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Encyclopedia > George W. Bush administration
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The Bush administration includes President George W. Bush, Vice President Richard Cheney, Bush's Cabinet, and other select officials and advisors. The Bush administration took office on January 20, 2001, and continues through to the present day. The administration's term is scheduled to end at noon on January 20th, 2009, when the administration of the 44th President, to be elected in November 2008, is to take office. Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford Bitch ass face Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States of America is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941) is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. Members are seated according to order of precedence.
Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. Members are seated according to order of precedence.

Bush's cabinet has included figures that were prominent in past administrations, notably former Secretary of State Colin Powell who had served as United States National Security Advisor under Ronald Reagan. Former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld had served as White House Chief of Staff and Secretary of Defense under Gerald Ford; Rumsfeld's successor, Robert Gates, served as Director of Central Intelligence under George H.W. Bush. Vice President Richard Cheney served as Secretary of Defense under George H. W. Bush. United States Cabinet: President George W. Bush answers a question from the reporter at the end of a Cabinet Meeting to discuss his energy plan, Wednesday May 16, 2001. ... United States Cabinet: President George W. Bush answers a question from the reporter at the end of a Cabinet Meeting to discuss his energy plan, Wednesday May 16, 2001. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (137th in leap years). ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States order of precedence is a nominal and symbolic hierarchy of important positions within the government of the United States. ... General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... The Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, commonly referred to as the National Security Advisor, serves as the chief advisor to the President of the United States on national security issues. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and The role of the Secretary of Defense is to be the principal defense policy advisor to the President and is responsible for the formulation of general defense... Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is a U.S. politician and businessman, who was the 13th Secretary of Defense under President Gerald Ford from 1975–1977, and the 21st Secretary of Defense under President George W. Bush from 2001–2006. ... Joshua B. Bolten, the current White House Chief of Staff. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... Robert Michael Gates, Ph. ... The Office of Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) was established on January 23rd 1946 with Adm. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941) is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ...


Bush places a high value on personal loyalty and, as a result, his administration has high message discipline. He maintains a "hands-off" style of management that he believes prevents him from being tangled by intricacies that hinder sound decision-making. "I'm confident in my management style. I'm a delegator because I trust the people I've asked to join the team. I'm willing to delegate. That makes it easier to be President," he said in an interview with Diane Sawyer on ABC in December of 2003. Critics allege, however, that Bush is willing to overlook mistakes[1] made by loyal subordinates, and that Bush has surrounded himself with "yes men".[2] Loyalty is faithfulness or devotion to a person or cause. ... Message discipline is the concept that politicians and other public policy advocates should talk about what is relevant to achieve their aims, and not allow themselves to be sidetracked either by their own random thoughts or the random questions of media or citizens. ... Diane Sawyer is a television journalist for the U.S. network ABC News and co-anchor of ABCs Good Morning America, along with with Robin Roberts. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... A hierarchy (in Greek hieros = sacred, arkho = rule) is a system of ranking and organizing things. ...


There has been only one non-Republican present in Bush's cabinet: Secretary of Transportation Norman Mineta, the first Asian American cabinet secretary, who had previously served as Secretary of Commerce under Bill Clinton, is a Democrat. Mineta resigned from Bush's cabinet on July 7, 2006 to pursue "other challenges".[3] Mary Peters, a Republican, was nominated and confirmed to succeed him as Transportation Secretary. The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Democratic Party. ... Seal of the United States Department of Transportation The United States Secretary of Transportation is the head of the United States Department of Transportation. ... Norman Yoshio Mineta (born November 12, 1931) is an American politician of the Democratic Party. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... The office of the U.S. Secretary of Commerce in the mid-20th century. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... Mary E. Peters Mary E. Peters is an American public servant and businesswoman and President George W. Bushs nominee for Department of Transportation Secretary. ...

