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Encyclopedia > George McGovern
George McGovern
George McGovern

In office
January 3, 1963 – January 3, 1981
Preceded by Joseph H. Bottum
Succeeded by James Abdnor

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from South Dakota's 1st district
In office
January 3, 1957 – January 3, 1961
Preceded by Harold O. Lovre
Succeeded by Ben Reifel

Born July 19, 1922 (1922-07-19) (age 85)
Avon, South Dakota
Political party Democratic
Spouse Eleanor McGovern (1921-2007)
Profession historian, professor, politician
Religion Methodist
George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine

George Stanley McGovern, (born July 19, 1922) is a former United States Representative, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee. McGovern lost the 1972 presidential election in a landslide to incumbent Richard Nixon. Image File history File links George_McGovern_bioguide. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Joseph H. Bottum is a senator from South Dakota. ... James Abdnor (b. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... South Dakotas at-large district. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harold Orrin Lovre (January 30, 1904 - January 17, 1972) was a U.S. Republican politician. ... This article should appear in one or more categories. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Avon is a city located in Bon Homme County, South Dakota. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... For other uses, see Historian (disambiguation). ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Image File history File links Time-mcgovern. ... Image File history File links Time-mcgovern. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Nixon redirects here. ...


McGovern, a World War II combat veteran, was most noted for his opposition to the Vietnam War. He is currently serving as the United Nations global ambassador on hunger. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... UN and U.N. redirect here. ...


He is currently the oldest living major party candidate for President of the United States. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Early life and career

McGovern was born in Avon in South Dakota and lived in nearby Mitchell, having moved there at the age of six. The son of a minister, he graduated from Dakota Wesleyan University in Mitchell. Avon is a city located in Bon Homme County, South Dakota. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Mitchell is a city in Davison County, South Dakota, USA. The population was 14,558 at the 2000 census. ... Dakota Wesleyan University (DWU)is a four-year university located in Mitchell, South Dakota, and is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. ...


McGovern married Eleanor Stegeberg of Woonsocket on October 31, 1943. The two had met during a high school debate in which Eleanor and her sister Ila defeated McGovern and his partner. Woonsocket is a city located in Sanborn County, South Dakota. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


As the war approached, McGovern recalled later, he felt insecure about his own courage. A gym teacher once called him a "physical coward" for failing to vault a gymnastics horse. To prove himself, McGovern, who was afraid of heights, took flying lessons and got a pilot's license through the U.S. Government's Civilian Pilot Training Program. "Frankly, I was scared to death on that first solo flight," McGovern remembered. "But when I walked away from it, I had an enormous feeling of satisfaction that I had taken the thing off the ground and landed it without tearing the wings off."[1]


He volunteered for the United States Army Air Forces during World War II and served as a B-24 Liberator bomber pilot in the Fifteenth Air Force, flying 35 missions over enemy territory from bases in North Africa and later Italy, often against heavy anti-aircraft artillery. McGovern was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for saving his crew by crash landing his damaged bomber on a small Mediterranean island. McGovern's wartime service is at the center of Stephen E. Ambrose's book The Wild Blue[2], which the author dedicated to McGovern's wife Eleanor. The United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was the aviation component of the United States Army primarily during World War II. The title of Army Air Forces succeeded the prior name of Army Air Corps in June 1941 during preparation for expected combat in what came to be known as... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Consolidated B-24 Liberator was an American heavy bomber that was produced in greater numbers than any other American combat aircraft during World War II and still holds the record as the most produced allied aircraft. ... Activated on November 1, 1943, the Fifteenth Air Force was established as part of the U.S. Army Air Force in the World War II Mediterranean Theater of Operations as a strategic air force and commenced combat operations the day after it was formed. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... American troops man an anti-aircraft gun near the Algerian coastline in 1943 Anti-aircraft, or air defense, is any method of combating military aircraft from the ground. ... The Distinguished Flying Cross. ... Stephen Ambrose, at the 2001 premiere of Band of Brothers Stephen Edward Ambrose (January 10, 1936 – October 13, 2002) was an American historian and biographer of U.S. Presidents Dwight Eisenhower and Richard M. Nixon. ... The Wild Blue, by historian Steven Ambrose, was published in 2001. ...


On return from the war, McGovern earned a divinity degree from Garrett Theological Seminary[3]in Evanston near Chicago, and briefly tried his hand as a Methodist minister. Dissatisfied, he earned a Ph.D in history from Northwestern University in Evanston and became a professor at his alma mater, Dakota Wesleyan University. Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary (G-ETS) is a graduate school of theology of the United Methodist Church located in Evanston, Illinois. ... Incorporated City in 1872. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Northwestern University (NU) is a selective private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university with campuses located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago, Illinois. ... Evanston is the name of several places in the United States of America: Evanston, Illinois Evanston, Indiana Evanston, Ohio Evanston, Wyoming This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Dakota Wesleyan University (DWU)is a four-year university located in Mitchell, South Dakota, and is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. ...


Although he was raised by two Republican parents, he chose not to join any party until the 1948 presidential election, when he registered as an Independent and joined the newly-formed Progressive Party. During the campaign, he attended the party's first national convention as a delegate and volunteered for the eventually unsuccessful campaign of its presidential nominee, former Vice President Henry A. Wallace. GOP redirects here. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States Progressive Party of 1948 was a political party that ran former Vice President Henry A. Wallace of Iowa for president and U.S. Senator Glen H. Taylor of Idaho for vice president in 1948. ... For delegates in the . ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–46). ...


