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Encyclopedia > George W. Campbell
George W. Campbell
George W. Campbell

George Washington Campbell (February 9, 1769February 17, 1848) was an American statesman. Image File history File links GeorgeWCampbell. ... Image File history File links GeorgeWCampbell. ... February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Born in Scotland, he immigrated to North Carolina in 1772 with his parents. He graduated from the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) in 1794 and began studying law. He was admitted to the bar in North Carolina and began practicing in Knoxville, Tennessee. Timeline of Scottish history Caledonia List of not fully sovereign nations Subdivisions of Scotland National parks (Scotland) Traditional music of Scotland Flower of Scotland Wars of Scottish Independence National Trust for Scotland Historic houses in Scotland Castles in Scotland Museums in Scotland Abbeys and priories in Scotland Gardens in Scotland... Link titleLink title == == State nickname: Tar Heel State; Old North State Other U.S. States Capital [i ,ove dance this wed site dosnt really have a lot of onfo on it so dot wast your time PostalAbbreviation = NC Largest city {{{LargestCity}}} Governor {{{Governor}}} Senators {{{Senators}}} Official language(s... 1772 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... one of the earlier names for Princeton University Trenton State College is now known as The College of New Jersey This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other Princetons, see Princeton. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Aphorism Critical legal studies Jurisprudence Law (principle) Legal research Letter versus Spirit List of legal abbreviations Legal code Natural justice Natural law Philosophy of law Religious law External links Find more information on Law by searching one of Wikipedias sibling projects: Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School... A bar association is a body of lawyers who, in some jurisdictions, are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession. ... City nickname: The Marble City, K-Town, Big Orange Country, Knox Vegas Location Location within the U.S. State of Tennessee Government Cities in Tennessee Tennessee Mayor Bill Haslam Physical characteristics Area      Land      Water 254. ...


He was elected the Congressman at-large from Tennessee in 1803, serving until 1809 (the 8th, 9th and 10th Congresses). During the 10th Congress he was the chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Ways and Means. He was also one of the managers appointed in 1804 to conduct the impeachment hearings for John Pickering, judge of the United States District Court for the District of New Hampshire, and later in the same year, the impeachment hearings against Samuel Chase, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the Senate. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Other U.S. States Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Governor Phil Bredesen (D) Senators Bill Frist (R) Lamar Alexander (R) Official languages English Area 109,247 km² (36th)  - Land 106,846 km²  - Water 2,400 km² (2. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Eighth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Ninth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 10th Congress) Tenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... The Committee on Ways and Means is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... John Pickering (22 September 1737 - 11 April 1805) served as Chief Justice of the New Hampshire Superior Court and as Judge for the Federal District Court of New Hampshire. ... A judge or justice is an official who presides over a court. ... The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system. ... State nickname: The Granite State Other U.S. States Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Governor John Lynch (D) Senators Judd Gregg (R) John Sununu (R) Official languages English Area 24,239 km² (46th)  - Land 23,249 km²  - Water 814 km² (3. ... Samuel Chase painting by John Beale Bordley (1836). ... Seal of the Supreme Court The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the United States of America. ...


He left Congress in 1809 when he became a state Supreme Court judge, serving through 1811. The Tennessee Supreme Court is the highest appellate court of the State of Tennessee. ... A judge or justice is an official who presides over a court. ... 1811 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


He served as a United States Senator from Tennessee twice, once from 1811 to 1814, having been elected to fill the seat of Jenkin Whiteside, and again from 1815 to 1818. His first service was from October 8, 1811 to February 11, 1814, when he resigned to accept appointment as the United States Secretary of the Treasury. He returned to the Senate on October 10, 1815. During the 15th Congress he was the chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance, resigning again on April 20, 1818 on this occasion to accept appointment as ambassador to Russia. Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Jenkin Whiteside (1772–1822) was an attorney who served as a United States Senator from Tennessee. ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1818 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years). ... 1811 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... John W. Snow, the current Secretary of the Treasury. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in Leap years). ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... (Redirected from 15th Congress) Fifteenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on Finance (or, less formally, Senate Finance Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... April 20 is the 110th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (111th in leap years). ... An ambassador, rarely embassador, is a diplomatic official accredited to a foreign sovereign or government, or to an international organization, to serve as the official representative of his or her own country. ...


