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Encyclopedia > George Washington University

The George Washington University

Motto Deus Nobis Fiducia
(In God Our Trust)
Established 1821
Type Private
Academic term Semester
Endowment US $1.019 billion[1].
President Steven Knapp
Faculty 2,062
Undergraduates 10,813
Postgraduates 13,718
Location Flag of the United States Washington, D.C., USA
Campus Urban: Foggy Bottom campus, 43 acres; Mount Vernon campus in Foxhall, 26 acres
Colors Buff and Blue            
(Derived from Washington's Continental Army uniform)
Nickname G.W.
Mascot Colonial
Athletics NCAA Division I
Atlantic Ten Conference
18 sports teams
Website www.gwu.edu
Public transit access Foggy Bottom-GWU Station
on the Blue and Orange Washington Metro Lines

The George Washington University (GW), is a private, coeducational university located in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The school was founded in 1821 as The Columbian College in the District of Columbia by Baptist ministers using funds bequeathed by George Washington. It has since developed into a non-sectarian research institution known especially for its social sciences, international affairs, and law programs. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Steven Knapp has been a professor provost at Johns Hopkins University since 1996 and dean of the School of Arts and Sciences from 1994 to 1996. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2... ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Foggy Bottom is one of Washington, DCs oldest 19th century neighborhoods, so named because, as a low-lying area, fog (endemic to the swamps of early Washington) tended to congregate there. ... Map of Washington, D.C., with Foxhall highlighted in red Foxhall is a neighborhood in Washington, D.C., bordered by Reservoir Road on the north side and Foxhall Road on the west and south sides. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... For other uses of the term, see Buff Buff is a pale yellow-brown colour that got its name from the colour of buffalo leather. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Atlantic 10 Conference (A10) is a college athletic conference which operates mostly on the United States eastern seaboard. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Foggy Bottom-GWU is a Washington Metro station in Washington, DC on the Blue and Orange Lines. ... The Blue Line of the Washington Metro consists of 27 subway stations from Franconia_Springfield to Largo Town Center. ... The Orange Line of the Washington Metro consists of 26 subway stations from Vienna/Fairfax-GMU to New Carrollton. ... The Washington Metro, or simply Metro, is the rapid transit system of Washington, D.C., and neighboring suburban communities in Maryland and Virginia, both inside and outside the Capital Beltway. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... Foggy Bottom is one of Washington, DCs oldest 19th century neighborhoods, so named because, as a low-lying area, fog (endemic to the swamps of early Washington) tended to congregate there. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is a term describing individuals belonging... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Sectarianism is an adherence to a particular sect or party or denomination, it also usually involves a rejection of those not a member of ones sect. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      International relations (IR), a branch of political science, is the study of foreign affairs and global issues among states within the international system, including the roles of states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... Lady Justice or Justitia is a personification of the moral force that underlies the legal system (particularly in Western art). ...

Contents

Campuses

Foggy Bottom

The George Washington University's Foggy Bottom Campus is generally bound by 24th Street on the West, 19th Street on the East, Pennsylvania Avenue on the North, and F Street on the South.
The George Washington University's Foggy Bottom Campus is generally bound by 24th Street on the West, 19th Street on the East, Pennsylvania Avenue on the North, and F Street on the South.

Most of the university's undergraduate and graduate studies are conducted on its 43-acre, downtown Foggy Bottom campus, which is situated just a few blocks from the White House and the National Mall. Barring a few outlying buildings, the boundaries of campus are delineated by Pennsylvania Avenue, 19th Street, E Street, and Virginia Avenue. However, the University owns much of the property in Foggy Bottom, and leases it to various tenants, including the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. GW is said to be the second-largest land-owner in the District of Columbia, following the federal government. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 674 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (905 × 805 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 674 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (905 × 805 pixel, file size: 1. ... Pennsylvania Avenue street sign, 2004. ... Foggy Bottom is one of Washington, DCs oldest 19th century neighborhoods, so named because, as a low-lying area, fog (endemic to the swamps of early Washington) tended to congregate there. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Facing east across the Mall with ones back towards the Lincoln Memorial. ... Pennsylvania Avenue street sign, 2004. ... The E Street Expressway is a spur from Interstate 66 into the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The eastern terminus of the E Street Expressway is at 20th Street, N.W. From there, traffic continues along E Street, N.W., to 17th Street, N.W., near the White... View of Virginia Avenue from the roof of the Hall on Virginia Avenue Virginia Avenue is a street in Washington, D.C. Like other state-named streets in Washington, it diagonally crosses the grid pattern formed by lettered (east-west) and numbered (north-south) streets. ... ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...


Since the GW campus is integrated with the city, it has less of a traditional campus than those of other major universities. However, the university has a significant presence in the area. Signs indicating the relative location of various university buildings can be found on almost every street corner. The student union (known as the Marvin Center), several residence halls, the Media and Public Affairs building, and other major academic buildings are located within a three-block radius of the University Yard (the original quadrangle on campus).