Four years later, in 1952, he heard a radio broadcast of Governor Adlai Stevenson's speech accepting the presidential nomination of the Democratic Party. He immediately went into town and registered as a Democrat, then volunteered for Stevenson's campaign the following day. Although Stevenson lost that election, McGovern remained active in Democratic politics. By 1953, he had been named Executive Director of the South Dakota Democratic Party and, in 1956, he ran for and won a seat in the House of Representatives, winning reelection in 1958 against a strong challenge from South Dakota's two-term Governor Joe Foss. Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician, noted for intellectual demeanor and advocacy of liberal causes in the Democratic party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The South Dakota Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of South Dakota. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Joseph Jacob Joe Foss (April 17, 1915 – January 1, 2003) was an American politician, an ace fighter pilot, and a recipient of the Medal of Honor in 1943. ...


Congressional career

After two terms in the House, he unsuccessfully ran for the Senate in 1960, losing to Republican incumbent Karl Mundt 52%-48%. The election loss made him available for appointment as the first director of President John F. Kennedy's Food for Peace program. In 1962, he stood for election to South Dakota's other Senate seat and won, serving his first of three Senate terms. Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1960 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of John F. Kennedy as president. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Karl Earl Mundt (1900 - 1974) was a U.S. educator and a Republican United States Senator from South Dakota from 1948 to 1973. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... This article should appear in one or more categories. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue, simultaneous hold marked in light purple, Republican hold and Democratic pickup marked in dark purple. ...


Opposition to Vietnam War

Although he voted in favor of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, McGovern later became a strong critic of defense spending, and was an early and vocal opponent of U.S. military involvement in Vietnam, often criticizing the policies of fellow Democrat, President Lyndon Johnson. The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution was a joint resolution of the U.S. Congress passed in August 1964 in direct response to a minor naval engagement known as the Gulf of Tonkin Incident. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ...

Congressional opposition to
U.S. wars and interventions
1812 North America
House Federalists’ Address
1917 World War I
Filibuster of the Armed Ship Bill
1935-1939 (General)
Neutrality Acts
1935-40 (General)
Ludlow Amendment
1970 Vietnam
McGovern-Hatfield Amendment
1970 Southeast Asia
Cooper-Church Amendment
1971 Vietnam
Repeal of Tonkin Gulf Resolution
1973 Southeast Asia
Case-Church Amendment
1973 (General)
War Powers Resolution
1974 Covert Ops (General)
Hughes-Ryan Amendment
1976 Angola
Clark Amendment
1982 Nicaragua
Boland Amendment
2007 Iraq
House Concurrent Resolution 63
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McGovern was outspoken in his criticism of the Senate's "war hawks". During Senate floor debate in September 1970, he assailed his colleagues for not supporting an amendment that he had cosponsored with Senator Mark Hatfield (R-Oregon) calling for a complete withdrawal of troops from Vietnam: Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Opposition to the War of 1812 was widespread in the United States, especially in New England. ... Robert Marion La Follette, Sr. ... The Neutrality Acts were a series of laws that were passed by the United States Congress in the 1930s, in response to the growing turmoil going on in Europe and Asia that eventually led to World War II. They were spurred by the growth in isolationism in the US following... Louis Ludlow was a Washington correspondent for a large number of newspapers, and then served as a Democrat in the U.S. House of Representatives for the Indianapolis, Indiana district for twenty years. ... The McGovern-Hatfield amendment (alternately, Hatfield-McGovern amendment) was a proposed amendment in 1970 during the Vietnam War that, if passed, would have required the end of United States military operations in the Republic of Vietnam by December 31, 1970 and a complete withdrawal of American forces halfway through the... The Cooper-Church amendment was introduced in the United States Senate during the Vietnam War and is known as the first amendment to limit presidential powers during war time. ... The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution was a joint resolution of the U.S. Congress passed in August 1964 in direct response to a minor naval engagement known as the Gulf of Tonkin Incident. ... The Case-Church Amendment was a piece of legislation that sought to rein in President Richard Nixons conduct of the Vietnam War. ... The War Powers Act of 1973 (Public Law 93-148) is also referred to as the War Powers Resolution (Sec. ... The Hughes-Ryan Act was an amendment to the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, that forces the President of the United States to report all covert Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) operations to a Congressional committee within a set time limit. ... The Clark amendment was an amendment to the U.S. Arms Export Control Act of 1976, named for its sponsor, Senator Dick Clark (D-Idaho). ... The Boland Amendment was the name given to three U.S. legislative amendments between 1982 and 1984, all aimed at limiting US government assistance to the rebel Contras in Nicaragua. ... “The New Way Forward” redirects here. ... War Hawk is a term originally used to describe a member of the House of Representatives of the Twelfth Congress of the United States (usually from the south & southwest) who advocated going to war against Great Britain in the War of 1812. ... The McGovern-Hatfield amendment (alternately, Hatfield-McGovern amendment) was a proposed amendment in 1970 during the Vietnam War that, if passed, would have required the end of United States military operations in the Republic of Vietnam by December 31, 1970 and a complete withdrawal of American forces halfway through the... Mark Odom Hatfield (born July 12, 1922) is a former United States Senator and Governor of Oregon. ...

"Every Senator in this chamber is partly responsible for sending 50,000 young Americans to an early grave... This chamber reeks of blood... it does not take any courage at all for a Congressman or a Senator or a President to wrap himself in the flag and say we are staying in Viet Nam, because it is not our blood that is being shed." He blamed his colleagues for having contributed to "that human wreckage all across our land — young men without legs or arms or genitals or faces — or hopes."[4]

In a retort to the powerful Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman, John Stennis, McGovern declared, "I'm tired of old men dreaming up wars for young men to fight. If he wants to use American ground troops in Cambodia, let him lead the charge himself."[5] Armed Services Committee could refer to: U.S. House Committee on Armed Services U.S. Senate Committee on Armed Services This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... John Cornelius Stennis (August 3, 1901 - April 23, 1995) was a Senator from the state of Mississippi. ...


