FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > George Washington Bridge
George Washington Bridge
George Washington Bridge
Carries 14 lanes (8 upper, 6 lower) of I-95/US 1/US 9/US 46, pedestrians and bicycles
Crosses Hudson River
Locale Fort Lee, New Jersey and Manhattan in New York City
Maintained by Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
Design Double-decked Suspension bridge
Longest span 1,066.80 meters (3,500 feet)
Total length 1,450.85 meters (4,760 feet)
Width 36.27 meters (119 feet)
Vertical clearance 14 feet (upper level), 13 feet 6 inches (lower level)
Clearance below 64.62 meters (212 ft) at mid-span
Opening date October 25, 1931 (upper level)
August 29, 1962 (lower level)
Toll cars $6.00 ($5 peak / $4 off-peak with E-ZPass) northbound only
For the bridge in New York that crosses the Harlem River, see Washington Bridge.

The George Washington Bridge (known informally as the GW Bridge, the GWB, the GW, or the George) is a toll suspension bridge spanning the Hudson River, connecting the Washington Heights neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City to Fort Lee in New Jersey by means of Interstate 95, U.S. Route 1/9. U.S. Route 46, which is entirely in New Jersey, ends halfway across the bridge at the state border. The GW is considered one of the world's busiest bridges in terms of vehicle traffic[1]; In 2004, the bridge carried 108,404,000 vehicles, with current AADT estimates of nearly 300,000 vehicles daily. This number is similar to that of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. The GW span is the fourth largest suspension bridge in the U.S as of 2006. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1667x2400, 2474 KB) George Washington Bridge, spanning the Hudson River between New York City and New Jersey. ... Interstate 95 (abbreviated I-95) is an Interstate highway that runs 1,927 miles (3,101 kilometers) north-south along the east coast of the United States. ... U.S. Route 1 (also called U.S. Highway 1, and abbreviated US 1) is a United States highway which parallels the east coast of the United States. ... U.S. Route 9 is a north-south United States highway in the states of Delaware, New Jersey, and New York in the United States. ... U.S. Route 46 is an east-west U.S. Highway, running 75. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, is a river running mainly through New York State but partly forming the boundary between the states of New York and New Jersey. ... Map highlighting Fort Lees location within Bergen County. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1613  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is a bi-state agency (operated pursuant to an interstate compact) that runs most of the regional transportation infrastructure including the bridges, tunnels, airports and seaports within the New York-New Jersey Port District. ... A suspension bridge is a type of bridge that has been made since ancient times as early as CE 100. ... October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... August 29 is the 241st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (242nd in leap years), with 124 days remaining. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Three of the bridges that cross the Harlem River are visible in this photo of the river: the High Bridge (closed to traffic) in the foreground; the Alexander Hamilton Bridge (part of Interstate 95); and the Washington Bridge furthest away. ... A suspension bridge is a type of bridge that has been made since ancient times as early as CE 100. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, is a river running mainly through New York State but partly forming the boundary between the states of New York and New Jersey. ... Nagle Avenue Washington Heights is a New York City neighborhood in the northern reaches of the borough of Manhattan. ... The Five Boroughs of New York City: 1: Manhattan 2: Brooklyn 3: Queens 4: Bronx 5: Staten Island In New York City, a borough is a unique form of government used to administer the five constituent counties that make up the city; it differs significantly from other borough forms of... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1613  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Map highlighting Fort Lees location within Bergen County. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... Interstate 95 (abbreviated I-95) is an Interstate highway that runs 1,927 miles (3,101 kilometers) north-south along the east coast of the United States. ... U.S. Route 1/9 is the concurrency of U.S. Route 1 and U.S. Route 9 from Woodbridge Township, New Jersey north to New York City, New York, United States. ... U.S. Route 46 is an east-west U.S. Highway, running 75. ... Following is a list of angels in Enochian. ... The San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge ( ; known locally as the Bay Bridge) is a toll bridge which spans San Francisco Bay and links the California cities of Oakland and San Francisco in the United States, as part of Interstate 80. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The bridge contains two levels, an upper level with four lanes in each direction and a lower level with three lanes in each direction, for a total of 14 lanes of travel. Additionally, the bridge houses two paths on either side of the bridge for pedestrian traffic. The speed limit on the bridge is 45 mph (70 km/h), though heavy traffic is common and frequently makes it difficult to reach such speeds.