The nearby area surrounding GW's main library, Gelman Library, forms the busy heart of the campus. The seven-story library building, which contains over two-million volumes, is constructed in the popular Brutalist architectural style of the 1970's. It features a concrete façade punctuated by windows that are divided by projecting vertical slabs. For most of the year, parts of the library are open 24-hours, 7 days per week for use by students, faculty and staff. The library's upper level is home to the National Security Archive, a highly-respected research institution that publishes declassified U.S. government files concerning selected topics of American foreign policy. For example, in June of 2007, the organization made the Central Intelligence Agency's so-called "family jewels," which detail twenty five years of misdeeds, available to the public [3]. Brutalism is an architectural style that spawned from the Modernist architectural movement and which flourished from the 1950s to the 1970s. ... The National Security Archive is a 501(c)(3) non-profit research and archival institution located within The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1985 by Thomas Blanton, it archives and publishes declassified U.S. government files concerning selected topics of American foreign policy. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... The Family Jewels is the informal name used to refer to a set of reports that detail illegal activities conducted by the United States Central Intelligence Agency in a roughly quarter-century period spanning the 1950s through the mid-1970s. ...

Locations of the Foggy Bottom (right) and Mount Vernon (left) campuses

Adjacent to the library is Lisner Auditorium and a large open area known as Kogan Plaza. The Foggy Bottom Metro Station Station is located at the intersection of 23rd and I Streets, due south of Washington Circle. The University hospital, where many politicians in the city often seek medical treatment[4], is located next to the Metro station entrance. Sometime in late 2007, construction on a large commercial development (known currently as "Square 54") is expected to begin on the currently-vacant lot previously occupied by the old GW Hospital. It is the second-largest undeveloped lot in the District of Columbia. [5] [6] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Foggy Bottom-GWU is a Washington Metro station in Washington, DC on the Blue and Orange Lines. ... Washington Circle is a traffic circle in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., U.S.A.. It is located at the intersection of Pennsylvania Avenue, New Hampshire Avenue, K Street, and 23rd Street, N.W. The through lanes of K Street (which are U.S. Highway 29) tunnel under...

A satellite View of the Mount Vernon Campus
A satellite View of the Mount Vernon Campus

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Mount Vernon

In 1999, the university acquired the 23-acre Mount Vernon College for Women campus and renamed it The George Washington University at Mount Vernon College. Nicknamed "The Vern," the campus is served by a twenty-four hour shuttle service known as the Vern Express. Despite the fact that its dorms are now fully co-educational, the campus' legacy as a former women's college has been retained with the Elizabeth Somers Women's Leadership Program, a unique residential-academic program for first-year female undergraduate students. Mount Vernon College for Women was an all-women institute for higher learning located in the Georgetown district of Washington, DC. The college was acquired by The George Washington University in 1999, and became their Mount Vernon campus. ...


Ashburn and Other Centers

The George Washington University also operates a postgraduate-geared campus in Ashburn, Virginia. Several other satellite education centers are maintained by the university, including the Alexandria Graduate Education Center in Alexandria, the Graduate Education Center in Arlington, and the Hampton Roads Center in Newport News. Ashburn, Virginia is an unincorporated area located in Loudoun County, Virginia, 30 miles west of Washington, D.C., and is part of the Washington Metropolitan Area. ... Location in Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia Founded 1718 Government  - Mayor William D. Euille Area  - City  15. ... Arlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia (which calls itself a commonwealth), directly across the Potomac River from Washington, DC. By an act of Congress July 9, 1846, the area south of the Potomac was returned to Virginia effective in 1847 As of 2000... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Incorporated 1896 Government  - Mayor Joe Frank Area  - City  119. ...


History

George Washington had long argued for the creation of a university in the District of Columbia. In his will, he bequeathed fifty shares of the Potomac Company to support such an institution. He wrote, "I give and bequeath in perpetuity the fifty shares which I hold in the Potomac Company (under the aforesaid Acts of the Legislature of Virginia) towards the endowment of a University to be established within the limits of the District of Columbia, under the auspices of the General Government, if that Government should incline to extend a fostering hand towards it."[2] The shares turned out to not be worth very much, but Washington's idea for a university continued. George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... ... The Potomac Company was created in 1785 to make improvements to the Potomac River in order to improve its navigability. ...

