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Encyclopedia > George II of Great Britain
George II
King of Great Britain and Ireland; Elector of Hanover; Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (more...)
Reign 11 June 172725 October 1760
Coronation 11 October 1727
Predecessor George I
Successor George III
Consort Caroline of Ansbach
Issue
Frederick, Prince of Wales
Anne, Princess Royal
Princess Amelia Sophia
Princess Caroline Elizabeth
Prince George William of Wales
Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland
Princess Mary, Landgravine of Hesse
Louise, Queen of Denmark and Norway
Full name
George Augustus
German: Georg August
Titles
HM The King
HRH The Prince of Wales
HRH The Duke of Cornwall and Cambridge
HSH The Duke of Cambridge
HSH The Hereditary Prince of Hanover
HSH Prince Georg August of Hanover
HSH Duke Georg August of Brunswick-Lüneburg
Royal house House of Hanover
Royal anthem God Save the King
Father George I
Mother Sophia Dorothea of Celle
Born 10 November 1683(1683-11-10)
Flag of Holy Roman Empire Herrenhausen Palace, Hanover
Died 25 October 1760 (aged 76)
Flag of England Kensington Palace, London
Burial 11 November 1760
Westminster Abbey, London

George II (George Augustus; 10 November 168325 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. The precise style of British Sovereigns has varied over the years. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (660x800, 97 KB) old portrait File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): George II of Great Britain List of English monarchs ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ... George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727)[1] was King of Great Britain and Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ... “George III” redirects here. ... Caroline of Ansbach (later Queen Caroline; Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline; 1 March 1683 – 20 November 1737) was the queen consort of George II. // Margravine Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach was born on 1 March 1683, at Ansbach in Germany, the daughter of Johann Friedrich, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach and his second wife... The Prince Frederick, Prince of Wales (Frederick Lewis; 1 February 1707 – 31 March 1751) was a member of the British Royal Family, the eldest son of King George II. He was born into the House of Hanover and, under the Act of Settlement passed by the English Parliament in 1701... Princess Anne of Orange, Princess Royal and Princess of Hanover, Princess-Regent of Friesland (2 November 1709–12 January 1759) was the second child and eldest daughter of King George II of Great Britain and his consort, Queen Caroline. ... For other persons known as Princess Amelia, see Princess Amelia The Princess Amelia Sophie (10 July 1711 – 31 October 1786), was a member of the British Royal Family, the second daughter of King George II. // Early Life Princess Amelia was born in Schloss Herrenhausen, Hanover, Germany. ... The Princess Caroline Elizabeth ( May 30, 1713 - December 28, 1757) was a member of the British Royal Family, the fourth child and third daughter of King George II. // Early Life Princess Caroline Elizabeth was born in Hanover, Germany. ... Prince George William of Wales (November 13, 1717 - February 17, 1718) was a member of the British Royal Family, an infant son of George II and Caroline of Ansbach, then the Prince and Princess of Wales. ... The Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, KG, KB, PC (15 April 1721–31 October 1765), a younger son of King George II of Great Britain and Queen Caroline, was a noted military leader. ... For other persons known as Princess Mary, see Princess Mary The Princess Mary (5 March 1723 – 14 January 1772) was a member of the British Royal Family, a daughter of George II and Caroline of Ansbach. ... Louise of Hanover and of Great Britain (December 18, 1724 - December 19, 1751) was the youngest surviving daughter of George II of Great Britain and Caroline of Ansbach, and became Queen consort of Denmark and Norway. ... A Royal House or Dynasty is a sort of family name used by royalty. ... The House of Hanover (the Hanoverians) is a German royal dynasty which has ruled the Duchy of Braunschweig-Lüneburg, the Kingdom of Hanover and the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... This article is on the British patriotic anthem. ... George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727)[1] was King of Great Britain and Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ... Sophia Dorothea (15 September 1666 – 13 November 1726) was the wife and cousin of George Louis, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, later George I of Great Britain, and mother of George II through an arranged marriage of state, instigated by the machinations of Duchess Sophia of Hanover. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... , Hanover(i) (German: , IPA: ), on the river Leine, is the capital of the federal state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Kensington Palace Park Kensington Palace is a royal residence set in Kensington Gardens in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London, England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen-in-Parliament) legislative power. ... This article is about the nobility title. ... Capital Hanover Head of State King of Hanover Hanover (German: ) was a historical territory in todays Germany, at various times a principality, an electorate of the Holy Roman Empire, a kingdom and a province of Prussia and of Germany. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ...


He was the last British monarch to have been born outside of Great Britain, and was famous for his numerous conflicts with his father and, subsequently, with his son. As king, he exercised little control over policy in his early reign, the government instead being controlled by Great Britain's first de facto Prime Minister, Sir Robert Walpole. De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford, (commonly known as Robert Walpole, or Sir Robert Walpole) KG, KB, PC (26 August 1676 – 18 March 1745) was a British statesman who is generally regarded as having been the first Prime Minister of Great Britain. ...

Contents

Early life

HSH Duke Georg August of Hanover was born at Herrenhausen Palace, Hanover (Germany). He was the son of Georg Ludwig, then the Hereditary Prince of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and his wife, Sophia of Celle; both George I and Sophia committed adultery but Sophia's alleged abandonment of George led to their being divorced in 1694. , Hanover(i) (German: , IPA: ), on the river Leine, is the capital of the federal state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany. ... George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727)[1] was King of Great Britain and Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ... Capital Hanover Head of State King of Hanover Hanover (German: ) was a historical territory in todays Germany, at various times a principality, an electorate of the Holy Roman Empire, a kingdom and a province of Prussia and of Germany. ... Sophia Dorothea (September 15, 1666 - November 23, 1726) , wife of George Louis, elector of Hanover (George I of Great Britain), only child of George William, duke of Brunswick-Luneburg-Celle, by a Huguenot lady named Eleanore dOlbreuze (1639-1722), was born on the 15th of September 1666. ...


