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Encyclopedia > George Wallace
George C. Wallace, Jr.
George Wallace

In office
January 14, 1963 – January 16, 1967
Lieutenant James B. Allen
Preceded by John Malcolm Patterson
Succeeded by Lurleen Wallace
In office
January 18, 1971 – January 15, 1979
Lieutenant Bill Baxley
Preceded by Albert Brewer
Succeeded by Fob James
In office
January 17, 1983 – January 19, 1987
Preceded by Fob James
Succeeded by H. Guy Hunt

Election date
November 5, 1968
Running mate Curtis LeMay
Opponent(s) Richard Nixon (R)
Hubert Humphrey (D)
Incumbent Lyndon B. Johnson (D)
Preceded by New party
Succeeded by John G. Schmitz

Born April 25, 1919(1919-04-25)
Clio, Alabama
Died September 13, 1998 (aged 79)
Montgomery, Alabama
Political party Democratic
American Independent Party (1968)
Spouse Lurleen Wallace (deceased)
Cornelia Ellis Snively (divorced)
Lisa Taylor (divorced)
Profession Lawyer
Religion Born-again Christian

George Corley Wallace Jr. (August 25, 1919September 13, 1998), was a United States politician who was elected Governor of Alabama as a Democrat for four terms (1963-1967, 1971-1979 and 1983-1987) and ran for U.S. President four times, running as a Democrat in 1964, 1972, and 1976, and as the American Independent Party candidate in 1968. He is best known for his pro-segregation attitudes and as a symbol of bigotry during the American desegregation period, which he modified after the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act by arguing that it was better that he be governor while the schools were being desegregated than for someone else to be in authority. George Wallace may refer to: George Wallace (1919-1998), Governor of Alabama, and a candidate for President of the United States George Wallace, Jr. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The following is a list of the territorial and state governors of Alabama. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... There have been several noteworthy people named James Allen. ... John Malcolm Patterson (born September 27, 1921) is an American politician who was the forty-ninth Governor of Alabama, from 1959 to 1963. ... Lurleen Burns Wallace (September 19, 1926 – May 7, 1968), born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, was the Governor of Alabama from 1967 until her death and first wife of Alabama Governor George Wallace. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... William Joseph Baxley II (born June 27, 1941) is an American Democratic politician and attorney. ... Albert Preston Brewer (born October 26, American politician who was the Governor of Alabama from May, 1968 until January, 1971. ... Forrest Hood Fob James, Jr. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... Forrest Hood Fob James, Jr. ... Harold Guy Hunt (born June 17, 1933 in Holly Pond, Alabama) is an American politician who served two terms as the Governor of Alabama from 1987 to 1993. ... The American Independent Party is a California political party. ... The United States presidential election of 1968 was a wrenching national experience, and included the assassination of Democratic candidate Robert F. Kennedy, the violence at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, and widespread demonstrations against the Vietnam War across American university and college campuses. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Curtis Emerson LeMay (November 15, 1906–October 3, 1990) was a general in the United States Air Force and the vice presidential running mate of independent candidate George C. Wallace in 1968. ... Nixon redirects here. ... GOP redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... LBJ redirects here. ... John George Schmitz (August 12, 1930–January 10, 2001) was an ultraconservative Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Orange County, California, prominent member of the John Birch Society, and the American Independent Party candidate for President of the United States in 1972. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Clio is a town in Barbour County, Alabama, United States. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Coordinates: , Country State County Montgomery Incorporated December 3, 1819 Government  - Mayor Bobby Bright Area  - City  156. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... The American Independent Party is a California political party. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lurleen Burns Wallace (September 19, 1926 – May 7, 1968), born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, was the Governor of Alabama from 1967 until her death and first wife of Alabama Governor George Wallace. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Born again is a term used originally and mainly in Christianity, where it is associated with salvation, conversion and spiritual rebirth. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The following is a list of the territorial and state governors of Alabama. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The American Independent Party is a California political party. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Racial segregation characterised by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home. ... For people named Bigot and other meanings, see Bigot (disambiguation). ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity... (Redirected from 1964 Civil Rights Act) President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964. ...

Contents

Early life

Wallace was born in Clio in Barbour County in southeastern Alabama to George Corley Wallace and Mozell Smith. He became a regionally successful boxer in his high school days, then went directly to law school at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa in 1937.[1] After receiving a law degree in 1942, he enlisted in the US Army Air Corps, flying combat missions over Japan during World War II. Wallace attained the rank of staff sergeant in the 58th Bomb Wing of the 20th Air Force Division. He served under General Curtis LeMay, who would be his running mate in the 1968 presidential race. While in the service, Wallace nearly died of spinal meningitis, but prompt medical attention saved him. He was left with partial hearing loss and nerve damage, and was medically discharged with a disability pension. Clio is a town in Barbour County, Alabama, United States. ... Barbour County, Alabama is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship school of the University of Alabama System. ... Tuscaloosa is a city in west central Alabama in the southern United States. ... The United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was the aviation component of the United States Army primarily during World War II. The title of Army Air Forces succeeded the prior name of Army Air Corps in June 1941 during preparation for expected combat in what came to be known as... “Fights” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... United States Military Staff Sergeant insignia (U.S. Air Force) Staff Sergeant is the fifth enlisted rank in the U.S. Air Force, just above Senior Airman and below Technical Sergeant. ... Twentieth Air Force is one of numbered air forces that comprise the United States Air Force. ... Curtis Emerson LeMay (November 15, 1906–October 3, 1990) was a general in the United States Air Force and the vice presidential running mate of independent candidate George C. Wallace in 1968. ... The United States presidential election of 1968 was a wrenching national experience, and included the assassination of Democratic candidate Robert F. Kennedy, the violence at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, and widespread demonstrations against the Vietnam War across American university and college campuses. ... Meningitis is inflammation of the membranes (meninges) covering the brain and the spinal cord. ... Hearing impairment or deafness is decreased or absent ability to perceive auditory information. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Axonotmesis. ...


Entry into politics

In 1938, at age nineteen, Wallace contributed to his grandfather's successful campaign for probate judge. Late in 1945, he was appointed Assistant Attorney General of Alabama, and during May 1946, he won his first election as a member to the Alabama House of Representatives. At the time, he was considered a moderate on racial issues. As a delegate to the 1948 Democratic National Convention, he did not join the Southern walkout at the convention, despite his opposition to President Harry S. Truman's proposed civil rights program, which he considered an infringement on states' rights. The dissenting Democrats, known as Dixiecrats, supported then-Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina for the presidency. In his 1963 inauguration as governor, Wallace excused this action on political grounds. In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Alabama Legislature met at the Alabama State Capitol between 1851 to 1985. ... The 1948 Democratic National Convention was held in Philadelphia from July 12 to July 14, and resulted in the nomination of President Harry Truman for President and of Alben Barkley for Vice President. ... The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... States rights refers to the idea, in U.S. politics and constitutional law, that U.S. states possess certain rights and political powers in relation to the federal government. ... The States Rights Democratic Party, usually known as the Dixiecrat Party, was a short-lived splinter group that broke from the Democratic Party in 1948. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83...