A bust of George Washington on The Foggy Bottom campus of the George Washington University
A bust of George Washington on The Foggy Bottom campus of the George Washington University

Aware of Washington's wishes, a group of men led by Baptist missionary and minister Luther Rice raised funds to purchase a site for a college to educate citizens for work as missionaries and clergy. A large building was constructed on College Hill, which is now known as Meridian Hill, and on February 9, 1821, President James Monroe approved the congressional charter creating The Columbian College. President Monroe, John C. Calhoun, Henry Clay, the Marquis de Lafayette and other dignitaries attended the college's first commencement exercises in 1824. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 539 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) One of four busts of George Washington on the campus of the George Washington University. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 539 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) One of four busts of George Washington on the campus of the George Washington University. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is a term describing individuals belonging... Two Mormon missionaries A missionary is traditionally defined as a propagator of religion who works to convert those outside that community; someone who proselytizes. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      For other types of... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth President of the United States (1817-1825), and the fourth Virginian to hold the office. ... A congressional charter is a law passed by the United States Congress that states the mission, authority and activities of a group. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century, best known as a spokesman for slavery, nullification and the rights of electoral minorities, such as slave-holders. ... Henry Clay, Sr. ... Marie-Joseph-Paul-Roch-Yves-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette (September 6, 1757 – May 20, 1834), was a French aristocrat most famous for his participation in the American Revolutionary War and early French Revolution. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


The college's buildings were used as a hospital during the Civil War. At times, academic and administrative departments have occupied other buildings around Washington, including what is now the National Museum of Women in the Arts on New York Avenue in northwest Washington. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... National Museum of Women in the Arts The National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA), located in Washington, D.C. is the only museum solely dedicated to celebrating women’s achievements in the visual, performing, and literary arts. ...


The name of the institution was changed to Columbian University in 1873 and, in an agreement with the George Washington Memorial Association, to The George Washington University in 1904. The university was among the first American institutions to grant a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in 1888. Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


During the Vietnam War era, Thurston Hall, an undergraduate dormitory housing 875 students was (according to campus folklore) a staging ground for Student Anti-War Demonstrations (at 1900 F street, the building is just 3 blocks from The White House). Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


Since the 1970s, through the presidencies of Lloyd Hartman Elliott and Stephen Joel Trachtenberg, GWU has become a major undergraduate and graduate institution. In December 2006, the university named Johns Hopkins University provost Steven Knapp its next president, to begin his term on August 1, 2007.[3] Stephen Joel Trachtenberg is the current President of The George Washington University. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... Steven Knapp has been a professor provost at Johns Hopkins University since 1996 and dean of the School of Arts and Sciences from 1994 to 1996. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


In 1996, the university purchased the Mount Vernon College for Women in the city's Foxhall neighborhood that became the school's co-educational Mount Vernon Campus. The campus was first utilized in 1997 for women only, but became co-eduational in a matter of years. The Mount Vernon campus is now totally integrated into the GW community, serving as a great compliment to the Foggy Bottom campus. Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Map of Washington, D.C., with Foxhall highlighted in red Foxhall is a neighborhood in Washington, D.C., bordered by Reservoir Road on the north side and Foxhall Road on the west and south sides. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ...


Academics

Students at GW participate in a wide variety of educational opportunities inside and outside of the classroom. 9,700 full-time undergraduates are studying in 87 majors with 1,500 in business, 500 in engineering, 2,000 in international affairs, 700 in communications and media, 800 in sciences and math, 2,900 in social sciences, and 1,300 in arts, languages, and humanities. Nearly 900 students participate in GW's Study Abroad Programs each semester in 50 countries.[7] Additionally, about 125 entering students each fall join the University Honors Program community of 500 students. These students routinely live in the Scholars' Village, which is a unique academic housing concept for upperclassmen. Each "villager" has competed for a space in this prestigious "themed-house" environment.


The George Washington University has a medical school and its own hospital.


In addition to offering courses on its Foggy Bottom and Mount Vernon campuses, GW faculty teach a large number of graduate courses in the suburbs of Washington (in Maryland and Virginia). The Graduate School of Political Management primarily holds their classes in the Hall of the States building at 444 North Capitol Street, located on north side of the U.S. Capitol Building and Senate offices.

Medical school students in class (1958)
Medical school students in class (1958)

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2612x3889, 1449 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): George Washington University ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2612x3889, 1449 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): George Washington University ...

Organization

The university is governed by a Board of Trustees[8]. The Board is responsible for selecting the President of the University, who is charged with managing the institution.


The university is organized into nine schools and colleges:

The Elliott School of International Affairs is a division of the George Washington University located in Washington, D.C. specializing in foreign affairs and diplomacy. ... The George Washington University Law School, commonly referred to as GW Law, was founded in 1865 and is the oldest law school in the District of Columbia. ... The School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) is a college within The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. which specializes in engineering, technology and communications, and trasportation. ...

Tuition

By some measures, The George Washington University is the most expensive undergraduate institution in the United States[9]. Tuition is guaranteed to remain at the freshman rate for up to ten continuous (full time) semesters of attendance at the university. Tuition for the 2007-2008 year is $39,210 with a housing/board estimated cost of $11,900[10]. That tuition rate only applies to the incoming Class of 2011 and those who remain at the university after 10 full time semesters.


Students and faculty

10,761 undergraduate students attended the university as of the 2006-2007 school year[11]. 12,634 graduate students enrolled for the Fall 2005 academic semester. In 2001, there were 1,508 full-time and 2,725 part-time members of the faculty.