He married Margravine Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach in 1705. One of the other Princesses considered was the Swedish Princess Hedvig Sophia of Sweden, who became a widow 1702. Caroline of Ansbach (later Queen Caroline; Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline; 1 March 1683 – 20 November 1737) was the queen consort of George II. // Margravine Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach was born on 1 March 1683, at Ansbach in Germany, the daughter of Johann Friedrich, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach and his second wife... Hedvig Sofia Augusta, Princess of Sweden (26 June 1681-22 December 1708), Duchess of Holstein-Gottorp, was the eldest child of King Charles XI of Sweden, and his wife Ulrike Eleonore of Denmark. ... Events March 8 - William III died; Princess Anne Stuart becomes Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland. ...


Act of Settlement

Under the Act, the Hereditary Prince became a naturalised English subject in that same year. Anne, who had succeeded to the English throne in 1702, admitted him to the Order of the Garter in 1706. She created him Duke of Cambridge, Earl of Milford Haven, Viscount Northallerton and Baron Tewkesbury on 9 November[1] of the same year. Act of Settlement The Electress Sophia of Hanover The Act of Settlement (12 & 13 Wm 3 c. ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... Duke of Cambridge is a title frequently conferred upon junior members of the British royal family. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


When Anne died on 1 August 1714, George Ludwig (Louis) acceded as George I, and the Duke, automatically became Duke of Cornwall, Duke of Rothesay and Earl of Carrick. His father created him Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester on 27 September 1714. Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) became Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March 1702, succeeding William III and II. Her Roman Catholic father, James II and VII, was forcibly deposed in 1688; her brother-in-law and her sister then became joint monarchs as William III... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Battle of Gangut, by Maurice Baquoi, 1724-27. ... George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727)[1] was King of Great Britain and Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ... The Dukedom of Cornwall was the first dukedom created in the peerage of England. ... Banner of the Duke of Rothesay, the quarterings represent the Great Steward of Scotland and the Lord of the Isles. ... The Earldom of Carrick has been created several times in the Peerage of Scotland and once in the Peerage of Ireland. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ... The Earldom of Chester is one of the few palatine earldoms in England. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Battle of Gangut, by Maurice Baquoi, 1724-27. ...


Quarrel with the King

The Prince of Wales had an extremely poor relationship with his father. When the Princess of Wales gave birth to Prince George William in 1717, a family quarrel ensued; at the baptism, the Prince of Wales insisted on having the Duke of Newcastle (whom the king detested) as a godfather, whilst the King chose his brother, the Duke of York and Albany. When he publicly vituperated his father, the Prince of Wales was temporarily put under arrest. Afterwards, the King banished his son from St. James's Palace, the King's residence, and excluded him from all public ceremonies. Prince George William of Wales (November 13, 1717 - February 17, 1718) was a member of the British Royal Family, an infant son of George II and Caroline of Ansbach, then the Prince and Princess of Wales. ... This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ... Arms of Thomas Pelham-Holles Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and 1st Duke of Newcastle-under-Lyme (July 21, 1693 – November 17, 1768) was a British Whig statesman, whose official life extended throughout the Whig supremacy of the 18th century. ... A godparent, in many denominations of Christianity, is someone who sponsors a childs baptism. ... Ernest Augustus, Duke of York and Albany KG (7 September 1674, Osnabruck –14 August 1728, Osnabruck) was the youngest son of Ernest Augustus, Elector of Brunswick-Lüneburg and Sophia of the Palatinate and a younger brother of George I of Great Britain. ... For other uses, see Arrest (disambiguation). ... St Jamess Palace and The Mall by Jan Kip, 1715. ...


Political opposition

The Prince of Wales did all in his power to encourage opposition to George I's policies. His London residence, Leicester House, became a meeting place for his father's opponents, including Sir Robert Walpole and Viscount Townshend. In 1720, Walpole encouraged the King and his son to reconcile. In the same year, Walpole made a return to political office, from which he had been excluded since 1717. George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727)[1] was King of Great Britain and Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford, (commonly known as Robert Walpole, or Sir Robert Walpole) KG, KB, PC (26 August 1676 – 18 March 1745) was a British statesman who is generally regarded as having been the first Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... Charles Townshend Charles Townshend, 2nd Viscount Townshend (April 18, 1674–June 21, 1738), was an English statesman. ...


In 1721, the economic disaster of the South Sea Bubble allowed Sir Robert to rise to the pinnacle of government. Walpole and his Whig Party were dominant in politics, for George I feared that the Tories did not support the succession laid down in the Act of Settlement. The power of the Whigs was so great that the Tories would not come to hold power for another half-century. Sir Robert essentially controlled British government, but, by joining the King's side, lost the favour of the Prince of Wales. Hogarthian image of the South Sea Bubble by Edward Matthew Ward, Tate Gallery More well known than The South Sea Company is perhaps the South Sea Bubble (1711 - September 1720) which is the name given to the economic bubble that occurred through overheated speculation in the company shares during 1720. ... The Whigs (with the Tories) are often described as one of two political parties in England and later the United Kingdom from the late 17th to the mid 19th centuries. ... George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727)[1] was King of Great Britain and Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... Act of Settlement The Electress Sophia of Hanover The Act of Settlement (12 & 13 Wm 3 c. ...


Early reign

Monarchical Styles of
King George II of Great Britain
Reference style His Majesty
Spoken style Your Majesty
Alternative style Sire

George II succeeded to the throne at the time of his father's death on 11 June 1727, but a battle of wills continued with his son and heir-apparent, Prince Frederick. The King may have planned to exile his son to the British colonies, but, in any event, did not actually do so. George was crowned at Westminster Abbey on 4 October. The Hanoverian composer Handel was commissioned to write four new anthems for the coronation; one of which, Zadok the Priest, has been sung at every coronation since. Image File history File links Edward's_crown_PD_cleaned. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... Look up majesty in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Majesty is an English word rooting in the Latin Maiestas, meaning literally, Greatness. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ... The Prince Frederick, Prince of Wales (Frederick Lewis; 1 February 1707 – 31 March 1751) was a member of the British Royal Family, the eldest son of King George II. He was born into the House of Hanover and, under the Act of Settlement passed by the English Parliament in 1701... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “Handel” redirects here. ... Zadok the Priest being performed at the Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne in 2005 Zadok the Priest is a coronation anthem composed by George Frideric Handel (1685–1759) using texts from the King James Bible. ...