In 1953, he was elected judge in the Third Judicial Circuit Court. Here he became known as "the little fightin' judge," a reference to his boxing days.[citation needed] Circuit courts previously were United States federal courts established in each federal judicial district. ...


Failed run for governor

He was defeated by John Patterson in Alabama's Democratic gubernatorial primary election in 1958, which at the time was the decisive election, the general election still almost always being a mere formality. This was a political crossroads for Wallace. Patterson ran with the support of the Ku Klux Klan, an organization Wallace had spoken against, while Wallace was endorsed by the NAACP.[2] After the election, aide Seymore Trammell recalled Wallace saying, "Seymore, you know why I lost that governor's race?... I was outniggered by John Patterson. And I'll tell you here and now, I will never be outniggered again."[2][3] In the wake of his defeat, Wallace adopted hard-line segregationism, and used this stand to court the white vote in the next gubernatorial election. John Malcolm Patterson (born September 27, 1921) is an American politician who was the forty-ninth Governor of Alabama, from 1959 to 1963. ... For other uses, see Primary. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is one of the oldest and most influential hate organizations in the United States. ... Racial segregation is a kind of formalized or institutionalized discrimination on the basis of race, characterized by the races separation from each other. ...


Governor of Alabama

From left to right: Governor Wallace, NASA Administrator James E. Webb and scientist Wernher von Braun at the Marshall Space Flight Center.
Wallace standing against desegregation while being confronted by Deputy U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach at the University of Alabama in 1963.
Wallace standing against desegregation while being confronted by Deputy U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach at the University of Alabama in 1963.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... James E. Webb James Edwin Webb (October 7, 1906–March 27, 1992) was the second administrator of NASA, serving from February 14, 1961 to October 7, 1968. ... For other uses of von Braun, see von Braun (disambiguation). ... Aerial view of the test area at Marshall Space Flight Center The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is a lead NASA center for propulsion, Space Shuttle propulsion, external fuel tank, crew training and payloads, International Space Station (ISS) design and construction, for computers, networks, and information management. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (4239x3337, 929 KB) Information from LOC TITLE: [Governor George Wallace attempting to block integration at the University of Alabama] CALL NUMBER: USN&WR COLL - Job no. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (4239x3337, 929 KB) Information from LOC TITLE: [Governor George Wallace attempting to block integration at the University of Alabama] CALL NUMBER: USN&WR COLL - Job no. ... Nicholas deBelleville Katzenbach (born January 17, 1922) was a American lawyer and United States Attorney General. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship school of the University of Alabama System. ...

Segregation

He was elected governor in a landslide victory in 1962. He took the oath of office standing on the gold star where, 102 years prior, Jefferson Davis was sworn in as President of the Confederate States of America. In his inaugural speech, he used the line for which he is best known: It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with President of the United States oath of office. ... For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... An inauguration is a ceremony of formal investiture whereby an individual assumes an office or position of authority or power. ...

In the name of the greatest people that have ever trod this earth, I draw the line in the dust and toss the gauntlet before the feet of tyranny, and I say segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever.[4][5]

The lines were written by Wallace's new speechwriter, Asa Carter, a Klansman and longtime anti-Semite. Asa Earl Carter (September 4, 1925 ? June 7, 1979) was a speechwriter to Governor George Wallace of Alabama; and, under the pseudonym Forrest Carter, an American novelist. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


To stop desegregation by the enrollment of black students Vivian Malone and James Hood, he stood in front of Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama on June 11, 1963 . This became known as the "Stand in the Schoolhouse Door." After being confronted by federal marshals, Deputy Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach, and the Alabama National Guard, he stood aside. Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity... Vivian Malone became the first African-American to graduate from the University of Alabama. ... James Hood was one of the first two African Americans to enroll at the University of Alabama in 1963 and was made famous when Alabama Governor George Wallace tried to block them from entering, triggering a showdown with federal troops. ... Foster Auditorium is a multi-purpose facility at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship school of the University of Alabama System. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... “U.S. Marshals” redirects here. ... Nicholas deBelleville Katzenbach (born January 17, 1922) was a American lawyer and United States Attorney General. ... The United States National Guard is a reserve forces component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ...


Wallace again attempted to stop four black students from enrolling in four separate elementary schools in Huntsville in September 1963. After intervention by a federal court in Birmingham, the four children were allowed to enter on September 9, becoming the first to integrate a primary or secondary school in Alabama.[6][7] Huntsville, Alabama (top center), near the Tennessee border, is north of Birmingham and northeast of Decatur, across the Tennessee River flowing northwest. ... Nickname: Location in Jefferson County in the state of Alabama Coordinates: , Country State Counties Jefferson, Shelby Incorporated December 19, 1871 Government  - Type Mayor - Council  - Mayor Bernard Kincaid (Current) Larry Langford (Mayor-Elect) Area  - City 151. ...


Wallace disapproved vehemently of the desegregation of the state of Alabama and wanted desperately for his state to remain segregated. In his own words: "The President (Kennedy) wants us to surrender this state to Martin Luther King and his group of pro-Communists who have instituted these demonstrations."[8]


Economics and education

The principal achievement of Gov. Wallace's first term was an innovation in Alabama development several other states later adopted: he was the first Southern governor to travel to corporate headquarters in Northern and Northeastern states to offer tax abatements and other incentives to companies willing to locate plants in Alabama. Numerous companies did so, notably shoe and textile manufacturers from the Northeast, and others such as Uniroyal, which located its first modern tire plant in Opelika, Alabama. Historic Southern United States. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Map of the US northeast. ... The United States Rubber Company was a rubber manufacturer founded by Charles R. Flint in 1892. ... Opelika is a city in Lee County in east central Alabama. ...


Wallace initiated a junior college system that is now spread throughout the state, preparing many students to complete four-year degrees at Auburn University or the University of Alabama. For the Indian grade 11 and 12 schools, see Junior College A junior college is a two-year post-secondary school whose main purpose is to provide a method of obtaining academic, vocational and professional education. ... Auburn University (AU or Auburn) is a state university located in Auburn, Alabama, U.S. With more than 24,100 students and 1,200 faculty, it is one of the largest universities in the state,[6] and according to U.S. News & World Report, has a selectivity rating of more... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship school of the University of Alabama System. ...


Democratic presidential primaries of 1964

Using the segregationist image created by the University of Alabama controversy, he attempted to win national office in the United States presidential election, 1964. He ran on an "outsider" image, opposition to civil rights for blacks, message of states' rights, and "law and order" platform. In Democratic primaries in Wisconsin, Maryland and Indiana, he won a third of the vote in each.[citation needed] Presidential electoral votes by state. ... For other uses, see Primary. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ...