Student Life

The George Washington University has been ranked by The Princeton Review as in Top 10 for the following categories:[4] The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ...

  • Most Politically Active
  • Dorms Like Palaces
  • Great College Towns
  • Best in the Northeast
  • College With a Conscience

Student government

The Student Association (SA) is the official undergraduate and graduate student government of The George Washington University. The SA is fashioned after the federal government with three cooperative and equal branches of government. The President and Executive Vice President, however, are separately and popularly elected. Senate representation is divided among the schools of the university. Student elections are generally held in February or March of the spring semester and have been administered electronically since 1999 in designated locations or via paper ballot. To be elected, candidates for President and Executive Vice President must receive at least 40% of the student vote or else require a run-off election. Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ...


Historically, SA presidents have fared well in the political arena. Former SA president Edward "Skip" Gnehm was the Ambassador to Kuwait during the Gulf War and received the Presidential Distinguished Service Award and two Presidential Meritorious Service Awards. Former SA president John David Morris (1989-1990) currently serves as a city councilman in Peoria, Illinois, and Al Park (1994-1995) is a New Mexico state representative and possible candidate for New Mexico Attorney General. Actor Alec Baldwin ran for SA President as a junior and narrowly lost. After his defeat, he transferred to New York University (NYU) to pursue his acting career. Jonathan D. Katz was SA president from 1980-81 and went on to found Queer Nation San Francisco and to become a professor of gay and lesbian studies as well as art. , : See how it plays in Peoria United States Illinois Peoria 46. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Alec Baldwin (born Alexander Rae Baldwin III on April 3, 1958 in Massapequa, New York) is an Academy Award-nominated, Emmy Award-winning and a Golden Globe Award-winning American actor. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... Jonathan David Katz (Ph. ...


The Student Association Executive Vice President chairs the Student Senate and assists the President in the performance of his duties.


The Student Association Senate is composed of 29 voting members, of which 15 are undergraduate students and 14 are graduate students. Seats are distributed proportionally based on each school's popular enrollment. There are also two undergraduate and two graduate at-large Senate seats.


The student government also includes a Student Court that adjudicates disputes between student groups and among the branches of the government.


Student organizations

There are over four hundred student organizations at the University, including organizations of common interest or political activism, ethnic organizations, and Greek organizations.


Political and international organizations

The George Washington University is home to several large and active political and international organizations.


The GW College Democrats hosts many Democratic events and speakers. In 2006-07, the College Democrats hosted Senators Boxer and Dorgan, Reps. Pallone, Frank, Israel, and Wexer, and James Carville. In addition, the chaper campaigned for Democratic House and Senate candidates in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Ohio. Howard Dean formally endorsed John Kerry for President on campus at a GW College Democrats sponsored event. In 2007, the GW College Democrats won second place in the College Democrats of America Chapter of the year award. Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ...


Started in Fall 2006, the GW Democrats, a collegiate chapter of the Progressive Democrats of America and the Young Democrats of America, focus on Democratic and Progressive activism. www. ...


Started in the Spring of 2006, War Child GWU is the first student chapter of War Child Canada in the United States. War Child is a non-profit organization aimed at helping children throughout the world caught up in the horrors of war. For other uses of the name War Child, see the disambiguation page. ...


The GW College Republicans was named the Best Chapter of 2005 by the College Republican National Committee. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with College Republicans. ...


Started during the 2006-2007 year, the GW College Libertarians are a voice for third parties and disillusioned Democrats and Republicans. They have been included in one debate with the GW Collge Democrats and GW College Republicans.


The International Affairs Society (IAS) participates in international affairs-related events such as the Model United Nations. A Model United Nations Conference in Stuttgart, Germany in action. ...


G.W.'s Student Global AIDS Campaign (SGAC) is one of the most active chapters in the country.[citation needed] Last year, the club staged AIDS awareness and prevention events, as D.C. currently has the highest rate of new AIDS cases in the country (119 per 100,000).[12] The Student Global AIDS Campaign (SGAC) is an advocacy group with more than 85 chapters at high schools, colleges, and universities across the United States committed to bringing an end to HIV and AIDS in the U.S. and around the world. ...


The GW Chapter of STAND, or GW STAND, was formed in 2003 shortly after the first STAND: A Student Anti-Genocide Coalition group was organized at Georgetown University. It has sponsored rallies, information sessions, and promoted divestment, about genocide in general, but specifically about genocide in Darfur. Georgetown University is an elite private research university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., United States. ... Genocide is the deliberate and systematic destruction of an ethnic or national group. ... Darfur (Arabic: , lit. ...


The Global Language Group, or Global Languages, is a non-profit organization that offers over 150 free classes in 50 languages.


Greek-letter organizations

There are four honor societies: Order of Omega, Phi Beta Kappa, Omnicron Delta Kappa, and Tau Beta Pi. The Order of Omega is an honors society recognizing particularly meritorious men and women in the undergraduate Greek system. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... The bent at Iowa Alpha (Iowa State University) Tau Beta Pi (ΤΒΠ or TBP) is the national engineering honor society in the United States and the second oldest collegiate honor society in the US. It honors students who have shown a history of academic achievement as well as a commitment to...