It was widely believed both that George would dismiss Walpole, who had distressed him by joining his father's government, and that he would be replaced by Sir Spencer Compton; George requested Compton, rather than Walpole, to write his first speech for him. Sir Spencer, however, requested Walpole for aid in the task, leading Queen Caroline, an ardent supporter of Sir Robert, to claim that Compton was incompetent. George did not behave obstinately; instead, he agreed with his wife and retained Walpole as Prime Minister, who continued to slowly gain royal favour, securing a generous civil list of £800,000 for the King. The Rt. ... A civil list is a list of individuals to whom money is paid by the government. ...


He also persuaded many Tory politicians to accept the succession laid down in the Act of Settlement as valid. In turn, the King helped Sir Robert to gain a strong parliamentary majority by creating peers sympathetic to the Whigs. For other uses, see Peerage (disambiguation). ...

British Royalty
House of Hanover
George II
   Frederick, Prince of Wales
   Anne, Princess of Orange
   Princess Amelia Sophia
   Princess Caroline Elizabeth
   William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland
   Mary, Landgravine of Hesse-Cassel
   Louise, Queen of Denmark
Grandchildren
   Augusta Charlotte, Duchess of Brunswick
   George III
   Edward Augustus, Duke of York
   Princess Elizabeth Caroline
   William Henry, Duke of Gloucester
   Henry Frederick, Duke of Cumberland
   Caroline Matilda, Queen of Denmark
Great-grandchildren
   Princess Sophia of Gloucester
   William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester

Whilst the Queen was still alive, Walpole's position was secure. He was the master of domestic policy, and he still exerted some control over George's foreign policy. Whilst the King was eager for war in Europe, the Prime Minister was more cautious. Thus, in 1729, he encouraged George to sign a peace treaty with Spain. This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... The House of Hanover (the Hanoverians) is a German royal dynasty which has ruled the Duchy of Braunschweig-Lüneburg, the Kingdom of Hanover and the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Image File history File links UK_Arms_1714. ... The Prince Frederick, Prince of Wales (Frederick Lewis; 1 February 1707 – 31 March 1751) was a member of the British Royal Family, the eldest son of King George II. He was born into the House of Hanover and, under the Act of Settlement passed by the English Parliament in 1701... Princess Anne of Orange, Princess Royal and Princess of Hanover, Princess-Regent of Friesland (2 November 1709–12 January 1759) was the second child and eldest daughter of King George II of Great Britain and his consort, Queen Caroline. ... For other persons known as Princess Amelia, see Princess Amelia The Princess Amelia Sophie (10 July 1711 – 31 October 1786), was a member of the British Royal Family, the second daughter of King George II. // Early Life Princess Amelia was born in Schloss Herrenhausen, Hanover, Germany. ... The Princess Caroline Elizabeth ( May 30, 1713 - December 28, 1757) was a member of the British Royal Family, the fourth child and third daughter of King George II. // Early Life Princess Caroline Elizabeth was born in Hanover, Germany. ... The Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, KG, KB, PC (15 April 1721–31 October 1765), a younger son of King George II of Great Britain and Queen Caroline, was a noted military leader. ... For other persons known as Princess Mary, see Princess Mary The Princess Mary (5 March 1723 – 14 January 1772) was a member of the British Royal Family, a daughter of George II and Caroline of Ansbach. ... Louise of Hanover and of Great Britain (December 18, 1724 - December 19, 1751) was the youngest surviving daughter of George II of Great Britain and Caroline of Ansbach, and became Queen consort of Denmark and Norway. ... Princess Augusta Charlotte of Wales (31 July 1737 - 23 March 1813), was a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of King George II and sister of King George III. She later married into the Ducal House of Brunswick, of which she was already a member. ... “George III” redirects here. ... Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of York (25 March 1739 – 17 September 1767) was the younger brother of George III of the United Kingdom, the second son of Frederick, Prince of Wales and Augusta of Saxe-Gotha. ... Princess Elizabeth Caroline of Wales (30 December 1740 - September 4, 1759) was a member of the British Royal Family, a grandchild of King George II and sister of George III of the United Kingdom Princess Elizabeth Caroline was born at Norfolk House, St Jamess Square, London. ... HRH Prince William Henry, Earl of Connaught, 1st Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh (November 14, 1743 - August 25, 1805) was a British prince and military officer, younger brother of King George III. He was born to Frederick Louis, Prince of Wales and Augusta of Saxe-Gotha at Leicester House in... Prince Henry Frederick, Duke of Cumberland and Strathearn (7 November 1745 - 18 September 1790) was the sixth child of Frederick, Prince of Wales and Augusta of Saxe-Gotha, and a younger brother of George III. // [edit] Early life HRH Prince Henry Frederick of Wales was born on 7 November 1745... Princess Caroline Matilda of Wales (Danish: ) (11 July 1751 - 10 May 1775), was a princess of Great Britain and Ireland, sister of George III and queen of Denmark from 1766 to 1772. ... Princess Sophia of Gloucester, (Sophia Matilda; 29 May 1773 - 29 November 1844) was a member of the British Royal Family, a great granddaughter of George II and niece of George III. // Princess Sophia was born on 29 May 1773 in Grosvenor Street, Mayfair. ... His Royal Highness Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh (January 15, 1776 - November 30, 1834) was a member of the British Royal Family, a great grandson of King George II. Early Life Prince William was born on 15 January 1776 in Rome, Italy. ...


In 1732, by granting a charter to James Oglethorpe, the King created the Province of Georgia in British North America, which was named after him. General James Oglethorpe James Edward Oglethorpe (December 22 1696 – June 30, 1785) was an English general, a philanthropist, and a founder of the state of Georgia. ... Savannah, Georgia colony, Early 1700s The Province of Georgia (also Georgia Colony) was one of the Southern colonies in British North America. ... British North America consisted of the loyalist colonies and territories (i. ...

Image File history File links Frederick_Prince_of_Wales. ... Image File history File links Frederick_Prince_of_Wales. ... The Prince Frederick, Prince of Wales (Frederick Lewis; 1 February 1707 – 31 March 1751) was a member of the British Royal Family, the eldest son of King George II. He was born into the House of Hanover and, under the Act of Settlement passed by the English Parliament in 1701...