Contents

History

DAR monument under GWB
DAR monument under GWB

Groundbreaking for the new bridge began in October 1927, a project of the Port of New York Authority. Its chief engineer was Othmar Ammann, with Cass Gilbert as architect. The bridge was dedicated on October 24, 1931, and opened to traffic the following day. Initially named the "Hudson River Bridge," the bridge is named in honor of George Washington, the first President of the United States. The Bridge is near the sites of Fort Washington (on the New York side) and Fort Lee (in New Jersey), which were fortified positions used by General Washington and his American forces in his unsuccessful attempt to deter the British occupation of New York City in 1776 during the American Revolutionary War. In 1910 the Washington Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution erected a stone monument to the Battle of Fort Washington. The monument is located about 100 yards northeast of the lighthouse, up the hill towards the eastern bridge anchorage. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x3456, 5333 KB) Summary Daughters of the American Revolution (D.A.R) monument to the Battle of Fort Washington, located under the approach deck of the George Washington Bridge, New York City, NY, USA. Erected in 1910. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x3456, 5333 KB) Summary Daughters of the American Revolution (D.A.R) monument to the Battle of Fort Washington, located under the approach deck of the George Washington Bridge, New York City, NY, USA. Erected in 1910. ... The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is a bi-state agency (operated pursuant to an interstate compact) that runs most of the regional transportation infrastructure including the bridges, tunnels, airports and seaports within the New York-New Jersey Port District. ... Othmar Ammann (March 26, 1879 - September 22, 1965) was a renowned civil engineer whose designs include: George Washington Bridge (opened October 24, 1931) Bayonne Bridge (opened November 15, 1931) Bronx-Whitestone Bridge (opened April 29, 1939) Throgs Neck Bridge (opened January 11, 1961) Verrazano Narrows Bridge (opened November 21... Woolworth Building (New York City), was the worlds tallest building at the time it was built, in 1909. ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and was later elected the first President of the United States. ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Fort Washington was a fortified position near the north end of Manhattan Island (now part of New York City) and was located at the highest point on the island. ... Combatants American Revolutionaries, France, Dutch Republic, Spain, American Indians Kingdom of Great Britain, German mercenaries, Loyalists, American Indians Commanders George Washington, Comte de Rochambeau, Nathanael Greene, Bernardo de Gálvez Sir William Howe, Sir Henry Clinton, Lord Cornwallis (more commanders) The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the... The Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) is a lineage membership organization[1] dedicated to promoting historic preservation, education, and patriotism. ... Combatants United States Britain Hessian Army Commanders George Washington Robert Magaw William Howe Wilhelm Knyphausen Strength 2,900 8,000 Casualties 53 killed, 96 wounded, & 2,818 captured 78 killed, 374 wounded Fort Washington was a fort located at the upermost tip of Manhattan, New York overlooking the Hudson River... The George Washington Bridge as seen from the Hudson River, July 2005. ...


When it opened, the bridge had the longest main span in the world; at 1,067 m (3,500 ft), it nearly doubled the previous record of 564 m (1,850 ft), which had been held by the Ambassador Bridge. (The record has since been exceeded numerous times.) The total length of the bridge is 1,451 m (4,760 ft). The Akashi-Kaikyo Bridge has the largest span of any bridge This list of the largest suspension bridges ranks the worlds suspension bridges by the length of main span (distance between the suspension towers). ... Ambassador Bridge from the Canadian side of the Detroit River The Ambassador Bridge is a privately-owned suspension bridge that connects Detroit, Michigan, in the United States, with Windsor, Ontario, in Canada. ... The Akashi-Kaikyo Bridge has the largest span of any bridge This list of the largest suspension bridges ranks the worlds suspension bridges by the length of main span (distance between the suspension towers). ...


As originally built, the bridge offered six lanes of traffic, but in 1946, two additional lanes were provided on what is now the upper level. A second, lower deck, which had been anticipated in Ammann's original plans, was added, opening to the public on August 29, 1962. This lower level was waggishly nicknamed "Martha" by some. The additional deck increased the capacity of the bridge by 75 percent, making the George Washington Bridge the world's only 14-lane suspension bridge, providing eight lanes on the upper level and six on the lower deck. It was also originally planned that the towers of the bridge would be encased in concrete and granite. However, due to cost considerations during the Great Depression and favorable aesthetic critiques of the bare steel towers, this was never done. The exposed steel towers, with their distinctive criss-crossed bracing, have become one of the bridge's most identifiable characteristics. August 29 is the 241st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (242nd in leap years), with 124 days remaining. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... The Great Depression was an economic downturn which started in 1929 and lasted through most of the 1930s. ...


