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Encyclopedia > George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston
George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston, British statesman
George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston, British statesman

The Most Honourable George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston (January 11, 1859March 20, 1925), was a conservative British statesman who served as Viceroy of India. Image File history File links Lord_Curzon. ... Image File history File links Lord_Curzon. ... The prefix The Most Honourable is a title of quality attached to the names of marquesses in the United Kingdom. ... January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1859 (MDCCCLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in Leap years). ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Governor-General of India (or Governor-General and Viceroy of India) was the head of the British administration in India. ...

Contents


Early life

Eldest son of the 4th Baron Scarsdale, rector of Kedleston, Derbyshire, Curzon was educated at Eton College and Balliol College, Oxford. At Oxford he was president of the Union, and after a brilliant university career was elected a fellow of All Souls College in 1883. Viscount Scarsdale and Baron Scarsdale are titles in the Peerage of the United Kingdom and Peerage of Great Britain, respectively. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings. ... Kedleston is a village and civil parish in the Amber Valley district of Derbyshire. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England, and boasts some of Englands most attractive scenery. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a prestigious and internationally known Public School for boys. ... College name Balliol College Named after John de Balliol Established 1263 Sister College St Johns Master Andrew Graham JCR President Jack Hawkins Undergraduates 403 Graduates 228 Homepage Boatclub Balliol College, founded in 1263, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... The University of Oxford (often called Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Oxford Union The Oxford Union Society, commonly referred to simply as the Oxford Union, is a private debating society in the city of Oxford, whose membership is drawn primarily but not exclusively from the University of Oxford. ... All Souls College (in full: The College of All Souls of the Faithful Departed, of Oxford) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


While at Oxford Curzon was the inspiration for a piece of doggerel which stuck with him in later life: The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...


My name is George Nathaniel Curzon,
I am a most superior person.
My cheeks are pink, my hair is sleek,
I dine at Blenheim twice a week.
Blenheim Palace, The Great Court. ...


Life and career

He became assistant private secretary to Lord Salisbury in 1885, and in 1886 entered Parliament as member for the Southport division of south-west Lancashire. He served as Under-Secretary of State for India in 1891-1892 and Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs in 1895-1898. Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury (February 3, 1830–August 22, 1903). ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... The Houses of Parliament, seen over Westminster Bridge The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative body in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories. ... (This article is about the English town of Southport. ... Lancashire is a county and duchy palatine in the North of England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State for India, 1858-1937, for India and Burma, 1937-1948 to be added Permanent Under-Secretaries of State for India, 1858-1937, for India and Burma, 1937-1948 1858: Sir George Russell Clerk 1860: Herman Merivale 1874: Sir Louis Mallet 1883: (Sir) Arthur Godley 1909... 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... This is a list of Under-Secretaries of State for Foreign Affairs in the British Foreign Office since 1782. ... 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In the meantime he had travelled in Central Asia, Persia, Afghanistan, the Pamirs, Siam, French Indochina and Korea, and published several books describing central and eastern Asia and related policy issues. Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia (Russian: Средняя Азия/Srednyaya Azia for Middle Asia or Центральная Азия/Tsentralnaya Azia for Central Asia; in Turkic languages Orta Asya; in Persian آسياى مرکزی; (Urdu: وسطى ايشيا)Wasti Asia; Standard Mandarin Chinese... Motto: Persian: Esteqlāl, āzādÄ«, jomhÅ«rÄ«-ye eslāmÄ« (English: Independence, freedom, (the) Islamic Republic) Anthem: SorÅ«d-e MellÄ«-e Īrān Capital Tehran Largest city Tehran Official language(s) Persian Government Islamic Republic  - Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei  - President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad Revolution Overthrew Mohammad Reza Pahlavi   - Declared... Located in Central Asia, the Pamir Mountains are formed by the junction of the worlds greatest mountain ranges, a geologic structural knot from which the great Tian Shan, Karakoram, Kunlun, and Hindu Kush mountain systems radiate. ... For the country formerly called Siam see Thailand SIAM is an acronym for Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. ... French Indochina was a federation of protectorates in Southeast Asia, part of the French colonial empire. ... Korea (Korean: (ì¡°ì„  or 한국, see below) is a geographical area, civilization, and former state situated on the Korean Peninsula in East Asia, bordering China to the northwest and Russia to the northeast, with Japan situated to the southeast across the Korea Strait. ...