First Gentleman of Alabama

A restriction in Alabama's state constitution prevented Wallace from seeking a second term in 1966. Therefore, Wallace had his wife, Lurleen Wallace, run for the office as a surrogate candidate, similar to the 1917 run of Ma Ferguson for the governorship of Texas on behalf of her husband, who had been impeached and was barred from running. Largely due to the work of Wallace's supporters, the Alabama restriction was later repealed. This article is about constitutional law; for the book by Vince Flynn see Term Limits (novel). ... The Alabama Constitution is the basic governing document of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... Lurleen Burns Wallace (September 19, 1926 – May 7, 1968), born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, was the Governor of Alabama from 1967 until her death and first wife of Alabama Governor George Wallace. ... The phrase power behind the throne refers to a person or group that informally exercises the real power of an office. ... Miriam Amanda Wallace “Ma” Ferguson (June 13, 1875 – June 25, 1961) became the first female Governor of Texas in 1924, and the second female state governor in the United States. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... James Edward Pa Ferguson (August 31, 1871 - September 21, 1944) was a controversial United States politician from the state of Texas. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ...


Mrs. Wallace won the election in the fall of 1966, and was inaugurated in January 1967.


Lurleen Wallace died in office on May 7, 1968, during her husband's presidential campaign.[9] She was succeeded by Lieutenant Governor Albert Brewer, reducing Wallace's influence until his new bid for election in his own right in 1970. is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... Albert Preston Brewer (born October 26, American politician who was the Governor of Alabama from May, 1968 until January, 1971. ...


1968 third party presidential run

Wallace ran for President in the 1968 election as the American Independent Party candidate. He hoped to force the House of Representatives to decide the election by receiving enough electoral votes, presumably giving him the role of a power broker. Wallace hoped that southern states could use their clout to end federal efforts at desegregation. His platform contained generous increases for beneficiaries of Social Security and Medicare. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The United States presidential election of 1968 was a wrenching national experience, and included the assassination of Democratic candidate Robert F. Kennedy, the violence at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, and widespread demonstrations against the Vietnam War across American university and college campuses. ... The American Independent Party is a California political party. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college that chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... United States Government redirects here. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity... Social Security, in the United States, currently refers to the federal Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) program. ... President Johnson signing the Medicare amendment. ...


Nixon worried Wallace might steal enough votes to give the election to the Democratic candidate, Vice President Hubert Humphrey. Some Democrats feared Wallace's appeal to blue-collar workers and union members would hurt Humphrey in Northern states like Ohio, New Jersey, and Michigan. Wallace ran a "law and order" campaign similar to Nixon's. A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... A blue-collar worker is a member of the working class who performs manual labor and earns an hourly wage. ... In politics, law and order refers to a political platform which supports a strict criminal justice system, especially in relation to violent crime and property crimes, through harsher criminal penalties. ...

Further information: Southern strategy

When Wallace pledged to run over any demonstrators who got in front of his limousine and asserted the four letter words hippies did not know were w-o-r-k and s-o-a-p, his rhetoric became famous. He accused Humphrey and Nixon of wanting to radically desegregate the South. Wallace said, "There's not a dime's worth of difference between the Democrat and Republican Parties." His campaign was supported by the John Birch Society.[citation needed] In American politics, the Southern strategy refers to the focus of the Republican party on winning U.S. Presidential elections by securing the electoral votes of the U.S. Southern states. ... The John Birch Society is a conservative American exceptionalist organization founded in 1958 to fight what it saw as growing threats to the Constitution of the United States, especially a suspected communist infiltration of the United States government, and to support free enterprise. ...


While most of the media opposed Wallace, some southern newspapers enthusiastically backed him. George W. Shannon (1914–1998) of the now defunct Shreveport Journal, wrote countless editorials supporting the third-party concept. Wallace repaid Shannon by appearing at Shannon's retirement dinner. George Washington Shannon (February 20, 1914 - April 25, 1998) was a career Louisiana journalist who was described by a friend as a dedicated, old-time newspaperman who dug for the facts and tried to tell it like it was. ...


While Wallace carried five Southern states and won almost ten million popular votes, Nixon received 31 electoral votes more than needed to win the election. Wallace remains the last non-Democrat, non-Republican candidate to win any electoral votes. He was the first person since Harry F. Byrd, an independent segregationist candidate in the 1960 presidential election. (John Hospers in 1972, Ronald Reagan in 1976, Lloyd Bentsen in 1988 and John Edwards in 2004 all received one electoral vote from dissenters, but none "won" these votes.) Wallace also received the vote of one North Carolina elector who was pledged to Nixon. Harry Flood Byrd, Sr. ... Racial segregation is a kind of formalized or institutionalized discrimination on the basis of race, characterized by the races separation from each other. ... The New York Times front page from two days after the election: November 10, 1960. ... John Hospers (born 9 June 1918) was the first presidential candidate of the United States Libertarian Party, running in the 1972 presidential election. ... Reagan redirects here. ... Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... This article is about the American attorney and politician. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ...


Many found Wallace an entertaining campaigner. To hippies who called him a Nazi, he replied, "I was killing fascists when you punks were in diapers." Another quote: "They're building a bridge over the Potomac for all the white liberals fleeing to Virginia." Hippies (singular hippie or sometimes hippy) were members of the 1960s counterculture movement who adopted a communal or nomadic lifestyle, renounced corporate nationalism and the Vietnam War, embraced aspects of Buddhism, Hinduism, and/or Native American religious culture, and were otherwise at odds with traditional middle class Western values. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... Benito Mussolini and Adolf Hitler Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, refers to the right-wing authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... The Potomac River flows into the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... American liberalism—that is, liberalism in the United States of America—is a broad political and philosophical mindset, favoring individual liberty, and opposing restrictions on liberty, whether they come from established religion, from government regulation, from the existing class structure, or from multi-national corporations. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Second term as governor

In 1970, Wallace faced incumbent Governor Albert Brewer, who was the first gubernatorial candidate since Reconstruction to openly court black voters.[10] Brewer unveiled a progressive platform and worked to build an alliance between blacks and the white working class. He said of Wallace's out of state trips, "Alabama needs a full-time governor."[11] Albert Preston Brewer (born October 26, American politician who was the Governor of Alabama from May, 1968 until January, 1971. ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ...


To weaken the prospects of a presidential campaign in 1972, President Nixon backed Brewer and arranged an Internal Revenue Service investigation in the Wallace campaign. In the primary, Brewer got the most votes but failed to win an outright majority, triggering a run-off election. Seal of the Internal Revenue Service Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Part of the Taxation series        IRS redirects here. ...


The Wallace campaign aired TV ads with slogans such as "Do you want the black block electing your governor?" and circulated an ad showing a white girl surrounded by seven black boys, with the slogan "Wake Up Alabama! Blacks vow to take over Alabama."[12] Wallace called Brewer "Sissy Britches"[13][14] and promised not to run for president a third time.[15]


Wallace defeated Brewer in the runoff. The day after the election, he flew to Wisconsin to campaign for the White House.[16] Wallace, whose presidential ambitions would have been destroyed by a defeat, ran "one of the nastiest campaigns in state history," using racist rhetoric while proposing few ideas of his own.[17] This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Democratic presidential primaries of 1972

In early 1972, he declared himself a candidate, entering the field with George McGovern, 1968 nominee Hubert Humphrey, and nine other Democratic opponents. In Florida's primary, Wallace carried every county to win 42 percent of the vote. When running, Wallace claimed he was no longer for segregation, and had always been a moderate. [18] George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, (born July 19, 1922) is a former United States Representative, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ...