Le Corbusier (Charles-Edouard Jeanneret) said of the unadorned steel structure, "The George Washington Bridge over the Hudson is the most beautiful bridge in the world. Made of cables and steel beams, it gleams in the sky like a reversed arch. It is blessed. It is the only seat of grace in the disordered city. It is painted an aluminum color and, between water and sky, you see nothing but the bent cord supported by two steel towers. When your car moves up the ramp the two towers rise so high that it brings you happiness; their structure is so pure, so resolute, so regular that here, finally, steel architecture seems to laugh. The car reaches an unexpectedly wide apron; the second tower is very far away; innumerable vertical cables, gleaming against the sky, are suspended from the magisterial curve which swings down and then up. The rose-colored towers of New York appear, a vision whose harshness is mitigated by distance." (When the Cathedrals were White", 1947.) Charles-Edouard Jeanneret, widely known as Le Corbusier (October 6, 1887– August 27, 1965), was a French Swiss born architect, famous for his contributions to what is now called modernism, or the International Style. ...


Following the September 11th attacks on New York and Washington, the Port Authority prohibited people from taking photography on the premises of the bridge due to the fear that terrorist groups might study any potential photographs in order to plot a terrorist attack on the bridge. As the enclosed lower level is more vulnerable to hazardous material (HAZMAT) incidents than the upper level and most HAZMATs have been prohibited there even before the September 11th attacks, all trucks have also been banned from the lower after the September 11th attacks due to the fear that concealed HAZMATs could cause major incidents. The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... A hazardous material (HAZMAT) is any solid, liquid, or gas that can cause harm to humans, other living organisms, or the environment due to being radioactive, flammable, explosive, toxic, corrosive, a biohazard, an oxidizer, an asphyxiant, or capable of causing severe allergic reactions. ...


The George Washington Bridge is home to the world's largest free-flying American flag. The flag, located under the upper arch of the New Jersey tower, drapes vertically for 90 feet (27 m). The flag's stripes are about 5 feet (1.5 m) wide and the stars measure about 4 feet (1.2 m) in diameter. Weather permitting, the flag is flown on the following eight holidays: Martin Luther King Day, President's Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, and Veterans Day. National flag and ensign. ... The Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. ... Presidents Day is the common name for the United States federal holiday officially designated as Washingtons Birthday. ... Relatives and others traditionally place flags near veterans headstones on Memorial Day Memorial Day is a United States federal holiday that is observed on the last Monday of May (most recently observed May 29, 2006). ... In the United States, Flag Day (more formally, National Flag Day), is celebrated on June 14. ... In the United States, Independence Day (commonly known as the Fourth of July or simply the Fourth) is a federal holiday celebrating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on 4 July 1776, declaring independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... Labor Day is a United States federal holiday that takes place on the first Monday of September. ... Columbus Day is a holiday celebrated in many countries in the Americas, commemorating the date of Christopher Columbuss arrival in the New World on October 12, 1492. ... President Eisenhower signs HR7786, officially changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day. ...


Road connections

George Washington Bridge, Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) collections.
George Washington Bridge, Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) collections.

The George Washington Bridge carries I-95, US-1, and US-9 between New Jersey and New York. US-46 terminates at the state border in the middle of the bridge. I-80 and NJ-4 also feed into the bridge but end before reaching it. On the New Jersey side of the Bridge, the Palisades Interstate Parkway connects directly to the bridge's upper level, there were plans to give direct access to the lower level from the parkway but the plan has been postponed. The GW Bridge also connects to the New Jersey Turnpike. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2400x1694, 1726 KB) Summary George Washington Bridge, spanning the Hudson River between New York City and New Jersey. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2400x1694, 1726 KB) Summary George Washington Bridge, spanning the Hudson River between New York City and New Jersey. ... The Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) is an office of the National Park Service. ... Interstate 95 (abbreviated I-95) is an Interstate highway that runs 1,927 miles (3,101 kilometers) north-south along the east coast of the United States. ... U.S. Route 1 (also called U.S. Highway 1, and abbreviated US 1) is a United States highway which parallels the east coast of the United States. ... U.S. Route 9 is a north-south United States highway in the states of Delaware, New Jersey, and New York in the United States. ... U.S. Route 46 is an east-west U.S. Highway, running 75. ... Interstate 80 (abbreviated I-80) is the second-longest Interstate Highway in the United States. ... Route 4 is a state highway in New Jersey, United States. ... The Palisades Interstate Parkway, officially known (but not signed) as New Jersey State Highway 445 and New York State Reference Route 987C is a four-lane, 42 mile (68 kilometre) long, wooded highway, generally built to freeway standards, extending from Fort Lee, New Jersey (at the George Washington Bridge, which... The New Jersey Turnpike (sometimes called The Jersey Turnpike) is a toll road in New Jersey and is one of the most heavily traveled highways in the United States. ...