Party reformer

During the 1968 Democratic Convention, a motion was passed to establish a commission to reform the Democratic Party nomination process.[6] In 1969, McGovern was named chairman of the Commission on Party Structure and Delegate Selection; due to the influence of former McCarthy and Kennedy supporters on the staff, the commission significantly reduced the role of party officials and insiders in the nomination process, increased the role of caucuses and primaries, and mandated quotas for proportional black, women, and youth delegate representation.[7] (Redirected from 1968 Democratic Convention) Police and protesters at the Convention The 1968 Democratic National Convention was held in Chicago by the United States Democratic Party, for the purposes of choosing the Democratic nominee for the 1968 U.S. Presidential Election. ... The McGovern-Fraser Commission was a commission created at the 1968 democratic national convention due to riots outside the convention by minority groups and others who demanded better representation. ... A caucus is most generally defined as being a meeting of supporters or members of a political party or movement. ... For other uses, see Primary. ... This article is about the color black; for other uses, see Black (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Youth (disambiguation) Youth is defined by Websters New World Dictionary as, The time of life when one is young; especially: a: the period between childhood and maturity b: the early period of existence, growth, or development. ...


The fundamental principle of the McGovern Commission—that the Democratic primaries should determine the winner of the Democratic nomination—lasted throughout every subsequent nomination contest.


1968 Presidential campaign

At the 1968 Democratic Convention, in the wake of the Robert F. Kennedy assassination, McGovern sought the Democratic nomination. Although Hubert Humphrey appeared to be the favorite for the nomination, he was an unpopular choice with many anti-war Democrats, who identified him with Lyndon B. Johnson's controversial position on the Vietnam War. McGovern hoped to pick up Kennedy's anti-war, but the delegates failed to unite behind a single candidate who could have prevented Humphrey from getting the nomination. Some of Kennedy's support went to anti-war candidate Eugene McCarthy, who split most of the delegates with McGovern. With McGovern and McCarthy dividing the anti-war votes, Humphrey was able to win the nomination. McGovern came in third with 146.5 delegates, well behind Hubert Humphrey's 1759.25. Robert Kennedy The assassination of Robert F. Kennedy occurred on June 5, 1968. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... LBJ redirects here. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Not to be confused with the anti-Communist senator Joseph Raymond McCarthy. ...


1972 Presidential campaign

Democratic nomination

Arousing suspicions of Republican "dirty tricks," frontrunner Edmund Muskie did worse than expected in the New Hampshire primary and McGovern came in a close second. While Muskie's campaign funding and support dried up, McGovern picked up valuable momentum in the following months. Despite losing several primaries, including losing the Florida primary to George Wallace, McGovern secured enough delegates to the 1972 Democratic National Convention to win the party's nomination. McGovern's campaign manager, Gary Hart, became a presidential contender himself 12 years later. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... George Corley Wallace, Jr. ... The 1972 Democratic National convention nominated Senator George McGovern for President and Senator Thomas Eagleton for vice president. ... Gary Warren Hart (born Gary Warren Hartpence, November 28, 1936) is a politician and lawyer from the state of Colorado. ...


Prairie populist

In the 1972 election, McGovern ran on a platform that advocated withdrawal from the Vietnam War in exchange for the return of American prisoners of war[8] and amnesty for draft evaders who had left the country,[9] an anti-war platform that was presaged, in 1970, by McGovern's sponsorship of the McGovern-Hatfield amendment, seeking to end U.S. participation in the war by Congressional action. However, during a meeting with Democratic Governors conference, Nevada Governor Mike O'Callaghan asked McGovern what he would do if the North Vietnamese refused to release American POW's after a withdrawal. McGovern responded, "Under such circumstances, we'd have to take action," although he did not say what action.[10] Presidential electoral votes by state. ... A political platform is a list of the principles which a political party supports in order to appeal to the general public for the purpose of having said partys candidates voted into office. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... The McGovern-Hatfield amendment (alternately, Hatfield-McGovern amendment) was a proposed amendment in 1970 during the Vietnam War that, if passed, would have required the end of United States military operations in the Republic of Vietnam by December 31, 1970 and a complete withdrawal of American forces halfway through the... Donal Neil Mike OCallaghan (September 10, 1929–March 5, 2004) was the governor of the U.S. state of Nevada from 1971 until 1979. ...

Tom Eagleton and George McGovern on July 24, 1972 cover of Time Magazine

McGovern's platform also included an across-the-board, 37% reduction in defense spending over three years;[11] and a "demogrant" program giving $1,000 to every citizen in America [12] that was later changed to creating a $6,500 guaranteed minimum income for Americans, and was later dropped from the platform.[13] In addition, McGovern supported ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment. An infamous incident took place late in the campaign. McGovern was giving a speech and a Nixon admirer kept heckling him. McGovern called the young man over and said "Listen you son of a bitch, why don't you kiss my ass!" Mississippi Senator James Eastland later asked the Senator if that was what he had said. When McGovern said yes, Eastland replied that was the best thing he had ever said in the whole campaign. Image File history File links Time-eagleton. ... Image File history File links Time-eagleton. ... Thomas Francis Eagleton, LL.B., (born September 4, 1929) is a former U.S. Senator from Missouri. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Guaranteed minimum income is a proposed system of income redistribution that would provide eligible citizens with a certain sum of money (independent of whether they work or not), also known as Basic Income Guarantee (BIG), universal basic income, citizens income scheme, demogrant, or just a basic income (the term... The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution intended to guarantee equal rights under the law for Americans regardless of sex. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see James Eastland (disambiguation). ...


