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Encyclopedia > George Pataki
George E. Pataki


In office
January 1, 1995 – January 1, 2007
Lieutenant(s) Betsy McCaughey Ross
Mary Donohue
Preceded by Mario Cuomo
Succeeded by Eliot Spitzer

Born June 24, 1945 (1945-06-24) (age 62)
Peekskill, New York
Political party Republican
Spouse Libby Pataki
Profession Attorney
Religion Roman Catholic

George Elmer Pataki (born June 24, 1945) is an American politician who was the 57th Governor of New York serving from January 1995 until January 1, 2007. He is a member of the Republican Party and was seen as a possible 2000 and 2008 Presidential candidate. Image File history File links Pataki_cropped. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The Lieutenant Governor of New York is the second highest ranking official in the government of New York. ... Betsy McCaughey Ross (born on October 20, 1948, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) was the lieutenant-governor of the State of New York from 1995 to 1999, during the first term of Republican Governor George Pataki. ... Mary Donohue is the Lieutenant Governor of New York State. ... Mario Matthew Cuomo (born June 15, 1932) served as the Governor of New York from 1983 to 1995. ... Eliot Laurence Spitzer (born June 10, 1959) is an American lawyer, politician and the current Governor of New York. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Peekskill, New York is a distinct scenic community along the Hudson River, located in an area where the river winds through the Bear Mountain highlands. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Libby Pataki is the First Lady of New York and the wife of New York Gov. ... An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... “NY” redirects here. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...

Contents

Family and education

Pataki's paternal grandfather was Hungarian, his name was János (later John) Pataki (1883–1971) emigrant from Mátészalka, Hungary, and he came to the United States in 1908 to work in a hat factory. János married Erzsebet (later Elizabeth; 1887–1975) around 1904. Their son, Pataki's father, was Louis P. Pataki (1912–1996), a mailman. His maternal grandfather was Matteo Laganà (born in Calabria, Italy in 1889), who married Agnes Lynch of County Louth, Ireland around 1914. Their daughter, Margaret Lagana, is Pataki's mother. He has an older brother, Louis. Location of Szabolcs-Szatmar-Bereg county in Hungary Mátészalka is a large town in Szabolcs-Szatmár-Bereg county, in the Northern Great Plain region of eastern Hungary. ... Cliffside dwellings in Tropea. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Dundalk Code: LH Area: 820 km² Population (2006) 110,894 Website: www. ...


Pataki married Elizabeth Rowland in 1973, and they have four children: Emily, Teddy, Allison, and Owen. Libby Pataki is the First Lady of New York and the wife of New York Gov. ...


Pataki got a scholorship to enter Horace Mann School in Riverdale, a small section of Bronx, NY Pataki entered Yale University in 1964 on an academic scholarship, and graduated in 1967. While there he served as chairman of the Conservative Party of the Yale Political Union.[1] He received his J.D. from Columbia Law School in 1970.[2] He received his Master's in 1971. Riverdale is the name of several cities, towns, and neighborhoods. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... J.D. redirects here; for alternate uses, see J.D. (disambiguation) J.D. is an abbreviation for the Latin Juris Doctor, also called a Doctor of Law or Doctorate of Jurisprudence, and is the law degree typically awarded by an accredited U.S. law school after successfully completing three years... Columbia Law School, located in the New York City borough of Manhattan, is one of the professional schools of Columbia University, a member of the Ivy League, and one of the leading law schools in the United States. ...


History and campaigns

Peekskill, New York is a distinct scenic community along the Hudson River, located in an area where the river winds through the Bear Mountain highlands. ... The New York Legislature is the legislative branch of the U.S. state of New York, seated at the states capital, Albany. ... The New York State Senate is one of two houses in the New York State Legislature and has members each elected to two-year terms. ...

Early political career

Pataki first won elective office in 1981, as mayor of the Westchester County city of Peekskill. From 1985 to 1992, he represented a state Assembly district that included parts of Westchester, Putnam and Duchess counties. In 1992, Pataki beat incumbent Republican State Senator Mary Goodhue in a primary and served one term before running for Governor.


Governorship

First term, 1995–1998

1994 campaign

Pataki was a first term state senator from Westchester County when he launched his bid for the Republican nomination for governor in 1994. He said he launched the campaign because of his frustration in the Senate regarding how Albany worked and on tax issues. He was little known statewide and his campaign received a boost when he was endorsed by U. S. Sen. Al D'Amato. He received the party's endorsement at the spring state convention and easily defeated former State Republican Chairman Richard Rosenbaum in the September primary. Pataki was considered an underdog from the start since he was running against three term Gov. Mario Cuomo and that Pataki had little name recognition statewide. D'Amato reportedly backed Pataki because of a poll that showed a pro-choice, fiscal conservative from the New York City suburbs could win statewide for governor. The poll also showed a female running mate for lieutenant governor would help the ticket, thus leading to the selection of academic Betsy McCaughey as Pataki's running mate. Westchester County is a primarily suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Alfonse Marcello DAmato (born August 1, 1937) is a former New York politician. ... Mario Matthew Cuomo (born June 15, 1932) served as the Governor of New York from 1983 to 1995. ... The Lieutenant Governor of New York is the second highest ranking official in the government of New York. ... Betsy McCaughey Ross (born 1949) was the lieutenant-governor of the state of New York from 1994 to 1998, during the first term of governor George Pataki. ...