Assassination attempt

Wallace was shot five times by Arthur Bremer while campaigning in Laurel, Maryland, on May 15, 1972. As one of the bullets lodged in Wallace's spinal column, the shooting left him paralyzed. Three others wounded in the shooting survived. Bremer's diary, An Assassin's Diary, published after his arrest shows the assassination attempt was motivated by a desire for fame, and President Nixon had been a possible target. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Motto: Progressio Per Populum (Progress Through People) Location of Laurel in Maryland Coordinates: Country United States State Maryland County Prince Georges County Incorporated 1870 Mayor Craig A. Moe City Council Ward 1: Janis L. Robison Ward1: Gayle Snyder Ward2: Frederick Smalls (Pr. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Spinal cord nested in the vertebral column. ... Paralysed redirects here. ... An Assassins Diary (ISBN 0061204706) was the title of a book released in 1973 which was based on part of the diary of Arthur Bremer, the would-be assassin of Alabama Governor George Wallace. ... Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ...


Following the shooting, Wallace won primaries in Maryland, Michigan, Tennessee, and North Carolina. From his wheelchair, Wallace spoke at the Democratic National Convention in Miami on July 11, 1972. The Democratic nominee, South Dakota Senator George McGovern, was later defeated by President Nixon who carried 49 of the 50 states, losing only in Massachusetts. Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Miami redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Demonym South Dakotan Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th in the US  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, (born July 19, 1922) is a former United States Representative, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Since Wallace was out of Alabama for more than twenty days when he was recovering in Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring, Maryland, the state constitution required the lieutenant governor Jere Beasley to serve as acting governor from June 5 until Wallace's return to Alabama on July 7. Wallace never returned to Maryland. Not to be confused with Silver Springs. ... The Alabama Constitution is the basic governing document of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... Jere Locke Beasley was the acting Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from June 5 to July 7, 1972. ... An acting governor is a constitutional position created in some U.S. states when the governor dies in office or resigns. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Bremer was sentenced to fifty-three years in prison. He served thirty-five years and was released on parole on November 9, 2007.


Democratic presidential primaries of 1976

In November 1975, Wallace announced his bid. The campaign was plagued by voters' concerns with his health, as well as the media's constant use of images of his apparent "helplessness." His supporters complained such coverage was motivated by bias, citing the discretion used in coverage three decades earlier, or lack of coverage, of Franklin D. Roosevelt's paralysis before television became commercially available. Jimmy Carter won the nomination. Calculating all the southern primaries and caucuses, Wallace only carried Mississippi, South Carolina and his home state of Alabama. Calculating the popular votes in all primaries and caucuses, Wallace placed third behind Jimmy Carter and California Governor Jerry Brown. After all the primaries ended losing several Southern primaries to former Georgia governor Jimmy Carter, Wallace dropped out in June 1976. He eventually endorsed Carter, later claiming he facilitated a Southerner's nomination. FDR redirects here. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ...


Final term as governor

Change of views

Wallace became a born-again Christian in the late 1970s and apologized for his earlier segregationist views to black civil rights leaders. He said while he once sought power and glory, he realized he needed to seek love and forgiveness. His term as Governor (1983–1987) saw a record number of black appointments to government positions.[citation needed] Born again is a term used originally and mainly in Christianity, where it is associated with salvation, conversion and spiritual rebirth. ...


In the 1982 Alabama gubernatorial Democratic primary, Wallace's main opponents were Lieutenant Governor George McMillian and Alabama House Speaker Joe McCorquodale. In the primary, McCorquodale was eliminated, and the vote went to a runoff with Wallace holding a slight edge over McMillian. Wallace won the Democratic nomination by a margin of 51 to 49 percent. A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... Run-off or runoff may refer to one of the following. ...


In the general election, his opponent was Montgomery Republican mayor Emory Folmar. Most polling experts said this was the best chance since Reconstruction for a Republican to be elected Alabama governor. However, Wallace easily won the general election, with a margin of 62 to 39 percent. Emory McCord Folmar was born in Troy, AL on June 3, 1930. ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ...


Counting Lurleen Wallace's term as his surrogate, George Wallace achieved five gubernatorial terms across three decades, totaling seventeen years in office (it would have been twenty had Lurleen served four years instead of 17 months). This record is approached by the 15 year tenure of Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller in New York, the 14-year tenure (in consecutive terms) of Governor James R. Thompson of Illinois and Governor Tommy Thompson of Wisconsin, as well as the 16-year tenures attained by Governors Terry E. Branstad of Iowa (in consecutive terms), and Governors James A. Rhodes of Ohio, Edwin Washington Edwards of Louisiana, William Milliken of Michigan, and Jim Hunt of North Carolina (in non-consecutive terms). Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 - January 26, 1979) was a Governor of New York and the 41st Vice President of the United States of America from December 19, 1974 to January 20, 1977. ... This article is about the state. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other people with similar names, see Thomas Thompson. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Terry Edward Branstad (b. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... James Allen Rhodes (September 13, 1909 - March 4, 2001) was a Republican politician from Ohio, and as of 2004 one of only three U.S. state governors to be elected to four terms in office. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Edwin Washington Edwards (born 7 August 1927) is a United States politician who served as governor of Louisiana for four terms (1972 - 1980, 1984 - 1988, and 1992 - 1996), more terms than any other Louisiana governor. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... William Grawn Milliken (born March 26, 1922), is an American politician and served as the moderate Republican governor of Michigan from January 1969 to January 1983. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... James Baxter Hunt Jr. ...


Final years

At a Montgomery restaurant a few blocks from the State Capitol, Wallace became something of a fixture. In constant pain, he was surrounded by an entourage of old friends and visiting well-wishers and continued this ritual until a few weeks before his death. Coordinates: , Country State County Montgomery Incorporated December 3, 1819 Government  - Mayor Bobby Bright Area  - City  156. ...


Wallace was the subject of a documentary, George Wallace: Settin' the Woods on Fire, shown by PBS on the American Experience in 2000.[19][20] Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... American Experience (sometimes abbreviated AmEx) is a television program airing on the PBS network in the United States. ...


On one occasion, when asked by a reporter which contemporary American political figure he most admired, he paused thoughtfully for a moment, smiled, and said: "Myself."


A black lawyer recalls, "Judge George Wallace was the most liberal judge that I had ever practiced law in front of. He was the first judge in Alabama to call me 'Mister' in a courtroom." Later, when a supporter asked why he started using racist messages, Wallace replied, "You know, I tried to talk about good roads and good schools and all these things that have been part of my career, and nobody listened. And then I began talking about niggers, and they stomped the floor."[5]


Wallace died of septic shock from a bacterial infection in Jackson Hospital in Montgomery on September 13, 1998. He suffered from Parkinson's disease and respiratory problems in addition to complications from his gun-shot spinal injury. Septic shock is a very serious medical condition caused by decreased tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery as a result of infection and sepsis. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...


