FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > George VI of the United Kingdom
George VI
King of Great Britain, Ireland and the British
dominions beyond the Seas; Emperor of India
(more...)
Formal portrait, circa 1940–46
Formal portrait, circa 1940–46
Reign 11 December 19366 February 1952
India: 1936–47
Ireland: 1936–49
Coronation 12 May 1937
Predecessor Edward VIII
Successor Elizabeth II
Consort The Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon
Issue
Elizabeth II
Margaret, Countess of Snowdon
Full name
Albert Frederick Arthur George
Titles
HM The King
HRH The Duke of York
HRH The Prince Albert
HRH Prince Albert of Wales
HRH Prince Albert of Cornwall
HRH Prince Albert of York
HH Prince Albert of York
Royal house House of Windsor
Royal anthem God Save the King
Father George V
Mother Mary of Teck
Born 14 December 1895
Sandringham House, Norfolk
Baptised 17 February 1896
St. Mary Magdalene's Church, Sandringham
Died 6 February 1952 (aged 56)
Sandringham House, Norfolk
Burial 15 February 1952
St George's Chapel, Windsor
Occupation Military

George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 18956 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. He was the last Emperor of India (until 1947) and the last King of Ireland (until 1949). The precise style of British Sovereigns has varied over the years. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3425x4821, 1403 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): George VI of the United Kingdom Monarchy in Australia Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from... December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A Royal House or Dynasty is a sort of family name used by royalty. ... The House of Windsor, previously called the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, is the Royal House of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the other Commonwealth Realms. ... Publication of an early version in The Gentlemans Magazine, 15 October 1745. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 - 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, as a result of his creating it from the British branch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... Mary of Teck (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes; 26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953) was the Queen Consort of George V. Queen Mary was also the Empress of India and Queen of Ireland. ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Sandringham House is a country house on 8000 acres (32 km²) of land near the village of Sandringham, Norfolk, which is privately owned by the British Royal Family. ... Norfolk (IPA: //) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Sandringham House is a country house on 8000 acres (32 km²) of land near the village of Sandringham, Norfolk, which is privately owned by the British Royal Family. ... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Sandringham House is a country house on 8000 acres (32 km²) of land near the village of Sandringham, Norfolk, which is privately owned by the British Royal Family. ... Norfolk (IPA: //) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... February 15 is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Members of the public outside St Georges Chapel at Windsor Castle, waiting to watch the Garter Procession St Georges Chapel is the place of worship at Windsor Castle in England. ... Windsor castle, a thousand-year-old fortress transformed into a royal palace. ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The British monarch or Sovereign is the head of state of the United Kingdom and in the British overseas territories. ... A dominion, often Dominion, is the territory or the authority of a dominus (a lord or master). ... December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... New Crowns for Old depicts Disraeli as Abanazer from the pantomime version of Aladdin offering Victoria an Imperial crown in exchange for a Royal one. ... The designation King of Ireland has been used during three periods of Irish history. ...


As the second son of King George V, he was not expected to inherit the throne and spent his early life in the shadow of his elder brother, Edward (known as David to his family and close friends). He served in the Royal Navy during World War I, and after the war took on the usual round of public engagements. He married The Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon in 1923, and they had two daughters, Elizabeth (who succeeded him as Queen Elizabeth II) and Margaret. George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 - 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, as a result of his creating it from the British branch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the oldest of the British armed services (and is therefore the Senior Service). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


At the death of their father in 1936, his brother ascended the throne as Edward VIII. Less than a year later Edward VIII unexpectedly abdicated to marry the twice-divorced American socialite Wallis Simpson. The British Prime Minister, Stanley Baldwin, had informed Edward that he could not marry Mrs. Simpson and remain king. By reason of this abdication, unique in British history, George VI ascended the throne as the third monarch of the House of Windsor. The Instrument of Abdication signed by Edward VIII and his three brothers The Edward VIII abdication crisis refers to events which occurred in 1936, when King-Emperor Edward VIII of the British Empire precipitated a constitutional crisis throughout his realms by his desire to marry his mistress, Mrs. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Duke and Duchess of Windsor on their wedding day. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The House of Windsor, previously called the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, is the Royal House of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the other Commonwealth Realms. ...


Within 24 hours of his accession the Irish parliament (the Oireachtas) passed the External Relations Act, which essentially removed the power of the monarch in Ireland. Further events greatly altered the position of the British monarchy during his reign: three years after his accession the British Empire was at war with Nazi Germany. In the next two years, war with Italy and the Empire of Japan followed. A major consequence of World War II was the decline of the British Empire, with the United States and Soviet Union rising as pre-eminent world powers. With the independence of India and Pakistan, and the foundation of the Republic of Ireland, King George's reign saw the acceleration of the break-up of the Empire and its evolution from Empire to Commonwealth. The Oireachtas is the National Parliament of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Executive Authority (External Relations) Act, 1936 was an enactment of the Oireachtas (Irish parliament) in 1936. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Anthem Kimi ga Yo Imperial Reign Slogan: Fukoku Kyohei Enrich the Country, Strengthen the Military (a. ... Military assets such as the USS Nimitz are one means of power projection on a global scale—a hallmark of a superpower Soviet space station Mir was the worlds most advanced space station until ISS. Global recognition of the Soviet Unions early leadership in space technology represented the... The Republic of Ireland Act was an enactment of Oireachtas Éireann passed in 1948, which came into force on April 18, 1949 and which declared that the official description of Ireland was to be the Republic of Ireland. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...

Contents

Birth and family

The future George VI was given the first name of Albert and was known formally as Prince Albert (or "Bertie" to his family).[1] He was born at York Cottage, on the Sandringham Estate, Norfolk, during the reign of his great-grandmother Queen Victoria. His father was Prince George, Duke of York (later King George V), the second and eldest-surviving son of the Prince (later Edward VII) and Princess of Wales (later Queen Alexandra). His mother was the Duchess of York (later Queen Mary), the eldest daughter of Prince Francis, Duke of Teck and Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge. Sandringham House is a country house on 8000 acres (32 km²) of land near the village of Sandringham, Norfolk, which is privately owned by the British Royal Family. ... Norfolk (IPA: //) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... The title Duke of York is a title of nobility in the British peerage. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 - 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, as a result of his creating it from the British branch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... Princess Alexandra of Denmark (later Queen Alexandra of the United Kingdom; 1 December 1844 – 20 November 1925), was Queen Consort to Edward VII of the United Kingdom and thus Empress of India during her husbands reign. ... Mary of Teck (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes; 26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953) was the Queen Consort of George V. Queen Mary was also the Empress of India and Queen of Ireland. ... His Highness Prince Francis, Duke of Teck (Francis Paul Charles Louis Alexander) (August 28, 1837 - January 21, 1900)), was a member of the British Royal Family, the father of Queen Mary. ... Her Royal Highness Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge (Mary Adelaide Wilhelmina Elizabeth), (November 27, 1833 – October 27, 1897), was a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of King George III. She later held the title of Duchess of Teck by marriage. ...