Family problems

George's relationship with the Prince of Wales worsened during the 1730s. When the Prince of Wales married, an open quarrel broke out; the King banished him and his family from the royal court in 1737. Events and Trends The Great Awakening - A Protestant religious movement active in the British colonies of North America Sextant invented (probably around 1730) independently by John Hadley in Great Britain and Thomas Godfrey in the American colonies World leaders Louis XV King of France (king from 1715 to 1774) George...


After banishing his son, George also lost his wife, who died on 20 November 1737. Reputedly, when she asked her husband to remarry, he replied, "Non, j'aurai des maitresses!" (French for "No, I will have mistresses!"). George had already had an illegitimate son, Johann Ludwig, Graf von Wallmoden-Gimborn (22 April 1736 - 10 October 1811) by his mistress Amalie von Wallmoden, Countess of Yarmouth (1704-1765). The most famous of his mistresses was Henrietta Howard, Countess of Suffolk, who was one of Caroline's ladies-of-the-bedchamber. is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events 12 February — The San Carlo, the oldest working opera house in Europe, is inaugurated. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 26 - Stanislaus I of Poland abdicates his throne. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the US Federal Agent designation, see Special agent. ... Amalie Sophie Marianne von Wallmoden, Countess of Yarmouth (1 April 1704–19 October 1765) was a mistress of George II of Great Britain. ... Events Building of the Students Monument in Aiud, Romania. ... Year 1765 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Henrietta Howard (1688 - July 26, 1767), was a mistress of King George II of Great Britain. ...


War and rebellion

Against Walpole's advice, George once again entered into war, the War of Jenkins' Ear, with Spain in 1739. The entire continent of Europe was plunged into war upon the death of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI in 1740. At dispute was the right of his daughter, Maria Theresa, to succeed to his Austrian dominions. George II's war with Spain quickly became part of the War of the Austrian Succession. Combatants British Empire Spain Commanders Edward Vernon James E. Oglethorpe George Anson Charles Knowles Blas de Lezo Manuel de Montiano Andrés Reggio The War of Jenkins Ear was a conflict between Great Britain and Spain that lasted from 1739 to 1748. ... Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI Charles VI, (German Karl VI; in full Karl Josef Franz)Holy Roman Emperor (October 1, 1685 – October 20, 1740) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1711 to 1740 and the second son of Leopold I with his third wife, Eleonore-Magdalena of Pfalz-Neuburg. ... Not to be confused with Maria Theresa of Austria (1816-1867). ... Combatants Prussia France Spain Bavaria Naples and Sicily Sweden (1741 — 1743) Austria Great Britain Hanover Dutch Republic Saxony Kingdom of Sardinia Russia Commanders Frederick II Leopold I Leopold II Maurice de Saxe François-Marie de Broglie Charles VII Charles Emil Lewenhaupt Ludwig Khevenhüller Charles Alexander George II Charles...


Sir Robert Walpole was powerless to prevent a major European conflict. He also faced the opposition of several politicians, led by John, Baron Carteret, later Earl Granville. Accused of rigging an election, Walpole retired, in 1742, after over twenty years in office. He was replaced by Spencer Compton, 1st Earl of Wilmington, George's original choice for the premiership, who had previously failed to gain office due to the manœuvres of Queen Caroline. Lord Wilmington, however, was a figurehead; actual power was held by Lord Carteret. When Lord Wilmington died in 1743, Henry Pelham took his place. The Right Honourable John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville, PC (22 April 1690–22 January 1763), English statesman, commonly known by his earlier title as Lord Carteret, was the son of George Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret (1667 - 1695), by his marriage with Grace Granville (September 3, 1654 - October 18, 1744), daughter... The Rt. ... The Right Honourable Henry Pelham (25 September 1694–6 March 1754) was a British Whig statesman, who served as Prime Minister of Great Britain from 27 August 1743 to his death about ten years later. ...


The pro-war faction was led by Lord Carteret, who claimed that if Maria Theresa failed to succeed to the Austrian Throne, then French power in Europe would increase. George II agreed to send more troops to Europe, ostensibly to support Maria Theresa, but in reality to prevent enemy troops from marching into Hanover. The British army had not fought in a major European war in over twenty years, during which time the government had badly neglected its upkeep. Nevertheless, the King enthusiastically sent his troops to Europe. He personally accompanied them, leading them into the Battle of Dettingen in 1743, thus becoming the last British monarch to lead troops into battle. His armies were controlled by his military-minded son, HRH The Duke of Cumberland. The war was not welcomed by the British public, who felt that the King and Lord Carteret were subordinating British interests to Hanoverian ones. Combatants Britain, Hanover, Austria France Commanders George II duc de Noailles Strength 50,000 70,000 Casualties 750 8,000 The Battle of Dettingen (German: Schlacht bei Dettingen) took place on June 16 (June 27 according to the Gregorian calendar, which the English had not officially adopted), 1743 at Dettingen... The Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, KG, KB, PC (15 April 1721–31 October 1765), a younger son of King George II of Great Britain and Queen Caroline, was a noted military leader. ...

Half-Crown of George II, 1746. The inscription reads GEORGIUS II DEI GRATIA (George II by the Grace of God). Under the King's head is the word LIMA, signifying that the coin was struck from silver seized from the Spanish treasure fleet off Lima, Peru.
Half-Crown of George II, 1746. The inscription reads GEORGIUS II DEI GRATIA (George II by the Grace of God). Under the King's head is the word LIMA, signifying that the coin was struck from silver seized from the Spanish treasure fleet off Lima, Peru.

