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Encyclopedia > George R. R. Martin
Science Fiction Writer
Books · Authors · Films · Television
George R. R. Martin

George R. R. Martin
Born: September 20, 1948
Bayonne, New Jersey
Occupation(s): Novelist
Genre(s): Fantasy, Science-Fiction
Magnum Opus: A Song of Ice and Fire
Influences: L. Frank Baum, Charles Dickens, Robert A. Heinlein, Robert E. Howard, J.R.R. Tolkien, Jack Vance, Roger Zelazny
Website: http://www.georgerrmartin.com/

George Raymond Richard Martin, sometimes called GRRM, born September 20, 1948 in Bayonne, New Jersey is an American author and screenwriter of science fiction, horror, and fantasy. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This page lists a broad variety of science fiction novels (and novel series)--some old, some new; some famous, some obscure; some well-written, some ill-written--and so may be considered a representative slice of the field. ... Note that this partial list contains some authors whose works of fantastic fiction would today be called science fiction, even if they predate, or did not work in that genre. ... Poster for 2001: A Space Odyssey, an archetypal science fiction film Science fiction film is a film genre that uses speculative, science-based depictions of imaginary phenomena such as extra-terrestrial lifeforms, alien worlds, and time travel, often along with technological elements such as futuristic spacecraft, robots, or other technologies. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Seal of Bayonne Bayonne is a city in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. ... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Smaug in his lair: an illustration for the fantasy The Hobbit Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ... Science Fiction redirects here. ... A Song of Ice and Fire (commonly abbreviated as ASoIaF) is a series of epic fantasy novels by American author George R. R. Martin. ... The Laughing Dragon of Oz, see Frank Joslyn Baum . ... Dickens redirects here. ... Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... Robert Ervin Howard (January 22, 1906 – June 11, 1936)[1] was a classic American pulp writer of fantasy, horror, historical adventure, boxing, western, and detective fiction. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... John Holbrook Vance (born August 28, 1916 in San Francisco, California) is generally described as an American fantasy and science fiction author, though Vance himself has reportedly objected to such labels. ... Roger Joseph Zelazny (May 13, 1937 – June 14, 1995) was an American writer of fantasy and science fiction short stories and novels. ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Seal of Bayonne Bayonne is a city in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. ... Cosette Dwyer is an amazing author. ... Screenwriters, scenarists or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Horror fiction is, broadly, fiction in any medium intended to scare, unsettle, or horrify the reader. ... For other definitions of fantasy see fantasy (psychology). ...

Contents

Biography

As a youth, Martin became an avid reader and collector of comic books. Issue 20 (Nov 1963) of Fantastic Four features a letter to the editor that he wrote during high school under the name George R. Martin. He credits the attention he received from this letter, as well as his following interest in fanzines, with leading to his interest in becoming a writer.[1] The Fantastic Four is a fictional American team of comic-book superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe. ... A fanzine (see also: zine) is a nonprofessional publication produced by fans of a particular subject for the pleasure of others who share their interest. ...


Martin wrote short fiction in the early 1970s, and won several Hugo Awards and Nebula Awards before he began writing novels late in the decade. Although much of his work is fantasy or horror, a number of his earlier works are science fiction occurring in a loosely-defined future history. He has also written at least one piece of political-military fiction, "Night of the Vampyres", collected in Harry Turtledove's anthology The Best Military Science Fiction of the 20th Century.[2] The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, In the Western world, the focus shifted from the social activism of the sixties to social activities for ones own pleasure, save for environmentalism, which continued in a very visible way. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... A future history is a postulated history of the future that some science fiction authors construct as a common background for fiction. ... Harry Norman Turtledove (born June 14, 1949) is an American historian and prolific novelist who has written historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction works. ...