The Interstate 10 tunnel which traverses the Mobile River is named in his honor. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 10 Interstate 10 (abbreviated I-10) is the southernmost east-west, coast-to-coast interstate highway in the United States. ...


Marriages and children

Wallace's first wife, Lurleen Burns Wallace, was the first (and, as of 2008, only) woman to be elected as governor of Alabama. They had four children together: Bobbi Jo (1944) Parsons, Peggy Sue (1950) Kennedy, George III (1951), and Janie Lee (1961) Dye, who was named after Robert E. Lee. Lurleen Burns Wallace (September 19, 1926 – May 7, 1968), born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, was the Governor of Alabama from 1967 until her death and first wife of Alabama Governor George Wallace. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Born George Wallace, III, on October 17, 1951, in Eufaula, Alabama. ... For other uses, see Robert E. Lee (disambiguation). ...


Lurleen died of cancer in 1968, while governor of Alabama. By the time of her funeral on May 9, Wallace had moved out of the governor's mansion and back to a home they had bought in Montgomery in 1967. Their children, aged 18, 16, and 6, were "distributed" to family members and friends for care (their eldest daughter had already married and left home).[9] is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Montgomery Incorporated December 3, 1819 Government  - Mayor Bobby Bright Area  - City  156. ...


Their son, commonly called George Wallace Jr., is a Republican active in Alabama politics. He was twice elected State Treasurer. He was an elected member of the Public Service Commission until he sought the GOP nomination for lieutenant governor. He lost in a runoff in July 2006, despite support obtained from popular Arizona U.S. Senator John McCain. GOP redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... McCain redirects here. ...


George Wallace later remarried and divorced twice. On 4 January 1971, he wed Cornelia Ellis Snively, a niece of former Alabama Governor Jim Folsom ("Big Jim"). The couple was divorced in 1978. In 1981, Wallace married Lisa Taylor, a country music singer, but the relationship ended in 1987. is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... James Elisha Folsom, Sr. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ...


In popular culture

The "Stand in the Schoolhouse Door" is featured in the 1994 film Forrest Gump. The sequence depicting this event is edited to make it appear that the film's lead character was part of the event. The film also showed footage of the attempted assassination of Wallace, which also was shown in the Oliver Stone film Nixon. For other uses, see Forrest Gump (disambiguation). ... William Oliver Stone (born September 15, 1946), known as Oliver Stone, is a three-time Academy Award winning film director and screenwriter. ... Nixon is a 1995 film directed by Oliver Stone for Cinergi Pictures that tells the story of the political and personal life of former President Richard Nixon. ...


Drive-By Truckers released two songs on its 2001 album Southern Rock Opera referring to life of George Wallace, entitled "The Three Great Alabama Icons" and "Wallace." Both songs deal heavily with his pro-segregationist views and how the state of Alabama, and the South as a whole, were seen because of his influence. Drive-By Truckers are a rock/alt-country/cowpunk (their website actually calls them a psychobilly band) band based in Athens, Georgia, though three out of five members (Mike Cooley, Patterson Hood, and Shonna Tucker) originally hail from The Shoals region of Northern Alabama. ... // Southern Rock Opera Southern Rock Opera is the sprawling 2001 double album recorded and released by Drive-By Truckers, a rock and alt-country band from northern Alabama. ...


In the 1972 crossover episode of the U.S. sitcom All in the Family that begins the spin-off series Maude, bigoted Archie Bunker (played by Carroll O'Connor) begrudgingly leaves Maude's house to go back to his motel. When wife Edith (played Jean by Stapleton) tries to stop him, liberal cousin Maude (played by Bea Arthur) discourages her by saying "Don't worry Edith, he can go back to the motel and watch television. Governor Wallace is on the Tonight Show, he'll love it!". For other uses, see All in the Family (disambiguation). ... Maude is a half-hour American television sitcom that was originally broadcast on the CBS network from September 12, 1972 until April 29, 1978. ...


In the Charlie Daniels song "Uneasy Rider," a hippie driving through the South tries to talk his way out of being beaten up by a group of rednecks by accusing one of his would-be attackers of faking his redneck credentials: "Would you believe this man has gone as far as tearing Wallace stickers off the bumpers of cars? And he voted for George McGovern for President." Charles Edward Charlie Daniels (born October 28, 1936 in Wilmington, North Carolina) is an American musician famous for his contributions to country and southern rock music. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, (born July 19, 1922) is a former United States Representative, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee. ...


In its August 1972 issue, National Lampoon magazine ran an article called "Tales from the South," a parody of Tales from the Crypt and a satirical take on Wallace's political career, written by Michael O'Donoghue and illustrated by Don Perlin. The original title, Crime Patrol. ... Michael ODonoghue (born January 5, 1940, Sauquoit, New York, United States; died November 8, 1994) was a 20th century writer and performer noted for his dark and destructive style of comedy, and as the first head writer of the highly influential American television program Saturday Night Live. ...


The play A Christmas Carol for George Wallace was produced by the Cripple Creek Theatre Company in New Orleans, Louisiana. A grassroots, nonprofit theatre in New Orleans, LA. The company was founded in December of 2005 by Andrew Kingsley and Andrew Vaught for the purpose of instigating action toward social and economic justice in the South. ... NOLA redirects here. ...


Famous comedian Bill Cosby mentions Wallace in his album 200 M.P.H.. During most of the title track, he talked about a sports car that he got from Carroll Shelby as a present and a "near death" experience driving the car. After expressing his fear over the car, he told the man "Take the keys and this car, it's all paid for, and you give it to George Wallace." Bill Cosby (born William Henry Cosby, Jr on July 12, 1937) is an American comedian, actor, television producer, and activist. ... 200 M.P.H. (1968) is the eighth album by Bill Cosby. ... Carroll Hall Shelby, (born January 11, 1923 in Leesburg, Texas) is an American racing and automotive designer. ...


Paula Fox's novel Desperate Characters references Wallace. On Sophie and Otto's drive through Queens to their house in Flynders, a campaign poster is mentioned: "The face of an Alabama presidential candidate stared with sooty dead eyes from his campaign posters, claiming the territory as his own. His country, warned the poster — vote for him — pathology calling tenderly to pathology." Fox confirms that it is a reference to Wallace in an interview with Bomb magazine.[21] Paula Fox (born April 22, 1923) is an American author of several childrens books and adult memoirs. ...


In the science-fiction novel Yellow Eyes by John Ringo, a UH-60 Black Hawk crew chief, Sergeant Wallace from Alabama, sacrifices himself to allow the black national security advisor to escape the invading Posleen, his parting words being "Alabama is raht proud of you, ma'am." According to the Black Hawk pilot, "Sergeant Wallace is not 'that' Wallace. 'That' Wallace died years ago." For the song from The Rocky Horror Show, see Science Fiction/Double Feature. ... // John Ringo is a popular American science fiction and fantasy author who writes full time. ... For other uses of Blackhawk/Black Hawk, see Black Hawk. ...


