FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > George Joachim Goschen, 1st Viscount Goschen

George Joachim Goschen, 1st Viscount Goschen (10 August 1831 - 7 February 1907) was a British statesman and businessman ironically best remembered for being "forgotten" by Lord Randolph Churchill. August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1831 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1907 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The term statesman is a respectful term used to refer to diplomats, politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... A businessman (sometimes businesswoman, female; or businessperson, gender neutral) is a generic term for a wide range of people engaged in profit-oriented enterprises, generally the management of a company. ... The Lord Randolph Henry Spencer-Churchill (13 February 1849 - 24 January 1895) was a British statesman. ...


He was born in London the son of William Henry Goschen, a merchant of German extraction. He was educated at Rugby under Tait, and at Oriel College, Oxford, where he took a first in classics. He entered his father's firm of Fruhling & Goschen, of Austin Friars, in 1853, and three years later became a director of the Bank of England. In 1863 he was returned without opposition as one of the four MPs for the City of London in the Liberal interest, and he was reelected in 1865. In November of the same year he was appointed Vice-President of the Board of Trade and Paymaster-General, and in January 1866 he was made Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, with a seat in the cabinet. When Gladstone became prime minister in December 1868, Goschen joined the cabinet as President of the Poor Law Board, until March 1871, when he succeeded Childers as First Lord of the Admiralty. In the 1874 general election he was the only Liberal returned for the City of London, and by a narrow majority. In the same year he was elected Lord Rector of the University of Aberdeen. Being sent to Cairo in 1876 as delegate for the British holders of Egyptian bonds in 1876, he concluded an agreement with the Khedive in order to arrange for the conversion of the debt. St. ... A view of Rugby School from the rear, including the playing field, where according to legend Rugby football was invented Rugby School, located in the town of Rugby in Warwickshire, is one of the oldest public schools in the United Kingdom and is perhaps the leading co-educational boarding school... Archibald Campbell Tait (21 December 1811 _ 3 December 1882) was an archbishop of Canterbury. ... Oriel College (in full: The House of Blessed Mary the Virgin in Oxford commonly called Oriel College, of the Foundation of Edward the Second of famous memory, sometime King of England), located in Oriel Square, Oxford, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United... Classics, particularly within the Western University tradition, when used as a singular noun, means the study of the language, literature, history, art, and other aspects of Greek and Roman culture during the time frame known as classical antiquity. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Bank of England is the central bank of the United Kingdom, sometimes known as The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street or The Old Lady. The Bank of England // Functions of the bank It performs all the recognized functions of a central bank -- to maintain price stability, and subject to... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... This article is about a small section of central London. ... The Liberal Party was one of the two major British political parties from the early 19th century until the 1920s, and a third party of varying strength and importance up to 1988, when it merged with the Social Democratic Party to form a new party which would become known as... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... Paymaster-General is a ministerial position in UK. Former holders of this post include: Lord John Russell 1830-1834 Sir Edmund Knatchbull 1834-1835 Sir Henry Brook Parnell 1835-1841 Edward John Stanley 1841 Sir Edmund Knatchbull 1841-1845 William Bingham Baring 1845-1846 Thomas Babington Macaulay 1846-1848 The... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... A Cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... The Right Honourable William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809–19 May 1898) was a British Liberal statesman and Prime Minister (1868–1874, 1880–1885, 1886 and 1892–1894). ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... 1868 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Poor Law Board was established in the United Kingdom in 1834 to administer the Poor Law just passed. ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Caricature from Punch, 1882 Hugh Culling Eardley Childers (June 25, 1827 - January 29, 1896) was a British and Australian Liberal statesman of the nineteenth century. ... The First Lord of the Admiralty was a British government position in charge of the Admiralty. ... The 1874 UK general election ended with the Liberals, led by William Gladstone, winning a majority of the votes cast, but Benjamin Disraelis Conservatives winning the majority of seats in the House of Commons, largely because they won a number of uncontested seats. ... A majority is a subset of a group that is more than half of the entire group. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings. ... The University of Aberdeen is a university in Aberdeen, Scotland, founded by William Elphinstone, Bishop of Aberdeen in 1495 as Kings College. ... Although technically in Giza, The Great Pyramids have become a symbol of Cairo internationally Cairo (Arabic: القاهرة; romanized: al-Qāhirah) is the capital city of Egypt (and previously the United Arab Republic) and has a metropolitan area population of approximately 15. ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Dutch East India Company bond, issued in 1623. ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Khedive (from Persian for lord) was a title created in 1867 by the Ottoman Sultan Abd-ul-Aziz for the then-governor of Egypt, Ismail Pasha. ...