Shrewdly, George II's French opponents encouraged rebellion by the Jacobites during the War of the Austrian Succession. The Jacobites were the supporters of the Roman Catholic James II, who had been deposed in 1689 and replaced not by his Catholic son, but by his Protestant daughter. James II's son, James Francis Edward Stuart, known as the Old Pretender, had attempted two prior rebellions; that of 1715, "the Fifteen", which was after he fled to France; and the rebellion of 1719, "the Nineteen", which was so weak that it was almost farcical. The Old Pretender's son, Charles Edward Stuart, popularly known, both then and since, as Bonnie Prince Charlie, however, led a much stronger rebellion on his father's behalf in 1745. ImageMetadata File history File links George2coin. ... Nickname: Motto: Hoc signum vere regum est Lima Province and Lima within Peru Coordinates: , Country  Peru Region Lima Region Province Lima Province Settled January 18, 1535 Government  - Mayor Luis Castañeda Lossio Area  - City 804. ... Charles Edward Stuart, Bonnie Prince Charlie, wearing the Jacobite blue bonnet Jacobitism was (and, to a very limited extent, remains) the political movement dedicated to the restoration of the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland. ... James II of England (also known as James VII of Scotland; 14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701) became King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685, and Duke of Normandy on 31 December 1660. ... James Francis Edward Stuart, the Old Pretender Prince James Francis Edward Stuart or Stewart, the Old Pretender, (10 June 1688 – 1 January 1766) was the son of the deposed King James II of England and VII of Scots, and as such laid claim to the English and Scottish thrones (as... The Jacobite Risings were a series of uprisings, rebellions, and wars in the British Isles occurring between 1688 and 1746. ... The Jacobite Risings were a series of uprisings, rebellions, and wars in the British Isles occurring between 1688 and 1746. ... Charles Edward Stuart (31 December 1720 – 31 January 1788), known in Scots Gaelic as Teàrlach Eideard Stiùbhairt, was the exiled claimant to the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and was commonly known as Bonnie Prince Charlie. ...


Bonnie Prince Charlie landed in Scotland in July 1745. Many Scots were loyal to his cause; he defeated British forces in September. He then attempted to enter England, where even Roman Catholics seemed hostile to the invasion. The French monarch, Louis XV, had promised to send twelve thousand soldiers to aid the rebellion, but did not deliver. A British army under the Duke of Cumberland, meanwhile, drove the Jacobites back into Scotland. On 16 April 1746, Bonnie Prince Charlie faced the Duke of Cumberland in the Battle of Culloden, the last battle ever fought on British soil. The ravaged Jacobite troops were routed by the British Government Army. Bonnie Prince Charlie escaped to France, but many of his Scottish supporters were caught and executed. Jacobitism was all but crushed; no further serious attempt was made at restoring the House of Stuart. Louis XV, called the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé) (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1715 until his death. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Catharine de Ricci (born 1522) canonized. ... Combatants British Army Jacobites Commanders William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender Strength 8,000 ca. ...


After the Forty-Five, the War of the Austrian Succession continued. Peace was made in 1748, with Maria Theresa being recognised as Archduchess of Austria. She subsequently dropped Great Britain as a key ally, deeming it too unreliable.


Later life

For the remainder of his life, George did not take any active interest in politics or war. During his last years, the foundation of the Industrial Revolution was laid as the population rose rapidly. British dominance in India increased with the victories of Robert Clive at the Battle of Arcot and the Battle of Plassey. A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... Robert Clive, 1st Baron Clive, meeting with Mir Jafar after Plassey, by Francis Hayman Major-General Robert Clive, 1st Baron Clive of Plassey, KB (29 September 1725 - 22 November 1774), also known as Clive of India, was the soldier of fortune and commander who established the military supremacy of the... Combatants British East India Company Siraj Ud Daulah (Nawab of Bengal), La Compagnie des Indes Orientales Commanders Colonel Robert Clive (later Governor of Bengal and Baron of Plassey) Mir Jafar Ali Khan (Commander-in-chief of the Nawab), M. Sinfray (French Secretary to the Council) Strength 2,200 European soldiers...


When the Prince of Wales died suddenly in 1751, his son, Prince George immediately succeeded him as Duke of Edinburgh. The new Duke was soon created Prince of Wales in recognition of his status as heir-apparent. However, the Dowager Princess of Wales mistrusted the King, and kept the two apart. Augusta of Saxe-Gotha (November 30, 1719-February 8, 1772) was Princess of Wales from May 8, 1736 to March 31, 1751. ...


In 1752, Great Britain reformed its calendar. It had previously operated under the Julian Calendar, but during 1752 adopted the Gregorian Calendar. The calendar change required omitting eleven days; 2 September was followed by 14 September. Furthermore, 1 January became the official beginning of the New Year, instead of 25 March. The former date had been commonly regarded as the beginning of the New Year for a long time, but the latter was retained in formal usage. To ensure consistency of financial record keeping, and to prevent annual payments falling due before they would have under the Julian Calendar, the fiscal year was not shortened, with the result that in the United Kingdom each tax year has since begun on 6 April. For other uses, see Calendar (disambiguation) A page from the Hindu calendar 1871–1872. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1754, King George issued the charter for King's College in New York City, which would later become Columbia University after the American Revolution. George's Prime Minister, Henry Pelham died in 1754, to be succeeded by his brother, the Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and, thereafter, by the Duke of Devonshire in 1756. Another notable minister was William Pitt, the Elder. Pitt was appointed a Secretary of State in Lord Devonshire's administration, but was disliked by the King, for he had previously opposed involvement in the War of the Austrian Succession. The hostility was marked by George's criticism of Pitt's speeches in early 1757. In April of the same year, George dismissed Pitt, but later recalled him. At the same time, Lord Newcastle returned as Prime Minister. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Alma Mater Columbia University in the City of New York is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and 1st Duke of Newcastle-under-Lyme (July 21, 1693 - November 17, 1768) was a Whig statesman, whose official life extended throughout the Whig supremacy of the 18th century. ... William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire (c. ... William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham PC (15 November 1708 – 11 May 1778) was a British Whig statesman who achieved his greatest fame as Secretary of State during the Seven Years War (aka French and Indian War) and who was later Prime Minister of Great Britain. ...