On the New York side, the twelve-lane Trans-Manhattan Expressway heads east across the narrow neck of upper Manhattan, from the bridge to the Harlem River, providing access from both decks to 178th Street, the Henry Hudson Parkway and Riverside Drive on the West Side of Manhattan, and to Amsterdam Avenue and the Harlem River Drive on the East Side. The Expressway connects directly with the Alexander Hamilton Bridge, which spans the Harlem River as part of the Cross-Bronx Expressway (I-95), providing access to the Major Deegan Expressway (I-87). Heading towards New Jersey, local access to the Bridge is available from 179th Street. There are also ramps connecting the bridge to the George Washington Bridge Bus Terminal, a commuter bus terminal with direct access to the New York City Subway at the 175th Street (A) station on the IND Eighth Avenue Line. The Trans-Manhattan Expressway is a highway in New York City. ... The Harlem River, shown in red, between the Bronx and Manhattan in New York City The Harlem River is a tidal strait in New York City, USA that flows 8 miles (13 km) between the East River and the Hudson River, separating the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx. ... The Henry Hudson Parkway is a New York City parkway that stretches from West 72nd Street in Manhattan to the Bronx-Westchester County boundary, where it meets the Saw Mill River Parkway. ... Riverside Drive is a scenic north-south thoroughfare in New York City. ... View of Amsterdam Avenue looking south from the Columbia University overpass between West 116th and 117th Streets View north from the overpass Tenth Avenue / Amsterdam Avenue is a north-south thoroughfare on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City. ... The Harlem River Drive is a major freeway-standard parkway on the east side of the New York City borough of Manhattan. ... Three of the bridges that cross the Harlem River are visible in this photo of the river: the High Bridge (closed to traffic) in the foreground; the Alexander Hamilton Bridge (part of Interstate 95); and the Washington Bridge furthest away. ... The Cross-Bronx Expressway is an expressway in New York City. ... Interstate 87 is a 346 mile (558 km) intrastate interstate highway located entirely within the state of New York. ... Interstate 87 (abbreviated I-87) is a 346 mile (558 km) intrastate interstate highway located entirely within the state of New York. ... The George Washington Bridge Bus Station is a commuter bus terminal located at the Manhattan end of the George Washington Bridge in Washington Heights. ... The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system operated by the New York City Transit Authority, an affiliate of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority as MTA New York City Transit. ... 175th Street–George Washington Bridge Bus Terminal (usually shortened to simply 175th Street) is a station on the IND Eighth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway; it is served at all times by the A train. ... The A Eighth Avenue Express and C Eighth Avenue Local are two services of the New York City Subway. ... A 1941 view of a sign for the Eighth Avenue Subway The Eighth Avenue Line is the original rapid transit line of the Independent Subway System (IND), now run by the New York City Transit Authority as part of the New York City Subway system. ...


Tolls

Current tolls for cars are $6, $5 with E-ZPass (peak hours) and $4 off-peak. A special discounted carpool toll ($1) is available for cars with three or more passengers, at all times, with E-ZPass, who proceed through a staffed toll lane (provided they have previously opted-in to the free "Carpool Plan"). Current tolls for motorcycles are $5, $4 peak hours with E-ZPass, $3 off-peak. Trucks are charged $6 per axle, with significantly discounted off-peak and overnight tolls.[2] The toll is only charged one way (into New York), which is how all Hudson River crossings from the Tappan Zee Bridge south are tolled. Foot traffic and cyclists cross for free on sidewalks, one on each side of the upper deck, offering spectacular views of the Hudson River, the Manhattan skyline and the New Jersey Palisades. Pedestrians had to pay tolls of 10 cents shortly after the bridge opened, but non-motorized traffic is no longer tolled. The George Washington Bridge takes in approximately $1 million per day in tolls. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Tappan Zee Bridge is a cantilever bridge in New York over the Hudson River at its widest point, the Tappan Zee. ... Palisades is also a general term for steep cliffs next to a river. ...


In January 2007 the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey announced an arrangement with Geico, the auto insurance giant, that included the posting of a large billboard on top of the toll plaza that said "Geico Drive Safely," and Geico signs on the tollbooths and approach roads. The arrangement would have provide the agency with $3.2 million over two years.[3] A week later, however, the Port Authority cancelled the contract with Geico after criticism that the signs would marr the landmarked bridge and that the Port Authority had failed to negotiated a good price for the deal.[4]


Non-motorized access

The George Washington Bridge during reconstruction on May 22, 2005.
The George Washington Bridge during reconstruction on May 22, 2005.

