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Encyclopedia > George Washington Parke Custis
George Washington Parke Custis
George Washington Parke Custis

George Washington Parke Custis (April 30, 1781October 10, 1857), the adopted son (and also stepgrandson) of United States President George Washington, was a nineteenth-century American writer, orator, and agricultural reformer. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 482 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (617 × 768 pixel, file size: 138 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 482 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (617 × 768 pixel, file size: 138 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://www. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...


Through his mother Eleanor Calvert Custis Stuart, he was a great-grandson of Charles Calvert, 5th Baron Baltimore and of Henry Lee of Ditchley. He was the grandson of Martha Washington through her first marriage to Daniel Parke Custis. After his father, John Parke Custis, died in November 1781, he and one of his sisters, Eleanor Parke Custis, were raised at Mount Vernon by George and Martha Washington. Custis attended but did not graduate from the College of New Jersey (later Princeton University) and St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland. Charles Calvert, 5th Baron Baltimore Charles Calvert, 5th Baron Baltimore (September 29, 1699 - April 24, 1751) was a British noble and Proprietary Governor of the Province of Maryland. ... Sir Henry Lee by Antonis Mor, 1568. ... Give Me Liberty Martha Dandridge Custis Washington (June 2, 1731 – May 22, 1802) was the wife of George Washington, the first president of the United States, and therefore is seen as the first First Lady of the United States (although that title was not coined until after her death; she... Daniel Parke Custis (15 October 1711-8 July 1757) was a wealthy Virginia planter. ... John Parke Custis (27 November 1754-5 November 1781) was a Virginia planter and stepson of George Washington. ... Eleanor Parke Custis Lewis (1779-1852), known as Nelly, is the adopted daughter and step-granddaughter of United States President George Washington. ... Back of the main house. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ... There are a number of colleges with the name St. ...


In 1802 he began the construction of Arlington House on land he had inherited from his father. He intended the house also to serve as a memorial to his adoptive father. The house has been restored and is now open to the public under the auspices of the National Park Service. --69. ... Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial, is a Greek revival style mansion located in Arlington, Virginia, on bluffs overlooking the Potomac River, directly across from the National Mall in Washington, D.C.. During the American Civil War, the grounds of the mansion were selected as the site of Arlington... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...


On July 7, 1804, Custis married Mary Lee Fitzhugh. Of their four children, only one daughter, Mary Anna Randolph Custis, survived. She married Robert E. Lee at Arlington on June 30, 1831. is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Mary Lee Fitzhugh Custis (April 22, 1788-April 23, 1853), was an Episcopal lay leader in Alexandria County (now Arlington County, Virginia). ... Mary Anna Randolph Custis Lee (October 1, 1808 – November 5, 1873) was the wife of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. ... // This article is about the Confederate general. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1799, Custis was commissioned as a cornet in the United States Army and aide-de-camp to General Charles Cotesworth Pinckney. Later, Custis volunteered in the defense of Washington, D.C., at the Battle of Bladensburg during the War of 1812. 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Bâ™­ cornet The cornet is a brass instrument that closely resembles the trumpet. ... The United States Army is the largest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... An aide-de-camp (French: camp assistant) is a personal assistant, secretary, or adjutant to a person of high rank, usually a senior military officer or a head of state. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Charles Cotesworth (C.C.) Pinckney (February 5, 1746 – August 16, 1825), was an early American statesman and a signer of the U.S. Constitution. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2... The Battle of Bladensburg was a battle fought during the War of 1812. ... Combatants United States British Empire: United Kingdom Upper Canada Lower Canada Newfoundland Bermuda Eastern Woodland Indians Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •United States Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at...


In 1853, the writer Benson John Lossing visited Custis at Arlington House. See the Cornell University Library transcription of Harper's New Monthly Magazine article: [1] (starting on page 433). Four of the Custis paintings mentioned in the Harper's article can be seen in color (Battle of Germantown/Battle of Trenton/Battle of Princeton/Washington at Yorktown) in the February 1966 issue of American Heritage magazine. 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Benson John Lossing (1813-1891) was an American historian and wood engraver, known best for his illustrated books on the American Revolution and American Civil War. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Custis was also notable as an orator and playwright. Two addresses delivered during the War of 1812 had national circulation, Oration by Mr. Custis, of Arlington; with an Account of the Funeral Solemnities in Honor of the Lamented Gen. James M. Lingan (1812) and The Celebration of the Russian Victories, in Georgetown, District of Columbia; on the 5th of June, 1813 (1813). Two of Custis's plays, The Indian Prophecy; or Visions of Glory (1827) and Pocahontas; or, The Settlers of Virginia (1830), were published. Other plays include The Rail Road (1828), The Eighth of January, or, Hurra for the Boys of the West! (ca. 1830), North Point, or, Baltimore Defended (1833), and Montgomerie, or, The Orphan of a Wreck (1836). Custis wrote a series of biographical essays about his adoptive father, collectively entitled Recollections and Private Memoirs of Washington, which was posthumously edited and published by his daughter. A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ...


When Custis died in 1857, his son-in-law Robert E. Lee came to control (as executor of the will) almost 200 slaves on Custis's three plantations, Arlington, White House in New Kent County, and Romancoke in King William County. Under Custis's will, the slaves were to be freed once the legacies from his estate were paid, and absolutely no later than five years after his death. // This article is about the Confederate general. ... New Kent County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... King William County is a county located on the Middle Peninsula in the state of Virginia. ...


External links

The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...

References

  • Bearss, Sara B. "The Federalist Career of George Washington Parke Custis," Northern Virginia Heritage 8 (Feb. 1986): 15–20.
  • Bearss, Sara B. "The Farmer of Arlington: George W. P. Custis and the Arlington Sheep Shearings," Virginia Cavalcade 38 (1989): 124–133.
  • Brady, Patricia. Martha Washington: An American Life (New York: Viking/Penguin, 2005). ISBN 0-670-03430-4.
  • John T. Kneebone et al., eds., Dictionary of Virginia Biography (Richmond: The Library of Virginia, 1998- ), 3:630-633. ISBN 0-88490-206-4.

  Results from FactBites:
 
George Washington Parke Custis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (347 words)
George Washington Parke Custis (April 30, 1781 – October 19, 1857), was the adopted son (and also step-grandson) of United States President George Washington.
While George Washington lived in Germantown, Custis was sent to Germantown Academy (then called the Union School of Germantown), from which he eventually graduated.
In 1799, Custis was commissioned as a colonel in the United States Army and aide-de-camp to General Charles Cotesworth Pinckney.
Arlington House - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1774 words)
After his father died, young Custis was raised by his grandmother and her second husband, George Washington at Mount Vernon.
Custis, a farsighted agricultural pioneer, painter, playwright, and orator, was interested in perpetuating the memory and principles of George Washington.
Custis wanted a fitting memorial to George Washington and a safe place to display his collection of George Washington's memorabilia, which he called his “Washington Treasures.” The facade of the house including both wings is 140 feet.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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