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Encyclopedia > George Metesky

George P. Metesky (November 2, 1903May 23, 1994), better known as the Mad Bomber, terrorized New York City for 16 years in the 1940s and 1950s with explosives he planted in theaters, terminals, libraries and offices. Most bombs were left in locations such as phone booths, restrooms, and under theater seats. Metesky was apprehended based on an early use of criminal profiling and clues given in letters he wrote to a newspaper. He admitted to placing 32 bombs, was found legally insane and committed to a state mental hospital.[1][2] is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Offender profiling, or more scientifically, psychological profiling, is a behavioral and investigative tool that helps investigators to profile an unknown subject (unsub) or offender(s). ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Involuntary commitment is the practice of using legal means or forms as part of a mental health law to commit a person to a mental hospital, insane asylum or psychiatric ward without their informed consent, against their will or over their protests. ...

Contents

Injury

Following World War I, Metesky joined the U.S. Marines, serving as a specialist electrician at the United States Consulate in Shanghai. Returning home, he put his skills to work as a mechanic and lived with his two unmarried sisters in the family home in Waterbury, Connecticut. Metesky was employed as a generator wiper at the Hell Gate generating plant of a Consolidated Edison Utility Company subsidiary. In 1931 he was injured when an accident at the plant produced a blast of hot gasses that knocked him down and that he inhaled. The accident left him disabled, and after collecting 26 weeks of sick pay he lost his job. According to claims he made later, the accident gave him pneumonia that developed into tuberculosis. A claim for workers' compensation was denied because he waited too long to file it. Three appeals of the denial were also rejected, the last in 1936. He developed a hatred for the company's attorneys and for the three co-workers whose testimony in his compensation case he believed was perjured in favor of the company.[3][4][5] The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... TVA electricians, Tennessee, 1942. ... For the uses of Consul as Chief Magistrate of a (city) state, see Consul. ... For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ... Look up Mechanic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Nickname: Motto: Quid Aere Perennius (What Is More Lasting Than Brass) Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , Country U.S. State NECTA Waterbury Region Central Naugatuck Valley Incorporated (town) 1686 Incorporated (city) 1853 Consolidated 1902 Government  - Type Mayor-board of aldermen  - Mayor Michael J. Jarjura Area  - City  28. ... This article is about machines that produce electricity. ... A wiper is the most junior crewmember in the engine room of a ship. ... Hell Gate Bridge from west looking northeast Hell Gate, shown in red, in a satellite photo of New York Harbor. ... Consolidated Edison, Inc. ... Sick Leave (or Sickness Pay or Sick Pay) is an employee benefit in the form of paid leave which can be taken during periods of sickness. ... This article is about human pneumonia. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or TuBerculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Workers compensation (colloquially known as workers comp in North American English or compo in Australian English) provides insurance to cover medical care and compensation for employees who are injured in the course of employment, in exchange for mandatory relinquishment of the employees right to sue their employer for the... Perjury is the act of lying or making verifiably false statements on a material matter under oath or affirmation in a court of law or in any of various sworn statements in writing. ...


He placed his first bomb in November 16, 1940, leaving it on a window sill at the Consolidated Edison Building on East 14th Street in Manhattan.[6] is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The bombs

Metesky's first bomb, a poorly made pipe bomb housed in a wooden toolbox, did not explode. The bomb was wrapped in a note written in distinctive block letters, stating "CON EDISON CROOKS - THIS IS FOR YOU." The note was signed "F.P." The authorities regarded this as not a threat since if the bomb had exploded, the note would have been obliterated. The second bomb, which also did not explode, appeared a year later, left in the street about four blocks away from another Con Edison site. This bomb had an alarm clock, unwound, as its timer and was again regarded as an isolated incident. This does not cite its references or sources. ...