Contents

Cabinet

President Bush meeting with his Cabinet at the White House.
President Bush meeting with his Cabinet at the White House.
Office Name Term
President George W. Bush 2001—
Vice President Richard B. Cheney 2001—
Sec. of State Colin L. Powell 2001–2005
Condoleezza Rice 2005—
Sec. of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld 2001–2006
Robert M. Gates 2006—
Sec. of the Treasury Paul H. O'Neill 2001–2003
John W. Snow 2003–2006
Henry M. Paulson 2006—
Attorney General John D. Ashcroft 2001–2005
Alberto R. Gonzales 2005—
Sec. of the Interior Gale A. Norton 2001–2006
Dirk Kempthorne 2006—
Sec. of Agriculture Ann M. Veneman 2001–2005
Michael O. Johanns 2005—
Sec. of Commerce Donald L. Evans 2001–2005
Carlos M. Gutierrez 2005—
Sec. of Labor Elaine L. Chao 2001—
Sec. of HHS Tommy G. Thompson 2001–2005
Michael O. Leavitt 2005—
Sec. of HUD Melquiades R. Martinez 2001–2003
Alphonso R. Jackson 2004—
Sec. of Transportation Norman Y. Mineta 2001–2006
Mary Peters 2006—
Sec. of Energy E. Spencer Abraham 2001–2005
Samuel W. Bodman 2005—
Sec. of Education Roderick R. Paige 2001–2005
Margaret Spellings 2005—
Sec. of Veterans Affairs Anthony J. Principi 2001–2005
R. James Nicholson 2005—
Sec. of Homeland Security Thomas J. Ridge 2003–2005
Michael Chertoff 2005—

Image File history File links BUSHCABINET.jpg‎ http://www. ... Image File history File links BUSHCABINET.jpg‎ http://www. ... North façade of the White House, seen from Pennsylvania Avenue. ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford Bitch ass face Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States of America is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941) is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and The role of the Secretary of Defense is to be the principal defense policy advisor to the President and is responsible for the formulation of general defense... Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is a U.S. politician and businessman, who was the 13th Secretary of Defense under President Gerald Ford from 1975–1977, and the 21st Secretary of Defense under President George W. Bush from 2001–2006. ... Robert Michael Gates, Ph. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Paul Henry ONeill (born December 4, 1935) served as the 72nd United States Secretary of the Treasury for part of President George W. Bushs first Administration. ... John W. Snow John William Snow, Ph. ... Henry Paulson Henry M. (Hank) Paulson, Jr. ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) was the 79th Attorney General of the United States. ... Alberto R. Gonzales (born August 4, 1955 in San Antonio, Texas, USA) is the current United States. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Secretary of the Interior Gale Norton Gale Ann Norton (born March 11, 1954) served as the 48th United States Secretary of the Interior, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Dirk Arthur Kempthorne (born October 29, 1951 in San Diego, California), is the current U.S. Secretary of the Interior, serving since May 2006. ... The United States Secretary of Agriculture is the head of the United States Department of Agriculture concerned with land and food as well as agriculture and rural development. ... Ann Margaret Veneman (born June 29, 1949) is currently the Executive Director of UNICEF. She was the first woman to become the United States Secretary of Agriculture. ... Michael Owen Johanns (born June 18, 1950 in Osage, Iowa) is an American Republican politician. ... The office of the U.S. Secretary of Commerce in the mid-20th century. ... Donald Evans Donald Louis Evans (born July 27, 1946) was the 35th U.S. Secretary of Commerce. ... Carlos M. Gutierrez (originally Gutiérrez) (born November 4, 1953) is the 35th U.S. Secretary of Commerce, succeeding Donald Evans. ... The United States Secretary of Labor is the head of the United States Department of Labor. ... Elaine Lan Chao (Traditional Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chao Hsiao-lan;[1] born March 26, 1953) currently serves as the 24th United States Secretary of Labor in the Cabinet of President of the United States George W. Bush. ... The United States Secretary of Health and Human Services is the head of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Tommy George Thompson (born November 19, 1941), a United States politician, was the 7th U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services and the 42nd Governor of Wisconsin. ... Michael O. Leavitt Michael Okerlund Leavitt (born February 11, 1951 in Cedar City, Utah) is an American, and is currently the Secretary of Health and Human Services. ... The United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development is the head of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Melquíades Rafael Mel Martínez (born October 23, 1946) is a Cuban-born American politician, currently a United States Senator from Florida and has agreed to head the Republican National Committee, after the partys current chairman, Ken Mehlman, steps down. ... Alphonso Roy Jackson (born September 9, 1945 in Marshall, Texas) is the current and 13th United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). ... Seal of the United States Department of Transportation The United States Secretary of Transportation is the head of the United States Department of Transportation. ... Norman Yoshio Mineta (born November 12, 1931) is an American politician of the Democratic Party. ... Mary E. Peters Mary E. Peters is an American public servant and businesswoman and President George W. Bushs nominee for Department of Transportation Secretary. ... The United States Secretary of Energy is the head of the United States Department of Energy, concerned as the name suggests, with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Edward Spencer Abraham (born June 12, 1952 in East Lansing, Michigan) is an American politician, of Lebanese Christian extraction. ... Samuel Wright Bodman III, Sc. ... The United States Secretary of Education is the head of the Department of Education. ... Roderick Raynor Rod Paige (born June 17, 1933), served as the 7th United States Secretary of Education from 2001 to 2005. ... Margaret Spellings (born Margaret Dudar on November 30, 1957) is the current Secretary of Education under the administration of U.S. President George W. Bush and was previously Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy to Bush. ... The United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs is the head of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, the department concerned with veterans benefits and related matters. ... Anthony Joseph Principi (born April 16, 1944) was the 4th United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs. ... Robert James Jim Nicholson is the current United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs. ... The United States Secretary of Homeland Security is the head of the United States Department of Homeland Security, the body concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... Thomas Joseph Ridge (born August 27, 1945 near Pittsburgh) is a U.S. political figure who served as a member of the United States House of Representatives (1983–1995), Governor of Pennsylvania (1995–2001), Assistant to the President for Homeland Security (2001–2003), and the first United States Secretary of... Michael Chertoff (born November 28, 1953) is the current United States Secretary of Homeland Security. ...