Albert's birthday (14 December 1895) was the anniversary of the death of his great-grandfather, Prince Albert, the Prince Consort. Uncertain of how the Prince Consort's widow Queen Victoria would take the news of the birth, the Prince of Wales wrote to his son, Prince George, Duke of York, that the Queen had been "rather distressed".[2] Two days later, he wrote again: "I really think it would gratify her if you yourself proposed the name Albert to her".[2] This mollified the baby's great-grandmother, who wrote to the baby's mother, the Duchess of York: "I am all impatience to see the new one, born on such a sad day but rather more dear to me, especially as he will be called by that dear name which is a byword for all that is great and good".[2] He was baptised Albert Frederick Arthur George at St Mary Magdalene's Church near Sandringham three months later.[3] However, his maternal grandmother Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge did not like the first name the baby had been given, and she wrote prophetically that she hoped the last name "may supplant the less favoured one".[4] The second son, Albert was fourth in line for the throne at birth. The third in line to the throne, his older brother Edward, was born more than a year earlier, on 23 June 1894. December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Francis Augustus Charles Albert Emanuel, later HRH The Prince Consort) (26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The Prince of Wales Feathers. This Heraldic badge of the Heir Apparent is derived from the ostrich feathers borne by Edward, the Black Prince. ... Baptism in early Christian art. ... Sandringham House is a country house on 8000 acres (32 km²) of land near the village of Sandringham, Norfolk, which is privately owned by the British Royal Family. ... Her Royal Highness Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge (Mary Adelaide Wilhelmina Elizabeth), (November 27, 1833 – October 27, 1897), was a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of King George III. She later held the title of Duchess of Teck by marriage. ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20... June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Early life

Four kings: King Edward VII (far right), his son George, Prince of Wales (far left), and grandsons Princes Albert (foreground) and Edward (rear), c. 1908
Four kings: King Edward VII (far right), his son George, Prince of Wales (far left), and grandsons Princes Albert (foreground) and Edward (rear), c. 1908

As a great-grandson of Queen Victoria, Albert was styled His Highness Prince Albert of York from birth. In 1898, Queen Victoria issued Letters Patent that granted the children of the eldest son of the Prince of Wales the style Royal Highness. So, at age two, Albert became His Royal Highness Prince Albert of York. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (850x1170, 230 KB) Summary His Britannic Majesty, King-Emperor Edward VII of the United Kingdom together with his son, His Britannic Majesty, King-Emperor George V and grandsons, Kings Edward VIII and George VI. Taken by Her Majesty, Queen-Empress Alexandra... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (850x1170, 230 KB) Summary His Britannic Majesty, King-Emperor Edward VII of the United Kingdom together with his son, His Britannic Majesty, King-Emperor George V and grandsons, Kings Edward VIII and George VI. Taken by Her Majesty, Queen-Empress Alexandra... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... Royal Highness (abbreviation HRH) is a style (His Royal Highness or Her Royal Highness). ...


He often suffered from ill health and was described as "easily frightened and somewhat prone to tears".[5] His parents, the Duke and Duchess of York, were generally removed from their children's day-to-day upbringing, as was the norm in upper-class families of that era. Albert developed a severe stammer that lasted for many years, as well as chronic stomach problems. He suffered from knock knees, and to correct this he was forced to wear splints, which were extremely painful. He was also forced to write with his right hand although he was naturally left-handed.[6] Stuttering, also known as stammering in the United Kingdom, is a speech disorder in which the flow of speech is disrupted by involuntary repetitions and prolongations of sounds, syllables, words or phrases; and involuntary silent pauses or blocks in which the stutterer is unable to produce sounds. ... Genu valgum is commonly referred to as knock knees, a condition where the knees angle in and touch when the legs are straightened. ... People who are left-handed are more dextrous with their left hand than with their right hand: they will probably also use their left hand for tasks such as personal care, cooking, and so on. ...


Queen Victoria died on 22 January 1901, and the Prince of Wales succeeded her as King Edward VII. The Duke of York became the new Prince of Wales. Prince Edward was then second in line for the throne, and Prince Albert was third. January 22 is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Military career and education

From 1909, Albert attended the Royal Naval College, Osborne as a naval cadet. He came bottom of the class in the final examination, but despite this he progressed to the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth in 1911.[7] When Edward VII died on 6 May 1910, Albert's father became King George V. Prince Edward was created Prince of Wales on 2 June 1910, and Albert was now second in line to the throne. Osborne House and its grounds are now open to the public Osborne House is a former royal residence in East Cowes, Isle of Wight, UK. // History The house was built between 1845 and 1851 for Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. ... A cadet is a future officer in the military. ... Britannia Royal Naval College (BRNC), Dartmouth, is the location of initial officer training in the Royal Navy, and is located on a hill overlooking the town of Dartmouth in the county of Devon, England. ... May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (127th in leap years). ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... June 2 is the 153rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (154th in leap years), with 212 days remaining. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...


Albert was commissioned as a midshipman on 15 September 1913 and one year later began service in World War I. He saw action aboard HMS Collingwood in the Battle of Jutland (31 May1 June 1916), which ended as a tactical victory for Germany but a strategic victory for the United Kingdom. Albert did not see further action in the War largely because of ill health caused by a duodenal ulcer.[8] A midshipman is a subordinate officer, or alternatively a commissioned officer of the lowest rank, in the navies of several English-speaking countries. ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... HMS Collingwood was a -class battleship of the Royal Navy. ... Combatants Royal Navy (Grand Fleet) Kaiserliche Marine (High Seas Fleet) Commanders Sir John Jellicoe, Sir David Beatty Reinhard Scheer, Franz von Hipper Strength 28 battleships, 9 battlecruisers, 8 heavy cruisers, 26 light cruisers, 78 destroyers 16 battleships, 5 battlecruisers, 6 pre-dreadnoughts, 11 light cruisers, 61 torpedo-boats Casualties 6... May 31 is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...