The polls had Gov. Cuomo up by as much as ten points going into the final two weeks, but they then narrowed at the end. In reality, however, Pataki remained neck and neck with Cuomo during the entire race, focusing solely on the issues of tax cuts and the death penalty during the campaign. In addition he made an issue of Cuomo seeking a fourth term as governor and pledged to serve only two terms in office. Cuomo was helped late in the race by the endorsement of New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani. In the end, Pataki narrowly defeated Cuomo in the general election. (It has been said that Pataki was elected by voters choosing the "ABC" candidate: Anybody But Cuomo.) Rudolph William Louis Giuliani III, (born May 28, 1944) is an American lawyer, prosecutor, businessman, and Republican politician from the state of New York. ...


Pataki made up for a softer performance in New York City and Long Island by running up a decisive margin north of the city, especially among upstaters disenchanted with Cuomo.[3] Pataki was the first governor elected since Franklin D. Roosevelt to not come from one of the five boroughs of New York City. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ... FDR redirects here. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Environment

Pataki has long been regarded as an environmentalist and he has made the environment and open space preservation a top priority of his administration. He has long cited that Theodore Roosevelt is his political hero for his work as a conservationist. Pataki has conserved more land statewide and has pushed bond issues in referendums that provided more money to preserve land and clean up the state's rivers and lakes. He has been a long standing advocate for cleaning up the Hudson River and in pushing stricter environmental regulations and penalties. Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and...


Death penalty

Polls showed that the majority of New Yorkers wanted the state's death penalty laws restored. A bill to restore the death penalty passed the Legislature several years in a row, only to be vetoed by Cuomo. Pataki made the issue a top priority of his and when the bill reached his desk he signed it into law in 1995. The state's Court of Appeals later ruled the death penalty unconstitutional in the form in which it was written (in the case of People v. LaValle), and the State Legislature has not passed a bill to restore it in a new form. Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Holding The current statute of capital punishment in the state of New York was declared unconstitutional as it violated article one, section six of the state constitution. ...


Higher education

Pataki has long vetoed increases to spending at the State University of New York and City University of New York. In addition he has vetoed increases to funding for the state's tuition assistance program and equal opportunity program. His higher education policies have included calling for laws to limit the amount of time a student can receive state tuition assistance while in a public university, which he says will increase the rate of graduation in four years. He has also appointed more SUNY and CUNY trustees who are against open enrollment and remedial education policies and who have pushed for a stricter core curriculum program in the public universities. Pataki was criticized for appointing his close friend and former budget director, Robert King, as the Chancellor of SUNY. The State University of New York, abbreviated SUNY (IPA pronunciation: ) is a system of public institutions of higher education in New York, United States. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym: IPA pronunciation: ), is the public university system of New York City. ...


Tax cuts and spending cuts

Pataki has been a long-time advocate of tax cuts during his administration and his time in the state legislature. He signed and sponsored several tax cuts during his first term in office and in addition made spending cuts to the budgets he proposed. This has included a push for privatization of state entities.


During the first years of Pataki's administration, he began to institute the major spending cuts, which he has advocated for most of his career. Among the cost cutting initiatives was a push to privatize the World Trade Center from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. The New York City governor's office for more than 20 years had been in the center. The privatization effort took effect a few weeks before the September 11 attack when Larry Silverstein assumed a 99-year lease for $3.2 billion. The events and initiatives (or lack thereof) regarding the Center have defined the Pataki governorship. The World Trade Center in New York City (sometimes informally referred to as the WTC or the Twin Towers) was a complex of seven buildings in Lower Manhattan, mostly designed by American architect Minoru Yamasaki and engineer Leslie Robertson and developed by the Port Authority of New York and New... Tolls collected at the Holland Tunnel and other crossings help fund the Port Authority. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 7 World Trade Center Larry A. Silverstein (born 1932 in Bedford-Stuyvesant in Brooklyn, New York) is a Jewish American billionaire real estate investor and operator and the head of Silverstein Properties, a real estate development group. ...