The George Washington Bridge is also popular among sightseers and commuters traveling by foot, bicycle, or roller skates. Normally the North sidewalk is for pedestrians only, and the South sidewalk (accessible by a long, steep ramp on the Manhattan side of the bridge) is shared by bicyclists and pedestrians. The South sidewalk, while requiring a climb / descent of the ramp on the New York side, offers the easiest access for bicyclists, with a level surface from end to end. The North sidewalk requires stairway climbs and descents on both sides, always an inconvenience and obstables to handicapped people, and a greater risk in poor weather conditions. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 801 KB)The George Wshington Bridge during some cosmetic work on May 22, 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 801 KB)The George Wshington Bridge during some cosmetic work on May 22, 2005. ...


From September 12, 2005 through September 2006, bicycle and pedestrian access to the George Washington Bridge is being affected by Port Authority construction (tower painting including lead removal). Until June 18, 2006, the North sidewalk was closed for construction and the South sidewalk was open from 6:00 AM to midnight for both pedestrians and bicyclists. From June 19, 2006 to October 13, 2006 at approximately 3 p.m, the North sidewalk was open from 6:00 AM to midnight and the South sidewalk was closed at all times. From October 13, 2006 at approximately 3 p.m, the South sidewalk is open from 6:00 AM to midnight and the North sidewalk is closed at all times. The Port Authority explains that periodically closing either sidewalk is to remove contractor's equipment.[5]. September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (170th in leap years), with 196 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Transportation Alternatives, a New York City advocacy group, has proposed an enhanced River Road connector in Fort Lee, which would create safer pedestrian and bicycle access to the George Washington Bridge on the New Jersey side of the bridge.[6] The Green Transportation Hierarchy Transportation Alternatives is a non-profit NGO based out of New York City. ...