Caricature from Punch,13 August 1881: "This is a Joke-'im picture of a Wise Man from the East, at present ascertaining which way the wind blows"
Caricature from Punch,13 August 1881: "This is a Joke-'im picture of a Wise Man from the East, at present ascertaining which way the wind blows"

In 1878 his views on the county franchise question prevented him from voting uniformly with his party. With the City of London becoming more Conservative, Goschen did not stand there at the 1880 general election, but was instead returned for Ripon in Yorkshire, which he represented until 1885, when he was returned for the Eastern Division of Edinburgh. He declined to join Gladstone's government in 1880 and also refused the post of Viceroy of India, but he did become special ambassador to the Porte, where he settled the Montenegrin and Greek frontier questions in 1880 and 1881. He was made an Ecclesiastical Commissioner in 1882. When Sir Henry Brand was raised to the peerage in 1884, Goschen was offered the role of Speaker of the House of Commons, but he declined. During the parliament of 1880-1885 he frequently found himself at odds with his party, especially over franchise extension and questions of foreign policy. When Gladstone adopted Home Rule for Ireland, Goschen followed Lord Hartington (afterwards 8th Duke of Devonshire) and became one of the most active of the Liberal Unionists. He failed to retain his seat for Edinburgh at the election in July of that year. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x786, 41 KB)1881 caricature of G.H. Goschen: Scanned from Punch, 13 August 1881, p. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x786, 41 KB)1881 caricature of G.H. Goschen: Scanned from Punch, 13 August 1881, p. ... August 13 is the 225th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (226th in leap years), with 140 days remaining. ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1878 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Suffrage is the civil right to vote, or the exercise of that right. ... In the UK general election of 1880, also known as the Midlothian Campaign, the Liberals, led by the fierce oratory of retired former Liberal leader William Gladstone in attacking the supposedly immoral foreign policy of the Beaconsfield government, secured one of their largest ever majorities, leaving the Conservatives a distant... Map sources for Ripon at grid reference SE3171 Ripon is a cathedral city in North Yorkshire, England, 214 miles NNW from London. ... 1885 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Edinburghs location in Scotland Edinburgh viewed from Arthurs Seat. ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Governor-General of India (or Governor-General and Viceroy of India) was the head of the British administration in India. ... The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Imperial motto of sultan Abdülaziz El-Muzaffer Daima (Ottoman Turkish for the Ever Victorious) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Constantinople (Ä°stanbul) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Sultans of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40 million Area 6. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian Capital Podgorica Former Royal Capital Cetinje President Filip Vujanović Prime Minister Milo Đukanović Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  13,812 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2003)  â€“ Density  616,258  48. ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1882 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Henry Bouverie William Brand, 1st Viscount Hampden (27 January 1814 - 7 March 1892), Speaker of the British House of Commons 1872-84, was the second son of the 21st Baron Dacre, and was a descendant of the 17th century English revolutionary MP John Hampden. ... The Peerage is a system of titles of nobility which exists in the United Kingdom and is one part of the British honours system. ... 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). ... The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress (ie: the House of Commons or House of Representatives). ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1885 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Foreign Policy is a bimonthly American magazine founded in 1970 by Samuel P. Huntington and Warren Demian Manshel. ... Devolution or Home rule is the pooling of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... Spencer Compton Cavendish, 8th Duke of Devonshire (29 June 1833 - 19 October 1908) was a British politician, previously known (1858-1891) as Marquess of Hartington. ... The Liberal Unionists were a British political party which split away from the Liberals in 1886, and had effectively merged with the Conservatives by the turn of the century, the formal merger being completed in 1912. ...