Comedian Dan Naturman has a joke in his stand-up act about George Wallace as a weatherman: "Precipitation now, precipitation tomorrow, precipitation forever." Dan Naturman (born October 20, 1969) Stamford, Connectcut, is an American stand-up comedian. ...


"Sweet Home Alabama" is a song by Southern rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd that first appeared in 1974 on their second album, Second Helping. The memorable lines "In Birmingham, they love the governor, Boo, boo, boo! Now we all did what we could do" as well as "Sweet home Alabama, Oh sweet home baby, Where the skies are so blue, And the governor's true" are all widely interpreted to be references to Governor Wallace, and his attempt to enforce and defend segregation (which, though a failure, was still in keeping with his earlier promises). Sweet Home Alabama is a song by Southern rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd that first appeared in 1974 on their second album, Second Helping. ... Lynyrd Skynyrd (pronounced lĕh-nérd skin-nérd) (pronounced ) is an iconic U.S. Southern rock band. ...


P.J. Proby released a song on his 1969 album Three Week Hero titled "Jim's Blues/George Wallace Is Rollin' In This Mornin'." The song is notable for having all four members of Led Zeppelin as the backing group. P.J. Proby, born James Marcus Smith (November 6, 1938), is a singer, songwriter, and actor noted for his theatrical portrayals of Elvis Presley and Roy Orbison and interpretations of modern standards in the vein of Tom Jones. ... Three Week Hero is an album released by rock singer P.J. Proby on April 8, 1969 by Liberty Records. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ...


Neil Young briefly mentions the attempted assassination of George Wallace in one of his songs entitled "War Song", in which he sings: "They shot George Wallace down, He'll never walk around." This article is about the musician. ...


"Settin' the Woods on Fire" was sung by Joker and Harley Quinn in an episode of The Batman. The Joker is a fictional character and supervillain that appears in the comic books published by DC Comics. ... For the Agatha Christie character Harley Quin, see The Mysterious Mr. ... The Batman is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ...


Peter Gabriels song, Family Snapshot is about Arthur Bremmer planning and performing his plan of assassination. The song shows clearly that Bremmer timed the shooting to get as much publicity as possible, making sure he did it in time for the early news.


References

  1. ^ Alabama Governor George Wallace, gubernatorial history
  2. ^ a b Mccabe, Daniel; Paul Stekler, Steve Fayer (2000). George Wallace: Settin' the Woods on Fire (transcript). The American Experience. PBS. Retrieved on 2006-05-25. Complete transcript of the PBS documentary.
  3. ^ Riechers, Maggie (March/April 2000). "Racism to Redemption: The Path of George Wallace". Humanities 21 (2). 
  4. ^ Michael J. Klarman (March/April 2004). "Brown v. Board: 50 Years Later". Humanities: The Magazine of the National Endowment for the Humanities. 
  5. ^ a b Public Broadcasting Service; WGBH (2000). George Wallace: Settin' the Woods on Fire: Wallace Quotes. The American Experience. PBS. Retrieved on 2006-09-05.
  6. ^ Sonnie Wellington Hereford IV (Spring 2007). "My Walk Into History". Notre Dame Magazine. 
  7. ^ A brief history of race and schools, The Huntsville Times
  8. ^ Alabama Governor George Wallace, public statement of May 8, 1963 in the New York Times. May 9, 1963).
  9. ^ a b Carter, Dan T. The Politics of Rage: George Wallace (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1995, 2000) 310-312, 317-320. ISBN: 0-8071-2597-0 Not available online.
  10. ^ Rogers, William Warren, et al. Alabama: The History of a Deep South State. Tuscaloosa; The University of Alabama Press, 1994, 576.
  11. ^ http://www.steveflowers.us/columns/101205.htm Flowers, Steve, "Steve Flowers Inside the Statehouse", October 12, 2005
  12. ^ Swint, Di Kerwin C. (2006). Mudslingers: The Top 25 Negative Political Campaigns of All Time Countdown from No. 25 to No. 1. Greenwood Publishing Group, p. 228. ISBN 0-2759-8510-5. 
  13. ^ http://www.time.com/time/printout/0,8816,943783,00.html
  14. ^ Carter, Dan T. (1996). From George Wallace to Newt Gingrich: Race in the Conservative Counterrevolution, 1963-1994. Louisiana State University Press, p. 48. ISBN 0-8071-2366-8. 
  15. ^ Flowers, 2005
  16. ^ Flowers, October 12, 2005
  17. ^ Warren, 576
  18. ^ The American Experience | George Wallace: Settin' the Woods on Fire | Program Description
  19. ^ Mccabe, Daniel (writer, director, producer), Paul Stekler (writer, director, producer), Steve Fayer (writer). (2000). George Wallace: Settin' the Woods on Fire [Documentary]. Boston, USA: American Experience.
  20. ^ Public Broadcasting Service; WGBH (1999). George Wallace: Settin' the Woods on Fire (web site). The American Experience. PBS. Retrieved on 2006-05-25. Web site for the PBS documentary, including a complete transcript, references to other Wallace information, and tools for teachers.
  21. ^ http://www.bombsite.com/fox/fox4.html

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is an independent federal agency of the United States established by the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965 (Pub. ... PBS redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The International Standard Book Number, or ISBN (sometimes pronounced is-ben), is a unique[1] identifier for books, intended to be used commercially. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... PBS redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Carter, Dan T. The Politics of Rage: George Wallace, the Origins of the New Conservatism, and the Transformation of American Politics. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1995, 2000) ISBN: 0-8071-2597-0