Delayed budgets

While Pataki campaigned against the New York State practice of not adopting an ontime budget by the start of the April 1 state fiscal year for over a decade, Pataki's first 10 years in office did not see the adoption of an ontime budget. is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


"Three men in a room" decision-making

Pataki campaigned against the practice of having major state policy decisions be made by "three men in a room" — the governor, the Assembly Speaker, and the Senate Majority Leader. The practice continued during his tenure as Governor, however.


Second term, 1999–2002

1998 campaign

Pataki was considered the frontrunner from the start of the 1998 campaign for governor. He was unopposed for the Republican nomination and paired with a new running mate, Judge Mary Donohue. The Democrats faced a primary battle between New York City Council Speaker Peter Vallone, Lt. Gov. Betsy McCaughey Ross, and former Transportation Commissioner James LaRocca. Vallone captured the Democratic nomination, with Thomas Golisano running as the Independence nominee and McCaughey Ross as the Liberal Party nominee. Pataki was easily reelected to a second term in office. Mary Donohue is the Lieutenant Governor of New York State. ... Peter F. Vallone, Sr. ... Betsy McCaughey Ross (born on October 20, 1948, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) was the lieutenant-governor of the State of New York from 1995 to 1999, during the first term of Republican Governor George Pataki. ... Blase Thomas Golisano (1942-) is the billionaire founder of Paychex, the second-largest payroll processor in the United States, and owner of the Buffalo Sabres hockey team. ...


Policy and political work

In 1999, Governor Pataki signed into law comprehensive health care legislation that provided health insurance coverage, under Family Health Plus, to lower income adults who do not have health insurance through their employers. In 1999, Pataki explored a possible bid for the Presidency. In 2000, Pataki was also mentioned as a possible candidate for the U.S. Senate against First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Hillary Rodham Clinton (born Hillary Diane Rodham on October 26, 1947) is the Biggest loser/retard these united states have seen from New York. ...


Vice presidency

In July 2000, Pataki's name surfaced on the short list to be the running mate for Republican presidential nominee George W. Bush, along with the names of Governor John Engler of Michigan, Governor Tom Ridge of Pennsylvania, former Senator John Danforth of Missouri, and former U. S. Labor Secretary Elizabeth Dole of North Carolina. Bush eventually selected the man who was in charge of scouting vice presidential candidates, former Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney. Pataki had strongly campaigned for Bush including an unsuccessful effort to keep John McCain off the New York primary ballot (which Bush ultimately won). George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... John Mathias Engler (born October 12, 1948) is an American politician. ... Thomas Joseph Ridge (born August 27, 1945 near Pittsburgh, USA) is an American politician who served as a member of the United States House of Representatives (1983–1995), Governor of Pennsylvania (1995–2001), Assistant to the President for Homeland Security (2001–2003), and the first United States Secretary of Homeland... John Danforth John Claggett Danforth (born September 5, 1936), also referred to as Jack Danforth, is a former United States Ambassador to the United Nations and former Republican United States Senator from Missouri. ... Elizabeth Hanford Liddy Dole (born July 29, 1936) is an American politician who served in both the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush presidential administrations, and currently serves as a United States senator representing the state of North Carolina. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ...


September 11 terrorist attacks

Pataki's New York City office had moved out of the World Trade Center in the months before the September 11, 2001 attacks to new offices on Third Avenue. A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


Pataki and Giuliani appointed the LMDC to distribute nearly $10 billion in federal grants and to oversee the construction of a memorial, though as of September 2006 the latter has not begun. Giuliani had to step down because of term limits and Pataki took the lead on the building process, though the Port Authority is a state-run agency and thus Giuliani had very little control in the rebuilding effort anyway. The Lower Manhattan Development Corporation (LMDC} was formed after the September 11 attacks to plan the reconstruction of Lower Manhattan and distribute nearly $10 billion in federal funds aimed at rebuilding downtown Manhattan. ...


Native American casinos

Pataki has been a long advocate for Native American casinos in upstate New York. He has proposed the creation of several casinos throughout upstate with the revenue being shared by the state, tribe and municipal government. In the 1990s he was able to secure the creation of one casino on an Indian reservation outside Syracuse. His plans to create new casinos were blocked by Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver until after the Sept. 11 attacks, when Silver was persuaded that more money could come into the state government. Pataki soon signed an agreement to create new casinos in the Catskills, Niagara Falls, and in Buffalo. The Seneca Niagara Casino opened in Niagara Falls in January 2003. Nickname: The Salt City Location of Syracuse within the state of New York Coordinates: City Government  - Mayor Matthew Driscoll Area  - City 66. ... Sheldon Silver (born February 13, 1944) is a politician and member of the United States Democratic Party, currently serving as Speaker of New York State Assembly. ... Catskill State Park as seen from Overlook Mountian The Catskill Mountains are an extension of the Appalachian Mountains into New York State. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State County Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... The Seneca Niagara Casino is located in Niagara Falls, New York and built to compete with Casino Niagara and Niagara Fallsview Casino Resort in Niagara Falls, Ontario. ...