In February 1918 Prince Albert was appointed Officer in Charge of Boys at the Royal Naval Air Service's training establishment at Cranwell.[9] With the establishment of the Royal Air Force later that year and the transfer of Cranwell from Navy to Air Force control, Albert transferred from the Royal Navy to the Royal Air Force.[10] He was later appointed Officer Commanding Number 4 Squadron of the Boys' Wing at Cranwell and he remained there until August 1918.[9] Personnel of No 1 Squadron RNAS in late 1914 The Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) was the air arm of the Royal Navy until near the end of World War I, when it merged with the British Armys Royal Flying Corps (RFC) to form the Royal Air Force. ... RAF Cranwell is a Royal Air Force station in Lincolnshire close to the village of Cranwell, near Sleaford. ... The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. ...


After the war, Prince Albert studied history, economics and civics for a year at Trinity College, Cambridge, from October 1919.[11] Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street...


On 3 June 1920, Prince Albert was created Duke of York, Earl of Inverness and Baron Killarney.[12] He then began to take on royal duties, representing his father, the King. June 3 is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... The title Duke of York is a title of nobility in the British peerage. ... The title of Earl of Inverness has been created several times in the Peerage of the Peerage of the United Kingdom, each time as a subsidiary title for a member of the royal family. ... Prince Andrew, the current Duke of York since 1986 Duke of York is also a small island in Papua-New Guinea, see Duke of York (island) The title Duke of York is a title of nobility usually given to the second son of the British monarch, unless the title is...


Marriage

British Royalty
House of Windsor
George VI
   Elizabeth II
   Margaret, Countess of Snowdon

In a time when royals were expected to marry fellow royals, it was unusual that Albert had a great deal of freedom in choosing a prospective wife. In 1920 he met Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, the youngest daughter of Claude Bowes-Lyon, 14th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne and Cecilia Cavendish-Bentinck. He became determined to marry her.[13] The British monarch or Sovereign is the head of state of the United Kingdom and in the British overseas territories. ... The House of Windsor, previously called the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, is the Royal House of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the other Commonwealth Realms. ... Image File history File links Royal_Standard_of_England. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, later Queen Elizabeth (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite; 4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002), was the Queen Consort of George VI from 1936 until his death in 1952. ... Claude George Bowes-Lyon, 14th and 1st Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne (14 March 1855–7 November 1944) was the maternal grandfather of Queen Elizabeth II. He was born at Lowndes Square in London, the son of Claude Bowes-Lyon, 13th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne and his wife, the... Cecilia Nina Bowes-Lyon née Cavendish-Bentinck, (11 September 1862 – 23 June 1938) was the mother of Queen Elizabeth (later Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother) and maternal grandmother and godmother of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. ...


Although Lady Elizabeth was a direct descendent of King Robert I of Scotland and King Henry VII of England, she was, according to British law, a commoner. She rejected his proposal twice and hesitated for nearly two years, reportedly because she was reluctant to make the sacrifices necessary to become a member of the royal family.[14] In the words of Lady Elizabeth's mother, Albert would be "made or marred" by his choice of wife, and after a protracted courtship Elizabeth agreed to marry him.[15] Robert I, King of Scots (Mediaeval Gaelic:Roibert a Briuis; modern Scottish Gaelic: Raibeart Bruis; Norman French: Robert de Brus or Robert de Bruys; 11 July 1274 – 7 June 1329), usually known in modern English as Robert the Bruce, was King of Scotland from 1306 until his death in 1329. ... Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), was the founder and first patriarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... A commoner, in British law, is someone who is neither the Sovereign nor a noble. ...


They were married on 26 April 1923 in Westminster Abbey. The newly-formed British Broadcasting Company wished to record and broadcast the event on radio, but the Chapter vetoed the idea (although the Dean, Herbert Edward Ryle, was in favour).[16] Lady Elizabeth was styled Her Royal Highness The Duchess of York after their marriage. Albert's marriage to a British commoner was considered a modernising gesture.[17] April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (117th in leap years). ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... The British Broadcasting Company Ltd was a British commercial company formed on October 18, 1922 by British and American electrical companies doing business in the United Kingdom. ... This article incorporates text from the Catholic Encyclopedia, which is in the public domain. ... Herbert Edward Ryle (1856 - 1925), was a distinguished Old Testament scholar. ...


The Duke and Duchess of York had two children, Elizabeth (called "Lilibet" by the family), born 21 April 1926, who succeeded her father as Elizabeth II, and Margaret, born 21 August 1930. The Duke and Duchess and their two daughters lived a relatively sheltered life at their London residence, 145 Piccadilly. One of the few stirs was when the Canadian Prime Minister, R. B. Bennett, considered the Duke for Governor General of Canada in 1931 — a proposal that the King rejected on the advice of his ministers.[18] Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... April 21 is the 111th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (112th in leap years). ... 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... August 21 is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Piccadilly is a major London street, running from Hyde Park Corner in the west to Piccadilly Circus in the east. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... Richard Bedford Bennett, 1st Viscount Bennett, PC, KC (July 3, 1870 – June 26, 1947) was the eleventh Prime Minister of Canada from August 7, 1930 to October 23, 1935. ... The Governor General of Canada (French: Gouverneure générale du Canada or Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian Monarch, who is Canadas Head of State; Canada is one of sixteen Commonwealth realms, all of which share a single...


Reluctant king

George VI, Queen Elizabeth and Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret in their coronation robes

On 20 January 1936, King George V died and Prince Edward ascended the throne as Edward VIII. As Edward had no children, Albert was the heir presumptive to the throne until his unmarried brother had any legitimate children, or died. George V had had severe reservations about Edward, saying, "I pray God that my eldest son will never marry and that nothing will come between Bertie and Lilibet and the throne."[19] Less than a year later, on 11 December 1936, Edward VIII abdicated the throne in order to marry his love, the twice-divorced Wallis Warfield Simpson. Edward had been advised by Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin that he could not remain King and marry a divorced woman with two living ex-husbands. Edward chose abdication in preference to abandoning his marriage plans. Thus Prince Albert, Duke of York, was now king, a position he was reluctant to accept. The day before the abdication, he went to London to see his mother, Queen Mary. He wrote in his diary, "When I told her what had happened, I broke down and sobbed like a child."[20] Image File history File links Coronation of King George VI Probably Crown copyright, 1937. ... Image File history File links Coronation of King George VI Probably Crown copyright, 1937. ... Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, later Queen Elizabeth (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite; 4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002), was the Queen Consort of George VI from 1936 until his death in 1952. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... An Heir Presumptive (capitalised) is the person provisionally scheduled to inherit a throne, peerage, or other hereditary honor, but whose position can be displaced by the birth of an Heir Apparent or of a new Heir Presumptive with a better claim to the throne. ... December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Instrument of Abdication signed by Edward VIII and his three brothers The Edward VIII abdication crisis refers to events which occurred in 1936, when King-Emperor Edward VIII of the British Empire precipitated a constitutional crisis throughout his realms by his desire to marry his mistress, Mrs. ... The Duke and Duchess of Windsor on their wedding day. ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... Mary of Teck (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes; 26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953) was the Queen Consort of George V. Queen Mary was also the Empress of India and Queen of Ireland. ...