On the resignation of Lord Randolph Churchill in December 1886, Goschen, though a Liberal Unionist, accepted Lord Salisbury's invitation to join his ministry as Chancellor of the Exchequer. Churchill had assumed he could not be replaced and so many commented that he "forgot Goschen" was a potential alternative. Goschen needed a seat in Parliament and so first stood for Liverpool in a by-election but was defeated by seven votes in January 1887. He was then elected for the strongly Conservative St Georges, Hanover Square, in February. His chancellorship was memorable for his successful conversion of the National Debt in 1888. Aberdeen University again conferred upon him the honour of the rectorship in 1888, and he received a similar honour from the University of Edinburgh in 1890. From 1895 to 1900 Goschen was First Lord of the Admiralty. He retired in 1900, and was raised to the peerage as Viscount Goschen of Hawkhurst, Kent. Though retired from active politics he continued to take a great interest in public affairs, and when Chamberlain started his tariff reform movement in 1903, Lord Goschen was one of the weightiest champions of free trade on the Unionist side. He died on the 7th of February 1907 and was succeeded by his son George Joachim (18661952), who was Conservative M.P. for East Grinstead from 1895 to 1900 and married a daughter of Lord Cranbrook. The Lord Randolph Henry Spencer-Churchill (13 February 1849 - 24 January 1895) was a British statesman. ... 1886 is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... The Right Honourable Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury, KG, PC (February 3, 1830–August 22, 1903). ... The ministry refers to all government ministers (whether or not they are in cabinet) headed by a prime minister. ... The Right Honourable Gordon Brown, MP, current Chancellor of the Exchequer The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the ancient title held by the British cabinet minister whose responsibilities are akin to the posts of Minister for Finance or Secretary of the Treasury in other jurisdictions. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... 1887 is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ... Government debt (public debt, national debt) is money owed by government, at any level (central government, federal government, national government, municipal government, local government, regional government). ... 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1583, is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... 1890 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. ... The First Lord of the Admiralty was a British government position in charge of the Admiralty. ... The Peerage is a system of titles of nobility which exists in the United Kingdom and is one part of the British honours system. ... Viscount Goschen is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... Joseph Chamberlain (July 8, 1836 - July 3, 1914) was a British politician. ... Protectionism is the economic policy of promoting favored domestic industries through the use of high tariffs and other regulations to discourage imports. ... 1903 has the latest occurring solstices and equinoxes for 400 years, because the Gregorian calendar hasnt had a leap year for seven years or a century leap year since 1600. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... 1907 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... George Joachim Goschen, 2nd Viscount Goschen (15 October 1866 - 24 July 1952) was a British politician who served as Governor of Madras from 1924 to 1929. ... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... 1952 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... East Grinstead is an historic town in north-east West Sussex in the UK near the East Sussex, Surrey and Kent borders, and only a few miles from Ashdown Forest. ... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. ... The Rt Hon. ...


In educational subjects Goschen had always taken the greatest interest, his best known, but by no means his only, contribution to popular culture being his participation in the University Extension Movement. His first efforts in parliament were devoted to advocating the abolition of religious tests and the admission of Dissenters to the universities. His published works indicate how ably he combined the wise study of economics with a practical instinct for business-like progress, without neglecting the more ideal aspects of human life. In addition to his well-known work on The Theory of the Foreign Exchanges, he published several financial and political pamphlets and addresses on educational and social subjects, among them being that on Cultivation of the Imagination, Liverpool, 1877, and that on Intellectual Interest, Aberdeen, 1888. He also wrote The Life and Times of George Joachim Goschen, publisher and printer of Leipzig (1903). (H. CH.) Non conformism is the term of KKK ... Economics (from the Greek οίκος [oikos], house, and νέμω [nemo], rules, hence household management) is the social science that studies the allocation of scarce resources to satisfy unlimited wants. ... 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... 1903 has the latest occurring solstices and equinoxes for 400 years, because the Gregorian calendar hasnt had a leap year for seven years or a century leap year since 1600. ...