In the 1980s he turned to work in television and as a book editor. On television, he worked on the new Twilight Zone and Beauty and the Beast series. As an editor, he oversaw the lengthy Wild Cards cycle, which took place in a shared universe in which an alien virus bestowed strange powers or disfigurements on a slice of humanity during World War II, affecting the history of the world thereafter (the premise was inspired by comic book superheroes and a Superworld superhero role-playing game of which Martin was gamemaster). Contributors to the Wild Cards series included Stephen Leigh, Lewis Shiner, Howard Waldrop, Walter Jon Williams and Roger Zelazny. His own contributions to the series often featured Thomas Tudbury, "The Great and Powerful Turtle", a powerful psychokinetic whose flying "shell" consisted of an armored VW Beetle. The 1980s refers to the period where corey sucks peters and has a not little to look at his little penis of and between 1980 and 1989. ... Note, this page is about the television series and its two revivals. ... Beauty and the Beast is an American television series, originally broadcast in 1987, centered around the relationship between Catherine (Linda Hamilton), an attorney who lived in New York City, and Vincent (Ron Perlman), a gentle, but lion-faced beast who belongs to a society of misfits and outcasts dwelling in... The cover of the first Wild Cards book, Wild Cards. ... A shared universe is a literary technique in which several different authors create works of fiction that share aspects such as settings or characters and that are intended to be read as taking place in a single universe. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... For the Aqua Teen Hunger Force episode, see Super Hero (Aqua Teen Hunger Force episode). ... Superworld is a superhero-themed role-playing game published by Chaosium in the 1980s. ... A role-playing game (RPG, often roleplaying game) is a type of game in which the participants assume the roles of fictional characters and collaboratively create or follow stories. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The cover of the first Wild Cards book, Wild Cards. ... Steve Leigh is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. ... Lewis Shiner (December 30, 1950, Eugene, Oregon) is an American writer. ... Howard Waldrop (born September 15, 1946) in Houston, Mississippi, and got his degree from the University of Texas. ... Walter Jon Williams (born 15 October 1953) is an American writer, primarily of science fiction. ... Roger Joseph Zelazny (May 13, 1937 – June 14, 1995) was an American writer of fantasy and science fiction short stories and novels. ... The Great and Powerful Turtle is a character from the Wild Cards series of books. ... Psychokinesis (literally mind-movement) or PK is the more commonly used term today for what in the past was known as telekinesis (literally distant-movement). It refers to the psi ability to influence the behavior of matter by mental intention (or possibly some other aspect of mental activity) alone. ... The Volkswagen Beetle or Bug is a small family car, the best known car of Volkswagen, of Germany, and almost certainly the world. ...


Martin's short story of the same name was adapted into the feature film Nightflyers (1987). 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1996 Martin returned to writing novel-length stories, beginning his lengthy cycle A Song of Ice and Fire (ostensibly inspired by the Wars of the Roses and Ivanhoe). In November of 2005, A Feast for Crows, the fourth book in this series, became The New York Times #1 Bestseller and also achieved #1 ranking on The Wall Street Journal bestseller list. In addition, in September 2006 A Feast for Crows was nominated for both a Quill award, and the British Fantasy Award.[3] The series has received praise from authors, publishers, readers and critics alike. 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... A Song of Ice and Fire (commonly abbreviated as ASoIaF) is a series of epic fantasy novels by American author George R. R. Martin. ... Lancaster York For other uses see Wars of the Roses (disambiguation) The Wars of the Roses (1455 - 1485) were a series of civil wars fought over the throne of England between adherents of the House of Lancaster and the House of York. ... For other uses, see Ivanhoe (disambiguation). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Feast for Crows is the fourth of seven planned novels in A Song of Ice and Fire, an epic fantasy series by American author George R. R. Martin. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with a worldwide average daily circulation of more than 2. ... The Quill Awards are a consumer-driven award created to inspire reading while promoting literacy. ... The British Fantasy Awards are administered annually by the British Fantasy Society and were first awarded in 1971. ...