Courtier and journalist Dermot Morroh alleged that there was brief speculation as to the desirability of bypassing Albert and his brother, Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, in favour of the younger brother Prince George, Duke of Kent. This seems to have been suggested on the grounds that Prince George was at that time the only brother with a son.[21] The Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester (Henry William Frederick Albert; 31 March 1900 – 10 June 1974) was a member of the British Royal Family, the third son of George V of the United Kingdom and Queen Mary, and thus uncle to Elizabeth II. He was appointed regent for his niece... The Prince George, Duke of Kent (George Edward Alexander Edmund) (20 December 1902–25 August 1942) was a member of the British Royal Family, the fourth son of King George V. He held the title of Duke of Kent from 1934 to his death in 1942. ...


Reign

Albert assumed the style and title King George VI to emphasise continuity with his father and restore confidence in the monarchy.[22] The beginning of George VI's reign was taken up by questions surrounding his predecessor and brother, whose titles, style and position were uncertain. He had been introduced as "His Royal Highness Prince Edward" for the Abdication broadcast,[23] but George VI felt that by abdicating and renouncing the succession Edward had lost the right to bear Royal titles, including "Royal Highness".[24] In settling the issue, George's first act as King was to confer upon his brother the title HRH The Duke of Windsor. But the Letters Patent creating the dukedom prevented any wife and children from bearing royal styles. George VI was also forced to buy the royal houses of Balmoral Castle and Sandringham House from Prince Edward, as these were private properties and did not pass to George VI on his accession.[25]Three days after his accession, on his forty-first birthday, he invested his wife, the new Queen, with the Order of the Garter.[26] The peerage title Duke of Windsor was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1937 for The Prince Edward, formerly King of the United Kingdom. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... Balmoral Castle. ... Sandringham House is a country house on 8000 acres (32 km²) of land near the village of Sandringham, Norfolk, which is privately owned by the British Royal Family. ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ...


George VI's coronation took place on 12 May 1937, the previously intended date of Edward's coronation. In a break with tradition, Queen Mary attended the coronation as a show of support for her son.[27] There was no Durbar held in Delhi for George VI, as had occurred for his father, as the cost would have been a burden to the government of India.[28] Rising Indian nationalism made the welcome that the royal couple would have received likely to be muted at best,[29] and a prolonged absence from Britain would have been undesirable in the tense period before World War II. Two overseas tours were undertaken, to France and North America, both of which promised greater strategic advantages in the event of war.[30] British coronations are held in Westminster Abbey. ... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Durbar (Persian darbar) is an Iranian term meaning the Shahs noble court. ... , Delhi (Hindi: , Urdu: , Punjabi: ), sometimes referred to as Dilli, is the second-largest metropolis in India after Mumbai with a population of 13 million. ... The flag of British India British India, circa 1860 The British Raj (Raj in Hindi meaning Rule; from Sanskrit Rajya) was the British rule between 1858 and 1947 of the Indian Subcontinent, which included the present-day India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Burma (Myanmar), whereby these lands were under the colonial... The Indian independence movement incorporated the efforts by Indians to liberate the region from British rule and form the nation-state of India. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


The growing likelihood of war in Europe dominated the early reign of George VI. The King was constitutionally bound to support Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain's appeasement stance towards Adolf Hitler. However, when the King and Queen greeted Chamberlain on his return from negotiating the Munich Agreement in 1938, they invited him to appear on the balcony of Buckingham Palace with them. This public association of the monarchy with a politician was exceptional, as balcony appearances were traditionally restricted to the royal family.[6] World map showing the location of Europe. ... Arthur Neville Chamberlain (18 March 1869 – 9 November 1940), known as Neville Chamberlain, was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1937 to 1940. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Appeasement. ... Hitler redirects here. ... For the annual global security meeting held in Munich, see Munich Conference on Security Policy Chamberlain holds the paper containing the resolution to commit to peaceful methods signed by both Hitler and himself on his return from Germany in September 1938. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ...

George VI, King of Canada, grants Royal Assent to laws in the Canadian Senate, 19 May 1939. His consort, Queen Elizabeth, is to the right

In 1939, the King and Queen undertook an extensive tour of Canada, during which they made a brief visit to the United States. From Ottawa, the royal couple were accompanied throughout the trip by the Prime Minister of Canada, and not a British minister, meaning they were present in both Canada and the US as King and Queen of Canada.[31] George was the first reigning Monarch of Canada to visit North America, though he had been to his Canadian realm previously as Prince Albert and as Duke of York. The Canadian Prime Minister at the time, William Lyon Mackenzie King, hoped that the King's presence in Canada would allow him to demonstrate in reality the principles of the Statute of Westminster 1931, which gave full self-government to the Dominions and recognised each Dominion as having a separate crown. Thus, at his Canadian residence, Rideau Hall, George VI personally accepted and approved the Letter of Credence of the newly appointed U.S. Ambassador to Canada, Daniel Calhoun Roper. The official Royal Tour historian, Gustave Lanctot, stated: "When Their Majesties walked into their Canadian residence, the Statute of Westminster had assumed full reality: the King of Canada had come home."[32] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (600x751, 258 KB) Scanned image of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, King and Queen of Canada, in the Canadian Senate, May 21, 1939. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (600x751, 258 KB) Scanned image of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, King and Queen of Canada, in the Canadian Senate, May 21, 1939. ... The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Canada, proclaimed by King George V, November 21, 1921. ... // The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which a constitutional monarch completes the legislative process of lawmaking by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ... The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full year calendar). ... Motto: Advance Ottawa/Ottawa en avant Location of the City of Ottawa in the Province of Ontario Coordinates: Country Canada Province Ontario Established 1850 as Town of Bytown Incorporated 1855 as City of Ottawa Amalgamated January 1, 2001 Government  - Mayor Larry OBrien  - City Council Ottawa City Council  - Representatives 8... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... In the Politics of the United Kingdom, the Cabinet is a formal body comprised of government officials chosen by the Prime Minister. ... The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Canada, proclaimed by King George V, November 21, 1921. ... Not to be confused with William Lyon Mackenzie, Mackenzie Kings grandfather. ... This article is about the Statute of Westminster relating to the British Empire and its dominions. ... A dominion, often Dominion, is the territory or the authority of a dominus (a lord or master). ... Rideau Hall is the official residence of the Governor General of Canada, and is the place of residence of the Monarch of Canada when visiting Ottawa. ... A Letter of Credence is a formal letter sent by one head of state to another formally accrediting a named individual (usually but not always a diplomat) to be their ambassador in the country of the head of state receiving the letter of credence. ... Categories: Stub | U.S. Secretaries of Commerce | 1867 births | 1943 deaths ... Gustave Lanctot, front row left, part of the Oxford Canadian Ice Hockey Team Gustave Lanctot, OC, FRSC, also spelled Gustave Lanctôt, (5 July 1883 – 2 February 1975) was a Canadian historian and archivist. ...