The International Standard Book Number, or ISBN (sometimes pronounced is-ben), is a unique[1] identifier for books, intended to be used commercially. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
George Wallace
Political offices
Preceded by
John Malcolm Patterson
Governor of Alabama
1963–1967
Succeeded by
Lurleen Wallace
Preceded by
Albert Brewer
Governor of Alabama
1971–1979
Succeeded by
Fob James
Preceded by
Fob James
Governor of Alabama
1983–1987
Succeeded by
H. Guy Hunt
Party political offices
Preceded by
John Malcolm Patterson
Democratic Party nominee for Governor of Alabama
1962 (won)
Succeeded by
Lurleen Wallace
Preceded by
N/A
American Independent Party presidential nominee
1968 (3rd)
Succeeded by
John G. Schmitz
Preceded by
Lurleen Wallace
Democratic Party nominee for Governor of Alabama
1970 (won), 1974 (won)
Succeeded by
Fob James
Preceded by
Fob James
Democratic Party nominee for Governor of Alabama
1982 (won)
Succeeded by
Bill Baxley
Honorary titles
Preceded by
Lurleen Wallace
First Gentleman of Alabama
1967 – 1968
Succeeded by
Martha Farmer Brewer
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... American Experience (sometimes abbreviated AmEx) is a television program airing on the PBS network in the United States. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... John Malcolm Patterson (born September 27, 1921) is an American politician who was the forty-ninth Governor of Alabama, from 1959 to 1963. ... The following is a list of the territorial and state governors of Alabama. ... Lurleen Burns Wallace (September 19, 1926 – May 7, 1968), born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, was the Governor of Alabama from 1967 until her death and first wife of Alabama Governor George Wallace. ... Albert Preston Brewer (born October 26, American politician who was the Governor of Alabama from May, 1968 until January, 1971. ... The following is a list of the territorial and state governors of Alabama. ... Forrest Hood Fob James, Jr. ... Forrest Hood Fob James, Jr. ... The following is a list of the territorial and state governors of Alabama. ... Harold Guy Hunt (born June 17, 1933 in Holly Pond, Alabama) is an American politician who served two terms as the Governor of Alabama from 1987 to 1993. ... John Malcolm Patterson (born September 27, 1921) is an American politician who was the forty-ninth Governor of Alabama, from 1959 to 1963. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The following is a list of the territorial and state governors of Alabama. ... Lurleen Burns Wallace (September 19, 1926 – May 7, 1968), born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, was the Governor of Alabama from 1967 until her death and first wife of Alabama Governor George Wallace. ... The American Independent Party is a California political party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The United States presidential election of 1968 was a wrenching national experience, and included the assassination of Democratic candidate Robert F. Kennedy, the violence at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, and widespread demonstrations against the Vietnam War across American university and college campuses. ... John George Schmitz (August 12, 1930–January 10, 2001) was an ultraconservative Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Orange County, California, prominent member of the John Birch Society, and the American Independent Party candidate for President of the United States in 1972. ... Lurleen Burns Wallace (September 19, 1926 – May 7, 1968), born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, was the Governor of Alabama from 1967 until her death and first wife of Alabama Governor George Wallace. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The following is a list of the territorial and state governors of Alabama. ... Forrest Hood Fob James, Jr. ... Forrest Hood Fob James, Jr. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The following is a list of the territorial and state governors of Alabama. ... William Joseph Baxley II (born June 27, 1941) is an American Democratic politician and attorney. ... Lurleen Burns Wallace (September 19, 1926 – May 7, 1968), born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, was the Governor of Alabama from 1967 until her death and first wife of Alabama Governor George Wallace. ... In situations where the head of state or government is a woman, the term First Gentleman is sometimes used to mirror the term First Lady. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The following is a list of the governors of Alabama. ... William Wyatt Bibb (October 2, 1781 — July 10, 1820) was the first Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... Thomas Bibb was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1820 to 1821. ... Israel Pickens (January 30, 1780 – April 24, 1827) was an American politician, serving two terms as Governor of the state of Alabama from 1821 to 1825. ... John Murphy (1786–1841) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama, serving two terms from 1825 to 1829. ... Gabriel Moore {c. ... Samuel B. Moore (1789 - November 7, 1846) was the Democratic governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from March 3 to November 26, 1831. ... Clement Comer Clay (December 17, 1789–September 7, 1866) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1835 to 1837. ... Hugh McVay (1788–1851) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from July 17 to November 22, 1837. ... Arthur Pendleton Bagby (1794–September 21, 1858) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1837 to 1841. ... Benjamin Fitzpatrick (June 30, 1802 - November 21, 1869) was an American politician, who served as Governor of Alabama and as United States Senator from Alabama as a Democrat. ... Joshua Lanier Martin (December 5, 1799–November 2, 1856) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1845 to 1847. ... Reuben Chapman (July 15, 1799–1882) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1847 to 1849. ... Henry Watkins Collier (1801–1855) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1849 to 1853. ... John Anthony Winston (September 4, 1812–December 21, 1871) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1853 to 1857. ... Andrew Barry Moore (March 7, 1807–1873) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1857 to 1861. ... John Gill Shorter (April 3, 1818–May 29, 1872) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1861 to 1863, during the Civil War. ... Thomas Hill Watts (January 3, 1819–September 16, 1892) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1863 to 1865, during the Civil War. ... Lewis Eliphalet Parsons (April 28, 1819–June 8, 1895) was the appointed provisional Democratic Governor of Alabama from June to December, 1865, following the American Civil War. ... Robert Miller Patton (July 10, 1809–February 28, 1885) was the Whig Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1865 to 1867. ... Wager Swayne (November 10, 1834–December 18, 1902) was the appointed military Governor of Alabama, following the American Civil War, from 1867 to 1868. ... William Hugh Smith (April 28, 1826–January 1, 1899) was the Republican Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1868 to 1870 during the period of military reconstruction. ... Robert Burns Lindsay (July 4, 1824–February 13, 1902) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1870 to 1872. ... David Peter Lewis (1820–July 3, 1884) was the Republican Governor of Alabama from 1872 to 1874. ... George Smith Houston (January 17, 1811–December 31, 1879) was an American Democratic politician who was the Governor of Alabama from 1874 to 1878. ... Rufus Willis Cobb (February 25, 1829–November 26, 1913) was an American Democratic politician who was the Governor of Alabama from 1878 to 1882. ... Edward Asbury ONeal (September 20, 1818–November 20, 1890) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War. ... Thomas Seay (November 20, 1846–March 30, 1896) was an American Democratic politician who was the Governor of Alabama from 1886 to 1890. ... Thomas Goode Jones (November 26, 1844–April 28, 1914) was an American Democratic politician who was the Governor of Alabama from 1890 to 1894. ... William Calvin Oates (either November 30 or December 1, 1833–September 9, 1910) was an American colonel who led the 15th Alabama regiment in Battle of Gettysburg. ... Joseph Forney Johnston (March 23, 1843–August 8, 1913) was an American Democratic politician who was the Governor of Alabama from 1896 to 1900. ... William James Samford (September 16, 1844–June 11, 1901) was an American Democratic politician who was the Governor of Alabama from 1900 to 1901. ... William Dorsey Jelks (November 7, 1855–December 14, 1931) was an American Democratic politician who was the Governor of Alabama from 1901 to 1907. ... Braxton Bragg Comer (November 7, 1848–August 15, 1927) was an American Democratic politician who was the Governor of Alabama from 1907 to 1911. ... Emmet ONeal (September 23, 1853 – September 7, 1922) was an American Democratic politician who was the