Eagleton controversy

Main article: Thomas Eagleton Thomas Eagleton and George McGovern on July 24, 1972 cover of Time magazine after his nomination for vice president on the Democratic ticket Thomas Eagleton on August 7, 1972 cover of Time Magazine after his withdrawal for vice president on the Democratic ticket. ...


Just over two weeks after his nomination, it was revealed that McGovern's running mate, Thomas Eagleton, had received electroshock therapy for depression during the 1960s. Though many people still supported Eagleton's candidacy, an increasing number of influential politicians and columnists questioned his ability to handle the office of Vice President. The resulting negative attention prompted McGovern to accept Eagleton's offer to withdraw from the ticket, replacing him with United States Ambassador to France (and brother in-law of John F. Kennedy) Sargent Shriver. This occurred after McGovern had stated publicly he was still "...behind Eagleton 1000 percent"; reneging on that statement a few days later made McGovern look indecisive. The Eagleton controversy also put the McGovern campaign off message and was speculated at the time to perhaps be a harbinger of what would become McGovern's subsequent landslide loss.[14] Thomas Eagleton and George McGovern on July 24, 1972 cover of Time magazine after his nomination for vice president on the Democratic ticket Thomas Eagleton on August 7, 1972 cover of Time Magazine after his withdrawal for vice president on the Democratic ticket. ... Electroconvulsive therapy, also known as electroshock or ECT, is a controversial type of psychiatric shock therapy involving the induction of an artificial seizure in a patient by passing electricity through the brain. ... On the Threshold of Eternity. ... List of United States ambassadors to France : Benjamin Franklin, Arthur Lee, Silas Deane (substitued by John Adams in 1778) 1776-1779 Benjamin Franklin 1779-1785 Thomas Jefferson 1785-1789 Gouverneur Morris 1792-1794 James Monroe 1794-1796 Charles Cotesworth Pinckney 1796-1797 Robert R. Livingston 1801-1804 John Armstrong 1804... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. ...


Landslide loss

Sargent Shriver and George McGovern on August 14, 1972 cover of Time Magazine

The McGovern Commission changes to the convention rules marginalized the influence of establishment Democratic figures (some of whom had lost the nomination to McGovern). Many refused to support him, with some switching their support to the incumbent President Richard Nixon through a campaign effort called "Democrats for Nixon". In addition, McGovern was repeatedly attacked by associates of Nixon, who used an array of "dirty tricks" and illegal tactics during the campaign, including the infamous Watergate break-in, which eventually led to Nixon's resignation in 1974.[15][16] Image File history File links Shriver-time. ... Image File history File links Shriver-time. ... Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Nixon redirects here. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Watergate burglaries, which took place on May 28 and June 17, 1972, have been cited in testimony, media accounts, and popular works on Watergate as the pivotal event that led ultimately to the Watergate Scandal. ...


In the general election, the McGovern/Shriver ticket suffered a 60%-38% defeat to Nixon — at the time, the second biggest landslide in American history, with Electoral College totals of 520 to 17. McGovern's two electoral vote victories came in Massachusetts and Washington, D.C.; McGovern failed to win his home state of South Dakota, a state that had delivered for the Democrat in only three of the previous 18 presidential elections in the twentieth century.[17] In his telegram to Nixon conceding defeat, McGovern wrote, "I hope that in the next four years you will lead us to a time of peace abroad and justice at home. You have my full support in such efforts."[18] Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college that chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s The 20th century lasted from 1901 to 2000 in the Gregorian calendar (often from (1900 to 1999 in common usage). ...


Amnesty, abortion and acid

On April 25, 1972, George McGovern won the Massachusetts primary and journalist Robert Novak phoned Democratic politicians around the country, who agreed with his assessment that blue-collar workers voting for McGovern did not understand what he really stood for.[19] On April 27, 1972 Novak reported in a column that an unnamed democratic senator had talked to him about McGovern.[20] "The people don’t know McGovern is for amnesty, abortion and legalization of pot," the Senator said.[20] "Once middle America - Catholic middle America, in particular - finds this out, he’s dead."[20] The label stuck and McGovern became known as the candidate of "amnesty, abortion and acid."[19][21] is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert David Sanders Novak (born February 26, 1931) is a conservative American political commentator and journalist. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Novak was accused of manufacturing the quote.[20] To rebut the criticism, Novak took Eagleton to lunch after the campaign and asked whether he could identify him as the source.[20] The senator said he would not allow his identity to be revealed.[20] "Oh, he had to run for re-election", said Novak.[19] The McGovernites would kill him if they knew he had said that." Novak added.[19]


On July 15, 2007, Novak disclosed on Meet the Press that the unnamed senator was Thomas Eagleton.[19] Political analyst Bob Shrum says that Eagleton would never have been selected as McGovern's running mate if it had been known at the time that Eagleton was the source of the quote.[19] "Boy, do I wish he would have let you publish his name. Then he never would have been picked as vice president," said Shrum.[19] "Because the two things, the two things that happened to George McGovern—two of the things that happened to him—were the label you put on him, number one, and number two, the Eagleton disaster. We had a messy convention, but he could have, I think in the end, carried eight or 10 states, remained politically viable. And Eagleton was one of the great train wrecks of all time."[19] is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Meet the Press (MTP) is a weekly television news show produced by NBC. It started as a radio show in 1945 as American Mercury Presents: Meet the Press, originating from WRC-AM in Washington. ... Robert M. Bob Shrum, (born 1943) is an American political consultant. ...