The entire trip was a measure intended to soften the strong isolationist tendencies among the North American public vis-à-vis the developing tensions in Europe. Although the aim of the tour was mainly political, to shore up Atlantic support for Britain in any upcoming war, the King and Queen were enthusiastically received by the Canadian public.[33] The fear that George would be unfavourably compared to his predecessor, Edward VIII, was dispelled.[34] They were also warmly received by the American people, visiting the 1939 New York World's Fair and staying with President Franklin D. Roosevelt at the White House and at his private estate at Hyde Park, New York.[35] Isolationism is a foreign policy which combines a non-interventionist military and a political policy of economic nationalism (protectionism). ... Trylon, Perisphere and Helicline photo by Sam Gottscho The 1939-40 New York Worlds Fair, located on the current site of Flushing Meadows-Corona Park (also the location of the 1964-1965 New York Worlds Fair), was one of the largest worlds fairs of all time. ... This article is about the office in the United States. ... FDR redirects here. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The Home Of Franklin D Roosevelt National Historic Site preserves the Springwood estate in Hyde Park, New York, United States of America. ... Hyde Park is a town in Dutchess County, New York, United States. ...


When war broke out in 1939, George VI and his wife resolved to stay in London and not flee to Canada, as had been suggested. The King and Queen officially stayed in Buckingham Palace throughout the war, although they usually spent nights at Windsor Castle to avoid bombing raids. George VI and Queen Elizabeth narrowly avoided death when two German bombs exploded in a courtyard at Buckingham Palace whilst they were there.[36] Windsor castle, a thousand-year-old fortress transformed into a royal palace. ... Heinkel He 111 German bomber over the Surrey Docks, Southwark, London (German propaganda photomontage). ...

Eleanor Roosevelt (centre), King George VI and Queen Elizabeth in London, 23 October 1942
Eleanor Roosevelt (centre), King George VI and Queen Elizabeth in London, 23 October 1942

In 1940 Neville Chamberlain was replaced as Prime Minister by Winston Churchill. Throughout the war, the King and Queen provided morale-boosting visits throughout the UK, visiting bomb sites and munitions factories. The Royal Family adhered to rationing restrictions in the country at the time; indeed, U.S. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt during her stay at Buckingham Palace during the war reported expressly on the rationed food served in the Palace and the limited bathwater that was permitted.[37] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political leader who used her stature as First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945 to promote her husbands (Franklin D. Roosevelts) New Deal, as well as civil rights. ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (Can) (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was an English statesman, soldier and author. ... Civilian rationing: A shopkeeper cancels the coupons in a British housewifes ration book Rationing in the United Kingdom is the series of food rationing policies put in place by the government of the United Kingdom during certain wartime periods of the 20th Century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political leader who used her stature as First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945 to promote her husbands (Franklin D. Roosevelts) New Deal, as well as civil rights. ...


Author Will Swift has suggested that a strong bond of friendship was forged between the King and Queen and President and First Lady during the 1939 Royal Tour, which had major significance in the relations between the United States and Great Britain through the war years.[38] However, there have never been credible suggestions that the King took any strategic role in the war; his frequent letters to the President were mostly unanswered, and it was Roosevelt's relationship with Churchill that was critical. Eleanor Roosevelt took a wry view of the utility of kings and queens and the substance of George and Elizabeth ("a little self-consciously regal," was her verdict on Elizabeth).[39]


In 1945, in an echo of Chamberlain's appearance, the King invited Churchill to appear with him on the balcony of Buckingham Palace for the VE Day celebrations. Churchill waves to crowds in Whitehall on the day he broadcast to the nation that the war with Germany had been won, 8 May 1945. ...


Empire to Commonwealth

Statue of George VI at Carlton House Terrace, London

George VI's reign saw the acceleration of the dissolution of the British Empire, which had begun with the Balfour Declaration at the Imperial Conference of 1926, when the Commonwealth came into being and the Dominions were acknowledged to have evolved into sovereign states over a period of years previous — the declaration was formalised in the Statute of Westminster 1931 (Imp.).[40] Download high resolution version (444x734, 43 KB)George VI of the United Kingdom - Statue by W. McMillan, at Carlton House Terrace - London - England photo by and copyright Tagishsimon - 31st May 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old... Download high resolution version (444x734, 43 KB)George VI of the United Kingdom - Statue by W. McMillan, at Carlton House Terrace - London - England photo by and copyright Tagishsimon - 31st May 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old... The East Terrace soon after completion. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... The Balfour Declaration of 1926 is a statement of the October-November 1926 Imperial Conference of British Empire leaders in London. ... Imperial Conferences were gatherings of British Empire government leaders in London in 1887, 1897, 1902, 1907, 1911, 1921, 1923, 1926, 1930 and 1937. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Sovereignty is the exclusive right to exercise supreme political (e. ... This article is about the Statute of Westminster relating to the British Empire and its dominions. ...