Metesky planted no bombs between 1941 and 1950, choosing instead to send a series of threatening letters to various targets. His third bomb was discovered before it could explode, on March 29, 1950 in Grand Central Terminal. This bomb was more sophisticated and better built than the previous ones, suggesting military techniques. His fourth bomb, planted in a telephone booth in the New York Public Library, was the first to explode. is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The main concourse Grand Central Terminal (GCT, often unofficially called Grand Central Station) is a terminal rail station at 15 Vanderbilt Avenue (42nd Street and Park Avenue) in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Metesky planted three more gunpowder filled pipe bombs in 1950. None went off. Over the next two years, four Metesky bombs exploded in crowded public places around New York City. The first bomb to cause any injuries exploded in 1953. Before Metesky's bombing campaign was ended, he had planted between 32 and 47 bombs, of which 22 exploded, injuring 15 people. Some of the bombs came with notes, but the notes never revealed a motive, or a reason for choosing that location – the bomber never gave a reason.[7][5] Smokeless powder Gunpowder is a pyrotechnic composition, an explosive mixture that burns rapidly, producing volumes of hot gas which can be used as a propellant in firearms and fireworks. ...


Among Metesky's targets were Grand Central Terminal (bombs planted five times), the New York Public Library (twice), Penn Station (twice), the Port Authority Bus Terminal (twice), Radio City Music Hall (twice), the Empire State Building, Macy's, subway stations, and ferryboats. People feared that their subway station would be the next to be attacked and traveled around the city by bus.[5] Perhaps most notably, Metesky bombed movie theaters, where he slipped his devices into the underside of seats.[6] The main concourse Grand Central Terminal (GCT, often unofficially called Grand Central Station) is a terminal rail station at 15 Vanderbilt Avenue (42nd Street and Park Avenue) in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pennsylvania Station (commonly known as Penn Station) is the major intercity rail station and a major commuter rail hub in New York City. ... Port Authority Bus Terminal at Eighth Avenue and 42nd Street The Port Authority Bus Terminal is the main gateway for interstate buses into Manhattan in New York City. ... Radio City Music Hall at Christmas 2005 Radio City Music Hall is an entertainment venue located in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, New York on the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. ... This article is about the R.H. Macy & Co. ...


Criminal profile

Metesky's erratic bombing campaign left the police at a loss. After a December 2, 1956 bombing at the Paramount movie theater in Brooklyn left six of the theater's 1,500 occupants injured,[6] the police approached Dr. James Brussel, a psychiatrist with the New York State Commission for Mental Hygiene with an unusual request. is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Psychiatry is a branch of medicine dealing with the prevention, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of the mind and mental illness. ... Mental health is a term used to describe either a level of cognitive or emotional wellbeing or an absence of mental illness. ...


Brussel produced the following criminal profile of the bomber: Offender profiling, or more scientifically, psychological profiling, is a behavioral and investigative tool that helps investigators to profile an unknown subject (unsub) or offender(s). ...

"It's a man. Paranoiac. He's middle-aged, forty to fifty years old, introvert. Well proportioned in build. He's single. A loner, perhaps living with an older female relative. He is very neat, tidy and clean shaven. Good education, but of foreign extraction. Skilled mechanic, neat with tools. Not interested in women. He's a Slav. Religious. Might flare up violently at work when criticized. Possible motive: discharge or reprimand. Feels superior to his critics. Resentment keeps growing. His letters are posted from Westchester, and he wouldn't be stupid enough to post them from where he lives. He probably mails the letters between his home and New York City. One of the biggest concentration of Poles is in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and to get from there to New York you have to pass through Westchester. He has had a bad disease - possibly heart trouble."