Return to the Senate

After this loss, McGovern returned to South Dakota, where he was re-elected to the Senate in 1974. During the Iran hostage crisis he joined with conservative Republicans in authorizing military action to free the hostages. In 1980, he was defeated for re-election by U.S. Rep. James Abdnor amidst that year's Republican sweep, which became known as the "Reagan Revolution." In 1984, he sought his party's presidential nomination once again. Although he finished in third place in the Iowa caucus in a crowded field, his campaign eventually floundered and he withdrew soon after the New Hampshire primary. Iranian militants escort a blindfolded U.S. hostage to the media. ... Conservatism is a term used to describe political philosophies that favor tradition and gradual change, where tradition refers to religious, cultural, or nationally defined beliefs and customs. ... GOP redirects here. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... James Abdnor (b. ... President Reagan, with his Cabinet and staff, in the Oval Office (February 4, 1981) Headed by U.S. President Ronald Reagan from 1981 to 1989, the Reagan Administration was conservative, steadfastly anti-Communist and in favor of tax cuts and smaller government. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Since 1976, the Iowa caucus has been the first indication of which candidate for President of the United States would win the nomination of his or her political party at that partys national convention. ... The New Hampshire primary is the first of a number of statewide political party primary elections held in the United States every four years, as part of the process of the Democratic and Republican parties choosing their candidate for the presidential elections on the subsequent November. ...


Personal

The McGoverns had five children: Ann, Terry, Susan, Mary McGovern-McKinnon, and Steven.[22] In 1994, his daughter Teresa died of hypothermia while intoxicated. McGovern revealed his daughter had battled her alcohol addiction for years. He founded a non-profit organization in her name to help others suffering from alcoholism. Hypothermia is a condition in which an organisms temperature drops below that Required fOr normal metabolism and Bodily functionS. In warm-blooded animals, core [[body Temperature]] is maintained nEar a constant leVel through biologic [[homEostasis]]. But wheN the body iS exposed to cold Its internal mechanismS may be unable... Heroin bottle An addiction is a recurring compulsion by an individual to engage in some specific activity, despite harmful consequences to the individuals health, mental state or social life. ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ...


McGovern's wife, Eleanor, died January 25, 2007, at their home in Mitchell, South Dakota.[23] is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


1984 Presidential campaign

McGovern attempted a political comeback by running for the 1984 Democratic Presidential nomination. Despite having name recognition, and even hosting a 1984 episode of Saturday Night Live, the campaign was largely unsuccessful. McGovern won no primaries, and picked up just four votes at the Democratic Convention. He eventually gave his support to Democratic nominee Walter Mondale. This article is about the American television series. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ...


Recent activities

In 1981–1982, McGovern replaced historian Stephen Ambrose as a professor at the University of New Orleans. Stephen Ambrose, at the 2001 premiere of Band of Brothers Stephen Edward Ambrose (January 10, 1936 – October 13, 2002) was an American historian and biographer of U.S. Presidents Dwight Eisenhower and Richard M. Nixon. ... The University of New Orleans, often locally called UNO, is a medium sized public urban university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


McGovern played a dull caricature of himself in a 1990 Newhart episode. That year, he was awarded an honorary J.D. degree from the University of Houston law school. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


McGovern considered another run for the White House in 1992, according to a New York Times article published on January 25, 1991.


From 1998 to 2001, he served as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations (UN) Food and Agriculture Agencies, based in Rome, Italy (he was succeeded in this post by long-time Democratic Rep. Tony Hall). In 2001, he was appointed UN Global Ambassador on World Hunger by the World Food Programme.[24] UN and U.N. redirect here. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Tony Patrick Hall (born Jan. ... WFP redirects here. ...


He endorsed Democrat Wesley Clark's unsuccessful candidacy for the Democratic Party nomination for the 2004 presidential election on January 18, 2004 (24 days before Clark's withdrawal from the race). McGovern continues to lecture and make public appearances. He previously owned a used book store in his summer home of Stevensville in Montana's Bitterroot Valley. Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general of the United States Army. ... The 2004 U.S. Democratic Party presidential nomination process was a series of primaries and caucuses culminating in the Democratic National Convention that decided which pair of candidates would represent the Democrats in the 2004 election for President and Vice President of the United States. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Stevensville is a town located in Ravalli County, Montana. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... State nickname: Treasure State Other U.S. States Capital Helena Largest city Billings Governor Brian Schweitzer Official languages English Area 381,156 km² (4th)  - Land 377,295 km²  - Water 3,862 km² (1%) Population (2000)  - Population 902,194 (44th)  - Density 2. ...


On June 2, 2005, McGovern stated "the U.S. media needs a modern-day "Deep Throat" within the administration of President George W. Bush to reveal how America was "misled on Iraq." He is a member of the Middle East Policy Council. is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... W. Mark Felt, on the set of CBSs Face the Nation in 1976. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The Middle East Policy Council or MEPC is a Washington DC based 501(c)3 non-profit organization that deals with issues concerning the Middle East. ...


On July 28, 2005, McGovern appeared on Idaho Public Television's "Dialogue" program[25] and discussed a variety of subjects including parallels between the Iraq war and Vietnam, and Vice-President Dick Cheney's assertions that Iraq was involved in the 9/11 events. is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Idaho Public Television(Also known as IdahoPTV) is a PBS member network of stations covering the state of Idaho. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ...

Out of Iraq by George McGovern and William R. Polk

On September 4, 2005, he appeared at the Houston Astrodome in support of the survivors of Hurricane Katrina. This time, another Houston university, Rice University, awarded him an honorary Ph.D. Image File history File linksMetadata Out_of_Iraq. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Out_of_Iraq. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Reliant Astrodome, formerly just the Astrodome, is a domed sports stadium in Houston, Texas, and is part of the Reliant Park complex. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ...