Niagara Falls casino money fight

As a part of the creation of the Seneca Niagara Casino in Niagara Falls, an agreement was reached to give a percentage of the slot machine revenue to the City of Niagara Falls each year to spend on local tourism projects and projects relating to hosting the casino. Money was allocated for 2003, but disputes have come up since then. Part of the dispute is a claim by Niagara County to receive a share of the money for county government projects and another part had to do with restructuring the local commission charged with allocating the money. Pataki has called for the money to be given to a state entity he created to spur economic development in Niagara Falls, thus leaving the money under his control, a decision that is opposed by local leaders. Slot machines in the Trump Taj Mahal A slot machine (American English), fruit machine (British English), or poker machine (Australian English) is a certain type of casino game. ... Location in the state of New York Formed 1808 Seat Lockport Area  - Total  - Water 2,952 km² (1,140 mi²) 1,598 km² (617 mi²) 54. ...


Third term, 2003–2006

2002 campaign

Pataki was considered a strong contender for a third term. He ran again on a ticket with Lt. Gov. Mary Donohue and the Democrats faced a primary battle between State Comptroller Carl McCall and former HUD Secretary Andrew Cuomo. Pataki emphasized his previous work and the need to have continuity following Sept. 11. H. Carl McCall (born 1935) is a former Comptroller of New York State and was the Democratic candidate in the 2002 election for state governor. ... Andrew Mark Cuomo (born December 6, 1957, in New York City) is the New York State Attorney General, having been elected to that office on November 7, 2006. ...


Pataki sought the nomination of the Independence Party in his bid for a third term as well. He faced Thomas Golisano, the party's founder in his bid for the nomination. Pataki ran an active primary campaign and lost to Golisano. Donohue did win the primary for lieutenant governor and was both the running mate of Pataki and Golisano in the general election.


Pataki faced McCall and Golisano in the general election, during which he continued to empashize his past work for the state. He easily defeated the two, and at times it appeared Golisano would outpoll McCall, which did not happen in the end.


Cuomo-Pataki rematch

A Pataki-Cuomo rematch nearly occurred in the 2002 election. Mario's son Andrew Cuomo announced plans to run. However, he stumbled on April 17 and ultimately withdrew before the primary at the urging of his mentor Bill Clinton when Cuomo was quoted in the media as saying (regarding Pataki's performance post-9/11): Andrew Mark Cuomo (born December 6, 1957, in New York City) is the New York State Attorney General, having been elected to that office on November 7, 2006. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...

"Pataki stood behind the leader. He held the leader's coat. He was a great assistant to the leader. But he was not a leader. Cream rises to the top, and Rudy Giuliani rose to the top."[1]

World Trade Center legacy

The Port Authority owns the WTC site and Larry Silverstein is the site lease holder. Governor Pataki effectively controlled development at the WTC site by the power to appoint half the Port Authority commissioners and half the LMDC board members. In late 2002, the LMDC picked a plan dubbed Project THINK to replace the 10 million square feet of lost space and build a memorial. Pataki intervened to support a plan by Daniel Libeskind entitled Memory Foundations. When offered a choice between the Libeskind or THINK plans, the official LMDC poll showed that the public preferred "Neither". Daniel Libeskind in front of his extension to the Denver Art Museum. ... A vision of the planned Memory Foundations The Memory Foundations is the name given by Daniel Libeskind to his site plan selected by officials as what is to be built on the former World Trade Center site in New York City. ...


Although eventually most of Libeskind's plan was to be ignored it established two concepts that will define the Pataki legacy at Ground Zero — the placement (and name) of the 1,776-foot high Freedom Tower and the concept that the memorial be below street level. A symbolic cornerstone for the Freedom Tower with Pataki's name was laid on July 4, 2004, and after numerous design changes, construction commenced in May, 2006. For the building in Florida of the same name, see Freedom Tower (Miami). ...


The much-vaunted open and inclusive process never acknowledged public support for rebuilding the Twin Towers, including the Belton-Gardner Twin Towers II design, which drew national attention when it was sponsored by real estate developer Donald Trump in May 2005, and is favored by many 9/11 family-members. Donald John Trump (born June 14, 1946 in Queens, New York, New York) is an American business executive, entrepreneur, television personality and author. ...


In the spring of 2006, Attorney General Spitzer was quoted as saying the redevelopment was "an Enron-style debacle", and stated the LMDC was "an abject failure" that "violated its duty to the public". However in February 2007 as the new governor he unenthusiastically decided to proceed with Pataki’s plans.