From evidence including crime-scene photos and the bomber's notes and letters, Brussel derived a number of insights – besides the obvious grudge against Consolidated Edison, the bomber was male, unmarried, a Slav (Metesky's father was Lithuanian), a Catholic, in his 50s, living in Connecticut, a genuine paranoiac, self-educated and suffering from an oedipus complex, meticulous in dress and manner, and had an inadequate sex life - deduced from the rounded "w's" in his handwriting - which represented breasts. Brussel additionally stated that when the bomber was caught, he would be wearing a double-breasted suit, buttoned. Brussel convinced the police to heavily publicize the profile, predicting it would gain a response from the bomber. The publicity started in late December, creating a great number of false confessions and poor quality leads, but leading to positive results. Slavic and Slavonic are used interchangably in English, with the former perferred in US English, and the latter in English. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... For other senses of this word, see paranoia (disambiguation). ... The Oedipus complex in Freudian psychoanalysis refers to a stage of psychosexual development in childhood where children of both sexes regard their father as an adversary and competitor for the exclusive love of their mother. ... Double-breasted pea coat In clothing, double-breasted refers to a coat or jacket or similar garment having a wide overlap in the front with two parallel rows of buttons. ...


Open letters

On December 26, 1956, the New York Journal American published an open letter to the bomber, urging him to give himself up. The newspaper promised a "fair trial" and offered to publish his grievances. Metesky wrote back the next day, signing his letter "F.P.". He said that he would not be giving himself up, and revealed a wish to "bring the Con. Edison to justice". He listed all the locations where he had placed bombs that year, and seemed concerned that perhaps some had not yet been discovered. Another part of the letter said, "My days on earth are numbered—most of my adult life has been spent in bed—my one consolation is—that I can strike back—even from my grave—for the dastardly acts against me." After some editing by the police, the newspaper published Metesky's letter on January 10, along with another open letter asking him for more information about his grievances. is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... One of the New York Journals most infamous cartoons, depicting Philippine-American War General Jacob H. Smiths order Kill Everyone over Ten, from the front page on May 5, 1902. ...


Metesky's second letter provided some details about the materials used in the bombs (he had a preference for pistol powder, as "shotgun powder has very little power"), promised a bombing "truce" until at least March 1, and stated "I was injured on job at Consolidated Edison plant—as a result I am adjudged—totally and permanently disabled", going on to say that he had to pay his own medical bills and that Consolidated Edison had blocked his workers' compensation case. He also stated, "I tried to get my story to the press", "I typed tens of thousands of words (about 800,000)—nobody cared", and "I determined to make these dastardly acts known—I have had plenty of time to think—I decided on bombs." After police editing, the newspaper published the letter on January 15 and asked the bomber for "further details and dates" about his compensation case so that a new and fair hearing could be held.


Metesky's third letter was received by the newspaper on Saturday, January 19. The letter complained about lying on "cold concrete" after his injury without any first aid rendered, then developing pneumonia and later tuberculosis. The letter added details about his lost compensation case and the "perjury" of his co-workers; it gave the date of his injury; and suggested that if he didn't have a family that would be "branded" by his giving himself up, he might consider doing so to get his compensation case reopened. He thanked the Journal American for publicizing his case and said "the bombings will never be resumed." This letter was published Tuesday, the day after Metesky was arrested.[5][8]


Metesky identified

On Friday, January 18, Con Edison clerk Alice Kelly made a discovery while searching through "troublesome" worker's compensation case files, "troublesome" meaning cases where threats were made or implied. She found a file marked in red with the words "injustice" and "permanent disability", words that had been printed in the Journal American. The file indicated that one George Metesky, an employee from 1929 to 1931, had been injured in a plant accident on September 5, 1931.[4] Several letters from Metesky in the file displayed similarities to phraseology used by F.P., and Metesky otherwise appeared to match the profile developed by Brussel. The police were notified.[8] is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The police officially credited Alice Kelly with turning up the clue that led to Metesky's arrest, but she declined to claim the reward of $25,000 offered by the New York City Board of Estimate and $1,000 by the New York City PBA, saying she was merely doing her job. Consolidated Edison's board of directors also declined to file for the reward, prompting a group of shareholders to file as representatives of Kelly and the company.[9][10] The New York City Board of Estimate was a governmental body in New York City, responsible for budget and land-use decisions. ... The Patrolmens Benevolent Association of the City of New York is one of the labor unions representing police officers of the New York City Police Department. ... In relation to a company, a director is an officer (that is, someone who works for the company) charged with the conduct and management of its affairs. ...