First Marriage (1895)

Curzon's wife Mary Victoria, portraited by Franz von Lenbach, c. 1902
Curzon's wife Mary Victoria, portraited by Franz von Lenbach, c. 1902

In 1895 he married Mary Victoria Leiter (d. 1906), the beautiful daughter of Levi Zeigler Leiter, a Chicago millionaire of German Lutheran origin and a cofounder of the department store Field & Leiter (now known as Marshall Field). They had three daughters: Mary Irene (who inherited her father's Barony of Ravensdale and was created a life peer in her own right), Cynthia (first wife of Sir Oswald Mosley), and Alexandra Naldera (wife of Edward "Fruity" Metcalfe, the best friend of Edward VIII; best known as Baba Metcalfe, she later became a mistress of her brother-in-law Oswald Mosley, as did her stepmother, Grace). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (659x731, 247 KB) Mary Victoria Leiter, 1st wife of George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston Portrait study by Franz von Lenbach, 1902 Gallery: Alte Nationalgalerie Berlin, A III 513 File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (659x731, 247 KB) Mary Victoria Leiter, 1st wife of George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston Portrait study by Franz von Lenbach, 1902 Gallery: Alte Nationalgalerie Berlin, A III 513 File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link... Franz von Lenbach, Portrait of his daughter Marion Young shepherd, 1860 Franz von Lenbach (December 13, 1836 - May 6, 1904), German painter was born at Schrobenhausen, in Bavaria. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Levi Ziegler Leiter was a Chicago businessman and partner of Marshall Field who co-founded what became the Marshall Field and Company retail empire. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Marshall Fields State Street Store interior, about 1910 Marshall Field and Company is a department store. ... Baron Ravensdale, of Ravensdale in the County of Derbyshire, is a peerage title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... Sir Oswald Ernald Mosley, 6th Baronet (November 16, 1896 – December 3, 1980), was a British politician principally known as the founder of the British Union of Fascists. ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David Windsor), later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor (23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972), was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of... Sir Oswald Ernald Mosley, 6th Baronet (November 16, 1896 – December 3, 1980), was a British politician principally known as the founder of the British Union of Fascists. ...


Viceroy of India (1899-1905)

Lord Curzon with Maharaja of Baroda pose with the hunted tigers
Lord Curzon with Maharaja of Baroda pose with the hunted tigers

In January 1899 he was appointed Viceroy of India. He was created an Irish peer as Baron Curzon of Kedleston on his appointment, the creation taking this form, it was understood, in order that he might remain free during his father's lifetime to re-enter the House of Commons. Image File history File links Lord_Curzon_Hunting_1901. ... Image File history File links Lord_Curzon_Hunting_1901. ... Binomial name Panthera tigris (Linnaeus, 1758) Tigers (Panthera tigris) are mammals of the Felidae family and one of four big cats in the panthera genus. ... The Governor-General of India (or Governor-General and Viceroy of India) was the head of the British administration in India. ... The Peerage of Ireland is the term used for those peers created by British monarchs in their capacity as Lord or King of Ireland. ... The House of Commons is a component of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which also includes the Sovereign and the House of Lords. ...


Reaching India shortly after the suppression of the frontier risings of 1897-1898, he paid special attention to the independent tribes of the north-west frontier, inaugurated a new province called the North West Frontier Province, and pursued a policy of forceful control mingled with conciliation. The only major armed outbreak on this frontier during the period of his administration was the Mahsud Waziri campaign of 1901. North-West Frontier Province (NWFP) is geographically the smallest of the four provinces of Pakistan. ...