It was announced January, 2007 that HBO Productions has purchased the broadcast rights for the entire A Song of Ice and Fire series, with the author also serving as co-executive producer on the project. The plan calls for each book from the series to be filmed over an entire season's worth of episodes. Production will take place in Europe or New Zealand and Martin is reported to have agreed to script one episode per season. Further details are expected to be announced soon.[4]


Martin has also been an instructor in journalism (in which he holds a master's degree) and a chess tournament director. In his spare time he collects medieval-themed miniatures[5] and continues to treasure his comic collection, which includes the first issues of Spider-Man and Fantastic Four. Although he is fairly active on the internet, he notes: "I do my writing on a completely different computer than the one I use for email and the internet, in part to guard against viruses, worms, and nightmares like this. (...) I write with WordStar 4.0 on a pure DOS-based machine."[6] Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and more broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... “M.S.” redirects here. ... Chess is a recreational and competitive game for two players. ... Miniatures of Legolas and an orc of Isengard, manufactured by Mithril Miniatures A miniature figure (also known as a miniature or just a mini) is a small figurine commonly used in miniature wargames such as Heroclix, Mage Knight, and Warhammer. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... The Fantastic Four is a fictional American team of comic-book superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe. ...


Themes

George R. R. Martin, circa 1986
George R. R. Martin, circa 1986

Martin's work is rarely cheerful; critics have described it as dark and cynical. [7] His first novel, Dying of the Light, set the tone for most of his future work; it is set on a mostly abandoned world that is slowly becoming uninhabitable as it moves away from its sun. This story, and many of Martin's others, have a strong sense of melancholy. His characters are often unhappy, or at least unsatisfied, and many have elements of tragic heroes. Reviewer T. M. Wagner writes, "Let it never be said Martin doesn't share Shakespeare's fondness for the senselessly tragic." [8] However, this gloominess can be an obstacle for some readers. The Inchoatus Group writes, "If this absence of joy is going to trouble you, or you’re looking for something more affirming, then you should probably seek elsewhere." [9] Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A tragic hero is an honorable protagonist with a tragic flaw, also known as fatal flaw, which eventually leads to his demise. ...


His characters are also multi-faceted, each with surprisingly intricate pasts, inspirations, and ambitions. Publisher's Weekly writes "The complexity of characters such as Daenarys [sic], Arya and the Kingslayer will keep readers turning even the vast number of pages contained in this volume, for the author, like Tolkien or Jordan, makes us care about their fates." [10] No one is given an unrealistic string of luck, however, so misfortune, injury, and death (and even false death) can befall any character, no matter how attached the reader has become. Martin once described his reasons for killing off characters as "...when my characters are in danger, I want you to be afraid to turn the page, (so) you need to show right from the beginning that you're playing for keeps." [11] Daenerys Targaryen is a fictional character from George R. R. Martins A Song of Ice and Fire. ... House Stark is a fictional noble family from George R. R. Martins A Song of Ice and Fire. ... House Lannister is a fictional family from George R. R. Martins A Song of Ice and Fire book series. ...


Fan relationship

Teaching at Clarion West, 1998.
Teaching at Clarion West, 1998.

In addition to writing, Martin is known for his regular attendance at science fiction conventions and his accessibility to fans. In the early 70's, critic and writer Thomas Disch identified Martin as a member of the "Labor Day Group",[12] writers who congregated at the annual Worldcon, usually held around Labor Day. Image File history File linksMetadata GeorgeRRMartinCW98_wb. ... Image File history File linksMetadata GeorgeRRMartinCW98_wb. ... Clarion is a six-week workshop for new and aspiring science fiction writers founded by Damon Knight and Kate Wilhelm. ... Science fiction conventions are gatherings of the community of fans (called science fiction fandom) of various forms of speculative fiction including science fiction and fantasy. ... Thomas M. Disch Thomas M. Disch (February 2, 1940 – ) is an American science fiction author. ... It has been suggested that World Science Fiction Society be merged into this article or section. ... Labour Day (or Labor Day) is an annual holiday that resulted from efforts of the labour union movement, to celebrate the economic and social achievements of workers. ...