Police investigators who later reviewed the path that led them to Metesky said that Con Edison had impeded their investigation for almost two years by repeatedly telling them that the records of employees whose services were terminated prior to 1940 had been destroyed. The investigators said that they had learned of the records' existence through a confidential tip, and that even in the face of police demands and formal requests Con Edison stalled, declaring that the papers were legal documents and that the company's legal department would have to be consulted before granting access.[9][7]


Arrest

Metesky was arrested at home shortly before midnight on Monday, January 21, 1957. At the time of his arrest the unsurprised Metesky confessed to being the bomber, showed police the garage where he had manufactured the bombs, and explained that "F.P." stood for "Fair Play".[11] An initial search found a lathe, short pieces of pipe, three cheap pocket watches and flashlight batteries.[12] Metesky had answered the door in bathrobe and pajamas; when police ordered him to get dressed for the trip to Waterbury Police Headquarters, he reappeared wearing a double-breasted suit, buttoned. is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Lathe (disambiguation). ... A gold pocket watch with hunter case and watch chain A pocket watch (or pocketwatch) usually is a strapless personal timepiece that is carried in a pocket. ...


Answers

Metesky told the arresting officers that he had been "gassed" in the Con Edison accident, had contracted tuberculosis as a result, and started planting bombs because he "got a bum deal". Going over a police list of 32 bomb locations, but never using the word "bomb", he remembered the exact date where each "unit" had been placed, and its size. He then added to the list the size, date and location of 15 early bombs the police had not known about – all left at Con Edison locations, and apparently never reported. When these were not mentioned in the newspapers, he started planting bombs in public places to gain publicity for the "injustices" done him.[3] He also cleared up the mystery of why no bombs were planted during World War II – as an ex-Marine, he abstained during the war, "for patriotic reasons".[13] Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or TuBerculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ...


In their search, police found parts for a bomb that would have been larger than any of the others. Metesky explained that it was intended for the New York Coliseum.[3] The New York Coliseum was a convention center that stood on Columbus Circle in New York City from 1954 to 2000. ...


Involuntary commitment

Metesky, suffering from advanced tuberculosis, admitted to placing 32 bombs and was indicted for attempted murder, damaging a building by explosion, endangering life and violation of the Sullivan Law. After hearing from psychiatric experts during pre-trial hearings, the judge declared Metesky a paranoid schizophrenic, "hopeless and incurable", and found him legally insane. On April 18, 1957, Metesky was committed to the Matteawan Hospital for the Criminally Insane at Beacon, New York.[2] In the common law legal system, an indictment (IPA: ) is a formal charge of having committed a most serious criminal offense. ... The Sullivan Act is a controversial gun control law in New York City. ... Schizophrenia (from the Greek word σχιζοφρένεια, or shjzofreneja, meaning split mind) is a psychiatric diagnosis that describes a mental disorder characterized by impairments in the perception or expression of reality and by significant social or occupational dysfunction. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Involuntary commitment is the practice of using legal means or forms as part of a mental health law to commit a person to a mental hospital, insane asylum or psychiatric ward without their informed consent, against their will or over their protests. ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Country United States State New York County Dutchess Government  - Mayor Clara Lou Gould (R) Area  - City  4. ...


While Metesky was at Matteawan, the Journal American hired a leading workers' compensation attorney to try to reopen his disallowed claim for the 1931 injury, on the grounds that Metesky was mentally incompetent at the time and did not know his rights. The appeal was denied.[14] Workers compensation (colloquially known as workers comp in North American English or compo in Australian English) provides insurance to cover medical care and compensation for employees who are injured in the course of employment, in exchange for mandatory relinquishment of the employees right to sue their employer for the...