His deep mistrust of Russian intentions led him to encourage British trade in Persia, paying a visit to the Persian Gulf in 1903. At the end of that year he sent a military expedition into Tibet led by Francis Younghusband, ostensibly to forestall a Russian advance. After bloody conflicts with Tibet's poorly-armed defenders, the mission penetrated to Lhasa, where a treaty was signed in September 1904. No Russian presence was found in Lhasa. Map of the Persian Gulf. ... Tibet (older spelling Thibet; Tibetan: བོད་, Bod, pronounced pö in Lhasa dialect; Chinese: 西藏, Hanyu Pinyin: Xīzàng or Chinese: 藏区, Hanyu Pinyin: Zàngqū [the two names are used with different connotations; see Name section below]) is a region in Central Asia and the home of the Tibetan people. ... Colonel Sir Francis Edward Younghusband (31 May 1863 - 31 July 1942) was a British Army officer, explorer, and spiritualist. ... Lhasa prefecture-level city in Tibet Autonomous Region Lhasa (Tibetan: ལྷ་ས་; Wylie: lha-sa; Simplified Chinese: 拉萨; Traditional Chinese: 拉薩; pinyin: Lāsà), sometimes spelled Llasa, is the traditional capital of Tibet and the capital of the Tibetan Autonomous Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


Within India, Lord Curzon of Kedleston appointed a number of commissions to inquire into Indian education, irrigation, police and other branches of administration, on whose reports legislation was based during his second term of office as viceroy. Reappointed governor-general in August 1904, he presided over the partition of Bengal (July 1905), which roused such bitter opposition among the people of the province that it was later revoked (1912). Bengal, known as Bôngo (Bengali: বঙ্গ), Bangla (বাংলা), Bôngodesh (বঙ্গদেশ), or Bangladesh (বাংলাদেশ) in Bangla, is a region in the northeast of South Asia. ...


A difference of opinion with the British military commander-in-chief in India, Lord Kitchener, regarding the position of the military member of council in India, led to a controversy in which Lord Curzon of Kedleston failed to obtain support from the home government. He resigned in August 1905 and returned to England. Horatio Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener of Khartoum Horatio Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener of Khartoum PC, KBE, KCB, ADC ( June 24, 1850 - June 5, 1916) was a British Field Marshal and statesman. ...


During his tenure, Curzon undertook the restoration of the Taj Mahal, and expressed satisfaction that he had done so. The Taj Mahal The Taj Mahal (Hindi: , Persian, Urdu: ), is a monument located in Agra in India, constructed between 1631 and 1654 by a workforce of 20,000. ...


Representative Peer for Ireland (1908)

In 1908 Curzon was elected a representative peer for Ireland, and thus relinquished any idea of returning to the House of Commons. In 1909-1910 he took an active part in opposing the Liberal government's proposal to abolish the legislative veto of the House of Lords. He served in Lloyd George's War Cabinet as Leader of the House of Lords from December 1916. Despite his continued opposition to votes for women (he had earlier headed the Anti-Suffrage League), the House of Lords voted conclusively in its favour. David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd George of Dwyfor, OM (January 17, 1863–March 26, 1945) was a British statesman and the last Liberal to be Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Suffrage parade, New York City, 1912 The movement for womens suffrage, led by suffragists (peaceful protestors) and suffragettes (violent protestors), is a social, economic and political reform movement aimed at extending the suffrage (the right to vote) to women. ... The Anti-Suffrage League was an organization that was opposed to womens suffrage. ...


Second Marriage (1917)

After a long affair with the romance novelist Elinor Glyn, Curzon married, in 1917, the former Grace Elvina Hinds, the Alabama-born widow of Alfred Hubert Duggan. His wife had three children from her first marriage. Despite fertility-related operations and several miscarriages, she was never able to give Curzon the son and heir he desperately desired, a fact that eroded their marriage, which ended in separation, though not divorce. Elinor Glyn (October 17, 1864 - September 23, 1943), born Nellie Sutherland in Jersey, was the author of It, Three Weeks, Beyond the Rocks, and other novels in a similarly softcore vein. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,423 sq. ...