There are 14 recognized men's social fraternities on campus, including Alpha Epsilon Pi, Beta Theta Pi, Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Kappa Psi, Phi Sigma Kappa, Pi Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Tau Kappa Epsilon, and Theta Delta Chi. Sigma Chi was approved for recolonization in 2006, and expects to be rechartered in early Fall 2007. Kappa Alpha Order inducted its alpha class on March 2, 2007, and expects to be rechartered in January 2008. Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Beta Theta Pi (ΒΘΠ) is a social collegiate fraternity that was founded at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, USA, where it is part of the Miami Triad which includes Phi Delta Theta and Sigma Chi. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 236 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ... ΛΧΑ (Lambda Chi Alpha), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America with more than 250,000 initiated members and chapters (called Zetas) at more than 300 universities. ... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... Phi Sigma Kappa (ΦΣK) is a fraternity devoted to three cardinal principles: the promotion of Brotherhood, the stimulation of Scholarship, and the development of Character. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... Pi Kappa Phi is a national social fraternity that was founded in the spirit of nu phi, meaning non-fraternity. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE or Teke, pronounced T-K-E or IPA , as in teak wood) is a college fraternity with chapters in the USA, and Canada, and affiliation with a German fraternity system known as the Corps of the Weinheimer Senioren Convent (WSC). ... Theta Delta Chi (ΘΔΧ, Theta Delt) is a social fraternity that was founded in 1847 at Union College. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... The Kappa Alpha Order (KA) is a secret collegiate Order of Christian Knights. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


There are also two social fraternities, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, and Sigma Alpha Mu (also called "SAMMY"), that are not recognized by the university. A group of male students also maintain Alpha Pi Epsilon (or "Apes"), a group that emerged from a collection of students who had lost recognition by Alpha Epsilon Pi and Zeta Beta Tau due to hazing charges in 2001. Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Sigma Alpha Mu (ΣΑΜ) also known as Sammy is a college fraternity founded at the City College of New York in 1909. ... Hazing is an often ritualistic test, which may constitute harassment, abuse or humiliation with requirements to perform meaningless tasks, sometimes as a way of initiation into a social group. ...


There are nine Panhellenic sororities on campus, including Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Epsilon Phi, Alpha Phi, Delta Gamma, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Phi Sigma Sigma, Sigma Delta Tau, and Sigma Kappa. Pi Beta Phi was approved for colonization by the Panhellenic Association in 2006, and installed as a chapter in January of 2007. Alpha Epsilon Phi (ΑΕΦ) is a sorority and a member of the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pi Beta Phi (ΠΒΦ) is an international fraternity for women founded as I.C. Sorosis on April 28, 1867, at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois. ...


Three National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) sororities, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.; Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.; and Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.; have chapters at GW. Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. has a city-wide chapter in Washington, DC, with some members from GW. Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ) Sorority, Incorporated, formed in January 15, 1908 at Howard University, became Americas first Greek-letter organization established by Black college women, and remains a predominately African-American sorority. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority Inc. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ...


The Multicultural Greek Council (MGC) includes Iota Nu Delta fraternity, Lambda Upsilon Lambda fraternity, Pi Delta Psi fraternity, and Sigma Psi Zeta sorority. Iota Nu Delta (ΙΝΔ) Fraternity Inc. ... La Unidad Latina, Lambda Upsilon Lambda Fraternity, Incorporated was established on February 19, 1982 in order to address the shortcomings of academic institutions in meeting and addressing the needs of Latino students in higher education. ... Pi Delta Psi Fraternity, Inc. ... Sigma Psi Zeta Sorority, Inc. ...


There are also a number of professional and honorary fraternities active on campus. Delta Phi Epsilon, the nation's first and only professional foreign service society, was rechartered in 2005. Theta Tau, the nation's oldest and foremost engineering fraternity, is active on campus, as is the national honor fraternity Phi Sigma Pi, and the professional business fraternity Delta Sigma Pi. Additionally, there are two community service based Greek-letter organizations on campus: Alpha Phi Omega, a co-educational service fraternity, and Epsilon Sigma Alpha, which was founded in spring 2003 and is currently the only community service sorority on campus. Delta Phi Epsilon (ΔΦΕ) is the name given to several college fraternities and sororities. ... ΘΤ (Theta Tau) Fraternity was founded in 1904 by four engineering students at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. ... Phi Sigma Pi (ΦΣΠ) is a national coeducational honor fraternity. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alpha Phi Omega (commonly known as APO, but also ΑΦΩ, A-Phi-O, and A-Phi-Q) is a co-ed service fraternity organized to provide community service, leadership development, [1] and social opportunities to college students. ...


