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Encyclopedia > George Roy Hill
George Roy Hill
Born December 20, 1921
Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
Died December 27, 2002 (complications from Parkinson's disease)
New York, New York, USA.
Spouse(s) Louisa Horton (7 April 1951 - ?) (divorced)

George Roy Hill (December 20, 1921December 27, 2002) was an Academy Award winning American film director. is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Director Herbert Brenon with actress Alla Nazimova on the set of War Brides, 1916 A director is a person who directs the making of a film. ...

Contents

Life

He was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to George R. and Helen Frances Owens Hill[1] part of a well-to-do Roman Catholic family with interests in the newspaper business;[2] the family owned the Minneapolis Tribune.[3] He was educated at local Blake High School.[2] He had a love of flying. After school, he liked to visit the airport and his hobby was to memorize the records of World War I flying aces.[1] He idolized US pilot Speed Holman[4] who, Hill once explained, "used to make his approach to the spectators at state fairs flying past the grandstand upside down."[1] Hill obtained his pilot’s licence at the age of 16.[3] Airplanes featured prominently in his later films and are frequently crashed as well - in Slaughterhouse-Five, The World According to Garp and especially The Great Waldo Pepper which showed the influence on Hill of pilots like Speed Holman. Minneapolis redirects here. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Star Tribune is the largest newspaper in Minnesota and is published seven days each week in an edition for the Minneapolis-St. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... United States may refer to: Places: United States of America SS United States, the fastest ocean liner ever built. ... For other uses, see Aviator (disambiguation). ... Slaughterhouse-Five is a film adaptation of the Kurt Vonnegut novel of the same name. ... The World According to Garp is 1982 feature film directed by George Roy Hill based on the novel of the same title by John Irving. ... The Great Waldo Pepper (1975) tells the story of a biplane pilot (Robert Redford) who missed out on the glory of combat in World War I after being assigned as a flight instructor instead. ...


Hill also loved classical music, especially Bach[3] and at Yale University studied music under notable composer Paul Hindemith, graduating in 1943.[2] While there, he was a member of Scroll and Key Society and of the Whiffenpoofs, America's oldest underclassman a cappella singing group. This article is about Western art music from 1000 AD to the 2000s . ... In music, the BACH motif is the sequence of notes B flat, A, C, B natural. ... Yale redirects here. ... Paul Hindemith aged 28. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Scroll and Key Society is a secret society established by John Addison Porter and others at Yale University, New Haven, CT, in 1842. ... Established in 1909, the Whiffenpoofs are an all-male vocal ensemble at Yale University, and the oldest collegiate singing group in the nation. ...


During World War II, Hill served in the United States Marine Corps as a cargo pilot in the South Pacific.[2] After the war, he worked as a newspaper reporter in Texas, then took advantage of the GI Bill to do graduate work at Trinity College, Dublin in Ireland on James Joyce's use of music in Ulysses and Finnegans Wake.[2] Some sources say he graduated in 1949 with a Bachelor's degree in literature.[5] Other sources say his thesis was never completed because he became sidetracked by the Irish theatre,[2] making his stage debut in 1948[1] as an actor at the Gaiety Theatre, Dublin[3] with Cyril Cusack's company in a production of George Bernard Shaw's The Devil's Disciple.[2] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... The South Pacific is an area in the southern Pacific Ocean. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... The G. I. Bill of Rights or Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944 provided for college or vocational education for returning World War II veterans as well as one-year of unemployment compensation. ... For other institutions named Trinity College, see Trinity College. ... This article is about the writer and poet. ... Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ... For the street ballad which the novel is named after, see Finnegans Wake. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... This article is about the thesis in academia. ... Oscar Wilde remains one of Irelands best-known playwrights The history of Irish theatre begins with the rise of the English administration in Dublin at the start of the 17th century. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... The Gaiety Theatre is a theatre on South King Street in Dublin, Ireland, off of Grafton Street and close to St. ... Cyril Cusack (November 26, 1910 – October 7, 1993) was an Irish Shakespearean actor, who appeared in more than 90 films [1]. Born in Durban, Natal, South Africa he was the son of a sergeant in the mounted police and an actress. ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was an Irish dramatist, literary critic, and socialist. ... The Devils Disciple is the only full-length play by G. Bernard Shaw set in America. ...


