 21, 2006, Bush attended the Centennial Celebration of Suffolk University in Boston as a guest speaker for the event, where he received an Honorary Diploma from the Beacon Hill based institution.[15] September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Suffolk University is a private university in Boston, Massachusetts, situated on Beacon Hill. ...


With the death of Gerald R. Ford on December 26, 2006, Bush is currently the oldest living former president. Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 361st in leap years. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

Former First Lady Nancy Reagan awards Bush the 2007 Ronald Reagan Freedom Award.
Former First Lady Nancy Reagan awards Bush the 2007 Ronald Reagan Freedom Award.

On February 6, 2007, Former President Bush became the ninth recipient of the Ronald Reagan Freedom Award, an award given to "those who have made monumental and lasting contributions to the cause of freedom worldwide," and to those who "embody President Reagan's lifelong belief that one man or woman truly can make a difference." The award was given in Beverly Hills, California, by Former First Lady Nancy Reagan, on behalf of her husband. Bush was Reagan's Vice President for eight years. [27] [28] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Nancy Davis Reagan (born Anne Frances Robbins July 6, 1921) was the First Lady of the United States of America from 1981 to 1989. ... Nancy Reagan presented the 2007 Ronald Reagan Freedom Award to Fmr. ... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... Nancy Reagan presented the 2007 Ronald Reagan Freedom Award to Fmr. ... For other uses, see: Beverly Hills (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital  Sacramento Largest city  Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Laura Bush Current First Lady (2001- ) First Lady of the United States is the unofficial title of the hostess of the White House. ... Nancy Davis Reagan (born Anne Frances Robbins July 6, 1921) was the First Lady of the United States of America from 1981 to 1989. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of...


Tributes

The George Bush Presidential Library and Museum is located on the southwest corner of the campus of Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas. The George Bush Presidential Library and Museum is the presidential library of United States President George H. W. Bush. ... Texas A&M University, often called A&M or TAMU for short, is a public, coeducational, research university located in College Station, Texas, USA. It is the flagship[4] institution of the Texas A&M University System. ... City nicknames: Aggieland, heart of the Research Valley Location in the State of Texas County Brazos County Mayor Ron Silvia Area  - Land  - Water 104. ...


George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston, Texas, was renamed after the former President in 1997. George Bush Intercontinental Airport (IATA: IAH, ICAO: KIAH) is located 23 miles (37 km) north of downtown Houston—between Interstate 45 and U.S. Highway 59—and is adjacent to the city of Humble. ...


The first modified Nimitz-class aircraft carrier George H. W. Bush-subclass was named USS George H. W. Bush when it was christened October 7, 2006.[29] The Nimitz-class supercarriers are a line of nuclear-powered aircraft carriers in service with the US Navy, and are the largest capital ships in the world. ... Former President George H. W. Bush views a model of the aircraft carrier that has been named in his honor. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... October 7 is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Bush was given the honorary title Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath (GCB) by Queen Elizabeth II. The only other Presidents to receive the honor are Ronald Reagan and Dwight D. Eisenhower (who received the title before he became President). The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ... Badge of a Companion of the Order of the Bath (Military Division) The Most Honourable Order of the Bath (formerly The Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath)[1] is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 - March 28, 1969) was an American soldier and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953-1961). ...


In 1999, the CIA headquarters facility in Langley, Virginia, was renamed the George Bush Center for Intelligence.[10] Langley is an unincorporated community in the census-designated place of McLean in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ...


In 2004, The Korea Society awarded George H. W. Bush with its annual James A. Van Fleet Award. The Korea Society is a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan, 501(c)(3) organization with individual and corporate members that is dedicated solely to the promotion of greater awareness, understanding and cooperation between the people of the United States and Korea. ... The General James A. Van Fleet Award, given annually since 1995 by The Korea Society, is awarded “to one or more distinguished Koreans or Americans in recognition of their outstanding contributions to the promotion of U.S.-Korea relations. ...


In 2006, he and Bill Clinton were awarded the Philadelphia Liberty Medal. He is also a recipient of the Albert Schweitzer Gold Medal for Humanitarianism. The Philadelphia Liberty Medal is an annual award presented by the Philadelphia Foundation to recognize leadership in the pursuit of freedom. ... Albert Schweitzer (January 14, 1875 _ September 4, 1965) was a German-born theologian, musician, philosopher, and Germany (now Haut_Rhin département, France). ...

Former President George H. W. Bush views a model of the aircraft carrier that has been named in his honor
Former President George H. W. Bush views a model of the aircraft carrier that has been named in his honor

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3008x1960, 627 KB)Daddy Bush with his new toy! , with her namesake in the background From left: Adm. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3008x1960, 627 KB)Daddy Bush with his new toy! , with her namesake in the background From left: Adm. ...