United States Senate Republican Primary of 2004

In 2004, Pataki and New York GOP Chairman Sandy Treadwell faced controversy after naming moderate Assemblyman Howard Mills the party's nominee for the U.S. Senate against Senator Chuck Schumer over conservative Michael Benjamin, who held significant advantages in both fundraising and organization.[4] Benjamin publicly accused Treadwell and Pataki of trying to muscle him out of the senate race and undermine the democratic process.[4] Mills went on to lose the election in the largest landslide for a Senate seat in the history of New York.[5] The New York Republican State Committee is the affiliate of the Republican Party in New York. ... Alexander Treadwell is a longtime Republican Party political leader in New York. ... The chamber of the New York State Assembly. ... Howard D. Mills III (born May 29, 1964) was nominated by Governor George E. Pataki in December 2004 and subsequently won New York State Senate confirmation to serve as head of the New York State Insurance Department. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is currently the senior U.S. Senator from the state of New York, serving since 1999. ... Michael Benjamin (born November 1, 1969) was born Michael Benjamin Bonheur in New York City, New York, USA. Benjamin works as a private investor focusing on Internet companies. ...


2004 Republican Convention in New York City

Pataki was instrumental in bringing the 2004 Republican National Convention to Madison Square Garden in Manhattan. He introduced President George W. Bush. A year prior, Pataki had boasted Bush would carry the state in the 2004 elections; Bush lost New York 58-40 to John Kerry. New York City, which normally votes overwhelmingly Democratic (the Democratic Presidential candidates carried 78 percent of the city vote in both 2000 and 2004 [2]), had never hosted a Republican Convention. 2004 Republican National Convention Logo President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney accepted their partys nomination to run for second terms. ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City, United States. ... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, New York, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ...


In addition, Democrats picked up one Congressional seat, gained seats in the state legislature, and in many local races across the state. Many Republicans, such as Congressman Peter T. King, blamed Pataki and what they viewed as his aimlessness as causing the rout. Pataki replaced some advisors and the state party replaced Chairman Alexander Treadwell. In 2005, Pataki enjoyed some positive publicity when the state passed its first on-time budget in twenty-one years, but he continued to suffer from low approval ratings, as well as Republican losses in local races that November, especially on Long Island, which was key to Pataki's three victories. Peter T. King (born April 5, 1944) is a Republican politician from the U.S. state of New York, currently the U.S. Representative for the states 3rd Congressional District (map). ... Alexander Treadwell is a longtime Republican Party political leader in New York. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ...


Voter anger with state government

In 2004, there was a growing voter dissatisfaction with how the state government conducted business. Two decades of late budgets and decision making by three men in a room on key issues led to voter anger and the defeat of several legislative incumbents. Pataki started to hold open sessions with legislative leaders on budget issues, and including the minority leaders of the Senate and Assembly in these discussions. In addition he encouraged the adoption of an ontime budget and in 2005 and 2006 the state budget was adopted on time.


State budget powers

Pataki's term has been marked with annual debates with the State Legislature over the powers allocated to the Executive and Legislative Branches on the adoption of the state budget. Pataki argued that the state constitution and court rulings gave him the power to submit a budget that allocated revenue and set policy. Pataki said the Legislature could then only change the numbers but could not change any policy decisions made in the budget document. Pataki and the Legislature ended up in court and the courts ruled in Pataki's favor, giving him more budgetary power. In 2005, the Legislature placed a constitutional amendment on the ballot to allocate more budget power to them. Pataki led a successful public information campaign to defeat this provision and to retain his budget authority. In 2006, Pataki vetoed a large part of the budget adopted by the Legislature because of these rulings.


Upstate economic development

Pataki has been criticized for not doing enough on the issue of upstate economic development. He has created a series of Empire Zones statewide, which serve to spur economic growth in cities by providing tax incentives for businesses. In addition he has used the state's banking laws to create banking development zones to intice banks to settle in upstate cities. Pataki has considered casino gaming an economic development program for upstate and he sponsored the creation of an Indian casino in Niagara Falls and in Buffalo to spur economic development. He has also promoted tourism practices for the upstate economy and created centers for excellence in the sciences in several upstate cities to spur economic growth. These policies have been criticized for not doing enough to encourage economic development, though New York City doesn't fare much better in that respect.


Liberal Republican legacy

In 2003 Pataki made a controversial budget proposal in which he proposed several tax cuts, despite the state's rising deficits. He also made cuts in education and health care funding, which, some say, may close emergency rooms and turn non-profit hospitals into for-profits. Pataki argued that new taxes would drive businesses out-of-state, reducing jobs, further compounding the deficit. The emergency room is the American English term for a room, or group of rooms, within a hospital that is designed for the treatment of urgent and medical emergencies. ...