At Matteawan, Metesky was unresponsive to psychiatric treatment but caused no trouble. He was declared harmless and released on December 13, 1973. When interviewed by a reporter at the time of his release, he said that he had forsworn violence, but reaffirmed his bitterness toward Consolidated Edison. He also stated that before he began planting his bombs, "I wrote 900 letters to the Mayor, to the Police Commissioner, to the newspapers, and I never even got a penny postcard back. Then I went to the newspapers to try to buy advertising space, but all of them turned me down. I was compelled to bring my story to the public." Metesky returned to his home in Waterbury, where he died twenty years later at the age of 90.[15] is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ...


References

  1. ^ Madden, Melissa Ann. George Metesky: New York's Mad Bomber. CourtTV Crime Library. Retrieved on 2007-09-13.
  2. ^ a b "'BOMBER' ORDERED TO STATE HOSPITAL; Leibowitz Commits Metesky to Matteawan as 'Hopeless and Incurable Man' – Mental Factor Decisive", The New York Times, 1957-04-19. Retrieved on 2007-09-14. “George Metesky, the so-called "Mad Bomber," was committed to Matteawan Hospital for the Criminally Insane yesterday by Judge Samuel S. Leibowitz in Kings County Court.” 
  3. ^ a b c Berger, Meyer. "Twisted Course of 'Mad Bomber' Vengeance Traced in a Deeply Complex Personality – Was Pampered by Sisters – Silent on Vengeance Plans – Owned a .38 Revolver – Had Bomb for Coliseum – Almost Caught One Day – Avoided the Confessional", The New York Times, 1957-01-25. Retrieved on 2007-09-16. “GEORGE P. METESKY, the machinist and electrician who planted forty-seven bombs in public places in the city between 1940 and the end of 1956, is a complex fellow.” 
  4. ^ a b Feinberg, Alexander. "Edison Clerk Finds Case in File; Bomber's Words Alerted Her; Alice Kelly Tells of Uncovering Record in Documents--Company Says It Notified Detective Squad Last Friday Night", The New York Times, 1957-01-23. Retrieved on 2007-09-17. “It was about 5 P.M. last Friday, almost quitting time, when Miss Alice G. Kelly, a senior office assistant at the Consolidated Edison Company, spotted a compensation case in the "dead" files. On top of this particular file, in red italics for emphasis, she noted the words "injustice" and "permanent disability".” 
  5. ^ a b c d Delafuente, Charles. "Terror in the Age of Eisenhower", The New York Times, 2004-09-10. Retrieved on 2007-09-18. “There was a bomber on the loose in New York City. On the evening of Dec. 2, 1956, 1,500 people were at the Brooklyn Paramount Theater watching 'War and Peace' when a pipe bomb beneath a seat exploded at 7:50 p.m. Six people were injured, including Abraham Blumenthal, who was lifted out of his seat by the blast. The next day, Police Commissioner Stephen P. Kennedy ordered what he called the 'greatest manhunt in the history of the Police Department.'” 
  6. ^ a b c "6 HURT IN BOMBING AT THEATRE HERE; 1,500 in Brooklyn Paramount as Crude Device Explodes", The New York Times, 1956-12-03. Retrieved on 2007-09-14. “A crude, homemade bomb exploded in the Brooklyn Paramount Theatre last night, injuring six persons. Fifteen hundred persons were in the theatre.” 
  7. ^ a b "Bomb-Hunt Delay Laid to Con Edison By Police Sources; POLICE SAY EDISON IMPEDED SEARCH", The New York Times, 1957-01-25. Retrieved on 2007-09-17. “Police investigators charged yesterday that the Consolidated Edison Company had impeded their search for the "Mad Bomber."” 
  8. ^ a b "The Bomber's Grievances Came to Light in a Series of Letters; PAPER RECEIVED DETAILED NOTES – Text of His Correspondence to Journal-American Tells of Bitterness Over Injury – Suspect's First Letter Sent From Westchester", The New York Times, 1957-01-23. Retrieved on 2007-09-13. “The clues in George Metesky's three recent letters to The New York Journal-American, which led the police to him after a search of sixteen years, were disclosed yesterday.” 