Media

There are two student run news sources on campus, the twice-weekly newspaper The GW Hatchet, founded in 1904, and The Daily Colonial, an online daily founded in 2004. The GW Hatchet is the student newspaper of the The George Washington University. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


There is also an online only student-run radio station, WRGW, that is in its 79th year.


In addition, there is a student run magazine on campus called GW Discourse, The Political Science Quarterly [13] (founded in December of 2006).


Student Groups

The Enosinian Society, founded in 1822, is one of George Washington University’s oldest and most storied student organizations. Invited speakers included prominent U.S., including Daniel Webster. The Society was reconstituted in 2005 and holds bi-weekly amicable, spirited debate on important issues of the day.[14] Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852) was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ...


Intramural sports are also very popular in addition to the NCAA Division I varsity teams.


GW is home to an active performing arts community. Music groups include Emocapella, the Sons of Pitch, the Sirens, The GW Vibes, the GW Troubadors, and the GW Pitches. Student theater organizations include Generic Theatre Company , 14th Grade Players, Forbidden Planet Productions (FPP), and receSs, GWU's only comedy troupe. Balance: The GW Ballet Group offers free student-taught ballet classes to members, produces and performs The Nutcracker and other shows and offers discounted tickets to ballets at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Capital Funk is GW's only competitive Hip Hop dance troupe. In May, 2007 they won first place at the 2007 East Coast Hip Hop Dance Competition hosted by Culture Shock DC [15] Emocapella (a portmanteau of emo and a cappella, though intentionally misspelled) is a critically-acclaimed all-male collegiate a cappella at the George Washington University. ... (left to right) Sergei Legat, as the Nutcracker, an unidentified child as a gingerbread soldier, and Lydia Rubtsova as Marianna in Vsevolozhskys costumes for the Ivanov/Petipa/Tchaikovsky The Nutcracker, St. ... The Kennedy Center as seen from the Potomac River. ...


As of Fall 2007, GW has two faculty-directed choral groups: University Singers and the smaller Chamber Singers. The latter was disbanded for a number of years but is being reinstated. University Singers tours each year, with international tours occurring every other year. In May and June of 2007, GW University Singers traveled to Croatia, Slovenia and Italy, and performed in all three countries.


The Chess Club was reconstituted in September of 2005 and now competes with other universities' teams nationally. It is currently coached by Grandmaster Lubosh Kavalek, who is also an alumnus. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lubomir (Lubosh) Kavalek (born August 9, 1943) is a noted Czech-American chess player. ...


School songs

Fight song

The school fight song, "Hail to the Buff & Blue" or "The G.W. Fight Song" is as follows:

Hail to the buff! (buff!)
Hail to the blue! (blue!)
Hail to the buff and blue!
All our lives we'll be proud to say,
We hail from G.W.! (go big blue!)
Oh by George we're happy we can say,
We're G.W. here to show the way!
So raise high the buff! (buff!)
Raise high the blue! (blue!)
Loyal to G.W.!
(You bet we're!)
Loyal to G.W.! (fight!)

This song plays on synthesized bells (without words) every weekday at noon and 6:00 p.m. from the center of campus.


Alma Mater

The school's Alma Mater as sung today was rewritten from its original version in 1970:

Hail Alma Mater,
To thy spirit guiding,
Knowledge thy closest friend
In its strength abiding,
Pledge we fidelity
Ne'er its place resigning,
Hail thee George Washington.

Athletics

George Washington Colonials logo

GW has an extensive Division I program that includes Men's Baseball, Basketball, Cross Country, Golf, Gymnastics, Women's Lacrosse, Rowing, Soccer, Women's Softball, Squash, Swimming & Diving, Tennis, Women's Volleyball, and Water Polo. Colonials athletics teams compete in the Atlantic 10 Conference. While only a Division II program, the Men's and Women's Rugby Teams both compete in the Potomac Rugby Union and have had much recent success.[16] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Atlantic 10 Conference (A10) is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in the eastern United States; it also has two member schools in Ohio. ...


The university's colors are buff and blue (buff being a color similar to tan, but often represented as gold or yellow). The colors were taken from George Washington's uniform in the Revolutionary War. For other uses of the term, see Buff Buff is a pale yellow-brown colour that got its name from the colour of buffalo leather. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ...


GW's football team won the Sun Bowl in El Paso, Texas in 1957. The school last competed in the sport in 1966 as a member of the Southern Conference.[17] United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Brut Sun Bowl is an annual college football bowl game that is played usually at the end of December in El Paso, Texas. ... El Paso redirects here. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... The Southern Conference (or SoCon) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the NCAAs Division I. SoCon football teams compete in the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (formerly known as I-AA). ...