Other advisors and officials

The Director of National Intelligence (DNI) is the United States government official subject to the authority, direction and control of the President of the United States who is responsible under the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 for: Serving as the principal adviser to the President of the... John Dimitri Negroponte (born July 21, 1939 in the United Kingdom) (IPA ) is an American (of Greek origin) career diplomat. ... John Michael Mike McConnell, is the current United States Director of National Intelligence. ... The Office of Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) was established on January 23rd 1946 with Adm. ... George Tenet George John Tenet (born January 5, 1953) is Distinguished Professor in the Practice of Diplomacy at Georgetown University and was previously the Director of Central Intelligence for the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. ... John E. McLaughlin, Acting Director of Central Intelligence, 2004. ... Porter Goss Porter Johnston Goss (born November 26, 1938) is an American politician, who was the last Director of Central Intelligence and the first Director of the Central Intelligence Agency following the passage of the IRPTA 2004 Act, which abolished the DCI position. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Michael Vincent Hayden (born March 17, 1945 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) holds the rank of General in the United States Air Force, which describes him as the highest-ranking military intelligence officer in the armed forces. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Louis Freeh was the fifteenth director of the FBI. He oversaw the agency for nearly 10 years during one of the most difficult periods of its history. ... SALUT Jaimerais devenir agent de la FBI au togo,car je veux servir lamerique et le monde entier. ... Robert Swan Mueller III (born August 7, 1944) is the current Director of the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation. ... The Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, commonly referred to as the National Security Advisor, serves as the chief advisor to the President of the United States on national security issues. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... Stephen J. Hadley, Assistant to the President For National Security Affairs in George W. Bushs second term administration. ... EPA redirects here. ... Christine Todd Christie Whitman (born September 26, 1946) is an American Republican politician and author, who served as the 50th Governor of New Jersey and was the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency in the administration of President George W. Bush. ... Michael O. Leavitt Michael Okerlund Leavitt (born February 11, 1951 in Cedar City, Utah) is an American, and is currently the Secretary of Health and Human Services. ... Stephen L. Johnson Stephen L. Johnson (born March 21, 1951 in Washington D.C) is an American career civil servant. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... United States Ambasadors to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... John Dimitri Negroponte (born July 21, 1939 in the United Kingdom) (IPA ) is an American (of Greek origin) career diplomat. ... John Danforth John Claggett Danforth (born September 5, 1936), also referred to as Jack Danforth, is a former United States Ambassador to the United Nations and former Republican United States Senator from Missouri. ... John Robert Bolton (born November 20, 1948), an attorney and an American diplomat in several Republican administrations, served as the interim[1] U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations with the title of ambassador, from August 2005 until December 2006, on a recess appointment. ... The FCCs official seal. ... Michael Powell Michael Kevin Powell (born March 23, 1963) is an American Republican politician. ... Kevin J. Martin Kevin Jeffrey Martin (born December 14, 1966 in Charlotte, North Carolina, raised in Weddington, North Carolina), is the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. ... The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is a body within the Executive Office of the President of the United States which is tasked with coordinating United States Federal agencies. ... Mitchell Elias Mitch Daniels, Jr. ... Joshua Brewster Bolten (born August 16, 