The GW in popular culture

The New York side of the George Washington Bridge as seen from the Hudson River, July 2005. The tarp on the tower is from restoration that was taking place at the time. Note the "Little Red Lighthouse."
The New York side of the George Washington Bridge as seen from the Hudson River, July 2005. The tarp on the tower is from restoration that was taking place at the time. Note the "Little Red Lighthouse."
  • The GWB's first movie appearance was in Ball of Fire (1941), and it subsequently appeared in How to Marry a Millionaire, The In-Laws, Desperately Seeking Susan and Manhattan Murder Mystery. The bridge features prominently in the 1997 movie Cop Land, its lower deck serving as a site for an important early scene and the entire bridge acting as a symbolic barrier between Manhattan and the small towns across the river in New Jersey.
  • Harry Belafonte encounters the bridge choked with abandoned cars in The World, the Flesh and the Devil.
  • The bridge's construction is featured in the 1942 children's book The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge by Hildegarde Swift and illustrated by Lynd Ward (ISBN 0-15-204571-6). In the book, a small lighthouse on the Manhattan shore fears it will be overshadowed and rendered useless by the bridge's tall towers and bright lights -- but is reassured that the bridge's lights are for airplanes, not ships. The lighthouse is currently owned by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation.
  • An episode of I Love Lucy concludes with the show's four main cast members beginning a motor trip from New York City to Hollywood, while driving across the George Washington Bridge and singing California, Here I Come.
  • In the film Network, William Holden's character twice tells the story of how, as a young reporter, he was awakened early in the morning to report on an accident on the bridge. His news crew is waiting for him on the bridge. So he hails a cab outside his apartment, and tells the driver, "Take me to the middle of the George Washington Bridge!" And the driver tells him, "Don't do it, buddy! You're young! You've got your whole life ahead of you!"
  • In The Amazing Spider-Man comic books (issue #121), Spider-Man's girlfriend, Gwen Stacy, is kidnapped and held at a bridge by the Green Goblin. The artwork depicts the Brooklyn Bridge, but the editor mistakenly labeled it as the George Washington Bridge. In addition to that, in Spider-Man: The Animated Series Mary Jane is thrown off the George Washington Bridge by the Green Goblin.
  • The bridge also appeared in X-Men as the team approaches the Statue of Liberty.
  • American composer William Schuman wrote The George Washington Bridge for concert band in 1950.
  • The GWB appears in Stephen King's Dark Tower books, both in New York and the city of Lud.
  • In 2005, a drug bust occurred after a truck driver made the mistake of using the lower deck (which disallows trucks), causing him to be stopped by police, who then found the marijuana that the truck was carrying.
  • In Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen, the main character and her family drive across the bridge as they relocate from Manhattan to New Jersey.
  • On The Cosby Show, Cliff anticipates his daughter Sondra's moving out of the house, and says to help her leave, he would, "CRAWL across the George Washington Bridge..."
  • Babylon Rising: The Europa Conspiracy, By Tim Lahaye includes a fictional plot to detonate a dirty bomb over the George Washington Bridge.
  • A portion of one of the greatest car-chase scenes on film, "The Seven Ups", takes place on the GWB. Also shown is the bus terminal that is part of bridge complex.
  • The bridge is mentioned in the song "The Cause of Death" by Immortal Technique, who claims that on 9/11 there was a news report of four non-Arabs who planted bombs on the bridge. However, the news report went unnoticed and seems only to be a conspiracy theory now.[7]
  • At the beginning of the video game Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty the main character jumps off the George Washington Bridge in order to infiltrate the cargo ship that is passing underneath.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2016x1512, 909 KB) The George Washington Bridge, as viewed from the Hudson River, July 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2016x1512, 909 KB) The George Washington Bridge, as viewed from the Hudson River, July 2005. ... The George Washington Bridge as seen from the Hudson River, July 2005. ... Ball of Fire (also known as The Professor and the Burlesque Queen) is a 1941 comedy film which tells the story of a group of encyclopedists interested in documenting slang who protect a nightclub singer on the lam for testifying against her mobster boyfriend. ... How to Marry a Millionaire is a 1953 film, directed by Jean Negulesco and starring Lauren Bacall, Marilyn Monroe, and Betty Grable. ... The In-Laws is a 1979 comedy film starring Alan Arkin and Peter Falk. ... Desperately Seeking Susan is a 1985 film directed by Susan Seidelman and starring Rosanna Arquette and Madonna. ... Manhattan Murder Mystery is a 1993 film directed by and starring Woody Allen who plays book editor Larry Lipton. ... Cop Land (1997) is an American dramatic film, written and directed by James Mangold, with an all-star cast, including Sylvester Stallone, Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, and Harvey Keitel. ... Harold George Belafonte, Jr. ... The World, The Flesh and the Devil is a 1959 science fiction film written and directed by Ranald MacDougall. ... The George Washington Bridge as seen from the Hudson River, July 2005. ... The George Washington Bridge as seen from the Hudson River, July 2005. ... The New York City Department of Parks and Recreation is the branch of government of the City of New York responsible for maintaining the citys parks system, preserving and maintaining the ecological diversity of the citys natural areas, and furnishing recreational opportunities for citys residents. ... I Love Lucy, a CBS television sitcom that aired in the 1950s, was the most popular American sitcom of its generation and is still considered by viewers and experts alike to be one of the greatest television series of all time. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1613  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... California, Here I Come was written in 1924 by Bud De Sylva and Joseph Meyer. ... Network is a 1976 satirical film about a fictional television network named Union Broadcasting System (UBS) and its struggle with poor TV ratings. ... William Holden (April 17, 1918 – ca. ... Cover to The Amazing Spider-Man #530. ... Cover of graphic novel The Death of Gwen Stacy The Night Gwen Stacy Died is a famous story arc starring the Marvel Comics character Spider-Man, published in 1973. ... Gwendolyne Gwen Stacy[1] was a supporting character in Marvel Comics’ Spider-Man series. ... The Green Goblin is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe, a supervillain considered one of Spider-Man’s greatest foes. ... For other uses, see Brooklyn Bridge (disambiguation). ... X-Men is a 2000 American action movie, featuring a group of comic book superheroes called the X-Men. ... Liberty Enlightening the World, commonly known as the Statue of Liberty, is a statue, given to the USA by France in the late 19th century, that stands at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor as a welcome to all: returning Americans, visitors, and immigrants alike. ... William Schuman William Howard Schuman (August 4, 1910–February 15, 1992) was an American composer and music administrator. ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... The Dark Tower painting by Michael Whelan The Dark Tower is a series of seven books by American writer Stephen King that tells the tale of lead character Roland Deschains quest for the Dark Tower. ... Lud is a fictional city in Stephen Kings Dark Tower series. ... A Cannabis sativa plant The drug cannabis, also called marijuana, is produced from parts of the cannabis plant, primarily the cured flowers and gathered trichomes of the female plant. ... A panel from Tim LaHaye’s multi-million selling ‘’Left Behind’’ series, depicting the fate LaHaye anticipates for those who do not follow Jesus Christ. ... Felipe Coronel (born February 19, 1978), better known as Immortal Technique, is a hip hop MC and political activist. ... The date that commonly refers to the attacks on United States citizens on September 11, 2001 (see the September 11, 2001 Attacks). ... Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty (commonly abbreviated MGS2) is a stealth-based game that was developed and published by Konami for the PlayStation 2 in 2001. ...