As Treasury Secretary, a Presidential Cabinet position to which he was appointed by James Madison, he faced national financial disorder brought on by the War of 1812. Congress had failed to recharter the First Bank of the United States after its charter expired in 1811, and appropriations for the war were unavailable, so Campbell had to convince Americans to buy government bonds. He was forced to meet to lenders terms, selling government bonds at exorbitant interest rates. In September, 1814 the British occupied Washington, D.C. and the credit of the government was lowered even further. Campbell was unsuccessful in his efforts to raise money through additional bond sales and he resigned that October after only eight months in office, disillusioned and in bad health. Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was the fourth (1809–1817) President of the United States. ... The War of 1812 was a conflict fought on land in North America and at sea around the world between the United States and United Kingdom from 1812 to 1815. ... The First Bank of the United States was proposed by Alexander Hamilton to relieve the war debt from the United States Revolutionary War, develop a national currency, and dispose of the western territories. ... War is a state of widespread conflict between states, organisations, or relatively large groups of people, which is characterised by the use of lethal violence between combatants or upon civilians. ... Bonds can refer to: A financial bond (including a junk bond or a zero-coupon bond) Barry Bonds A chemical bond (including the ionic bond, covalent bond, coordinate covalent bond, metallic bond, hydrogen bond, Carbon-carbon bond, Disulfide bond and Glycosidic bond) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid... An interest rate is the rental price of money. ... September is the ninth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with 30 days. ... Washington, D.C. is the capital city of the United States of America. ... The term credit can have several meanings in different contexts. ... October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ...


He was the U.S. ambassador to Russia from 1818 until 1821, and a member of the French Spoliation Claims Commission in 1831. An ambassador, rarely embassador, is a diplomatic official accredited to a foreign sovereign or government, or to an international organization, to serve as the official representative of his or her own country. ... 1818 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1831 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


He died in 1848 and is buried at Nashville City Cemetery in Nashville, Tennessee. 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Nashville skyline Nashville is the capital of the U.S. state of Tennessee. ...


Campbell County, Tennessee is named in his honor. Campbell County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ...


This article incorporates facts obtained from the public domain Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ...

United States Secretaries of the Treasury Seal of the United States Department of the Treasury
Hamilton | Wolcott | Dexter | Gallatin | Campbell | Dallas | Crawford | Rush | Ingham | McLane | Duane | Taney | Woodbury | Ewing | Forward | Spencer | Bibb | Walker | Meredith | Corwin | Guthrie | Cobb | Thomas | Dix | Chase | Fessenden | McCulloch | Boutwell | Richardson | Bristow | Morrill | Sherman | Windom | Folger | Gresham | McCulloch | Manning | Fairchild | Windom | Foster | Carlisle | Gage | Shaw | Cortelyou | MacVeagh | McAdoo | Glass | Houston | Mellon | Mills | Woodin | Morgenthau | Vinson | Snyder | Humphrey | Anderson | Dillon | Fowler | Barr | Kennedy | Connally | Shultz | Simon | Blumenthal | Miller | Regan | Baker | Brady | Bentsen | Rubin | Summers | O'Neill | Snow
Preceded by:
Albert Gallatin
United States Secretary of the Treasury
1814
Succeeded by:
Alexander J. Dallas

  Results from FactBites:
 
Beers: Campbell p. 119 (508 words)
John Campbell (the great-grandfather of Graham S.) was a native of York county, Penn., and moving to Washington county about 1778, located on a tract of 191 acres, called "Fumanah," in Cross Creek township.
George W. Campbell was born September 26, 1826, and passed his youth on the home place.
Campbell possesses the confidence of the community, and is a very successful man. In 1890 he was elected justice of the peace, being an active member of the Republican party.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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