1955[], although other sources list his year of birth as 1954) is an American who was named as U.S. President George W. Bushs second White House Chief of Staff on March 28, 2006, replacing Andrew Card on April 14, 2006. ... Rob Portman speaks on March 17, 2005 at the White House ceremony at which President George W. Bush nominated him to be the next U.S. Trade Representative. ... Joshua B. Bolten, the current White House Chief of Staff. ... Andy Card Andrew Hill Card Jr. ... Joshua Brewster Bolten (born August 16, 1955[], although other sources list his year of birth as 1954) is an American who was named as U.S. President George W. Bushs second White House Chief of Staff on March 28, 2006, replacing Andrew Card on April 14, 2006. ... The White House Counsel is a staff appointee of the President of the United States. ... Alberto R. Gonzales (born August 4, 1955 in San Antonio, Texas, USA) is the current United States. ... Harriet Ellan Miers (born August 10, 1945 in Dallas, Texas) is an American lawyer, and former White House Counsel. ... Fred Fisher Fielding (born March 21, 1939) is senior partner at Wiley, Rein, & Fielding, a Washington, D.C. law firm. ... Karen Parfitt Hughes (born December 27, 1956 in Paris, France) is a Republican U.S. political professional from the state of Texas. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... The White House Press Secretary is a senior White House official with a rank one step below Presidential Cabinet level. ... Ari Fleischer conducts a White House press conference Lawrence Ari Fleischer (born October 13, 1960) was the press secretary for U.S. President George W. Bush from January 2001 to July 2003. ... Scott McClellan in the press room of the White House Puffy McMoonface (born February 14, 1968) was the White House Press Secretary (2003-2006) for President George W. Bush. ... Tony Snow Robert Anthony Tony Snow, (born June 1, 1955) is the current White House Press Secretary for George W. Bush. ... A body man is, in American political jargon, a personal assistant to a politician or political candidate. ... Blake Gottesman Blake Gottesman (born 1980) is the current personal aide and body man to President George W. Bush, and has worked for Bush since his presidential campaign began in 1999. ... Joe Hagin (born January 6, 1956) is the current Deputy White House Chief of Staff for President George W. Bush. ... Joshua Brewster Bolten (born August 16, 1955[], although other sources list his year of birth as 1954) is an American who was named as U.S. President George W. Bushs second White House Chief of Staff on March 28, 2006, replacing Andrew Card on April 14, 2006. ... Harriet Ellan Miers (born August 10, 1945 in Dallas, Texas) is an American lawyer, and former White House Counsel. ... Karl Christian Rove (born December 25, 1950) is Deputy Chief of Staff to President George W. Bush. ... Joel Kaplan Joel Kaplan is the White House Deputy Chief of Staff for Policy for U.S President George W. Bush. ...

Supreme Court nominations and appointments

Bush nominated the following people to the Supreme Court of the United States: John Roberts is sworn in as Chief Justice by Associate Justice John Paul Stevens in the East Room of the White House on the same day as his confirmation, September 29, 2005. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the...

John Glover Roberts Jr. ... Sandra Day OConnor (born March 26, 1930) is an American jurist who served as the first female Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1981 to 2006. ... William Hubbs Rehnquist (October 1, 1924 – September 3, 2005) was an American lawyer, jurist, and a political figure, who served as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States and later as the Chief Justice of the United States. ... Harriet Ellan Miers (born August 10, 1945 in Dallas, Texas) is an American lawyer, and former White House Counsel. ... John Glover Roberts Jr. ... Samuel Dale Sam Brownback (born September 12, 1956) is the senior United States senator from the U.S. state of Kansas. ... David Hackett Souter (born September 17, 1939) has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1990. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born... Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ... Harriet Ellan Miers (born August 10, 1945 in Dallas, Texas) is an American lawyer, and former White House Counsel. ...