References

  1. ^ George Washington Bridge turns 75 years old: Huge flag, cake part of celebration, Times Herald-Record, October 24, 2006. "The party, however, will be small in comparison to the one that the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey organized for 5,000 people to open the bridge to traffic in 1931. And it won't even be on what is now the world's busiest bridge for fear of snarling traffic."
  2. ^ Port Authority Toll Rates (reprint 2002), accessed October 22, 2006
  3. ^ The New York Times. "With Ad Deal, Insurer Wades Into Bridge Traffic." January 4, 2006.[1]
  4. ^ The New York Times. "Agency Cancels Insurer’s Ads for George Washington Bridge." January 9, 2006.[2]
  5. ^ George Washington Bridge: Pedestrians and Bicyclists Latest update, accessed October 22, 2006
  6. ^ Support Grows in NJ for GW Bridge to "River Road" Connector Path, Transportation Alternatives Magazine, Summer 2003
  7. ^ Lueck, Thomas J.. "Bomb Scare On Bridge", New York Times, 21 August 2002. Retrieved on 2006-09-23.

The Times Herald Record, often referred to as just The Record in its coverage area, is a daily newspaper published in Middletown, New York. ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 70 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 70 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The Green Transportation Hierarchy Transportation Alternatives is a non-profit NGO based out of New York City. ... August 21 is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 23 is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years). ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

External links

Bridges and tunnels in New York City
This box: view  talk  edit
Bridges

Bayonne Bridge | Brooklyn Bridge | Bronx Whitestone Bridge | City Island Bridge | Cross Bay Veterans Memorial Bridge | George Washington Bridge | Goethals Bridge | Hell Gate Bridge | Henry Hudson Bridge | Joseph P. Addabbo Memorial Bridge | Kosciuszko Bridge | Madison Avenue Bridge | Manhattan Bridge | Marine Parkway-Gil Hodges Memorial Bridge | Outerbridge Crossing | Pelham Bridge | Pulaski Bridge | Queensboro (59th Street) Bridge | Third Avenue Bridge | Throgs Neck Bridge | Triborough Bridge | Verrazano-Narrows Bridge | Williamsburg Bridge Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 2503 KB) Other versions Originally from en. ... // Bridges by water body East River From north to south: Throgs Neck Bridge Bronx-Whitestone Bridge Rikers Island Bridge (only connects Rikers Island to Queens) Hell Gate Bridge Triborough Bridge Roosevelt Island Bridge (east channel only) Queensboro Bridge Williamsburg Bridge Manhattan Bridge Brooklyn Bridge Hudson River George Washington Bridge (I... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1613  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... The Bayonne Bridge, as seen from Port Richmond, Staten Island The Bayonne Bridge is the third longest steel arch bridge in the world. ... For other uses, see Brooklyn Bridge (disambiguation). ... Bronx Whitestone Bridge © 2004 Metropolitan Transportation Authority Aerial view of the Bronx Whitestone Bridge Ground view of its sister bridge, the Throgs Neck Bridge, from Queens © 2006 Michael Roach The Bronx Whitestone Bridge, colloquially referred to as the Whitestone Bridge, is a suspension bridge that crosses the East River and... The City Island Bridge is a fixed bridge in the Bronx, New York City, connecting City Island and the mainland. ... The Cross Bay Veterans Memorial Bridge (originally Cross Bay Bridge) wholly in New York City, is a toll bridge that crosses Beach Channel in Jamaica Bay to Rockaway Peninsula, and is located in Queens. ... The Goethals Bridge, seen from Staten Island The Goethals Bridge (pronounced GAWTH-uhls) connects Elizabeth, New Jersey to Staten Island, New York over the Arthur Kill. ... The Hell Gate Bridge (originally the New York Connecting Railroad Bridge) is a 1,017-foot (310 m) steel arch railroad bridge between Astoria in the borough of Queens and Randalls and Wards Islands (which are now joined into one island and are politically part of Manhattan) in New York... The Henry Hudson Bridge is a steel arch toll bridge in New York City across the Harlem River, a tidal estuary. ... The Joseph P. Addabbo Memorial Bridge located in the New York City borough of Queens, is a bridge that runs south from Howard Beach, crosses the Grassy Bay portion of Jamaica Bay to Broad Channel. ... The Kosciuszko Bridge is a truss bridge that spans Newtown Creek between Brooklyn and Queens. ... The Madison Avenue Bridge crosses the Harlem River from Manhattan to the Bronx. ... The Manhattan Bridge is a suspension bridge that crosses the East River in New York City, connecting Lower Manhattan with Brooklyn. ... The Marine Parkway-Gil Hodges Memorial Bridge in New York City (originally Marine Parkway Bridge) is a toll bridge that crosses Rockaway Inlet and connects Rockaway Peninsula, in Queens, with Brooklyn. ... The Outerbridge Crossing, seen from Tottenville, Staten Island. ... Pelham Bridge is a Bascule bridge located in The Bronx. ... The Pulaski Bridge in New York City connects Long Island City in Queens to Greenpoint in Brooklyn over Newtown Creek. ... For the bridge in New Westminster, British Columbia, see Queensborough Bridge. ... The Third Avenue Bridge carries southbound road traffic over the Harlem River from Manhattan to the Bronx. ... Aerial view of the Throgs Neck Bridge The Throgs Neck Bridge is a suspension bridge opened on January 11, 1961 that carries Interstate 295 and connects the Throgs Neck section of the Bronx with the Bayside section of Queens. ... The Triborough Bridge is a complex of three bridges connecting the New York City boroughs of the Bronx, Manhattan, and Queens, using what were two islands, Wards Island and Randalls Island as intermediate rights-of-way between the water crossings. ... Verrazano Bridge redirects here, for the bridge to Assateague Island, see Verrazano Bridge (Maryland) The Verrazano-Narrows Bridge is a double-decked suspension bridge that connects the boroughs of Staten Island and Brooklyn in New York City at the Narrows, the reach connecting the relatively protected upper bay with the... The Williamsburg Bridge is a suspension bridge in New York City across the East River connecting Manhattan at Delancey St. ...