On March 22, 2006 McGovern spoke at the University of Virginia, Miller Center of Public Affairs on the topic of world hunger.Fighting World Hunger, a 60 minute lecture, is available in streaming video and audio formats through the University Channel. During the lecture he discussed the history of U.S. hunger initiatives along with his own role in establishing programs such as Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and the National School Lunch Program. He also expressed his views on the Iraq war and alcoholism as a social ill. is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) is a program of the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) for healthcare and nutrition of low-income mothers and children under the age of five. ... The Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act was signed by United States President Harry S. Truman in 1946. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ...


In 2006, the film One Bright Shining Moment — The Forgotten Summer of George McGovern [26] was released in the United States. Directed by Stephen Vittoria and narrated by Amy Goodman, the documentary chronicles the life and times of George McGovern, focusing on his 1972 bid for the presidency. The film features McGovern, Gloria Steinem, Gore Vidal, Warren Beatty, Howard Zinn and Dick Gregory. One Bright Shining Moment: The Forgotten Summer of George McGovern is a 2005 documentary directed by Stephen Vittori. ... Amy Goodman on Democracy Now! Amy Goodman b. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Gloria Steinem at news conference, Womens Action Alliance, January 12, 1972 Gloria Marie Steinem (born March 25, 1934) is an American feminist icon, journalist and womens rights advocate. ... Eugene Luther Gore Vidal (born October 3, 1925) (pronounced and , ) is an American author of novels, stage plays, screenplays, and essays, and the scion of a prominent political family. ... Henry Warren Beatty (born March 30, 1937), better known as Warren Beatty, is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American actor, producer, screenwriter, and director. ... Howard Zinn (born August 24, 1922) is an American historian, political scientist, social critic, activist and playwright, best known as author of the bestseller[5] , A Peoples History of the United States. ... Dick Gregory (1964) Richard Dick Claxton Gregory, (born October 12, 1932) is an African American comedian, social activist, writer, entrepreneur, and nutritionist. ...


On October 3, 2006, a book written by McGovern and foreign policy analyst William R. Polk titled Out of Iraq: A Practical Plan for Withdrawal Now was released by Simon & Schuster. In the book McGovern and Polk argue for an immediate withdrawal of U.S. military forces from Iraq.[27] is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... William Roe Polk is a veteran foreign policy consultant, author, and descendent of president James K. Polk. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... The United States Armed Forces are the military services of the United States. ...


On October 5October 7, 2006, the George and Eleanor McGovern Library and Center for Leadership and Public Service was dedicated at Dakota Wesleyan University in Mitchell, South Dakota. Among the dedication's dignitaries were former President Bill Clinton and Allen Neuharth. For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dakota Wesleyan University (DWU)is a four-year university located in Mitchell, South Dakota, and is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. ... Mitchell is a city in Davison County, South Dakota, USA. The population was 14,558 at the 2000 census. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Allen H. Neuharth (born 1924, American businessman, author, and columnist. ...


On the January 2, 2007 episode of CNN's Larry King Live, McGovern announced publicly for the first time that he voted for Gerald Ford in the 1976 presidential election, even though Ford was a Republican. McGovern said he felt more comfortable with Ford than with Carter, whom he did not know well. But, McGovern voted for Carter in 1980, when Carter lost his bid for re-election. is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Larry King Live is a nightly CNN interview program hosted by broadcaster and writer Larry King. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... The United States presidential election of 1976 followed the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon in the wake of the Watergate scandal. ...


On July 10, 2007, "An Evening with George McGovern" was held at Dakota Wesleyan University in Mitchell, South Dakota, to celebrate McGovern's upcoming 85th birthday. The event was anchored by veteran NBC correspondent Sander Vanocur. When asked by Vanocur about his feelings about the term "McGovernism" to describe a particular liberal philosophy, McGovern quipped, "“Well, I’m one politician that’s in the dictionary, even though it’s as a swear word.”[28] is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Dakota Wesleyan University (DWU)is a four-year university located in Mitchell, South Dakota, and is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. ... Mitchell is a city in Davison County, South Dakota, USA. The population was 14,558 at the 2000 census. ... This article is about the television network. ... Sander Vanocur (born 8 January 1928) is an American journalist. ...


As well, a celebration of McGovern's 85 years was held on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., attended by such notables as former Senator and Republican Presidential Nominee Bob Dole and former Senator Gary Hart, campaign manager for McGovern's 1972 presidential campaign. In remarks prepared for the event, Bill Clinton, who worked on the McGovern campaign in 1972, referred to the over 300 attendees at the celebration as "McGovern's heirs."[29] In October of 2007 McGovern endorsed U.S. Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY) for the 2008 Democratic Nomination. Capitol Hill is the name of a district in the following cities: Capitol Hill, Denver, Colorado Capitol Hill, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Capitol Hill, Seattle, Washington Capitol Hill, Washington, DC It is also a common nickname for the United States Congress and the politicians who serve it (e. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ... Gary Warren Hart (born Gary Warren Hartpence, November 28, 1936) is a politician and lawyer from the state of Colorado. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... The 2008 Democratic primaries will be the selection process by which the Democrats choose their candidates in the 2008 election for President and Vice President of the United States through a series of primaries and caucuses culminating in the 2008 Democratic National Convention, to be held from Monday, August 25...


On March 10, 2008, he appeared on Comedy Central's "The Colbert Report." During the interview, he stated that although he endorsed Hillary Clinton, he did not know Barack Obama at the time and has been "very impressed with him as a candidate." In addition, McGovern briefly commented on his opposition to the war in Iraq and Stephen Colbert featured McGovern's 2006 book, "Out of Iraq: A Practical Plan for Withdrawal Now." is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Comedy Central is an American cable television and satellite television channel in the United States. ... The Colbert Report (IPA ) is an American satirical television program that airs from 11:30 p. ... REDIRECT Hillary Rodham Clinton   This is a redirect from a title with another method of capitalisation. ... “Barack” redirects here. ... This article is about Stephen Colbert, the actor. ...