Britain's brief League of Nations Mandate over Iraq ended in 1932 with Iraqi independence without membership in the as-yet ill-defined Commonwealth even being considered. This process gathered pace after World War II. Transjordan became independent as the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan in 1946, Burma in January 1948, and Palestine (although divided between Israel and the Arab states) that May; all three opted out of the Commonwealth. After declaring itself a Republic, southern Ireland left the Commonwealth the following year. India became the two independent dominions of India and Pakistan. George relinquished the title of Emperor of India, and became King of India and King of Pakistan instead. In 1950 India became a republic within the Commonwealth, and George VI ceased to be King of India. India recognised George's new title as Head of the Commonwealth.[41] The League of Nations was an international organization founded as a result of the Paris Peace Conference in 1919-1920. ... The British Mandate of Iraq was a League of Nations Class A mandate under Article 22 and entrusted to Britain when the Ottoman Empire was divided in 1919 by the Treaty of Versailles following World War I. This award was completed on April 25, 1920, at the Sanremo conference in... Map of the territory of the British Mandate of Palestine The Emirate of Transjordan was an autonomous political division of the British Mandate of Palestine, created as an administrative entity in April 1921 before the Mandate came into effect. ... Flag Britain unilaterally closed the territory east of the Jordan River (Transjordan) to Jewish settlement and organized Transjordan as an autonomous state in 1923. ... New Crowns for Old depicts Disraeli as Abanazer from the pantomime version of Aladdin offering Victoria an Imperial crown in exchange for a Royal one. ... The present British Monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, is the second to be recognised as Head of the Commonwealth in the 53 member states of the Commonwealth of Nations. ...


Illness and death

The stress of the war had taken its toll on the King's health,[42] exacerbated by his heavy smoking and subsequent development of lung cancer among other ailments including arteriosclerosis. Increasingly his daughter Princess Elizabeth, the heir presumptive to the throne, would take on more of the royal duties as her father's health deteriorated. In September 1951, George VI underwent a pneumonectomy where his left lung was removed following the discovery of a malignant tumor.[43] The cigarette is the most common method of smoking tobacco. ... Lung cancer is the malignant transformation and expansion of lung tissue, and is the most lethal of all cancers worldwide, responsible for 1. ... // Introduction Arteriosclerosis means the hardening of the arteries in Greek. ... A pneumonectomy (or pneumectomy) is an surgical procedure to remove a lung. ...


In January 1952, despite advice from those close to him, he went to the airport to see off Princess Elizabeth, who was going on a tour of Australia. Before takeoff he reportedly said to Bobo Macdonald, Elizabeth's nanny in childhood who was accompanying her on the trip, "Take care of Lilibet for me", and she promised she would.[44] It was the last time he was to see her.


On 6 February 1952, George VI died in his sleep at Sandringham House in Norfolk, at the age of 56.[42] After Lying-in-State at Westminster Hall, his funeral took place on 15 February, and he was interred in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle.[45] In 2002, the remains of his wife Queen Elizabeth and the ashes of his daughter, Princess Margaret, were interred in the King George VI Memorial Chapel in St George's Chapel alongside him. February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Lying-in-state is the term used during a major funeral procession when the coffin is placed on public view to allow members of the public to pay their respects to the deceased. ... February 15 is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Members of the public outside St Georges Chapel at Windsor Castle, waiting to watch the Garter Procession St Georges Chapel is the place of worship at Windsor Castle in England. ... Windsor castle, a thousand-year-old fortress transformed into a royal palace. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Other information

A plaque on Manchester Town Hall records George VI's titles before giving up the title Emperor of India
A plaque on Manchester Town Hall records George VI's titles before giving up the title Emperor of India

ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1168x1760, 392 KB) Summary A plaque on the Manchester Town Hall records George VIs titles before giving up being Emperor of India. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1168x1760, 392 KB) Summary A plaque on the Manchester Town Hall records George VIs titles before giving up being Emperor of India. ... Manchester Town Hall Manchester Town Hall is a building in Manchester, England that houses the citys government and administrative functions. ... New Crowns for Old depicts Disraeli as Abanazer from the pantomime version of Aladdin offering Victoria an Imperial crown in exchange for a Royal one. ...

Titles

Flag of United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Motto  2(French) God and my right Anthem God Save the Queen 3 United Kingdom() – on the European continent() – in the European Union() [] Capital London Largest conurbation (population) Greater London Urban Area Official languages English (de facto)4 Government  -  Monarch Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair Formation  -  Acts of Union...

  • 18951898: His Highness Prince Albert of York
  • 1898–1901: His Royal Highness Prince Albert of York
  • 1901: His Royal Highness Prince Albert of Cornwall and York
  • 1901–1910: His Royal Highness Prince Albert of Wales
  • 1910–1920: His Royal Highness The Prince Albert
  • 1920–1936: His Royal Highness The Duke of York
    • in Scotland: May 1929: His Grace The Lord High Commissioner
  • 1936–1952: His Majesty The King

and, occasionally, outside of the United Kingdom, and with regard to India (until the King ceased to use the imperial title upon India's independence) 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Indias Independence Day (Hindi: Swatantrata Divas) is celebrated on August 15 to commemorate its independence from British rule and its birth as a sovereign nation on that day in 1947. ...

  • 1936–1947: His Imperial Majesty The King–Emperor

Isle of Man: 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_isle_of_man. ...

Islands of Guernsey & Jersey: The Lord of Mann is the current ruler of the Isle of Man. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Guernsey. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Jersey. ...

Bold textInsert non-formatted text here This statue of Rollo the Viking (founder of the fiefdom of Normandy) stands in Falaise, Calvados, birthplace of his descendant William I the Conqueror (the Duke of Normandy who became King of England). ...

Styles

Monarchical Styles of
King George VI of the United Kingdom
Reference style His Majesty
Spoken style Your Majesty
Alternative style Sir

From his brother's ascension to the throne, on 20 January 1936, until his own accession, on 11 December 1936, Prince Albert held the style His Royal Highness, The Prince Albert, Duke of York, Earl of Inverness and Baron Killarney. Image File history File links Edward's_crown_PD_cleaned. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... Look up majesty in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Majesty is an English word rooting in the Latin Maiestas, meaning literally, Greatness. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


His full style as king was, from 11 December 1936, George the Sixth, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas King, Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India. Following 1948 the style Emperor of India was dropped, and the King was styled George the Sixth, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas King, Defender of the Faith. December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Honours

This is a list of the honours and appointments of George VI of the United Kingdom. ...