Federal Reserve appointment

On October 24, 2005, Bush nominated Ben Bernanke to succeed Alan Greenspan as Chairman of the Federal Reserve. The Senate Banking Committee recommended Bernanke's confirmation by a 13-1 voice vote on November 16, 2005. With the full Senate's approval on January 31, 2006 by another voice vote, Bernanke was sworn in on February 1, 2006. October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ben Shalom Bernanke (born December 13, 1953) (pronounced ber-NAN-kee, bər-nan-kē or ), is an American macroeconomist who is the current Chairman of the Board of Governors of the United States Federal Reserve (the Fed). He was previously Chairman of the U.S. Presidents Council of... Alan Greenspan (born March 6, 1926) is an American economist and was Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve of the United States from 1987 to 2006. ... The Chairman of the Board of Governors of the United States Federal Reserve is the head of the central bank of the United States and one of the more important decision-makers in American economic policies. ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central banking system of the United States. ... The United States Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs has jurisdiction over matters related to banks and banking, price controls, deposit insurance, export promotion and controls, federal monetary policy, financial aid to commerce and industry, issuance of redemption of notes, currency and coinage, public and private housing, urban... A voice vote in a legislative body refers to a vote taken on a topic where the participants respond to a question with yea (yes), nay (no), or present (abstain). ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Political philosophy

The guiding political philosophy of the Bush administration has been termed neoconservative. The specific elements of neoconservative leadership have been itemized in policy papers by members of the Project for a New American Century. Administration officials chosen from the membership of the Project for a New American Century (PNAC) began with the selection of the candidate for vice president, Dick Cheney. Others included Richard Armitage, Zalmay Khalilzad, Lewis "Scooter" Libby, Richard Perle, former U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, and Paul Wolfowitz. Neoconservatism describes several distinct political ideologies which are considered new forms of conservatism. ... The Project for the New American Century, or PNAC, is a Washington, DC based think tank. ... Richard L. Armitage Richard Lee Armitage (born April 26, 1945) was the 13th United States Deputy Secretary of State, the second-in-command at the State Department, serving from 2001 to 2005, Previously, he was a high-ranking troubleshooter and negotiator in the Departments of State and Defense. ... Dr. Zalmay Mamozy Khalilzad (Pashtu/Persian: ‎ ) (born 22 March 1951) is the U.S. Ambassador to Iraq. ... I. Lewis Scooter Libby Irve Lewis Scooter Libby, Jr. ... Richard Norman Perle, (born September 16, 1941 in New York City), is an American political advisor and lobbyist who worked for the Reagan administration as an assistant Secretary of Defense and worked on the Defense Policy Board Advisory Committee from 1987 to 2004. ... Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is a U.S. politician and businessman, who was the 13th Secretary of Defense under President Gerald Ford from 1975–1977, and the 21st Secretary of Defense under President George W. Bush from 2001–2006. ... Paul Dundes Wolfowitz (b. ...


In 1998, following perceived Iraqi unwillingness to co-operate with UN weapons inspections, members of the PNAC, including former defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld and Paul Wolfowitz, wrote to President Bill Clinton urging him to remove Saddam Hussein from power using US diplomatic, political and military power. 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (Arabic: [1]; April 28, 1937[2] – December 30, 2006[3]), was the President of Iraq from July 16, 1979, until April 9, 2003. ...