On his return to the US, Hill acted Off Broadway and toured with Margaret Webster's Shakespeare Repertory Company, where he met Louisa Horton, whom he married on April 7, 1951.[1] He then appeared on Broadway in Richard II and August Strindberg's The Creditors].[2] In 1952, he featured in a supporting role in the Hollywood movie Walk East on Beacon,[2] but the outbreak of the Korean War resulted in his recall to active duty service for 18 months as night fighter pilot with the rank of major;[2] he was stationed at the Marine Corps jet flight training center in Cherry Hill, North Carolina.[1] United States may refer to: Places: United States of America SS United States, the fastest ocean liner ever built. ... Off-Broadway plays or musicals are performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway, productions. ... Margaret Webster (1905-1972) was an important United States born theater actress, producer and director. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... Repertory or rep, called stock in the U.S., is a term from Western theatre. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Title page of Richard II, from the fifth quarto, published in 1615. ...   (January 22, 1849 â€“ May 14, 1912) was a Swedish writer, playwright, and painter. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... The UKs Royal Marines in a Rigid Raider assault watercraft A marine corps (from French corps de marine) is a branch of a nations armed forces incorporating Marines, intended to be capable of mounting amphibious assaults using infantry, armour, aircraft, and watercraft. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ...


After his return to civilian life, he bought an open-cockpit Waco biplane built in 1930, which he retained until about ten years before his death.[1] Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Work

During his military service at Cherry Hill, he had had to be 'talked down' by a ground controller at Atlanta airport,[1] an incident that led to his writing a screenplay about his experiences called My Brother's Keeper, which was bought for the Kraft Television Theatre.[3] It was transmitted in 1953[1] with Hill himself in the cast.[3] After his demobilisation, he joined the company as a writer, later becoming a director of various Kraft episodes.[2] He won an Emmy for writing and directing a TV version of A Night to Remember, the story of the sinking of the Titanic.[3] This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... Sample from a screenplay, showing dialogue and action descriptions. ... It has been suggested that Kraft Television Theater be merged into this article or section. ... Demobilization is the process of standing down a nations armed forces from combat-ready status. ... An Emmy Award. ... A Night to Remember is a 1955 non-fiction book by Walter Lord about the sinking of the ocean liner RMS Titanic in 1912. ... Look up titanic, Titanic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


From television, he moved to Broadway in 1957 as a director of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play Look Homeward, Angel and Tennessee WilliamsPeriod of Adjustment.[2] Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Look Homeward, Angel is Thomas Wolfes first novel. ... Thomas Lanier Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983), better known by the pseudonym Tennessee Williams, was a major American playwright and one of the prominent playwrights of the twentieth century. ... A play by Tennessee Williams about two couples, one young the other middle ages, both experiencing pains and difficulties in their relationships. ...


He filmed the latter as a Hollywood movie in 1962, then Toys in the Attic in 1963. Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Toys in the Attic is a 1963 film starring Dean Martin, Geraldine Page, Wendy Hiller and Gene Tierney. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ...


The 1964 Peter Sellers movie The World of Henry Orient raised Hill's profile in Hollywood, but his 1966 blockbuster Hawaii was a setback. Reportedly, when budget estimates reached $14 million, the producers attempted to replace Hill with Arthur Hiller; but abandoned the idea after hundreds of native Polynesians in the cast went on strike, declaring: "We can and will perform only for our friend, Monsieur Hill."[2] Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Peter Sellers, CBE (8 September 1925 – 24 July 1980) was a British comedian and actor best known for his three roles in Dr. Strangelove and as Inspector Clouseau in The Pink Panther films. ... The World of Henry Orient is a 1964 comedy film directed by George Roy Hill. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Hawaii is a 1966 American motion picture based on the novel of the same name by James A. Michener. ... Arthur Hiller, O.C. (born November 22, 1923 in Edmonton, Alberta) is an Oscar-nominated Canadian film director. ...