Foreign Secretary (1919-24)

Appointed Foreign Secretary from January 1919, Curzon gave his name to his proposal which became the British government's proposed Soviet-Polish boundary, the Curzon Line of December 1919 and which is approximately the border between Poland and its eastern neighbors today. The Curzon Line was a demarcation line proposed in 1919 by the British Foreign Secretary, Lord Curzon of Kedleston, as a possible armistice line between Poland, to the west, and Soviet Russia to the east, during the Polish-Soviet War of 1919–20. ...


While he did not have Lloyd George's support, the Prime Minister thought him overly pompous and self important, he nevertheless helped settle several foreign and imperial problems, notably in the Middle East where he negotiated Eygptian independence (granted in 1922); resolved an insurrection in the mandated territory of Iraq (by sending T E Lawrence to report and adopting his recommendations which were to grant internal self government under the rule of King Faisal) and at least delayed the problems in the British Mandate of Palestine with the establishment of the Kingdom of Jordan. Thomas Edward Lawrence (August 16, 1888 – May 19, 1935), also known as Lawrence of Arabia, and (apparently, among his Arab allies) Aurens or El Aurens, became famous for his role as a British liaison officer during the Arab Revolt of 1916–1918. ... There were numerous monarchs known as King Faisal, including: King Faisal of Saudi Arabia King Faisal I of Iraq King Faisal II of Iraq This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Map of the territory under the British Mandate of Palestine. ...


Curzon was largely responsible for creating the Armistice Day ceremonies to commemorate the ending of the First World War on November 11, 1918. This included the the plaster Cenotaph, designed by the noted British architect Sir Edwin Lutyens, for the Allied Victory parade in London, and it was so successful that it was reproduced in stone, and still stands where it forms a centerpiece of the present day commemoration ceremonies for the First and Second World Wars. The Cenotaph, London A ceremony at the Cenotaph, London, on Sunday 12th June 2005, remembering Irish war dead Memorial Cenotaph, Hiroshima, Japan A cenotaph is a tomb or a monument erected in honor of a person or group of persons whose remains are elsewhere. ...


On Andrew Bonar Law's retirement as Prime Minister in May 1923, Curzon was passed over for the job in favour of Stanley Baldwin. Many reasons are often cited for this but amongst the most prominent are that Curzon's character was objectionable to many Conservatives, that it was felt to be inappropriate for the Prime Minister to be a member of the House of Lords (though this did not prevent peers being considered for the premiership on several subsequent occasions) and that in a democratic age it would be dangerous for a party to be led by a rich aristocrat. A letter purporting to detail the opinions of Bonar Law but in actuality written by Baldwin sympathisers was delivered to the King's private secretary, though it is unclear how much impact this had in the final outcome. The Right Honourable Andrew Bonar Law (September 16, 1858–October 30, 1923) was a Conservative British statesman and Prime Minister. ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867–14 December 1947) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom on three separate occasions. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ...


Curzon remained Foreign Secretary under Baldwin until the government fell in January 1924. When Baldwin formed a new government in November 1924, he did not reappoint Curzon as Foreign Secretary but instead as Lord President of the Council. Curzon held this post until the following March when he died in office. Upon his death the Barony, Earldom and Marquessate of Curzon of Kedleston became extinct, whilst the Viscountcy and Barony of Scarsdale were inherited by a nephew and the Barony of Ravensdale by his eldest daughter. The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ...


Assessment

There was a feeling after his death that Curzon had failed to reach the heights which his youthful talents had seemed destined to reach. This sense of opportunities missed was summed up by Churchill in his book Great Contemporaries (1937): Churchill redirects here. ...


The morning had been golden; the noontide was bronze; and the evening lead. But all were polished till it shone after its fashion.


It is believed that his name was given to a new school built in 1938 - Curzon Crescent Nursery School, Willesden, Middlesex, due to the areas links with All Souls


Bibliography

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
George Nathaniel Curzon

Curzon's publications include Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... Wikiquote logo Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...