Pataki has always been liberal on social issues, but by his third term, many social conservatives simmered over his continued support of abortion rights although he opposes the fundings and partial-birth versions of it as well as his heavy lobbying in favor of a gay rights bill that had languished in the state Senate for many years due to the opposition of Senate Leader Joseph Bruno from conservative upstate Rensselaer County. In 2003, Bruno finally gave in; the bill passed the senate and was signed into law by Pataki. This article is about the political effort. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... Joseph L. Bruno (born April 8, 1929) is an American businessman and politician. ...


On July 27, 2005, Pataki announced his intention not to seek a fourth term as governor in 2006. Along with several meetings with donors, trips to states important for their primaries, and an August 2005 veto of a bill that would allow sale of the morning-after pill, this fuels speculation that Pataki will seek the 2008 Republican presidential nomination. is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A primary election is an election in which voters in a jurisdiction select candidates for a subsequent election (nominating primary). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Emergency contraception or EC refers to any type of contraception that is taken after unprotected sexual intercourse or after sexual intercourse during which the primary contraception is believed to have failed (e. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 2008 is scheduled to occur on November 4, 2008. ...


Campaign for Fiscal Equity

Pataki's tenure has been marked with the long-standing Campaign for Fiscal Equity suit regarding the state's funding of public education. The CFE has sued in order to get more state money for the New York City public schools and to guarantee a sound education for all students. Pataki has fought the lawsuit his entire term, saying that the state should not pay for the increase funding and that the state constitution only guaranteed a sound education until 8th grade. Pataki has filed several appeals for the decisions and the final decision will be made after he leaves office. The Campaign for Fiscal Equity (CFE) is a New York-based not-for-profit organization persued a series of lawsuits against the State of New York. ...


Mandatory pre-kindergarten

As a part of the CFE lawsuit, education advocates have tried to seek state support and funding for mandatory pre-kindergarten classes in the state's public schools. Pataki has blocked this measure, which has support from legislative leaders and was a pet issue of former Lt. Gov. Betsy McCaughey Ross.


Hospitalization

Pataki suffered a burst appendix and had an emergency appendectomy on February 16, 2006 at Hudson Valley Hospital Center. Six days later, he developed a post-surgical complication (bowel obstruction caused by adhesions)[6] and was transferred to New York-Presbyterian/Columbia Medical Center for a second operation. From there, he was discharged on March 6. Doctors advised rest at home since his conditions could last up to a month. On the week of March 20–24, 2006, he appeared at a public press conference looking fit and thinner to comment on the progress of the annual budget and the recent Campaign for Fiscal Equity CFE ruling from the New York state court. During Pataki's two surgeries, when he was under anesthesia, power officially transferred to Lt. Gov. Mary Donohue, making her the state's acting governor. Pataki came under criticism when it was revealed that he and his staff did not inform Donohue that she was acting governor the first time, until after Pataki had woken up and resumed power. In human anatomy, the vermiform appendix (or appendix, pl. ... An appendicectomy (or appendectomy) is the surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. ... Bowel obstruction is a mechanical blockage of the intestines, preventing the normal transit of the products of digestion. ... An adhesion is a fibrous band of scar tissue that binds together normally separate anatomical structures. ... New York-Presbyterian Hospital is a prominent university hospital in New York City, composed of two medical centers, Columbia University Medical Center and New York Weill Cornell Medical Center, each affiliated with an Ivy League University. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Campaign for Fiscal Equity (CFE) is a New York-based not-for-profit organization persued a series of lawsuits against the State of New York. ...


Bilderberg conference 2006

Pataki attended the 2006 Bilderberg conference at the Brook Street Hotel in Ottawa, Canada on June 8–11. Due to the intense secrecy surrounding the organization, Pataki's precise function or role at the event is not known, although (as is usually the case with anything involving the Bilderberg Group) speculation is rampant. The front cover of the privately circulated report of the 1980 Bilderberg conference in Bad Aachen, Germany. ...


State Comptroller Alan Hevesi

In October 2006 Pataki named a special counsel to investigate the allegations that State Comptroller Alan Hevesi had misued state resources when he had a state driver chauffeur his wife around. Pataki's counsel was studying whether Pataki could recommend to the State Senate that Hevesi be removed from office. Pataki's special counsel recommended that Hevesi could be removed, but Pataki declined to recommend removal, saying that it would only for Hevesi's term expiring at the end of 2006 and not for his new term starting in 2007. After Hevesi's December 2006 resignation, Pataki briefly considered naming an interim comptroller to serve until the State Legislature named a new comptroller. Alan G. Hevesi (born 1940 in Queens, New York) is the Democratic Comptroller of the State of New York. ... The New York State Senate is one of two houses in the New York State Legislature and has members each elected to two-year terms. ...


Evaluations as Governor of the state of New York

Prior to Pataki's departure New York Post political writer Frederick Dicker authored a scathing critique of Pataki's tenure, accusing the Governor of broken promises, inattentiveness to his duties, and a focus on maintaining power. It was entitled "Good Riddance"[7] The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ...