As Secretary of State for the Southern Department, Pitt the Elder guided policy relating to the Seven Years' War, which may be viewed as a continuation of the War of the Austrian Succession. Maria Theresa, Archduchess of Austria, made an alliance with her nation's former enemies, Russia and France, and became the enemy of Great Britain and Hanover. George II feared that this new alliance would invade Hanover; thus, he aligned himself with Prussia. Great Britain, Hanover and Prussia were thus pitted against many major European powers, including Austria, Russia, France, Sweden and Saxony. The war spread from Europe to North America (where the conflict is also known as the French and Indian War) and to India, where it was termed the Second Carnatic War. The Secretary of State for the Southern Department was a position in the cabinet of the government of United Kingdom up to 1782. ... Combatants Kingdom of Prussia Kingdom of Great Britain and its American Colonies Electorate of Hanover Iroquois Confederacy Kingdom of Portugal Electorate of Brunswick Electorate of Hesse-Kassel Philippines Archduchy of Austria Kingdom of France Empire of Russia Kingdom of Sweden Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Saxony Kingdom of Naples and... Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DED Capital Dresden Minister-President Georg Milbradt (CDU) Governing parties CDU / SPD Votes in Bundesrat 4 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  18,416 km² (7,110 sq mi) Population 4,252,000 (11/2006)[1]  - Density 231 /km... Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,040 killed, wounded or captured The French and...

Statue of George II in Golden Square, Soho, London. By John Nost the elder, this was erected in 1753, but had actually been made 33 years previously for the Duke of Chandos. It is badly corroded (it has been suggested that this is due to over-zealous cleaning) and the right hand is damaged. The only other public statue of this king in London is at the Royal Naval College in Greenwich. (January 2006)
Statue of George II in Golden Square, Soho, London. By John Nost the elder, this was erected in 1753, but had actually been made 33 years previously for the Duke of Chandos. It is badly corroded (it has been suggested that this is due to over-zealous cleaning) and the right hand is damaged. The only other public statue of this king in London is at the Royal Naval College in Greenwich. (January 2006)

The King died unceremoniously of aortic dissection while seated on the lavatory on 25 October 1760. He was subsequently buried in Westminster Abbey. He was succeeded by his grandson, who became George III. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (480x640, 237 KB) Summary Statue of George II, Golden Square, Soho, London. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (480x640, 237 KB) Summary Statue of George II, Golden Square, Soho, London. ... We dont have an article called Golden Square Start this article Search for Golden Square in. ... Cast-iron architecture in Greene Street SoHo is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... John Nost[1] (d. ... The title Baron Chandos has been created twice in the Peerage of England. ... The Old Royal Naval College The Royal Naval College, Greenwich, was a Royal Navy training establishment between 1873 and 1998, in the centre of the Maritime Greenwich World Heritage Site in London. ... This article is about Greenwich in England. ... Aortic dissection is a tear in the wall of the aorta (the largest artery of the body). ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738–29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain, and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ...


Titles, styles, honours and arms

Titles

is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ... For other uses, see October (disambiguation). ... Events February 13 - Massacre of Glencoe March 1 - The Salem witch trials begin in Salem Village, Massachusetts Bay Colony with the charging of three women with witchcraft. ... For other uses, see October (disambiguation). ... Events February 13 - Massacre of Glencoe March 1 - The Salem witch trials begin in Salem Village, Massachusetts Bay Colony with the charging of three women with witchcraft. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 27 - Concluding that Emperor Iyasus I of Ethiopia had abdicated by retiring to a monastery, a council of high officials appoint Tekle Haymanot I Emperor of Ethiopia May 23 - Battle of Ramillies September 7 - The Battle of Turin in the War of Spanish Succession - forces of Austria and... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Battle of Gangut, by Maurice Baquoi, 1724-27. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Battle of Gangut, by Maurice Baquoi, 1724-27. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Battle of Gangut, by Maurice Baquoi, 1724-27. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...

Styles

In Great Britain, George II used the official style "George the Second, by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, etc." In some cases (especially in treaties), the formula "Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire" was added before "etc." // Fidei defensor is the Latin original of the English and French titles. ...


His full style immediately prior to his succession was His Royal Highness The Prince George Augustus, Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester, Duke of Cornwall, Duke of Rothesay, Duke of Cambridge, Marquess of Cambridge, Earl of Carrick, Earl of Milford Haven, Viscount Northallerton, Baron Renfrew, Baron of Tewkesbury, Lord of the Isles, Prince and Great Steward of Scotland, Hereditary Prince of Hanover, Knight of the Garter


Arms

George II's arms were: Quarterly, I Gules three lions passant guardant in pale Or (for England) impaling Or a lion rampant within a tressure flory-counter-flory Gules (for Scotland); II Azure three fleurs-de-lys Or (for France); III Azure a harp Or stringed Argent (for Ireland); IV tierced per pale and per chevron (for Hanover), I Gules two lions passant guardant Or (for Brunswick), II Or a semy of hearts Gules a lion rampant Azure (for Lüneburg), III Gules a horse courant Argent (for Westfalen), overall an escutcheon Gules charged with the crown of Charlemagne Or (for the dignity of Archtreasurer of the Holy Roman Empire). Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... Charlemagne (left) and Pippin the Hunchback. ...


Ancestors

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
16. William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8. George, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
17. Dorothea of Denmark
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4. Ernest Augustus, Elector of Hanover
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
18. Louis V, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9. Anne Eleonore of Hesse-Darmstadt
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
19. Magdalena of Brandenburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2. George I of Great Britain
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
20. Frederick IV, Elector Palatine
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10. Frederick V, Elector Palatine
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
21. Countess Louise Juliana of Nassau
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5. Sophia, Princess Palatine of the Rhine
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
22. James I of England
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11. Princess Elizabeth Stuart of Scotland
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
23. Anne of Denmark
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1. George II of Great Britain
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
24. William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (= 16)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12. George, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (= 8)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
25. Dorothea of Denmark (= 17)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6. George William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
26. Louis V, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt (= 18)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13. Anne Eleonore of Hesse-Darmstadt (= 9)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
27. Magdalena of Brandenburg (= 19)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3. Sophia Dorothea of Celle
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
28. Alexander d'Esnier, Seigneur d'Olbreuse
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14. Alexander II d'Esnier, Marquis de Desmiers
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
29. Marie Baudouin
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7. Eleonore d'Esnier, Countess of Williamsburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
30. Joachim Poussard, Seigneur de Bas Vandre
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
15. Jacquette Poussard de Vendre
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
31. Susan Gaillard
 