  • Russia in Central Asia (1889)
  • Persia and the Persian Question (1892)
  • Problems of the Far East (1894; new ed., 1896).

See

  • Mosley, Leonard Oswald. The glorious fault: The life of Lord Curzon
  • Nicolson, Harold. Curzon: the last phase
  • Gilmour, David (2003). Curzon - Imperial Statesman. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Retrieved on 2006-05-25.
Preceded by:
The Earl of Elgin
Viceroy of India
1899–1904
Succeeded by:
The Lord Ampthill
Preceded by:
The Lord Ampthill
Viceroy of India
1904–1905
Succeeded by:
The Earl of Minto
Preceded by:
The Marquess of Salisbury
Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports
1904–1905
Succeeded by:
HRH The Prince of Wales
Preceded by:
Francis William Browne, 4th Baron Kilmaine
representative peer for Ireland
1908–1925
Succeeded by:
office lapsed
Preceded by:
The Marquess of Crewe
Lord Privy Seal
1915–1916
Succeeded by:
The Earl of Crawford and Balcarres
Leader of the House of Lords
1916-1924
Succeeded by:
The Viscount Haldane
Lord President of the Council
1916–1919
Succeeded by:
Arthur James Balfour
Preceded by:
The Marquess of Lansdowne
Conservative Leader in the Lords
1916–1925
Succeeded by:
Stanley Baldwin
(as overall leader)'''
Preceded by:
Andrew Bonar Law
Leader of the British Conservative Party
1921–1922
with Austen Chamberlain
Succeeded by:
Andrew Bonar Law
Preceded by:
Arthur James Balfour
Foreign Secretary
1919–1924
Succeeded by:
Ramsay MacDonald
Preceded by:
The Lord Parmoor
Lord President of the Council
1924–1925
Succeeded by:
Arthur James Balfour
Preceded by:
The Viscount Haldane
Leader of the House of Lords
1924–1925
Succeeded by:
The Marquess of Salisbury
Preceded by:
New Creation
Marquess Curzon of Kedleston Succeeded by:
Extinct
Preceded by:
New Creation
Viscount Scarsdale Succeeded by:
Richard Nathaniel Curzon
Preceded by:
Alfred Nathaniel Curzon
Baron Scarsdale
Preceded by:
New Creation
Baron Ravensdale Succeeded by:
Mary Irene Curzon