Further reading

  • Thomas J. Spinner: George Joachim Goschen: the transformation of a Victorian liberal. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1973  ISBN 0-521-20210-8
  • Arthur D. Elliot: The life of George Joachim Goschen, First Viscount Goschen, 1831-1907. 2v. London: Longmans Green, 1911


Preceded by:
Sir William Hutt
Paymaster-General
1865–1866
Succeeded by:
William Monsell
Preceded by:
The Earl of Clarendon
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
1866
Succeeded by:
The Earl of Devon
Preceded by:
Hugh Childers
First Lord of the Admiralty
1871–1874
Succeeded by:
George Ward Hunt
Preceded by:
The Lord Randolph Churchill
Chancellor of the Exchequer
1887–1892
Succeeded by:
Sir William Harcourt
Preceded by:
The Earl Spencer
First Lord of the Admiralty
1895–1900
Succeeded by:
The Earl of Selborne



Sir William Hutt was born in Lambeth, Surrey in 1791. ... Paymaster-General is a ministerial position in UK. Former holders of this post include: Lord John Russell 1830-1834 Sir Edmund Knatchbull 1834-1835 Sir Henry Brook Parnell 1835-1841 Edward John Stanley 1841 Sir Edmund Knatchbull 1841-1845 William Bingham Baring 1845-1846 Thomas Babington Macaulay 1846-1848 The... George William Frederick Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon (January 12, 1800 - June 27, 1870), was an English diplomatist and statesman. ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... Caricature from Punch, 1882 Hugh Culling Eardley Childers (June 25, 1827 - January 29, 1896) was a British and Australian Liberal statesman of the nineteenth century. ... Old Admiralty House, Whitehall, London, Thomas Ripley, architect, 1723-26, was not admired by his contemporaries and earned him some scathing couplets from Alexander Pope The Admiralty was historically the authority in the United Kingdom responsible for the command of the Royal Navy. ... The Rt Hon. ... The Lord Randolph Henry Spencer-Churchill (13 February 1849 - 24 January 1895) was a British statesman. ... The Right Honourable Gordon Brown, MP, current Chancellor of the Exchequer The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the ancient title held by the British cabinet minister whose responsibilities are akin to the posts of Minister for Finance or Secretary of the Treasury in other jurisdictions. ... Sir William George Granville Venables Vernon Harcourt (October 14, 1827 - October 1, 1904) was a British Liberal statesman. ... John Poyntz Spencer, 5th Earl Spencer (1835 - 1910) (known as the Red Earl because of his distinctive long red beard) was a British Liberal Party politician under and close friend of British prime minister William Ewart Gladstone. ... Old Admiralty House, Whitehall, London, Thomas Ripley, architect, 1723-26, was not admired by his contemporaries and earned him some scathing couplets from Alexander Pope The Admiralty was historically the authority in the United Kingdom responsible for the command of the Royal Navy. ... William Waldegrave Palmer, 2nd Earl of Selborne (1859 - 1942), was a British politician. ...

Preceded by:
New Creation
Viscount Goschen
Succeeded by:
George Joachim Goschen


This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, which is in the public domain. Viscount Goschen is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... George Joachim Goschen, 2nd Viscount Goschen (15 October 1866 - 24 July 1952) was a British politician who served as Governor of Madras from 1924 to 1929. ... The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
George Joachim Goschen, 1st Viscount Goschen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (935 words)
With the City of London becoming more Conservative, Goschen did not stand there at the 1880 general election, but was instead returned for Ripon in Yorkshire, which he represented until 1885, when he was returned for the Eastern Division of Edinburgh.
Goschen needed a seat in Parliament and so first stood for Liverpool in a by-election but was defeated by seven votes in January 1887.
He died on the 7th of February 1907 and was succeeded by his son George Joachim (1866–1952), who was Conservative M.P. for East Grinstead from 1895 to 1900 and married a daughter of Lord Cranbrook.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m