Trivia

  • Bush's height, 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m), makes him the 4th tallest President of the United States.
  • He is the first president to have two middle names. Before his son came to national attention, he was simply known as George Bush. Today, President Bush is known as George Bush, Sr. or George H.W. Bush.
  • In 2001, he became the first President since John Adams to be father of another President, when his son, George W. Bush, was inaugurated. He is now referred to by various nicknames and titles, including "Former President Bush", "Bush the Elder", "the first President Bush", "Bush 41", "Papa Bush", and simply "41", in order to avoid confusion between him and his son. Although their names are similar, they are not identical - George W. Bush lacks his father's first middle name, Herbert.
  • On October 22, 1994, Bush appeared on Saturday Night Live, via satellite. He joined guest host Dana Carvey as the latter did his trademark impression of Bush. He again appeared with Carvey in the television show's special "Presidential Bash 2000."
  • He is the only President to have been CIA Director, and the only President to have headed the American diplomatic mission in China.
  • He is the only President to have been a World War II U.S. Navy combat aviator. He was the last of six US Presidents to have been a veteran of that war.
  • Despite being defeated by Bill Clinton in 1992 for the Presidency, the two have since become close associates. They have worked together on several causes, such as Hurricane Katrina relief, despite philosophical differences.
  • Bush banned broccoli from the White House and Air Force One: "I'm President of the United States, and I'm not going to eat any more broccoli!" This spawned lots of mocking satire, one example being a sketch on Histeria! in which Loud Kiddington attempts to make him eat broccoli in a parody of Green Eggs and Ham.
  • Bush held a bag of cocaine up during a speech in 1989. The cocaine was allegedly purchased in the Presidential Park across the street from the White House.
  • In an episode of the animated television series The Simpsons entitled "Two Bad Neighbors," the former First Couple, voiced by Harry Shearer and Tress MacNeille, move into Springfield and are driven out after a Dennis the Menace-style feud with Homer and Bart (wherein it is joked that Bart's destruction of Bush's memoirs explains their non-existence).
  • Bush is the third former president to have a ship of the United States Navy named for him while still alive. His namesake, the aircraft carrier USS George H. W. Bush (CVN-77), will be commissioned in 2009.
  • Bush is a member of the exclusive Bohemian Club.[30]
  • Both he and his son, current President George W. Bush, have led wars in Iraq against Saddam Hussein

John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) served as the nations first Vice President (1789–1797) and as its second President (1797–1801). ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 70 days remaining. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Saturday Night Live (SNL) is a weekly late night 90-minute American comedy-variety show based in New York City which has been broadcast live by NBC on Saturday nights since October 11, 1975. ... Dana Thomas Carvey (born June 2, 1955, in Missoula, Montana) is an American actor and comedian best known for his work on Saturday Night Live and the spin-off movie Waynes World. ... Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ... Broccoli is a plant of the Cabbage family, Brassicaceae (formerly Cruciferae). ... Histeria! was a short-lived animated television series of the late-1990s, created by Tom Ruegger (who also created Tiny Toons, Animaniacs, and Pinky and the Brain) at Warner Bros. ... Loud Kiddington is a fictional character featured on the Warner Bros. ... Green Eggs and Ham (ISBN 0-394-80016-8) is a childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Two Bad Neighbors is the 13th episode of The Simpsons seventh season. ... Harry Julius Shearer (born December 23, 1943) is an American comedic actor and writer. ... Tress MacNeille (born June 20, 1951) is an American voice actress who is best known for providing various voices on the animated television shows The Simpsons and Futurama, and also Animaniacs. ... For the Simpsons episode, see $pringfield (Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Legalized Gambling). ... For the British comic strip of the same name, see Dennis the Menace (UK). ... Homer Jay Simpson is a fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Dan Castellaneta. ... For the comic book series of the same name, see Bart Simpson (comic book series). ... The United States Navy, also known as the USN or the U.S. Navy, is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. ... Four aircraft carriers, (front-to-back) Principe de Asturias, amphibious assault carrier USS Wasp, supercarrier USS Forrestal and light V/STOL carrier HMS Invincible, showing size differences. ... USS (CVN-77) is the tenth Nimitz class supercarrier of the United States Navy. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that Bohemian Grove be merged into this article or section. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American politician and the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (Arabic: [1]; April 28, 1937[2] – December 30, 2006[3]), was the President of Iraq from July 16, 1979, until April 9, 2003. ...