Legacy

George McGovern helped institute major changes in Democratic party rules—including the requirement that delegates to the party's nominating convention be diverse—that continue to this day. He remains a symbol of the political left during the turbulent 1960s and early 1970s when the country was torn by U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War and the corruption and abuse of power of the Nixon administration. McGovern recognized the mixed results of his 1972 candidacy, saying, "I opened the doors of the Democratic Party and 20 million people walked out."[30] McGovern's campaign also represented the last time a mostly grass roots candidacy was able to wrest control of either party's presidential nomination against the perceived will of a party's leadership. McGovern has also become more forceful in recent years in drawing historical parallels between the Nixon and Bush administrations and the Vietnam and Iraq wars. In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Grassroots democracy is the political processes which are driven by groups of ordinary citizens, as opposed to larger organisations or wealthy individuals with concentrated vested interests in particular policies. ...


Despite his reputation as a dovish liberal, McGovern has publicly stated he is not a pacifist.[31] Pacifism is the opposition to war or violence as a means of settling disputes or gaining advantage. ...


McGovern's legacy also includes a commitment to combating hunger both in the US and across the globe. In addition to numerous domestic programs, together with Republican Sen. Bob Dole he created an international school lunch program through The George McGovern-Robert Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program, which helps fight child hunger and poverty by providing nutritious meals to children in schools in developing countries. McGovern currently serves on the board of Friends of the World Food Program.[32]


Electoral history

Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... Gary Warren Hart (born Gary Warren Hartpence, November 28, 1936) is a politician and lawyer from the state of Colorado. ... Jesse Louis Jackson, Sr. ... Thomas Francis Eagleton, LL.B., (born September 4, 1929) is a former U.S. Senator from Missouri. ... For other persons named John Glenn, see John Glenn (disambiguation). ... Biden redirects here. ...

Multimedia

  • George McGovern on Idaho Public Television's "Dialogue" (2005)
  • McGovern Campaign Commercials from 1972 and 1984
  • Trailer for the film "One Bright Shining Moment"
  • 2006 McGovern lecture on fighting world hunger
  • "Should the U.S. Get Out of Iraq?" October 18, 2006 The Brian Lehrer Show
  • George McGovern advocating a position of a six-month withdrawal from Iraq on NPR, October 1, 2006

is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... WNYC radio host Brian Lehrer. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Ambrose, Stephen, The Wild Blue : The Men and Boys Who Flew the B-24s Over Germany 1944–45, Simon & Schuster, 2001. ISBN 0-7432-0339-9.
  • Clinton, Bill, My Life, Vintage, 2005. ISBN 1-4000-3003-X.
  • Hart, Gary, Right from the Start: A Chronicle of the McGovern Campaign, Quadrangle, 1973. ISBN 0-8129-0372-2.
  • Marano, Richard Michael, Vote Your Conscience: The Last Campaign of George McGovern, Praeger Publishers, 2003. ISBN 0-275-97189-9.
  • McGovern, George S., The Essential America: Our Founders and the Liberal Tradition, Simon & Schuster, 2004. ISBN 0-7432-6927-6.
  • McGovern, George S., Grassroots: The Autobiography of George McGovern, Random House, 1977. ISBN 0-394-41941-3.
  • McGovern, George S., Terry: My Daughter's Life-And-Death Struggle With Alcoholism, Plume Books, 1997. ISBN 0-452-27823-6.
  • McGovern, George S., The Third Freedom: Ending Hunger in Our Time, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2002. ISBN 0-7425-2125-7.
  • McGovern, George S., A Time of War! A Time of Peace, Vintage Books, 1968. ISBN 0-394-70481-9.
  • Thompson, Hunter S., Fear and Loathing: On The Campaign Trail '72, Warner Books, 1973. ISBN 0-446-31364-5.
  • Watson, Robert P. (ed.), George McGovern: A Political Life, A Political Legacy, South Dakota State Historical Society Press, 2004.
  • White, Theodore H., The Making of the President 1972, Antheneum Publishers, 1973. ISBN 0-689-10553-3.
  • "What Might Have Been", article from The Washington Post by Thomas Leahy, February 20, 2005.
  • "Come Home, America: Liberals need another George McGovern—and perhaps conservatives do too.", article from The American Conservative by Bill Kauffman, January 30, 2006.
  • "The Way Out of War" A blueprint for leaving Iraq now November 8, 2006
  • McGovern, George S., "An Impartial Interrogation of George W. Bush" January 12, 2007