Martin has a good relationship with his official fan club, the Brotherhood without Banners, and has praised them in the past for their parties[13] and philanthropic efforts.[14] As of December 2006, the organization has over 1,000 official members listed on its website.[15] Philanthropy involves the donation or granting of money to various worthy charitable causes. ...


Martin is opposed to fan fiction, believing it to be copyright infringement and bad exercise for aspiring writers. He does not allow any of his intellectual property to be used in fan fiction.[16] Fan fiction (also spelled fanfiction and commonly abbreviated to fanfic) is fiction written by people who enjoy a film, novel, television show or other media work, using the characters and situations developed in it and developing new plots in which to use these characters. ...


Bibliography

Novels

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lisa Tuttle (born in Houston, Texas 1952) is a science fiction, fantasy, and on occasion horror author. ... Fevre Dream is a vampire novel written by George R.R. Martin and published in 1982. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Category: ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Song of Ice and Fire (commonly abbreviated as ASoIaF) is a series of epic fantasy novels by American author George R. R. Martin. ... A Game of Thrones is the first of seven planned novels in A Song of Ice and Fire, an epic fantasy series by American author George R. R. Martin. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... A Clash of Kings is the second of seven planned novels in A Song of Ice and Fire, an epic fantasy series by American author George R. R. Martin. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... A Storm of Swords is the third of seven planned novels in A Song of Ice and Fire, an epic fantasy series by American author George R. R. Martin. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Feast for Crows is the fourth of seven planned novels in A Song of Ice and Fire, an epic fantasy series by American author George R. R. Martin. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Dance with Dragons is the fifth of seven planned novels in the epic fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire by American author George R. R. Martin. ... The Winds of Winter is the working title for a future volume in the epic fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire by George R. R. Martin. ... A Dream of Spring is the working title for the projected final volume of the epic fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire by George R. R. Martin. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gardner Dozois (born July 23, 1947) is an American science fiction author and editor. ... Daniel Abraham is a science fiction / fantasy author who lives in Albuquerque, NM. His short stories have appeared in numerous publications and anthologies. ...

Novellas

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dark Visions is a compilation book, with 3 stories by Stephen King, 3 by Dan Simmons, and 1 by George R. R. Martin. ... The Hedge Knight is the first of a planned series of novellas written by George R. R. Martin, often referred to as Dunk and Egg stories after their protagonists. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... A Song of Ice and Fire (commonly abbreviated as ASoIaF) is a series of epic fantasy novels by American author George R. R. Martin. ... The Hedge Knight is the first of a planned series of novellas written by George R. R. Martin, often referred to as Dunk and Egg stories after their protagonists. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Collections

  • A Song for Lya (1976)
  • Songs of Stars and Shadows (1977)
  • Sandkings (1981)
  • Songs the Dead Men Sing (1983)
  • Nightflyers (1985)
  • Tuf Voyaging (1987, collection of linked stories)
  • Portraits of His Children (1987)
  • Quartet (2001)
  • GRRM: A RRetrospective (2003; reissued 2006 and 2007 as Dreamsongs)

1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... Sandkings is a collection of science fiction short stories by George R.R. Martin, published in 1981. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A collection of interconnected science fiction short stories by George R.R. Martin, written from the late 1970s onwards and published in collected form in 1987. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Wild Cards (as editor, and contributor to many editions)