Quotes

  • "This aggression will not stand."
  • "Read my lips: No new taxes."
  • "If you don't feel something strongly you're not going to achieve."
  • "Americans should be more like The Waltons and less like The Simpsons."
  • "I don't know that Atheists should be considered as citizens." (in August 1987 in a reply to an accredited reporter for American Atheist News Journal, Robert I. Sherman, who attended a campaign dinner for George H. W. Bush. Sherman's seven year-old son was "brutalized" at school for refusing to pledge to a "nation under God.". This was Bush's answer when Sherman asked what he would do to appeal to the Americans who are Atheists?[31])
  • "After a deluded gunman assassinated President Kennedy, our nation turned to Gerald Ford and a select handful of others to make sense of that madness. And the conspiracy theorists can say what they will, but the Warren Commission report will always have the final definitive say on this tragic matter. Why? Because Jerry Ford put his name on it and Jerry Ford’s word was always good." Eulogy for Gerald R. Ford Jan 2, 2007

Bush delivering the famous line at the 1988 convention Read my lips: No new taxes was a famous pledge made by Republican Presidential candidate George H.W. Bush at the 1988 Republican convention in his acceptance speech on August 18. ... Cover art for the DVD release of The Waltons first season. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... The American Atheist logo, based on the atomic model. ...

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.presidentialavenue.com/gb.cfm
  2. ^ http://travel.nytimes.com/2006/09/15/travel/escapes/15trip.html
  3. ^ http://www.andover.edu/news/bush.htm
  4. ^ http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq10-1.htm
  5. ^ http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq10-1.htm
  6. ^ Duane Hove, American Warriors: Five Presidents in the Pacific Theater of World War II, Burd Street Press, 2003. ISBN 1-57249-307-0.
  7. ^ http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0760625.html
  8. ^ http://www.amarillo.com/stories/110499/tex_bush.shtml
  9. ^ http://www.modernhistoryproject.org/mhp/ArticleDisplay.php?Article=BushCh10-1"
  10. ^ a b The George Bush Center for Intelligence - CIA, accessed February 26, 2006
  11. ^ George Herbert Walker Bush - WorldRoots.com, accessed February 26, 2006
  12. ^ Rice University: Fact or Fiction? - accessed May 9, 2006
  13. ^ Expectations, momentum, fatal mistakes - Tom Curry, MSNBC, January 15, 2004
  14. ^ Transcript - New York Times, June 30, 1997
  15. ^ George H. W. Bush: 1988 Republican National Convention Acceptance Address - transcript, speech delivered August 18, 1988, Superdome, New Orleans
  16. ^ George H. W. Bush: Inaugural Address - transcript, speech delivered January 20, 1989
  17. ^ George H. W. Bush: Address Before a Joint Session of the Congress on the Persian Gulf Crisis and the Federal Budget Deficit - transcript, speech delivered September 11, 1990
  18. ^ After the Storm, Anthony H. Cordesman
  19. ^ Reasons Not to Invade Iraq, by George Bush Sr. - The Memory Hole, accessed February 26, 2006
  20. ^ A Word Transformed - accessed February 26, 2006
  21. ^ Bush tells Gulf vets why Hussein left in Baghdad - S. H. Kelly, United States Army News Center, March 3, 1999
  22. ^ Transcripts from Malta Summit - CNN
  23. ^ http://www.snopes.com/history/american/bushscan.htm
  24. ^ Poll: Clinton Legacy Mixed - Gary Langer, ABC News, January 17, 2001
  25. ^ Open Mic - Scandal Scope - Richard von Busack, Metroactive Features, accessed February 26, 2006
  26. ^ Ebner SA, Badonnel MC, Altman LK, Braverman LE. Conjugal Graves disease. Ann Intern Med. 1992 Mar 15; 116(6):479-81.
  27. ^ http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2007/02/07/ex_president_bush_receives_reagan_award/
  28. ^ http://www.reaganfoundation.org/programs/cpa/awards.asp
  29. ^ http://www.nn.northropgrumman.com/bush/christening.html
  30. ^ http://www.infowars.com/exclusive_new_bg.htm
  31. ^ http://www.tucsonweekly.com/gbase/Currents/Content?oid=oid:89764]

The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (130th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... MSNBC, a combination of MSN and NBC, is a 24-hour cable news channel in the United States and Canada, and a news website. ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... June 30 is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 184 days remaining. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Louisiana Superdome, often informally referred to simply as the Superdome, is a large, multi-purpose sports and exhibition facility located in the Central Business District of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... The Memory Hole - is a metaphor from the 1984 novel by Eric Arthur Blair (1903 – 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The United States Army is one of the armed forces of the United States and has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... ABC News is a division of ABC television and radio networks (ABC), owned by The Walt Disney Company. ... January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