On Pataki's final day in office, The New York Times ran an editorial[8] evaluating his twelve years as governor. The Times praised his work on health care and the environment. He was criticized for the lack of tangible reform and the consolidation of power under his watch. The Times was conflicted about his record on crime and the state budget. The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...


Airplane usage

During his 1994 campaign, Pataki criticized Cuomo's use of state airplanes and said he would not use the planes as governor. In January 2007, Acting State Comptroller Tom Sanzillo announced that he was declining to pay a bill Pataki submitted to the state to lease a private plane to fly to Virginia in December 2006. Acting Comptroller Sanzillo said Pataki could have used a state plane to make the trip. Pataki flew to Virginia on state business in order to inspect steel to be used in the Freedom Tower. The bill was forwarded to the Office of Gov. Eliot Spitzer for consideration. Spitzer's office ruled that Pataki's campaign committee needed to pay the bill for the private plane, since a state plane could have been used. Tom Sanzillo was the acting State Comptroller of New York. ... Eliot Laurence Spitzer (born June 10, 1959) is an American lawyer, politician and the current Governor of New York. ...


Lieutenant Governors

Lt. Gov. Betsy McCaughey Ross

Pataki's 1994 running mate for lieutenant governor was Betsy McCaughey, an academic best known for her critique of the Clinton health care plan. McCaughey was selected because of her work on the Clinton health care plan. It is reported that Pataki choose McCaughey over sofa bed heiress Bernadette Castro for the spot. Castro was nominated for the U. S. Senate in 1994. The Lieutenant Governor of New York is the second highest ranking official in the government of New York. ... Betsy McCaughey Ross (born 1949) was the lieutenant-governor of the state of New York from 1994 to 1998, during the first term of governor George Pataki. ... Bernadette Castro is a New York politician and businesswoman who serves in the Cabinet of Gov. ...


McCaughey faced problems with Pataki and Pataki's staff from the start. It is reported that Pataki did not like McCaughey's relationship with the press or her public discussion of policy differences the two had. McCaughey also lost support from Pataki when she said that D'Amato had made suggestive comments to her.


McCaughey married during her first year as lieutenant governor and became Betsy McCaughey Ross. Lt. Gov. McCaughey Ross had many problems from the start with Pataki, who did not like her public displays and constant public attention. Pataki assigned her work on health care and education issues. Lt. Gov. McCaughey Ross said that Pataki did not listen to her advice on these issues, including her calls for mandatory state funding for pre-kindergarten in the state.


Lt. Gov. McCaughey Ross stood during Pataki's 1996 State of the State Address, which attracted attention to her (standing behind Pataki in a bright blue suit) and away from Pataki. She announced constant policy differences with Pataki and announced that Pataki would not talk to her. Pataki's public feud with McCaughey Ross inluded at times taking her state police bodyguards from her and trying to take her Albany office away. Pataki's aides constantly discussed McCaughey Ross in a negative context in the press and Parks Commissioner Bernadette Castro feuded with Lt. Gov. McCaughey Ross on the radio.


In April 1997, Pataki announced that he was dropping Lt. Gov. McCaughey Ross from his 1998 reelection ticket. McCaughey Ross said she would seek elected office in 1998 either as lieutenant governor, governor or to the U. S. Senate. In September of that year, she became a Democrat and unsuccessfully sought the governorship in that party's primary. She was on the 1998 general election ballot as the nominee of the Liberal Party for governor.


Lt. Gov. Mary Donohue

After dropping McCaughey Ross from his 1998 ticket, Pataki considered several replacement running mates. In the spring of 1998 he announced his choice of State Supreme Court Justice Mary Donohue for lieutenant governor. It is reported that Pataki also considered State Parks Commissioner Bernadette Castro, Erie County Comptroller Nancy Naples and State Sen. Mary Lou Rath for the lieutenant governorship as well. Naples would later join Pataki's Cabinet as State Motor Vehicles Commissioner. Mary Donohue is the Lieutenant Governor of New York State. ... Nancy Naples is the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles in New York. ... Mary Lou Rath is a state senator in New York. ...


In office, Lt. Gov. Donohue has been relegated to projects outside the governor's inner circle. She has worked on school violence prevention, local government, small business, and homeland security issues. Many of her duties have consisted of delivering speeches to groups around the state or filling in for Pataki at ceremonial events. Lt. Gov. Donohue has kept a generally low profile around the state.


In 2002, it was reported that Pataki considering dropping Lt. Gov. Donohue from his ticket and asking her to run for state attorney general instead. It is reported that he considered Secretary of State Randy Daniels and Erie County Executive Joel Giambra for lieutenant governor. Pataki decided to keep Lt. Gov. Donohue on as his 2002 running mate. Randy Daniels is the former Secretary of State of New York. ... Joel Giambra is the County Executive in Erie County, New York State. ...