The teams have achieved great successes in recent years including a first round victory in the Men's NCAA Division I Soccer Tournament in 2004 The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


Basketball

Mike Jarvis coached GW in the 1990s, and led the team to the NCAA Sweet 16 in 1993, where they were beaten by the Fab Five Michigan team. Jarvis also coached current Colonials Head Coach Karl Hobbs in high school. NBA flop Yinka Dare also played at George Washington for two years before being drafted in the first round by the New Jersey Nets. Mike Jarvis is a sports commentator and former NCAA basketball coach at Boston University, George Washington University, and St. ... The group nickname Fab Five is a play on the Fab Four, a famous nickname for The Beatles. ... Yinka Dare (born October 10, 1972 in Kano, Nigeria – January 9, 2004 in Englewood, New Jersey, U.S.) was a Nigerian professional basketball player; a 7-foot-1, 270 pound (122 kg) center. ... ‹ The template below (Taginfo) is being considered for deletion. ...


GW's Basketball team returned to the National Stage in 2004 after defeating No. 9 Michigan State and No. 12 Maryland in back to back games to win the 2004 BB&T Classic. That year the Men's Basketball team went on to win the Atlantic 10 West Title and the Atlantic 10 Tournament Title (earning an automatic bid to the 2005 NCAA Tournament). The #12 seeded Colonials tournament was short, ending with a first round loss to #5 Seed Georgia Tech. Michigan State University (MSU) is a co-educational public research university in East Lansing, Michigan USA. Founded in 1855, it was the pioneer land-grant institution and served as a model for future land-grant colleges in the United States under the 1862 Morrill Act. ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... The BB&T Corporation NYSE: BBT is one of Americas ten largest banks. ... 2005 Final Four, Edward Jones Dome The 2005 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 65 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France and Singapore. ...


The team began the 2005 season ranked 21st in the Associated Press poll and after some tournament success they closed out the year ranked 19th nationwide. They had a record of 26-2 (16-0 in the A-10) going into the 2006 NCAA Tournament. The 2005-2006 season had been the team's best ever, surpassing the start of the 1953-1954 season and receiving an #8 seed in the NCAA Tournament. In the tournament, they came back from a 18 point second-half deficit to defeat #9 seed UNC-Wilmington, but lost to Duke University, the top overall seed in the Second Round. The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... The 2006 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 65 schools playing in a single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The University of North Carolina at Wilmington is a public university located in Wilmington, North Carolina. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ...


While only one Colonial from the 2005-2006 team was drafted in the 2006 NBA Draft, Danilo Pinnock, there are currently three Colonials from that team in the NBA. Pops Mensah-Bonsu plays for the Dallas Mavericks and Mike Hall, who recently signed a contract with the Washington Wizards. The 2006 NBA Draft was held on June 28 at the Theatre at Madison Square Garden in New York City. ... Danilo Agustin J.R. Pinnock (born December 11, 1983 in Fort Hood, Texas) is an American professional basketball player. ... Nana Papa Yaw Mensah-Bonsu, generally known as Pops Mensah-Bonsu (born September 7, 1983 in London), is a British basketball player and former star at the George Washington University in the Atlantic 10 Conference. ... The Dallas Mavericks (also known as the Mavs) are an NBA basketball team based in Dallas, Texas. ... Michael Horus Hall (born June 5, 1984) in Chicago, Illinois is an American professional basketball player currently with the Washington Wizards of the NBA. He attended Alan B. Shepard High School in Palos Heights, Illinios Hall, a four year starter at George Washington University from 2002 through 2006 was a... The Washington Wizards are a professional basketball team based in Washington, D.C.. They play in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ...


The 2006-2007 basketball season was considered by many to be a rebuilding year for the colonials after graduating their entire starting front court and losing junior leader Danilo Pinnock to the NBA. But coach Karl Hobbs and Senior guard Carl Elliott managed to lead the team to a 23-8 record, winning the 2007 Atlantic 10 Tournament in Atlantic City, NJ (once again earning an auto-bid to the NCAA Tournament). The Colonials were placed as a #11 seed losing against #6 seed Vanderbilt University in Sacramento, CA 77-44 [18]. The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... Karl Hobbs is the head coach of the George Washington University Colonials mens basketball team. ... Alternate meanings: See Atlantic City (disambiguation) Atlantic City is a city located in USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 40,517. ... // Final four redirects here. ... Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Sacramento is the county seat of Sacramento County, California and the capital of the U.S. state of California. ...


Karl Hobbs, a former player and coach under Jim Calhoun at the University of Connecticut is in his sixth year as head coach. Hobbs is a fan favorite -- often receiving as much applause during his entrance to games as the athletes. Known for his outward shows of emotion during games that include stomping his foot and slamming his clipboard, Hobbs is considered one of the up-and-coming coaches in the NCAA. Karl Hobbs is the head coach of the George Washington University Colonials mens basketball team. ... James A. Calhoun (born May 10, 1942 in Braintree, Massachusetts) is the head coach of the University of Connecticuts mens basketball team. ... The University of Connecticut, commonly known as UConn, is the State of Connecticuts land-grant university. ...