Governor of Alabama from 1911 to 1915. ... Charles Henderson (April 26, 1860–January 7, 1937) was an American Democratic politician who was the Governor of Alabama from 1915 to 1919. ... Thomas Erby Kilby (July 9, 1865–October 22, 1943) was an American Democratic politician who was the Governor of Alabama from 1919 to 1923. ... William Woodward Brandon (June 5, 1868–December 7, 1934) was an American Democratic politician who was the Governor of Alabama from 1923 to 1927. ... David Bibb Graves (April 1, 1873–March 14, 1942) was an American Democratic politician and the Governor of Alabama 1927-1931 and 1935-1939, the first Alabama governor to serve two four-year terms. ... Benjamin Meek(s?) Miller (March 13, 1864–February 6, 1944) was an American Democratic politician Born in Oak Hill, Wilcox County, he was Associate justice of Alabama state supreme court, from 1921 to 1927. ... David Bibb Graves (April 1, 1873–March 14, 1942) was an American Democratic politician and the Governor of Alabama 1927-1931 and 1935-1939, the first Alabama governor to serve two four-year terms. ... Frank Murray Dixon (July 25, 1892–October 11, 1965) was an American Democratic politician who was the Governor of Alabama from 1939 to 1943. ... Chauncey Sparks (October 8, 1884–November 6, 1968), also known as George Chauncey Sparks, was a Democratic American politician who was Governor of Alabama from 1943 to 1947. ... James Elisha Folsom, Sr. ... Seth Gordon Persons (February 5, 1902–May 29, 1965) was an American Democratic politician who was the Governor of Alabama from 1951 to 1955. ... James Elisha Folsom, Sr. ... John Malcolm Patterson (born September 27, 1921) is an American politician who was the forty-ninth Governor of Alabama, from 1959 to 1963. ... Lurleen Burns Wallace (September 19, 1926 – May 7, 1968), born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, was the Governor of Alabama from 1967 until her death and first wife of Alabama Governor George Wallace. ... Albert Preston Brewer (born October 26, American politician who was the Governor of Alabama from May, 1968 until January, 1971. ... Forrest Hood Fob James, Jr. ... Harold Guy Hunt (born June 17, 1933 in Holly Pond, Alabama) is an American politician who served two terms as the Governor of Alabama from 1987 to 1993. ... James Elisha Folsom, Jr. ... Forrest Hood Fob James, Jr. ... Donald Eugene Don Siegelman (born February 24, 1946, in Mobile, Alabama) is an American Democratic politician. ... Robert Renfroe Bob Riley (born October 3, 1944) is an American politician in the Republican Party. ... Image File history File links State Seal of Alabama The Alabama state seal. ... The American Independent Party is a California political party. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... John George Schmitz (August 12, 1930–January 10, 2001) was an ultraconservative Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Orange County, California, prominent member of the John Birch Society, and the American Independent Party candidate for President of the United States in 1972. ... Lester Garfield Maddox Lester Garfield Maddox (September 30, 1915 – June 25, 2003) was an American Democratic Party politician who was governor of the U.S. state of Georgia from 1967 to 1971. ... John Richard Rarick (born January 29, 1924 in Waterford, Indiana)) is a lawyer, former Congressman, and former Presidential candidate. ... Howard Phillips (born February 6, 1941 in Boston, Massachusetts) is an American conservative political figure. ... Michael Peroutka Michael Anthony Peroutka (born 1952) is a Maryland lawyer, the founder of the Institute on the Constitution, cohost of The American View, and once held a position in the United States Department of Health and Human Services. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship school of the University of Alabama System. ... University of Alabama School of Law law school located in Tuscaloosa, AL, University of Alabama School of Law is one of five law schools in the state, one of three that is ABA accredited, and of the accredited schools, it is the only public law school in Alabama. ... Julia Strudwick Tutwiler (1841-1916) fame came from her devotion, interest, and untiring work in education, prison reform, and writing. ... Amelia Gayle Gorgas (June 1, 1826 - January 3, 1913) was librarian and post-mistress of the University of Alabama for 25 years until her retirement at the age of eighty in 1907. ... BEST IN HISTORY07:08, 31 May 2008 (UTC)07:08, 31 May 2008 (UTC)07:08, 31 May 2008 (UTC)~ Joseph William Namath (born May 31, 1943, Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania), also known as Broadway Joe, is a former American football quarterback. ... Paul William Bear Bryant (September 11, 1913–January 26, 1983) was an American college football coach. ... Dr. Robert E. Witt is president of the University of Alabama as of March 1, 2003. ... Nicholas Lou Saban (born October 31, 1951 in Fairmont, West Virginia) is an American college football coach and the current head coach of the Alabama Crimson Tide. ... This is a partial list of people affiliated with The University of Alabama. ... Foster Auditorium is a multi-purpose facility at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. ... The University of Alabama Arboretum is a 60-acre (243,000 m²) arboretum located near the intersection of Veterans Memorial Parkway and Pelham Loop Road in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. ... Moundville was a Mississippian period society located in the Black Warrior Valley of west-central Alabama. ... Bryant-Denny Stadium, located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, is the home stadium for the University of Alabama football team. ... Coleman Coliseum is a 15,043-seat multi-purpose arena in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. ... Sewell-Thomas Stadium is a baseball stadium in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. ... The Paul W. Bryant Museum is located on the campus of the University of Alabama, in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. ... Tuscaloosa is a city in west central Alabama in the southern United States. ... Head coach Nick Saban 1st year, 4–2 (2-1 in the Southeastern Conference) Home stadium Bryant-Denny Stadium Capacity 92,138 - Grass Conference SEC - West First year 1892 Website RollTide. ... Alabamas mens basketball program has been overshadowed for most of its history by football even though it trails only Kentucky in SEC basketball wins, SEC tournament titles and regular season titles. ... Athletic teams at The University of Alabama are known as the Crimson Tide. ... Alabama Public Radio is a network of public radio stations based in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, that serve western and northern Alabama with classical music, folk music, jazz, and nostalgic music programs, as well as news and feature programs from the National Public Radio, Public Radio International, and American Public Media networks. ... WVUA-CA is a television station owned and operated by the University of Alabama, affiliated with the i, America One and ShopNBC networks. ... WVUA-FM 90. ... The Million Dollar Band , or MDB, is the marching band of the University of Alabama. ... Big Al is the costumed mascot of the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. ... The Crimson White, known colloquially as The CW, is the student-run newspaper of the University of Alabama. ... The University of Alabama is a school with many rich and spirited traditions. ... The University of Alabama System encompasses three wholly independent universities in Alabama, USA: the University of Alabama, the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of Alabama in Huntsville. ... The University of Alabama School of Medicine is a medical school located in Birmingham, Alabama. ... The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) is a regional accreditor for over 13,000 public and private educational institutions ranging from preschool to college level in the Southern United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ... NCAA redirects here. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
King Encyclopedia (514 words)
George Corley Wallace was born on 25 August 1919 in Clio, Alabama.
Wallace’s position on civil rights and his anti-Washington rhetoric appealed not only to southern segregationists, but also to voters in other parts of the country.
Wallace died in Montgomery on 13 September 1998 at the age of 79.
George Wallace (3921 words)
Wallace died of respiratory and cardiac arrest at 9:49 p.m., said Dana Beyerly, a spokeswoman for Jackson Hospital in Montgomery.
Wallace was the first major political figure in his generation to exploit the antipathy toward Washington that went on to be a prime force in politics from coast to coast.
But George Wallace was a creature of the storm who always had wind beneath his wings, and that wind was the adoration of the white farmers and factory workers and rural courthouse bosses who counted the votes and doled out patronage.
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