 
 
 
 
 

William (4 July 1535 – 20 August 1592) was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg from 1559 until his death. ... George (17 November 1582, Celle – 2 April 1641, Hildesheim) was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... A palatinate is a territory administered by a count palatine, originally the direct representative of the sovereign, but later the hereditary ruler of the territory subject to the crowns overlordship. ... Ernest Augustus (German: Ernst August; 20 November 1629, Herzberg – 23 January 1698, Herrenhausen) was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and ruled over the Calenberg (or Hanover) subdivision of the duchy. ... Louis V, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt was the Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt from 1596 to 1626 . ... Anne Eleonore of Hesse-Darmstadt was born on 30th of July 1601 in Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany and died on the 6th May 1659 in Herzberg, Germany. ... George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727)[1] was King of Great Britain and Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Electress Sophia of Hanover (born Sophia, Countess Palatine of Simmern; 14 October 1630 – 8 June 1714) was the youngest daughter of Frederick V, Elector Palatine, of the House of Wittelsbach, the Winter King of Bohemia, and Elizabeth Stuart. ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... Elisabeth, Electress Palatine and Queen of Bohemia (born Princess Elizabeth Stuart of Scotland; 19 August 1596 – 13 February 1662) was the eldest daughter to James VI of Scotland and his Queen consort Anne of Denmark. ... Anna of Denmark (October 14, 1574 – March 4, 1619) was queen consort of King James I of England and VI of Scotland. ... William (4 July 1535 – 20 August 1592) was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg from 1559 until his death. ... George (17 November 1582, Celle – 2 April 1641, Hildesheim) was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... A palatinate is a territory administered by a count palatine, originally the direct representative of the sovereign, but later the hereditary ruler of the territory subject to the crowns overlordship. ... George William (German: Georg Wilhelm; 26 January 1624, Herzberg am Harz – 28 August 1705, Wienhausen) was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and ruled first over the Calenberg subdivision of the duchy, then over the Lüneburg subdivision. ... Louis V, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt was the Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt from 1596 to 1626 . ... Anne Eleonore of Hesse-Darmstadt was born on 30th of July 1601 in Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany and died on the 6th May 1659 in Herzberg, Germany. ... Sophia Dorothea (15 September 1666 – 13 November 1726) was the wife and cousin of George Louis, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, later George I of Great Britain, and mother of George II through an arranged marriage of state, instigated by the machinations of Duchess Sophia of Hanover. ...

Issue

Caroline's nine pregnancies, between 1707 and 1724, resulted in eight live births: Events January 1 - John V is crowned King of Portugal March 26 - The Acts of Union becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... Events January 14 - King Philip V of Spain abdicates the throne February 20 - The premiere of Giulio Cesare, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel, takes place in London June 23 - Treaty of Constantinople signed. ...

Name Birth Death Notes
Frederick, Prince of Wales 1 February 1707 31 March 1751 married, 1736, Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha; had issue
Anne, Princess Royal and Princess of Orange 2 November 1709 12 January 1759 married, 1734, William IV, Prince of Orange; had issue
Princess Amelia Sophia 10 July 1711 31 October 1786  
Princess Caroline Elizabeth 21 June 1713 28 December 1757  
Prince George William of Wales 13 November 1717 17 February 1718 died in infancy
Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland 26 April 1721 31 October 1765  
Princess Mary, Landgravine of Hesse 5 March 1723 14 January 1772 married, 1740, Frederick II, Landgrave of Hesse; had issue
Louise, Queen of Denmark and Norway 18 December 1724 19 December 1751 married, 1743, Frederick V of Denmark; had issue

The Prince Frederick, Prince of Wales (Frederick Lewis; 1 February 1707 – 31 March 1751) was a member of the British Royal Family, the eldest son of King George II. He was born into the House of Hanover and, under the Act of Settlement passed by the English Parliament in 1701... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 1 - John V is crowned King of Portugal March 26 - The Acts of Union becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Adam Smith is appointed professor of logic at the University of Glasgow March 25 - For the last time, New Years Day is legally on March 25 in England and Wales. ... Events January 26 - Stanislaus I of Poland abdicates his throne. ... Augusta of Saxe-Gotha Augusta of Saxe-Gotha (November 30, 1719 – February 8, 1772) was Princess of Wales from May 8, 1736 to March 31, 1751. ... Princess Anne of Orange, Princess Royal and Princess of Hanover, Princess-Regent of Friesland (2 November 1709–12 January 1759) was the second child and eldest daughter of King George II of Great Britain and his consort, Queen Caroline. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 12 - Two-month freezing period begins in France - The coast of the Atlantic and Seine River freeze, crops fail and at least 24. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1759 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Events January 8 - Premiere of George Frideric Handels opera Ariodante at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. ... William IV, Prince of Orange (September 1, 1711 – October 22, 1751) was the first hereditary stadtholder of the Netherlands. ... For other persons known as Princess Amelia, see Princess Amelia The Princess Amelia Sophie (10 July 1711 – 31 October 1786), was a member of the British Royal Family, the second daughter of King George II. // Early Life Princess Amelia was born in Schloss Herrenhausen, Hanover, Germany. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1711 (MDCCXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Princess Caroline Elizabeth ( May 30, 1713 - December 28, 1757) was a member of the British Royal Family, the fourth child and third daughter of King George II. // Early Life Princess Caroline Elizabeth was born in Hanover, Germany. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1713 (MDCCXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Prince George William of Wales (November 13, 1717 - February 17, 1718) was a member of the British Royal Family, an infant son of George II and Caroline of Ansbach, then the Prince and Princess of Wales. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 4 — The Netherlands, Britain & France sign Triple Alliance February 26-March 6 What is now the northeastern United States was paralyzed by a series of blizzards that buried the region. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1718 (MDCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, KG, KB, PC (15 April 1721–31 October 1765), a younger son of King George II of Great Britain and Queen Caroline, was a noted military leader. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1721 (MDCCXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1765 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other persons known as Princess Mary, see Princess Mary The Princess Mary (5 March 1723 – 14 January 1772) was a member of the British Royal Family, a daughter of George II and Caroline of Ansbach. ... This article is about the day. ... Events February 16 - Louis XV of France attains his majority Births February 24 - John Burgoyne, British general (d. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1772 (MDCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events May 31 - Friedrich II comes to power in Prussia upon the death of his father, Friedrich Wilhelm I. October 20 - Maria Theresia of Austria inherits the Habsburg hereditary dominions (Austria, Bohemia, Hungary and present-day Belgium). ... Frederick II (German: ) (14 August 1720 – 31 October 1785) was Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel from 1760 to 1785. ... Louise of Hanover and of Great Britain (December 18, 1724 - December 19, 1751) was the youngest surviving daughter of George II of Great Britain and Caroline of Ansbach, and became Queen consort of Denmark and Norway. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 14 - King Philip V of Spain abdicates the throne February 20 - The premiere of Giulio Cesare, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel, takes place in London June 23 - Treaty of Constantinople signed. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Adam Smith is appointed professor of logic at the University of Glasgow March 25 - For the last time, New Years Day is legally on March 25 in England and Wales. ... // Events February 14 - Henry Pelham becomes British Prime Minister February 21 - - The premiere in London of George Frideric Handels oratorio, Samson. ... Frederick V, painting by Carl Gustaf Pilo Statue of Frederick V in the center of Amalienborg by Jacques François Joseph Saly Frederick V (March 31, 1723 – January 13, 1766) was king of Denmark and Norway from 1746, son of Christian VI of Denmark and Sophia Magdalen of Brandenburg-Kulmbach. ...