Hill rebuilt his Hollywood reputation with the Julie Andrews movie Thoroughly Modern Millie and then the massively-successful Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and, after Slaughterhouse-Five, The Sting. Both Butch Cassidy and The Sting starred Paul Newman and Robert Redford. Butch Cassidy won four Academy Awards; The Sting won five Academy Awards, including Best Film and Best Director.[3] The success of those two films meant that, for a time, Hill was the sole director in history to have made two of the top 10 moneymaking films.[1] Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... This article is about the 1967 film. ... Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is a 1969 Western film that tells the story of bank robber Butch Cassidy (played by Paul Newman) and his partner The Sundance Kid (played by Robert Redford). ... Slaughterhouse-Five is a film adaptation of the Kurt Vonnegut novel of the same name. ... This article is about the 1973 film involving con artists. ... This article is about the American actor and race team owner. ... Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ...


Hill disliked tardiness on set. Paul Newman said of his time on Butch Cassidy: "If you weren’t on time, he’d take you up in his airplane. Scare the bejesus out of us."[6]


Hill's later films included The World According to Garp, The Great Waldo Pepper, Slap Shot , A Little Romance, and The Little Drummer Girl. The World According to Garp is 1982 feature film directed by George Roy Hill based on the novel of the same title by John Irving. ... The Great Waldo Pepper (1975) tells the story of a biplane pilot (Robert Redford) who missed out on the glory of combat in World War I after being assigned as a flight instructor instead. ... Slap Shot is a 1977 Hollywood film production starring Paul Newman and directed by George Roy Hill. ... A Little Romance is a 1979 film starring Laurence Olivier, Diane Lane, Arthur Hill, Sally Kellerman and Thelonious Bernard in the role of Daniel Michon. ... The Little Drummer Girl is a spy novel by John le Carré, published in 1983. ...


Hill died on December 27, 2002 at his home[7] in New York of complications from Parkinson's disease. [3] December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... This article is about the state. ...


Trivia

This article is about the 1973 film involving con artists. ... The Great Waldo Pepper (1975) tells the story of a biplane pilot (Robert Redford) who missed out on the glory of combat in World War I after being assigned as a flight instructor instead. ... Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is a 1969 Western film that tells the story of bank robber Butch Cassidy (played by Paul Newman) and his partner The Sundance Kid (played by Robert Redford). ... The World According to Garp is 1982 feature film directed by George Roy Hill based on the novel of the same title by John Irving. ...

Academy Awards and nominations

Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to directors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ... This article is about the 1973 film involving con artists. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to directors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ... Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is a 1969 Western film that tells the story of bank robber Butch Cassidy (played by Paul Newman) and his partner The Sundance Kid (played by Robert Redford). ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j New York Times, 28th December 2002.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Daily Telegraph, 29th December 2002.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i The Times, London, 30th December 2002.
  4. ^ The New York Times mis-spelled this name as "Homan" in their 28th December, 2002 edition but corrected it to "Holman" on 31st December, 2002
  5. ^ 'Sting' Director George Roy Hill Dies. CBS News (December 27, 2002).
  6. ^ interview in The Times, London, 27th July 2006.
  7. ^ New Zealand Herald, 30th December 2002.

Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study in Hollywood, California Founded on May 11, 1927 in California, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is a professional honorary organization dedicated to the advancement of the arts and sciences of motion pictures. ...

External links

Preceded by
Bob Fosse
for Cabaret
Academy Award for Best Director
1973
for The Sting
Succeeded by
Francis Ford Coppola
for The Godfather Part II

  Results from FactBites:
 
George Roy Hill - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (195 words)
George Roy Hill (December 20, 1922 - December 27, 2002) was an American film director.
George Roy Hill is most noted for directing such films as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and The Sting.
The George Roy Hill Collection at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
George Roy Hill 1921 - 2002 at tedstrong.com (285 words)
George Roy Hill in 1974 with his Oscar for The Sting (1973).
George Roy Hill was born December 20, 1921, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Hill, who won an Oscar for directing Paul Newman and Robert Redford in the 1973 box office hit The Sting, died Friday in his New York apartment of complications from Parkinson's disease; he was 81.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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