  • Wild Cards I (1987)
  • Wild Cards II: Aces High (1987)
  • Wild Cards III: Jokers Wild (1987)
  • Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (1988)
  • Wild Cards V: Down & Dirty (1988)
  • Wild Cards VI: Ace in the Hole (1990)
  • Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand (1990)
  • Wild Cards VIII: One-Eyed Jacks (1991)
  • Wild Cards IX: Jokertown Shuffle (1991)
  • Wild Cards X: Double Solitaire (1992)
  • Wild Cards XI: Dealer's Choice (1992)
  • Wild Cards XII: Turn of the Cards (1993)
  • Wild Cards: Card Sharks (1993)
  • Wild Cards: Marked Cards (1994)
  • Wild Cards: Black Trump (1995) (these three books are a trilogy)
  • Wild Cards: Deuces Down (2002)
  • Wilds Cards: Death Draws Five (2006)

The cover of the first Wild Cards book, Wild Cards. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

Children's books

  • The Ice Dragon (Originally printed in 1980[17], illustrated and re-printed October, 2006)

Awards

A more complete list of Martin's awards and nominations can be found at The Locus Index to Science Fiction Awards. The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Hugo Awards are given annually for the best science fiction or fantasy works. ... Sandkings is a novelette by George R.R. Martin. ... The Hugo Awards are given annually for the best science fiction or fantasy works. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Winners of the Nebula Award for best Novelette. ... The Way of Cross and Dragon is a short story by George R. R. Martin. ... The Hugo Awards are given annually for the best science fiction or fantasy works. ... The Bram Stoker Award is a recognition presented by the Horror Writers Association (HWA) for superior achievement in horror writing. ... This category of Bram Stoker Awards was previously titled best novella or best novellette. Nominees are listed below the winner(s) for each year. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... First awarded in 1975, the World Fantasy Awards are handed out annually at the World Fantasy Convention (WFC) to recognize outstanding achievement in the field of fantasy. ... This World Fantasy Award is given to the fantasy novella or novellas voted best by a panel of judges, and presented each year at the World Fantasy Convention. ... Locus Magazine is subtitled The Magazine Of The Science Fiction & Fantasy Field. It reports on the science fiction writing industry, including comprehensive listings of new books published in the field. ...


See also

This is a list of some (not all notable) authors in the horror fiction genre. ... Splatterpunk is a neologism coined to describe a subgenre of horror fiction distinguished by its graphic depiction of violence. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Official site: Speech at Electracon, 23 June 1984. URL accessed 21 November 2006.
  2. ^ Turtledove, Harry, ed, with Martin H. Greenberg. The Best Military Science Fiction of the 20th Century. New York: Ballantine, May 2001, p. 279-306.
  3. ^ A Feast for Crows award nominaions
  4. ^ ASoIaF to become a television series
  5. ^ http://www.georgerrmartin.com/knights/index.html
  6. ^ Not A Blog [1]
  7. ^ http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1129596,00.html "The American Tolkien" by Lev Grossman, a Times article on Martin.
  8. ^ http://www.sfreviews.net/stormofswords.html Review of A Storm of Swords by T. M. Wagner
  9. ^ http://www.inchoatus.com/Reviews/Review--A%20Storm%20of%20Swords,%20George%20Martin.htm Review of A Game of Thrones by The Inchoatus Group
  10. ^ http://reviews.publishersweekly.com/bd.aspx?isbn=0553106635&pub=pw Review of A Storm of Swords by Publisher's Weekly
  11. ^ Geekson interview with George RR Martin, 08/04/06
  12. ^ http://www.georgerrmartin.com/sp-lasfs81.html Essay by GRRM discussing his status as a member of the "Labour Day Group"
  13. ^ [http://www.bwbfanclub.com/fr_grrm.php
  14. ^ http://www.childsplaycharity.org/index.php
  15. ^ http://www.bwbfanclub.com/mb_member.php
  16. ^ http://www.westeros.org/Citadel/SSM/Entry/Fan_Fiction/
  17. ^ Review of The Ice Dragon with a footnote on the original printing

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
George R. R. Martin

The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ... The Internet Book List (IBList) is an online database with information about books, authors, short stories, etc. ...

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