Donohue did not run to succeed Pataki in 2006. In December 2006, Pataki appointed Donohue to be a Judge of the New York Court of Claims. The New York State Court of Claims is the court which handles all claims against the State of New York and affliated state agencies. ...


Cultural references

The last name of Hey Arnold! character Helga Pataki is taken from the governor. Hey Arnold! was an American animated television series that aired from October 7, 1996 until June 8, 2004 on Nickelodeon. ... Helga Geraldine Pataki is a fictional character in the Nickelodeon animated television series Hey Arnold!. She was voiced by Francesca Marie Smith. ...


In the 'Stretch & Bobbito 94' freestyle rap by Big L there is a line referring to the governor (and also Rudolph Giuliani) which goes 'And I wanna smoke pataki and rudolph julie like a wooley'. Lamont Coleman (May 30, 1974 – February 15, 1999), better known as Big L, was an American rapper. ... Rudolph William Louis Rudy Giuliani III, KBE (born May 28, 1944) served as the Mayor of New York City from January 1, 1994 through December 31, 2001. ...


State tickets on which Pataki has run

1994 Republican and Conservative Tickets
1998 NYS Republican and Conservative Party Tickets
2002 NYS Republican and Conservative Party Tickets

Betsy McCaughey Ross (born 1949) was the lieutenant-governor of the state of New York from 1994 to 1998, during the first term of governor George Pataki. ... Herbert (Herb) London is an American conservative activist, professor, academic and author. ... Dennis Vacco was Attorney General of New York State. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Bernadette Castro is a New York politician and businesswoman who serves in the Cabinet of Gov. ... Mary Donohue is the Lieutenant Governor of New York State. ... Bruce Blakeman is a politician from Nassau County, New York who is currently a member of the Board of Commissioners of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. ... Dennis Vacco was Attorney General of New York State. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Alfonse Marcello DAmato (born August 1, 1937) is a former New York politician. ... Mary Donohue is the Lieutenant Governor of New York State. ... John Faso (1952-) was the Republican nominee for Governor of New York, and was defeated by Democratic nominee Eliot Spitzer in the largest defeat for a Republican candidate in New York state history. ... Dora Irizarry is a Federal Judge in New York. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ "N. Y. Gov. George Pataki to deliver Class Day address", Yale Daily News, 2002-05-26. Retrieved on 2006-04-21. 
  2. ^ George Pataki Biography. Retrieved on 2006-04-21.
  3. ^ Deve Leip's Atlas of U. S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved on 2007-01-02.
  4. ^ a b Senate hopeful claims GOP bosses snubbed him. Albany Times-Union, February 25, 2004.
  5. ^ Major Parties to Anoint their Senate Combatants. Humbert, Mark. Associated Press, May 15, 2004.
  6. ^ the New York Daily News, February 22, 2006 page 5 "GOV HAS ANOTHER SURGERY. BLOCKAGE IN INTESTINES — PATAKI IS NOW AT HOSP IN CITY"
  7. ^ http://www.nypost.com/seven/12282006/postopinion/opedcolumnists/good_riddance_opedcolumnists_fredric_u__dicker.htm
  8. ^ "The George Pataki Era", The New York Times, 2006-12-31. Retrieved on 2007-01-02. 
Preceded by
Fred J. Bianco, Jr.
Mayor of Peekskill, New York
1981–1984
Succeeded by
Richard E. Jackson
Preceded by
Willis Stephens Sr.
New York State Assembly, 99th District
1985–1992
Succeeded by
Vincent Leibell
Preceded by
Mary Goodhue
New York State Senate, 37th District
1993–1994
Succeeded by
Vincent Leibell
Preceded by
Mario Cuomo
Governor of New York
1995–2006
Succeeded by
Eliot Spitzer

  Results from FactBites:
 
George Pataki - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3874 words)
George Elmer Pataki (born June 24, 1945) is the current Governor of New York State, USA and has held that office since January 1995, and as of June 2006 is the longest-serving of the current 50 U.S. governors.
Pataki and Giuliani appointed the LMDC to distribute nearly $10 billion in federal grants and to oversee the construction of a memorial, though as of September 2006 the latter has not begun.
Pataki came under criticism when it was revealed that he and his staff did not inform Donohue that she was acting governor the first time, until after Pataki had woken up and resumed power.
N.Y. Gov. Pataki leaves hospital - Boston.com (255 words)
George Pataki was released from a hospital Monday after 18 days of treatment for appendicitis and complications that followed surgery.
Pataki was released Monday from a Manhattan hospital after 18 days of treatment for appendicitis and its complications.
Pataki told reporters last week he was "chomping at the bit" to go home and have a pizza and a cold beer.
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