Tunnels

Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel | Holland Tunnel | Lincoln Tunnel | Queens Midtown Tunnel The Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel is a toll road in New York City which crosses under the East River at its mouth and connects the Boroughs of Brooklyn and Manhattan, nearly passing under, but providing no access to Governors Island. ... Clifford Milburn Holland, 1919 Traveling through the Holland Tunnel, from Manhattan to New Jersey. ... The Lincoln Tunnel is a 1. ... The Queens Midtown Tunnel is a toll road in New York City. ...

Operators

Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority | Metropolitan Transportation Authority | Port Authority of New York and New Jersey | New York City Department of Transportation | New York State Department of Transportation | Amtrak The Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority, described to the public by the popular name MTA Bridges and Tunnels, or MTA B&T, is an affiliate agency of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, a public benefit corporation, that operates all intrastate toll bridges in New York City. ... The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) is a public benefit corporation responsible for public transportation in the State of New York. ... The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is a bi-state agency (operated pursuant to an interstate compact) that runs most of the regional transportation infrastructure including the bridges, tunnels, airports and seaports within the New York-New Jersey Port District. ... The New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT or DOT) is responsible for the management of much of New York Citys transportation infrastructure. ... The New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) is reponsible for the development and operation of highways, railroads, mass transit systems, ports, waterways and aviation facilities in the U.S. state of New York. ... Acela Express in West Windsor, NJ Amtrak Cascades service with tilting Talgo trainsets in Seattle, Washington Amtrak train in downtown Orlando, Florida For other uses, see Amtrak (disambiguation). ...

Preceded by
Ambassador Bridge
Largest Suspension Bridge
1931 - 1937
Succeeded by
Golden Gate Bridge
Crossings of the Hudson River
Upstream
Tappan Zee Bridge
George Washington Bridge
Downstream
Lincoln Tunnel

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey - Bridges (946 words)
The two-level George Washington Bridge (GWB) crosses the Hudson River between upper Manhattan (West 178th Street) and Fort Lee, New Jersey and forms part of Interstate Highway I-95.
The twelve-lane Trans-Manhattan Expressway, extending eastward from the bridge to the Harlem River between 178th and 179th Streets, connects both levels of the bridge with Amsterdam Avenue, the Harlem River Drive and the 181st Street Bridge over the Harlem River.
The north sidewalk entrance is located two blocks west of the George Washington Bridge Bus Station, across from the corner of W 179th Street and Cabrini Boulevard.
George Washington Bridge at AllExperts (2039 words)
The George Washington Bridge (known informally as the GW Bridge, the GWB, or the GW) is a toll suspension bridge spanning the Hudson River, connecting the Washington Heights neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City to Fort Lee in New Jersey by means of Interstate 95, U.S. Route 1, U.S. Route 9.
The Bridge is near the sites of Fort Washington (on the New York side) and Fort Lee (in New Jersey), which were fortified positions used by General Washington and his American forces in his unsuccessful attempt to deter the British occupation of New York City in 1776 during the American Revolutionary War.
In 1910 the Washington Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution erected a stone monument to the Battle of Fort Washington.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m