In September 2000, the PNAC issued a report entitled Rebuilding America's Defenses: Strategies, Forces, and Resources For A New Century, proceeding "from the belief that America should seek to preserve and extend its position of global leadership by maintaining the preeminence of U.S. military forces." The group stated that when diplomacy or sanctions fail, the United States must be prepared to take military action. The PNAC argued that the Cold War deployment of forces was obsolete. Defense spending and force deployment must reflect the post-Cold War duties that US forces are obligated to perform. Constabulary duties such as peacekeeping in the Balkans and the enforcement of the No Fly Zones in Iraq put a strain upon, and reduced the readiness of US forces. The PNAC recommended the forward redeployment of US forces at new strategically placed permanent military bases in Southeast Europe and Southeast Asia. Permanent bases would ease the strain on US forces, allowing readiness to be maintained and the carrier fleet to be reduced. Furthermore, PNAC advocated that the US-globalized military should be enlarged, equipped and restructured for the "constabulary" roles associated with shaping the security in critical regions of the world.[4] 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... No-fly zone detail The Iraqi no-fly zones (NFZs) were proclaimed by the United States, United Kingdom and France after the Gulf War of 1991 to protect Kurds in the north and Shiite Muslims in the south. ...


Controversy

Bush's presidency has been characterized by a vigorous defense of "executive privilege", evidenced in such acts as signing Executive Order 13233, which suspends the release of presidential papers, tight control of Congressional inquiries into White House officers such as in the 9/11 Commission's interviews with Condoleezza Rice, Bush and Richard B. Cheney, and the generally high level of coordination between the White House, Congressional Republicans and Senate Republicans in both of Bush's terms. Many commentators have claimed that deference to executive privilege was one of the principal considerations in Bush's administration, when he proposed his three nominations for the Supreme Court, and appointed John R. Bolton to the United Nations.[5][6] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Executive Order 13233, restricting access to the records of former presidents and drafted by White House counsel Alberto R. Gonzales, was issued by President George W. Bush on November 1, 2001 shortly after the September 11, 2001 attacks. ... The Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks, including preparedness for and the immediate response... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941) is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... John Robert Bolton (born November 20, 1948), an attorney and an American diplomat in several Republican administrations, served as the interim[1] U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations with the title of ambassador, from August 2005 until December 2006, on a recess appointment. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ...


Policies of the Bush administration have been criticized for subverting elements of the constitution, undermining treaty obligations, failing to prevent the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and obstructing justice. The suspension of habeas corpus was reversed by the Supreme Court In Hamdi v. Rumsfeld, 542 U.S. 507 (2004). Domestic spying has included undercover infiltration of political organizations with no suspected terrorist affiliations, telephone surveillance without a warrant, and the Carnivore program for internet surveillance. The policy of holding enemy combatants in a legal status outside of either due process of criminal prosecution nor the Geneva conventions for prisoners of war created a legal limbo without a process for adjudication or appeal. The extraordinary rendition of an innocent citizen of Canada, to Syria, caused an international incident involving kidnapping, wrongful imprisonment and torture.[7] The Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank, stated in a white paper that "President Bush's constitutional vision is, in short, sharply at odds with the text, history, and structure of our Constitution, which authorizes a government of limited powers."[8] In common law, habeas corpus (/heɪbiÉ™s kɔɹpÉ™s/) is the name of a legal action or writ by means of which detainees can seek relief from unlawful imprisonment. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the... Holding U.S. citizens designated as enemy combatants by the Executive Branch have a right to challenge their detainment under the Due Process Clause. ... Carnivore is a name given to a system implemented by the Federal Bureau of Investigation that is analogous to wiretapping except in this case, e-mail and other communications are being tapped instead of telephone conversations. ... An enemy combatant has historically referred to members of the armed forces of the state with which another state is at war. ... In United States law, adopted from British law, due process (more fully due process of law) is the principle that the government must normally respect all of a persons legal rights instead of just some or most of those legal rights when the government deprives a person of life... Development of the Geneva Conventions from 1864 to 1949. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Extraordinary rendition and irregular rendition are terms used to describe the extrajudicial transfer of a person from one state to another, and Torture by proxy is used by some critics to describe extraordinary rendition by the United States, with regard to the alleged transfer of suspected terrorists to countries known... The Cato Institute is a libertarian think tank headquartered in Washington, D.C. The Institutes stated mission is to broaden the parameters of public policy debate to allow consideration of the traditional American principles of limited government, individual liberty, free markets, and peace by seeking greater involvement of the... See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... A white paper is an authoritative report; a government report outlining policy; or a document for the purpose of educating industry customers or collecting leads for a company. ...


