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Encyclopedia > George Washington Vanderbilt II
George W. Vanderbilt II
George W. Vanderbilt II

George Washington Vanderbilt II (November 14, 1862March 6, 1914) was a member of the prominent United States Vanderbilt family. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... November 14 is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 47 days remaining until the end of the year. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... This article details the family of Cornelius Vanderbilt. ...


The fourth and youngest son of William Henry Vanderbilt, George Washington Vanderbilt II was named after the youngest child (George Washington Vanderbilt) of the family founders (Cornelius Vanderbilt and Sophia Johnson) who died in 1864 at the age of 25 just two years after his namesake (GWB II) was born. William H. Vanderbilt (May 8, 1821 – December 8, 1885) was a businessman and a member of the prominent United States Vanderbilt family. ... George Washington Vanderbilt (1839-1864) was an American soldier and member of the prominent Vanderbilt family. ... Cornelius Vanderbilt Cornelius Vanderbilt I (May 27, 1794 – January 4, 1877) was an American entrepreneur who built his wealth in shipping and railroads and was the patriarch of the Vanderbilt family. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


George W. Vanderbilt II ran the family farm at New Dorp on Staten Island, New York where he had been born. After his father's death in 1885, he lived with his mother in Manhattan until his own townhouse at 9 West 53rd Street was completed in 1887. The approximate area of the neighborhood of New Dorp on Staten Island is shown highlighted in orange. ... For other uses, see Staten Island (disambiguation) Staten Island, shown in an enhanced satellite image Staten Island is one of the five boroughs of New York City, located on an island of the same name on the west side of the Narrows at the entrance of New York Harbor. ... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ...


An intellectual, this Vanderbilt lacked the family's work ethic and had little interest in the family business, preferring instead to spend his large inheritance on a lavish lifestyle frequently referred to as that of the idle rich. In addition to frequent visits to Paris, France, where several Vanderbilts kept a home, George W. Vanderbilt II traveled extensively. The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. ...


In 1888, Vanderbilt undertook to have Biltmore House constructed near Asheville, North Carolina. Modeled after the great French Châteaux of the Loire Valley, the 250-room castle on 125,000 acres (506 km²) of land would be the largest and most costly of all the Vanderbilt houses and remains the largest home in the United States. On Christmas 1895, Biltmore House opened its doors for a family celebration. Categories: Stub | Castles in America | Mansions | The Vanderbilts ... Asheville City Hall. ... The châteaux of the Loire Valley (Val de Loire) number more than 300. ... From the late 1870s to the 1920s the Vanderbilt clan employed Americas best Beaux-Arts architects and decorators to build an unequalled string of New York townhouses and East Coast palaces in the United States. ...


In 1898, in Paris, France, he married Edith Stuyvesant Dresser (1873–1958). An art connoisseur and collector, George W. Vanderbilt II filled his mansion with a collection of artwork by some of the greats such as Pierre-Auguste Renoir and James Whistler as well as a chess set belonging to Napoleon Bonaparte. Edith Stuyvesant Dresser Vanderbilt (17 January 1873-21 December 1958), nee Edith Stuyvesant Dresser, and also known as Edith Gerry was a descendant of Peter Stuyvesant, the first governor of Dutch colonial New York. ... Pierre-Auguste Renoir Pierre-Auguste Renoir (February 25, 1841–December 3, 1919) was a French artist who painted in the impressionist style. ... James Abbott McNeill Whistler (July 14, 1834 - July 17, 1903) was an American painter and etcher. ... Chess is an abstract strategy board game and mental sport for two players. ... Bonaparte as general Napoleon Bonaparte ( 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des...


Having a great interest in horticulture, Vanderbilt oversaw experiments in scientific farming, animal bloodline breeding, and silviculture. In 1892 Biltmore's Master Landscape Architect, Frederick Law Olmsted suggested that Vanderbilt hire Gifford Pinchot to manage the Biltmore Forest. According to Pinchot, who went on to be the first Chief of the United States Forest Service, Biltmore Forest was the first professionally managed forest in the U.S. The Latin words hortus (garden plant) and cultura (culture) together form horticulture, classically defined as the culture or growing of garden plants. ... Frederick Law Olmsted, oil painting by John Singer Sargent, 1895, Biltmore Estate, Asheville, North Carolina Frederick Law Olmsted (April 26, 1822 – August 28, 1903) was a United States landscape architect, famous for designing many well-known urban parks, including Central Park and Prospect Park in New York City, the country... Gifford Pinchot (August 11, 1865 – October 4, 1946) was the first Chief of the United States Forest Service (1905-1910) and the Republican Governor of Pennsylvania (1923-1927, 1931-1935). ... The USDA Forest Service, a United States government agency within the United States Department of Agriculture, is under the leadership of the United States Secretary of Agriculture. ...


In 1912 George and Edith Vanderbilt booked passage on the Titanic but canceled due to a premonition of Mrs. Vanderbilt's mother. It was too late for them to get their servant and baggage off the ship; both were lost when the Titanic collided with an iceberg and sank on April 15, 1912. Look up titanic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


While George W. Vanderbilt II spent much of his inheritance on the Biltmore estate and its upkeep, bad investments also helped to deplete his once great fortune. He lived on the property until 1914 when he died unexpectedly in Washington, D.C. after an operation for appendicitis. He was interred in the Vanderbilt family mausoleum at the Moravian Cemetery in New Dorp on Staten Island, New York. Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., with regard to the surrounding states of Maryland and Virginia. ... An appendicectomy (or appendectomy) is the surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. ... The Moravian Cemetery at 2205 Richmond Road in New Dorp on Staten Island, New York is the largest cemetery on the island. ...


After his death, his widow sold much of the large tract of land around the Biltmore estate to the United States Forest Service that helped create the Pisgah National Forest. Edith Dresser-Vanderbilt later married Peter Goelet Gerry (1879–1957), a United States Senator from Rhode Island. The USDA Forest Service, a United States government agency within the United States Department of Agriculture, is under the leadership of the United States Secretary of Agriculture. ... The Pisgah National Forest covers 1,076,711 acres (4,357 km²) of mountainous terrain across western North Carolina. ... Peter Goelet Gerry (1879-1957), also known as Peter G. Gerry, was a U.S. Senator from Rhode Island. ... Official language(s) None Capital Providence Largest city Providence Area  Ranked 50th  - Total 1,214* sq mi (3,144* km²)  - Width 37 miles (60 km)  - Length 48 miles (77 km)  - % water 32. ...


Edith and George W. Vanderbilt II's daughter, Cornelia Stuyvesant Vanderbilt (1900–1976), married British aristocrat, John F. A. Cecil, and eventually she inherited Biltmore House. Her sons, George and William Cecil, preserved the estate.


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