Legacy

There are a number of geographical features, roads, and institutions named after George VI. These include:

King George Hospital is an NHS hospital in London, United Kingdom. ... British Columbia provincial highway 99A is the current designation of Highway 99s original 1942 alignment. ... Eastern terminus of the Expo Line Skytrain. ... Motto: Building a sustainable region Area 2,878. ... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo - Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 36 - Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area Ranked 4th - Total 944,735 km... George VI Sound or Canal Jorge VI or Canal Presidente Sarmiento or Canal Seaver or King George VI Sound or King George the Sixth Sound is a major bay/fault depression, 300 miles (483 km) long in the shape of the letter J, which skirts the east and south shores... The King George VI Chase is a United Kingdom National Hunt horse race for five-year-old and above horses run over a distance of 3 miles at Kempton Park Racecourse on Boxing Day. ...

Ancestors

George VI's ancestors in three generations
George VI of the United Kingdom
Father:
George V of the United Kingdom
Paternal grandfather:
Edward VII of the United Kingdom
Paternal great-grandfather:
Albert, Prince Consort
Paternal great-grandmother:
Victoria of the United Kingdom
Paternal grandmother:
Alexandra of Denmark
Paternal great-grandfather:
Christian IX of Denmark
Paternal great-grandmother:
Louise of Hesse-Kassel
Mother:
Mary of Teck
Maternal grandfather:
Francis, Duke of Teck
Maternal great-grandfather:
Duke Alexander of Württemberg
Maternal great-grandmother:
Claudine Rhédey von Kis-Rhéde
Maternal grandmother:
Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge
Maternal great-grandfather:
Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge
Maternal great-grandmother:
Princess Augusta, Duchess of Cambridge

George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 - 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, as a result of his creating it from the British branch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Francis Augustus Charles Albert Emanuel, later HRH The Prince Consort) (26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... Princess Alexandra of Denmark (later Queen Alexandra of the United Kingdom; 1 December 1844 – 20 November 1925), was Queen Consort to Edward VII of the United Kingdom and thus Empress of India during her husbands reign. ... Christian IX of Denmark (April 8, 1818 – January 29, 1906) was King of Denmark from November 15, 1863 to January 29, 1906. ... Louise of Hesse-Cassel, Luise Wilhelmine Friederike Caroline Auguste Julie von Hessen-Kassel (in Danish, Louise Wilhelmine Frederikke Caroline Auguste Julie), b Kassel 7 Sep 1817, d Bernstorff 29 Sep 1898, was a daughter of ancient German princely family, the Landgraves of Hesse, and became Queen of Denmark, being the... Mary of Teck (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes; 26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953) was the Queen Consort of George V. Queen Mary was also the Empress of India and Queen of Ireland. ... His Highness Prince Francis, Duke of Teck (Francis Paul Charles Louis Alexander) (August 28, 1837 - January 21, 1900)), was a member of the British Royal Family, the father of Queen Mary. ... Duke Alexander of Württemberg (9 September 1804 – 4 July 1885) was the father of His Serene Highness Prince Francis of Teck and the grandfather to the Adolphus Cambridge, 1st Marquess of Cambridge and Queen Mary of Great Britain, wife of King George V. He was the son of Duke... Countess Claudia Rhédey von Kis-Rhéde, Countess of Hohenstein (September 21, 1812 - October 1, 1841) was the wife of Duke Alexander of Württemberg. ... Her Royal Highness Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge (Mary Adelaide Wilhelmina Elizabeth), (November 27, 1833 – October 27, 1897), was a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of King George III. She later held the title of Duchess of Teck by marriage. ... Prince Adolphus Frederick, Duke of Cambridge (24 February 1774-8 July 1850), was the tenth-born child and seventh son of King George III of the United Kingdom and Queen Charlotte. ... Princess Augusta of Hesse-Kassel (Augusta Wilhelmina Louisa; later Duchess of Cambridge; 25 July 1797 – 6 April 1889) was the consort of Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge, the tenth-born child, and seventh son, of George III and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. ...

Notes and sources

  1. ^ Windsor, The Duke of (1951). A King's Story. London: Cassell & Co Ltd, p.9. 
  2. ^ a b c Wheeler-Bennett, Sir John (1958). King George VI: His Life and Reign. New York: Macmillan, pp.7-8. 
  3. ^ His godparents were Queen Victoria, Empress Frederick, Grand Duke Friedrich Wilhelm of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, his wife the Grand Duchess (formerly Princess Augusta of Cambridge), the Crown Prince of Denmark, the Duke of Connaught, Prince Adolphus of Teck, and the Duchess of Fife. Source: The Times, Tuesday 18 February 1896, p.11.
  4. ^ Bradford, Sarah (1989). King George VI. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, p.2. ISBN 0297796674. 
  5. ^ Wheeler-Bennett, pp.17-18.
  6. ^ a b Matthew, H. C. G. (2004), "George VI (1895–1952)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press 
  7. ^ Bradford, pp.41-45.
  8. ^ Bradford, pp.55-76.
  9. ^ a b RAF Cranwell - College History. Retrieved on 2007-04-16.
  10. ^ Bradford, pp.55-76.
  11. ^ Wheeler-Bennett, pp.128-131.
  12. ^ Yvonne Demoskoff's Royalty: Peerage. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  13. ^ Vickers, Hugo (2006). Elizabeth: The Queen Mother. Arrow Books/Random House, pp.31, 44. ISBN 9780099476627. 
  14. ^ Bradford, p.106.
  15. ^ Bradford, p.77.
  16. ^ Reith, John (1949). Into the Wind. London: Hodder and Staughton, p.94. 
  17. ^ Roberts, Andrew; Edited by Antonia Fraser (2000). The House of Windsor. London: Cassell & Co., pp.57-58. ISBN 0-304-35406-6. 
  18. ^ Howarth, Patrick (1987). George VI. Hutchinson, p.53. ISBN 0091710006. 
  19. ^ Ziegler, Philip (1990). King Edward VIII: The Official Biography. London: Collins, p.199. ISBN 0002157411. 
  20. ^ Wheeler-Bennett, p.286.
  21. ^ Howarth, p.63.
  22. ^ Howarth, p.66.
  23. ^ Sinclair, David (1988). Two Georges: the Making of the Modern Monarchy. Hodder and Staughton, p.224. ISBN 0340332409. 
  24. ^ Howarth, p.143.
  25. ^ Ziegler, p.326.
  26. ^ Bradford, p.223.
  27. ^ Bradford, p.214.
  28. ^ Vickers, p.175.
  29. ^ Bradford, p.209.
  30. ^ Bradford, pp.269, 281.
  31. ^ The Royal Tour of 1939. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  32. ^ Galbraith, William (1989), "Fiftieth Anniversary of the 1939 Royal Visit", Canadian Parliamentary Review 12 (3) 
  33. ^ Vickers, p.187.
  34. ^ Bradford, pp.298-299.
  35. ^ The Times Monday, 12 June 1939 p. 12 col. A.
  36. ^ Churchill, Winston (1949). The Second World War. Cassell and Co. Ltd, p.334. 
  37. ^ Goodwin, Doris Kearns (1994). No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II. New York: Simon & Schuster, p.380. 
  38. ^ Swift, Will (2004). The Roosevelts and the Royals: Franklin and Eleanor, the King and Queen of England, and the Friendship that Changed History. John Wiley & Sons. 
  39. ^ Lash, Joseph P. (1971). Eleanor and Franklin. New York: Norton, p.582. 
  40. ^ The History of the Commonwealth. The Commonwealth Secretariat. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
  41. ^ King George VI. The Official Web-Site of the British Monarchy. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
  42. ^ a b The official web-site of the British Monarchy. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  43. ^ Bradford, p.454.
  44. ^ Fisher, Graham; Fisher, Heather (1982). The Queen's Family. London: W. H. Allen & Co. ISBN 0491028679. 
  45. ^ Bradford, p.462.

Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20... Sir John Wheeler Wheeler-Bennett, GCVO, MCG, OBE, FRSL, FBA, (October 13, 1902-December 9, 1975) was a conservative British historian of German and diplomatic history. ... A godparent, in some denominations of Christianity, is someone who sponsors a childs baptism. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... Victoria of the United Kingdom (born Victoria Adelaide Mary Louise) 21 November 1840 – 5 August 1901) was the eldest child and daughter of Queen Victoria and her consort Albert. ... Friedrich Wilhelm, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz Friedrich Wilhelm, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (17 October 1819-30 May 1904) was a Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. ... Princess Augusta Caroline Charlotte Elizabeth Mary Sophia Louise of Cambridge (19 July 1822 – 5 December 1916), was a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of King George III. She later married into the Grand Ducal House of Mecklenburg-Strelitz and became the Grand Duchess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. ... Frederik VIII (June 3, 1843 – May 14, 1912), was King of Denmark from 1906–1912. ... Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn (Arthur William Patrick Albert; 1 May 1850 – 16 January 1942) was a member of the British Royal Family, a son of Queen Victoria. ... Adolphus Cambridge, 1st Marquess of Cambridge(Adolphus Charles Alexander Albert Edward George Philip Louis Landislaus), neè His Serene Highness Prince Adolphus of Teck and later His Highness The Duke of Teck (13 August 1868-23 October 1927), was a member of the British Royal Family and a younger brother of... Her Royal Highness The Princess Louise, Princess Royal and Duchess of Fife (Louise Victoria Alexandra Dagmar Duff, née Wettin) (20 February 1867-4 January 1931), was the third child and the eldest daughter of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1785, and under its current name since 1788. ... February 18 is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 14 is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Charles Walsham Reith, 1st Baron Reith (July 20, 1889 - June 16, 1971), later Sir John Reith (1927-), then Baron Reith (1940-) established the British tradition of independent public service broadcasting. ... Lady Antonia Fraser, née Pakenham, (born August 27, 1932) is a British author of history and novels, best known for writing biographies. ... Highly regarded British biographer and historian. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 14 is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full year calendar). ... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (Can) (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was an English statesman, soldier and author. ... Doris Kearns Goodwin (born January 4, 1943) is an award-winning author and historian. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 14 is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Bradford, Sarah (1989). King George VI. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson. ISBN 0297796674. 
  • Howarth, Patrick (1987). George VI. Hutchinson. ISBN 0091710006. 
  • Matthew, H. C. G. (2004), "George VI (1895–1952)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press 
  • Sinclair, David (1988). Two Georges: the Making of the Modern Monarchy. Hodder and Staughton. ISBN 0340332409. 
  • Wheeler-Bennett, Sir John (1958). King George VI: His Life and Reign. New York: Macmillan. 

Sir John Wheeler Wheeler-Bennett, GCVO, MCG, OBE, FRSL, FBA, (October 13, 1902-December 9, 1975) was a conservative British historian of German and diplomatic history. ...

Further reading

Highly regarded British biographer and historian. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
George VI of the United Kingdom
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
George VI of the United Kingdom
George VI of the United Kingdom
House of Windsor
Cadet Branch of the House of Wettin
Born: 14 December 1895
Died: 6 February 1952
Regnal Titles
Preceded by
Edward VIII
King of the United Kingdom and British dominions beyond the seas
19361952
Succeeded by
Elizabeth II
Emperor of India
19361947
Succeeded by
Title removed by an Order-in-Council on 22 June 1948 [1]
King of Ireland
19361949
Succeeded by
End of monarchy
(republic declared)
Preceded by
New Creation
Head of the Commonwealth
19491952
Succeeded by
Elizabeth II
British royalty
Preceded by
Edward, Prince of Wales
Heir to the Throne
as heir presumptive
20 January11 December 1936
Succeeded by
Princess Elizabeth, Duchess of Edinburgh
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
New Creation
Duke of York
7th creation
19201936
Succeeded by
Merged in Crown
Honorary Titles
Preceded by
Iain Colquhoun
Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Scotland
19361937
Succeeded by
Norman Orr-Ewing
Persondata
NAME George VI
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Albert Frederick Arthur George Windsor
SHORT DESCRIPTION King-Emperor
DATE OF BIRTH 14 December 1896
PLACE OF BIRTH Sandringham House
DATE OF DEATH 6 February 1952
PLACE OF DEATH Sandringham House

  Results from FactBites:
 
George VI of the United Kingdom - Biocrawler (1798 words)
George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George Windsor, formerly Wettin) (December 14, 1895–February 6, 1952) was the third British monarch of the House of Windsor, reigning from December 11, 1936 to February 6, 1952.
George VI was born on 14 December, 1895 at York Cottage, on the Sandringham Estate, Norfolk.
Dukes in the Peerage of the United Kingdom
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: George VI of the United Kingdom (1994 words)
George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George) (December 14, 1895 - February 6, 1952) was the third British monarch of the House of Windsor, reigning from (December 11, 1936 to February 6, 1952).
George VI was born on December 14, 1895 at York Cottage, on the Sandringham Estate, Norfolk.
George VI was the last King of Ireland, succeeding to that title by the enactment of the External Relations Act, 1936, until its repeal in the Republic of Ireland Act, 1948 when Ireland also left the Commonwealth.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m