Ellen Mariani, widow of Louis Neil Mariani, killed in the 911 attacks, has charged George W. Bush, et. al., because "Defendant GWB has not been forthright and honest with regard to his administration's pre-knowledge of the potential of the "911" attacks" (Mariani v. Bush, Case number 03-5273, United States District Court, Eastern District of Pennsylvania). Former White House chief counter-terrorism advisor Richard A. Clarke has criticized both the failure to prevent the attacks of 911, and the response to them in both domestic and foreign policy, in his book Against All Enemies. The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... Richard A. Clarke (born 1951) provided national security advice to four U.S. presidents: Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, consulting on issues of intelligence and terrorism, from 1973 to 2003. ... Cover of Against All Enemies Against All Enemies: Inside Americas War on Terror is a 2004 book by Richard A. Clarke, criticizing past and present presidential administrations for the way they handled the war on terror. ...


The Union of Concerned Scientists published a report, Scientific Integrity in Policymaking, in March of 2004 that criticized the unprecedented "manipulation, suppression, and misrepresentation of science by the Bush administration ... World renowned scientific institutions such as that Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health take decades to build a team of world-class scientific expertise and talent. But they can be severely damaged in short order by the scientifically unethical behavior such as that displayed by the current administration."[9]


Third Way today issued a new report on September 5, 2006 analyzing the Bush administration’s record on national security. The report was released at a press conference in the Capitol with Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, retired General Wesley Clark, Assistant Minority Leader Dick Durbin, House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, Senate Armed Services Committee Ranking Member Carl Levin, and founding Third Way Co-Chair Senator Thomas Carper. In The Neo Con: The Bush Defense Record by the Numbers, Third Way analyzed available data across seven key national security indicators: Iraq, terrorism (broadly defined), Afghanistan, Iran, North Korea, the condition of the American military, and China. The report finds that the numbers lead to an indisputable conclusion that incompetence and a failed strategy have "helped lead us to this dangerous situation".[10] September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Security measures taken to protect the Houses of Parliament in London, England. ... For other uses, see Capitol (disambiguation). ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general of the United States Army. ... Richard Joseph Durbin (born November 21, 1944) is an American politician. ... Steny Hamilton Hoyer (born June 14, 1939) is a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives, representing the Marylands 5th congressional district since 1981. ... Carl Milton Levin (born June 28, 1934) is a Democratic United States Senator from Michigan and is the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Armed Services. ... Thomas Richard Carper (born January 23, 1947) is a United States politician who has been a U.S. Senator from Delaware since 2001. ... Terror is a pronounced state of fear, an overwhelming sense of imminent danger. ...


References

  1. ^ Eleanor (2004-05-28). Gen. Sanchez Gets Promoted. Retrieved on 2007 April 7.
  2. ^ Ackerman, Spencer. "Killing the messenger", Salon, 2004-11-16. Retrieved on 2006-11-20.
  3. ^ Wilber, Del Quentin. "Lone Democrat in Bush Cabinet Is Departing", Washington Post, 2006-06-24. Retrieved on 2006-11-20.
  4. ^ Rebuilding America's Defenses: Strategy, Forces and Resources For a New Century (PDF). Project for the New American Century (September 2000). Retrieved on 2007 April 7.
  5. ^ Baker, Peter. "Privilege at Stake With Nominees", Washington Post, 2005-08-02. Retrieved on 2006-11-20.
  6. ^ Kiely, Kathy. "Senators look for best angle on Miers", USA Today, 2005-10-04. Retrieved on 2006-11-20.
  7. ^ Mayer, Jane. "Outsourcing Torture: The secret history of America’s “extraordinary rendition” program.", The New Yorker, 2005-02-14. Retrieved on 2007-04-01.
  8. ^ Healy, Gene. "Power Surge: The Constitutional Record of George W. Bush.", The Cato Institute, 2006-05-01. Retrieved on 2007-04-01.
  9. ^ Numerous Prominant Signatories. "Scientific Integrity in Policymaking". Union of Concerned Scientists.
  10. ^ Sharon Burke and Harlan Geer. "The Neo Con: The Bush Defense Record by the Numbers". Third Way.

2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (149th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Project for the New American Century (PNAC) is a neo-conservative US think tank based in Washington, DC. Co-founded by William Kristol and Robert Kagan, the group was established in early 1997 as a non-profit organization. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... | April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... | April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ...

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