Further reading

  • Barilleaux, Ryan J.; Stuckey, Mary E. (1992). Leadership and the Bush Presidency: Prudence or Drift in an Era of Change. New York: Praeger. ISBN 0-275-94418-2. 
  • Bush, George H. W. (1999). All the best, George Bush: my life in letters and other writings. New York: Scribner. ISBN 0-684-83958-X. 
  • Ducat, Stephen J. (2004). The wimp factor: gender gaps, holy wars, and the politics of anxious masculinity. Boston: Beacon Press. ISBN 0-8070-4344-3. 
  • Duffy, Michael; Goodgame, Dan (1992). Marching in place : the status quo Presidency of George Bush. New York: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-671-73720-1. 
  • Green, John Robert (2000). The Presidency of George Bush. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas. ISBN 0-7006-0993-8. 
  • Hyams, Joe (1991). Flight of the Avenger: George Bush at War. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovic. ISBN 0-15-131469-1. 
  • Kelley, Kitty (2004). The Family: The True Story of the Bush Dynasty. London: Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-50324-5. 
  • Podhoretz, John (1993). Hell of a Ride: Backstage at the White House Follies, 1989-1993. New York: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-671-79648-8. 
  • Smith, Jean Edward (1992). George Bush's War. New York: Henry Holt & Company. ISBN 0-8050-1388-1. 
  • Tarpley, Webster G.; Chaitkin, Anton (1991). George Bush: The Unauthorized Biography. Washington: Executive Intelligence Review. ISBN 0-943235-05-7. 

Jean Edward Smith is an accomplished educator and biographer having authored such works as Grant, John Marshall: Definer of a Nation, and Presently he is the John Marshall Professor of Political Science at Marshall University. ...

See also

Further information: Category:George H.W. Bush

The Bush family:President George W. Bush, First Lady Laura Bush, former First Lady Barbara Bush, and former President George H. W. Bush sit surrounded by family in the Red Room (White House) on January 6, 2005, together to celebrate the senior couples 60th wedding anniversary. ... The Church Committee is the common term referring to the United States Senate Select Committee to Study Governmental Operations with Respect to Intelligence Activities, a U.S. Senate committee chaired by Senator Frank Church (D-ID) in 1975. ... The October Surprise Conspiracy was an alleged plot that claimed representatives of the 1980 Ronald Reagan presidential campaign had conspired with Islamic Republic of Iran to delay the release of 66 Americans held hostage in Tehran until after the 1980 U.S. Presidential election. ... Iranian militants escort a blindfolded U.S. hostage to the media. ... Kenneth Douglas Ken Taylor, OC , BA , MBA , LL.D (born October 5, 1934 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) was a Canadian ambassador to Iran. ... In the Iran-Contra Affair, United States President Ronald Reagans administration secretly sold arms to Iran, which was engaged in a bloody war with its neighbor Iraq from 1980 to 1988 (see Iran-Iraq War), and diverted the proceeds to the Contra rebels fighting to overthrow the leftist and... The Timeline of United States and China relations 1995-1997 consists of documented information relating both to the 1996 U.S. campaign finance scandal and the Peoples Republic of Chinas alleged nuclear espionage against the United States detailed in the Congressional report known as the Cox Report. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...

External links

Find more information on George H. W. Bush by searching Wikipedia's sister projects
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Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Charles W. Yost
U.S. Ambassador to the UN
19711973
Succeeded by
John A. Scali
Preceded by
David K. E. Bruce
Chief of the U.S. Liaison Office in Beijing
19741976
Succeeded by
Thomas S. Gates, Jr.
Political offices
Preceded by
John V. Dowdy
U.S. Congressman for the 7th District of Texas
19671971
Succeeded by
Bill Archer
Preceded by
Bob Dole
Chairman of the Republican National Committee
19731974
Succeeded by
Mary Louise Smith
Preceded by
William E. Colby
Director of Central Intelligence
January 30, 1976January 20, 1977
Succeeded by
Adm. Stansfield Turner
Preceded by
Bob Dole
U.S. Republican Party Vice Presidential Nominees
1980 (won), 1984 (won)
Succeeded by
Dan Quayle
Preceded by
Walter Mondale
Vice President of the United States
January 20, 1981January 20, 1989
Acting President: July 13, 1985
Preceded by
Ronald Reagan
U.S. Republican Party Presidential Nominees
1988 (won), 1992 (lost)
Succeeded by
Bob Dole
President of the United States
January 20, 1989January 20, 1993
Succeeded by
Bill Clinton
Preceded by
François Mitterrand
Chair of the G8
1990
Succeeded by
John Major
Order of precedence in the United States of America
Preceded by
Jimmy Carter
United States order of precedence
as of 2007
Succeeded by
Bill Clinton
Longevity
Preceded by
Gerald Ford
Oldest U.S. President still living
December 26, 2006–present
Succeeded by
Awards
Preceded by
Rudy Guiliani
Recipient of The Ronald Reagan Freedom Award
2007
Succeeded by
-
Persondata
NAME Bush, George Herbert Walker
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Bush, George Sr.
SHORT DESCRIPTION 41st president of the United States (1989-1993)
DATE OF BIRTH 12 June 1924
PLACE OF BIRTH Milton, Massachusetts
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

 
 

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