Legacy

  • The Seven Years' War continued after George II's death. It concluded during the early reign of George III, and led to important territorial gains for the British in North America and Asia. Nevertheless, the expensive conflict crippled the royal finances. British attempts to tax the Americans would lead to the American Revolution. Great Britain, however, fared much better in India. Company rule (that is, rule by the British East India Company) was secured within years of George II's death.
  • George II's disinterest in British government had contributed to the decline of the royal power. His successor, George III, sought to reverse the trend, but failed; thus, the power of ministers became well-established.
  • The patriotic song "God Save the King" was developed during George II's reign. It is thought that the first public performance of the song—sometimes cited as an adaptation of a piece by the French composer Jean-Baptiste Lully—occurred during the Forty-Five. In reference to the Jacobite Rebellion, a fourth verse (which included the words "Rebellious Scots to crush") was added, though it is now rarely sung. "God Save the King" (or "God Save the Queen") is now the unofficial national anthem of the United Kingdom, one of the two national anthems of New Zealand (along with "God Defend New Zealand"), and the royal anthem of Australia and Canada.

John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... // The East India Company was founded in 1600, as The Company of Merchants of London Trading into the East Indies. ... The British East India Company, sometimes referred to as John Company, was the first joint-stock company (the Dutch East India Company was the first to issue public stock). ... The University of Dublin, corporately designated the Chancellor, Doctors and Masters of the University of Dublin located in Dublin, Ireland, was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, making it Irelands oldest university. ... The Georg-August University of Göttingen (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, often called the Georgia Augusta) was founded in 1734 by George II, King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover, and opened in 1737. ... George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738–29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain, and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... Publication of an early version in The Gentlemans Magazine, 15 October 1745. ... Jean-Baptiste de Lully, originally Giovanni Battista di Lulli (November 28, 1632 – March 22, 1687), was an Italian-born French composer, who spent most of his life working in the court of Louis XIV of France. ... God Defend New Zealand is one of the national anthems of New Zealand, together with God Save the Queen. Although they both have equal status, only God Defend New Zealand is used, and most New Zealanders would be unaware that the country has two national anthems. ... A royal anthem is a patriotic song, much like a national anthem that recognizes the nations monarch. ...

See also

This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain... Succession to the British Throne has generally been according to the rules of male-preference primogeniture. ... HRH The Prince of Wales, the Heir Apparent. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

References

  1. ^ Yvonne's Royalty: Peerage
  • British Broadcasting Corporation. (2004). "George II."
  • "George II." (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica, 11th ed. London: Cambridge University Press.
  • Nichols F. Observations concerning the body of His Late Majesty. Philos Trans Lond. 1761;52:265-274.
  • "George II and Queen Caroline." John Van der Kiste, Sutton Publishing, 1997
  • Henry Churchyard "Royal Genealogies, Part 9"
  • Sam Sloan "Big Combined Family Trees (pafg746)"
  • Funeral of George II An account by Horace Walpole on Mytimemachine.co.uk
George II of Great Britain
Cadet branch of the House of Welf
Born: 10 November 1683 Died: 25 October 1760
Regnal titles
Preceded by
George I
King of Great Britain
King of Ireland

11 June 1727 – 25 October 1760
Succeeded by
George III
Elector of Hanover
11 June 1727 – 25 October 1760
British royalty
Preceded by
George, Elector of Hanover
later became King George I
Heir to the Thrones
as heir apparent
1714 – 1727
Succeeded by
Frederick, Prince of Wales
Peerage of England
New creation Duke of Cambridge
3rd creation
1706 – 1727
Merged in the crown
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
James Stuart
in English peerage
Prince of Wales
1714 – 1727
Succeeded by
The Prince Frederick

  Results from FactBites:
 
George II of Great Britain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2647 words)
George II (George Augustus) (10 November 1683–25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death.
George II was famous for his numerous conflicts with his father and afterwards with his son (a seemingly common problem for members of the Hanoverian dynasty).
Duke George Augustus of Hanover was born at Schloss Herrenhausen, Hanover.
George I of Great Britain - Free Encyclopedia (473 words)
George I of Great Britain (May 28, 1660 - June 11, 1727) was the first Hanoverian King of the Kingdom of Great Britain (as well as King of Ireland) from August 1, 1714, to June 11, 1727.
George was born on May 28, 1660 in Hanover, Germany, and was the son of the Electress Sophia of Hanover who was a granddaughter of King James I of England.
George's mother died only a few weeks before her cousin, Queen Anne of Great Britain, and thus it was George who inherited the throne on Queen Anne's death on August 1, 1714.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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