This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Farrar, Straus and Giroux is a book publishing company, founded in 1946 by Roger W. Straus, Jr. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... Victor Alexander Bruce, 9th Earl of Elgin, 13th Earl of Kincardine (16 May 1849 - 18 January 1917) was a British statesman who served as Viceroy of India from 1894 to 1899. ... The Governor-General of India (or Governor-General and Viceroy of India) was the head of the British administration in India. ... Sir Arthur Oliver Villiers Russell, 2nd Baron Ampthill GCSI GCIE BA (19 February 1869–7 July 1935) was the son of the 1st Baron Ampthill. ... Sir Arthur Oliver Villiers Russell, 2nd Baron Ampthill GCSI GCIE BA (19 February 1869–7 July 1935) was the son of the 1st Baron Ampthill. ... The Governor-General of India (or Governor-General and Viceroy of India) was the head of the British administration in India. ... Gilbert John Elliot-Murray-Kynynmond, 4th Earl of Minto (June 9, 1845 - March 1, 1914) was an English politician, Governor General of Canada, and Viceroy of India. ... Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury (February 3, 1830–August 22, 1903). ... Flag of the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports The Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports is a ceremonial official in the United Kingdom. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert) (3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor (formerly known as the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha). ... In the United Kingdom, representative peers were individuals elected by the members of the Peerage of Scotland and the Peerage of Ireland to represent them in the British House of Lords. ... The Most Honourable Robert Offley Ashburton Crewe-Milnes, 1st and last Marquess of Crewe (12 January 1858 - 20 June 1945) was an English statesman and writer. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... David Alexander Edward Lindsay, 27th Earl of Crawford, 10th Earl of Balcarres (1871-1940) was a British Conservative politician. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... Lord Haldane Richard Burdon Sanderson Haldane, 1st Viscount Haldane, (July 30, 1856 - August 19, 1928), was an important British Liberal politician, lawyer, and philosopher. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... The Right Honourable Arthur James Balfour, 1st Earl of Balfour, KG, OM, (25 July 1848 – 19 March 1930) was a British statesman and the thirty-third Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The Most Honourable Henry Charles Keith Petty-FitzMaurice, 5th Marquess of Lansdowne, KG, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE (14 January 1845 – 3 June 1927) was a British politician and Irish peer who served successively as Governor General of Canada, Viceroy of India, Secretary of State for War, and Secretary of State for... Leaders of the Conservative Party since 1834. ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867–14 December 1947) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom on three separate occasions. ... The Right Honourable Andrew Bonar Law (September 16, 1858–October 30, 1923) was a Conservative British statesman and Prime Minister. ... Leaders of the Conservative Party since 1834. ... The Rt. ... The Right Honourable Andrew Bonar Law (September 16, 1858–October 30, 1923) was a Conservative British statesman and Prime Minister. ... The Right Honourable Arthur James Balfour, 1st Earl of Balfour, KG, OM, (25 July 1848 – 19 March 1930) was a British statesman and the thirty-third Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... James Ramsay MacDonald (12 October 1866–9 November 1937) was a British politician and twice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... Charles Alfred Cripps, 1st Baron Parmoor KCVO PC (October 3, 1852 - June 30, British politician who switched from the Conservative to the Labour Party and was a strong supporter of the League of Nations and of Church of England causes. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... The Right Honourable Arthur James Balfour, 1st Earl of Balfour, KG, OM, (25 July 1848 – 19 March 1930) was a British statesman and the thirty-third Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... Lord Haldane Richard Burdon Sanderson Haldane, 1st Viscount Haldane, (July 30, 1856 - August 19, 1928), was an important British Liberal politician, lawyer, and philosopher. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... James Edward Hubert Gascoyne-Cecil, 4th Marquess of Salisbury (October 23, 1861 - April 4, 1947) was the eldest son and heir of the Victorian statesman Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury. ... The title of Marquess Curzon of Kedleston was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1921 for the Foreign Secretary, the Earl Curzon of Kedleston. ... Viscount Scarsdale and Baron Scarsdale are titles in the Peerage of the United Kingdom and Peerage of Great Britain, respectively. ... Viscount Scarsdale and Baron Scarsdale are titles in the Peerage of the United Kingdom and Peerage of Great Britain, respectively. ... Baron Ravensdale, of Ravensdale in the County of Derbyshire, is a peerage title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... Mary Irene Curzon, 2nd Baroness Ravensdale (1896-1966)was the elder child of George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston and Mary Victoria Leiter, daughter of Levi Zeigler Leiter. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston (877 words)
George Nathaniel Curzon of Kedleston, 1st Baron (January 11, 1859 - March 20, 1925), Conservative British statesman, Viceroy of India.
Eldest son of the 4th baron Scarsdale, rector of Kedleston, Derbyshire, Curzon was educated at Eton and Balliol College, Oxford.
In 1904 he was appointed lord warden of the Cinque Ports; in the same year he was given the honorary degree of DCL by Oxford University, and in 1908 he was elected chancellor of the university.
George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1179 words)
Eldest son of the 4th Baron Scarsdale, rector of Kedleston, Derbyshire, Curzon was educated at Eton College and Balliol College, Oxford.
Within India, Lord Curzon of Kedleston appointed a number of commissions to inquire into Indian education, irrigation, police and other branches of administration, on whose reports legislation was based during his second term of office as viceroy.
Upon his death the Barony, Earldom and Marquessate of Curzon of Kedleston became extinct, whilst the Viscountcy and Barony of Scarsdale were inherited by a nephew and the Barony of Ravensdale by his eldest daughter.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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