is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.airportjournals.com/Display.cfm?varID=0605004
  2. ^ http://www.pbs.org/newshour/conversation/july-dec01/wildblue_8-16.html
  3. ^ In 1974, Garrett Theological Seminary became Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary. See Garrett-Evangelical: An Arranged MarriageRetrieved May 13, 2007.
  4. ^ http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,902748,00.html
  5. ^ http://www.thecrimson.com/printerfriendly.aspx?ref=355047
  6. ^ White, Theodore H. The Making of the President 1972. Antheneum Publishers. 1973. pp. 17–20. ISBN 0689105533
  7. ^ White. pp. 24–33
  8. ^ White p. 122
  9. ^ White p. 360
  10. ^ http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,877739-4,00.html
  11. ^ White p. 123
  12. ^ White p. 125
  13. ^ White p. 190
  14. ^ See, for example, Time Magazine's August 7, 1972, cover story, for a contemporaneous view of the McGovern campaign's handling of this issue.
  15. ^ http://www.guardian.co.uk/uselections2004/story/0,13918,1165126,00.html
  16. ^ http://www.villagevoice.com/news/0529,ridgeway,66005,6.html
  17. ^ http://www.uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/index.html
  18. ^ http://www.time.com/time/printout/0,8816,712179,00.html
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h Meet the Press Transcript for July 15, 2007. "Interview with Robert Novak
  20. ^ a b c d e f Kansas City Star. "With another disclosure, Novak bedevils the dead" by Steve Kraske. July 28, 2007. The original story is a dead link. An archival copy is available here.
  21. ^ Columbia Tribune. "A slice of history: Biographers of the late U.S. Sen. Thomas Eagleton of Missouri will find some vivid anecdotes when they comb through his large collection of journals, letters and transcripts housed in Columbia" by Terry Ganey. August 19, 2007
  22. ^ Seth Tupper, The Daily Republic, Eleanor McGovern dies at age 85, Jan 26, 2007. Retrieved March 4, 2007.
  23. ^ http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0701/02/lkl.01.html
  24. ^ http://www.wfp.org/english/?ModuleID=137&Key=401
  25. ^ http://www.idahoptv.org/dialogue/showtemplate.cfm?ShowNo=1030
  26. ^ http://firstrunfeatures.com/onebrightdvd.html
  27. ^ Amazon: "Out of Iraq" Amazon.com
  28. ^ http://www.dwu.edu/press/2007/jul11.htm
  29. ^ http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/18/AR2007071801965_pf.html
  30. ^ Jonah Goldberg, "Nedrenaline Rush" August 11, 2006 National Review
  31. ^ http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,906071,00.html
  32. ^ http://www.friendsofwfp.org
  33. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=78731
  34. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=277899
  35. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=62087
  36. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=69042
  37. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=7029
  38. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=58481
  39. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=46950
  40. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=58482
  41. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=6354
  42. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=260055
  43. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=3877
  44. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=55208
  45. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=58503

(Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Amazon. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ...

External links

  • Dakota Wesleyan University
  • McGovern Library
  • McGovern talks about his book, Social Security and the Golden Age
  • George McGovern: Cheney is wrong about me, wrong about war — Op-Ed, Los Angeles Times, April 24, 2007
  • McGovern 72 Site
  • McGovern Tribute Site
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Harold O. Lovre
Member from South Dakota's
1st congressional district

1957 – 1961
Succeeded by
Ben Reifel
United States Senate
Preceded by
Joseph H. Bottum
Senator from South Dakota (Class 3)
1963 – 1981
Served alongside: Karl E. Mundt, James Abourezk,
Larry Pressler
Succeeded by
James Abdnor
Party political offices
Preceded by
Hubert Humphrey
Democratic Party presidential candidate
1972
Succeeded by
Jimmy Carter
Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Harold Orrin Lovre (January 30, 1904 - January 17, 1972) was a U.S. Republican politician. ... South Dakotas at-large district. ... This article should appear in one or more categories. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Joseph H. Bottum is a senator from South Dakota. ... The following is a list of United States Senators from South Dakota. ... Karl Earl Mundt (1900 - 1974) was a U.S. educator and a Republican United States Senator from South Dakota from 1948 to 1973. ... James Abourezk was the first Arab-American to serve in the U.S. Senate. ... Larry Lee Pressler (b. ... James Abdnor (b. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... This is a list of the candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States that the U.S. Democratic Party has nominated since its founding. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... This is a list of the candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States that the U.S. Democratic Party has nominated since its founding. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... For other persons named James Buchanan, see James Buchanan (disambiguation). ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (nicknamed the Little Giant because he was short but was considered by many a giant in politics) was an American politician from the western state of Illinois, and was the Democratic Party nominee for President in 1860. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Southern Democrats are members of the U.S. Democratic Party who reside in the U.S. South. ... For the 1960s commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, see George McClellan (police commissioner). ... Governor Horatio Seymour Horatio Seymour (May 31, 1810 - February 12, 1886) was an American politician. ... Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811 – November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Republican party, reformer and politician. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... Winfield Scott Hancock (February 14, 1824 – February 9, 1886) was a career U.S. Army officer and the Democratic nominee for President of the United States in 1880. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908), the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States, was the only President to serve non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... Alton Brooks Parker (May 14, 1852 – May 10, 1926) was an American lawyer and judge and a U.S. presidential candidate in the 1904 elections. ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... James Middleton Cox (March 31, 1870 – July 15, 1957) was a Governor of Ohio, U.S. Representative from Ohio and Democratic candidate for President of the United States in the election of 1920. ... John W. Davis John William Davis (April 13, 1873 — March 24, 1955) was an American politician and lawyer. ... Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... FDR redirects here. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician, noted for intellectual demeanor and advocacy of liberal causes in the Democratic party. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... LBJ redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
George McGovern - MSN Encarta (390 words)
George McGovern, born in 1922, American political leader, who was the Democratic presidential nominee in 1972 and represented South Dakota in the United States House of Representatives (1956-1960) and the United States Senate (1962-1980).
McGovern was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1956.
McGovern first chose Senator Thomas F. Eagleton of Missouri as his running mate, but the campaign was damaged when it was revealed that Eagleton had been hospitalized for mental health problems in the 1960s.
George McGovern - Picture - MSN Encarta (113 words)
As a senator for the state of South Dakota and a leader in the movement to end the war in Vietnam, McGovern ran for president unsuccessfully in 1972 against Richard M. Nixon.
A member of the House of Representatives from 1956 to 1960 and of the United States Senate from 1962 to 1980, McGovern tried to enlist the anti-Vietnam supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Robert Kennedy, who was assassinated in 1968.
McGovern failed to win the nomination in 1968, but represented the party, along with vice-presidential candidate Sargent Shriver, in the 1972 election, where he was defeated by Nixon.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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