Spirit Programs

The mascot for the Colonials is George, a student wearing a life-size George Washington costume with a large head. [5] The sports teams are called Colonials. There is also an inflatable Colonial mascot called "Big George" (as opposed to "Little George," the life-size mascot) and an inflatable hippo.[6] The Hippo was instituted by Stephen Joel Trachtenberg, and there is a hippo statue at the corner of 21st and H Street NW on campus. Professor and former University Honors Program Chairman David Allen Grier is credited with fabricating the legend of the "River Horse" and the statue's purpose for being located on campus. Hippo can refer to: hippo- is the stem of the Greek word for horse. ...


The official student supporters' group of the men's basketball team is called the Colonial Army. It is one of the largest student organizations on campus.


Reserve Officers Training Corps

GW has a Navy ROTC program on campus. The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program of the United States armed forces present on college campuses to recruit and educate commissioned officers. ...


Notable alumni and faculty

John Foster Dulles, Secretary of State and a highly influential Cold War policy maker
John Foster Dulles, Secretary of State and a highly influential Cold War policy maker
J. Edgar Hoover, the longest serving, and arguably most controversial director of the FBI
J. Edgar Hoover, the longest serving, and arguably most controversial director of the FBI

Lists of notable alumni, faculty, and current students of the George Washington University. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (753x945, 60 KB) http://reid. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (753x945, 60 KB) http://reid. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ... A Senate Majority Leader is a politician within a Senate who leads the majority party, or majority coalition, of sitting senators. ... File links The following pages link to this file: John Foster Dulles Categories: U.S. history images ... File links The following pages link to this file: John Foster Dulles Categories: U.S. history images ... John Foster Dulles (February 25, 1888 – May 24, 1959) was an American statesman who served as Secretary of State under President Dwight D. Eisenhower from 1953 to 1959. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Download high resolution version (430x640, 46 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: J. Edgar Hoover Categories: U.S. history images ... Download high resolution version (430x640, 46 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: J. Edgar Hoover Categories: U.S. history images ... John Edgar Hoover (January 1, 1895 – May 2, 1972) was an influential but controversial director of the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Official White House portrait of former U.S. First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. ... Official White House portrait of former U.S. First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. ... First official White House portrait. ... This article is about the use of the term first lady internationally. ...

Presidents

  • William Staughton (1821-1827)
  • Stephen Chapin (1828-1841)
  • Joel Smith Bacon (1843-1854)
  • Joseph Getchell Binney (1855-1858)
  • George Whitefield Samson (1859-1871)
  • James Clarke Welling (1871-1894)
  • Samuel Harrison Greene (1894-1895)
  • Benaiah L. Whitman (1895-1900)
  • Samuel Harrison Greene (1900-1902)
  • Charles Willis Needham (1902-1910)
  • Charles Herbert Stockton (1910-1918)
  • William Miller Collier (1918-1921)
  • Howard L. Hodgkins (1921-1923)
  • William Mather Lewis (1923-1927)
  • Cloyd Heck Marvin (1927-1959)
  • Oswald Symister Colclough (1959-1961)
  • Thomas Henry Carroll (1961-1964)
  • Lloyd Hartman Elliott (1965-1988)
  • Stephen Joel Trachtenberg (1988-2007)
  • Steven Knapp (2007 - Present)

William Staughton (1770-1829) was a Baptist clergyman, a Chaplain of the United States Senate, and the first president of Columbian College (later known as George Washington University). ... Stephen Joel Trachtenberg is the current President of The George Washington University. ... Steven Knapp has been a professor provost at Johns Hopkins University since 1996 and dean of the School of Arts and Sciences from 1994 to 1996. ...

Notes

  1. ^ "GW's endowment breaks one billion," GW Hatchet [1]
  2. ^ "Rediscovering George Washington" from the website of the Public Broadcasting Service; accessed February 23, 2007
  3. ^ The GW Hatchet, December 4, 2006; accessed February 23, 2007
  4. ^ http://www.princetonreview.com/college/research/profiles/generalinfo.asp?listing=1022790&LTID=1
  5. ^ GW Spirit Programs, [2]
  6. ^ GW Spirit Programs http://spirit.gwu.edu/AboutUs/Mascots/

is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

External links

  • The GW and Foggy Bottom Historical Encyclopedia
  • George Washington University Historical Photographs - online images of individuals, localities, objects, buildings, events, and groups associated with the history of the University.
  • The George Washington University web site
  • The GW Hatchet - A twice-weekly independent student newspaper
  • The Daily Colonial - A daily, online students news site
  • Official GW athletics site
  • The GW Patriot - A conservative monthly journal web site
  • GW News Center
  • WRGW - GW's All-Online Student-Run Radio Station
  • GW's Parent's Association
  • GW's Alumni Online Community
  • Maps and aerial photos for 38°54′03″N 77°02′50″W / 38.900750, -77.047100Coordinates: 38°54′03″N 77°02′50″W / 38.900750, -77.047100
    • Maps from WikiMapia, Google Maps, Live Search Maps, Yahoo! Maps, or MapQuest
    • Topographic maps from TopoZone or TerraServer-USA

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