  9. ^ a b "'BOMBER' REWARD MIGHT GO BEGGING; Woman Who Picked Out Key File Won't Claim $26,000 --Police Give Report", The New York Times, 1957-02-16. Retrieved on 2007-09-18. “It became increasingly evident yesterday that the $26,000 in rewards posted for the apprehension of the so-called Mad Bomber might never be paid.” 
  10. ^ "WOMEN'S UNIT SEEKS 'BOMBER' REWARDS", The New York Times, 1957-02013. Retrieved on 2007-09-19. “The first claim for the $26,000 rewards offered for information leading to the capture of George P. Metesky, the so-called "Mad Bomber", was filed yesterday.” 
  11. ^ "SUSPECT IS HELD AS 'MAD BOMBER'; HE ADMITS ROLE; Files of Edison Co. Lead to Ex-Employee in Waterbury – Extradition Is Planned NO EVIDENCE IN HOME Worker Quoted as Saying He Was 'Gassed' at Plant, Contracted Tuberculosis – 30 Bombs in 16 Years", The New York Times, 1957-01-22. Retrieved on 2007-09-14. “The police here announced early today that a 54-year-old man had admitted that he is the so-called Mad Bomber. The police said the man had confessed at Waterbury, Conn., where he is being questioned. The added that 'all things indicate he is the man.'” 
  12. ^ "George Did It", Time Magazine, 1957-02-04. Retrieved on 2007-09-15. “It was nearly 11 o'clock, one mild, foggy night last week, when a squad of cops deployed cautiously around an old, grey, lace-curtained house at 17 Fourth Street in the factory district of Waterbury, Conn. After the guards were set, plainclothesmen walked up the steps and pounded loudly on the front door. The downstairs lights winked on, and stocky, smiling, pajama-clad George Metesky, a 54-year-old bachelor, answered the knock. His two elderly spinster sisters watched warily in the background. George never lost his polite grin. 'I think.' he said after a few preliminary questions and answers. 'I know why you fellows are here. You think I'm the Mad Bomber.'” 
  13. ^ "Court Here Rules 'The Mad Bomber' Is Still Incompetent", The New York Times, 1972-06-20. Retrieved on 2007-09-18. “George P. Metesky, the eccentric mechanic once known as "The Mad Bomber," lost a legal effort yesterday to have himself declared mentally competent.” 
  14. ^ "BOMBER'S CLAIM DENIED; State Refuses to Reconsider Metesky's Injury Case", The New York Times, 1957-05-30. Retrieved on 2007-09-14. “In rejecting the appeal, a panel of three board members ruled that Mr. O'Rourke had not offered conclusive proof that Metesky was mentally incompetent at the time of the accident.” 
  15. ^ Kaufman, Michael T. "Mad Bomber,' Now 70, Goes Free Today; 37 Blasts Set – Initials 'F.P.' Explained – Institute Assailed", The New York Times, 1973-12-13. Retrieved on 2007-09-14. “George Metesky, the onetime "Mad Bomber," who for 16 years in the nineteen-forties and fifties terrorized the city with the explosives he set off in theaters, terminals, libraries and offices, is going home to Waterbury today.” 

  Results from FactBites:
 
George Metesky Information (0 words)
Metesky sent a series of threatening letters to various sources in the fallow period up to his third bomb, which was discovered before it could explode on March 29, 1950, at Grand Central Station.
Metesky was arrested in January, 1957; where he confessed to being the bomber, showed his garage where he created the bombs, and revealed the meaning of "F.P." to the police.
Metesky was found insane on April 18, 1957 and was committed to the Matteawan State Hospital.
Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal (0 words)
George P. Metesky (November 2 1903 – May 23 1994), better known as the Mad Bomber, terrorized New York City for 16 years in the 1940s and 1950s with explosives he planted in theaters, terminals, libraries and offices.
Metesky's bombs were gunpowder-filled pipe bombs, ranging in size from four to ten inches long and from one-half inch to two inches in diameter.
Metesky was brought to the courtroom to hear the charges from Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital, where he had been undergoing psychiatric examination.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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