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Encyclopedia > George Herriman
George Herriman and some of his fans.
George Herriman and some of his fans.

George Joseph Herriman (August 2, 1880April 25, 1944) was an American cartoonist, best known for his comic strip Krazy Kat. Image File history File linksMetadata Herrcar. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Herrcar. ... August 2 is the 214th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (215th in leap years), with 151 days remaining. ... 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (116th in leap years). ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ... A cartoonist at work. ... Detail of a Sunday page in which Ignatz, disguised as a painting, hurls a brick at Krazy Kat, who interprets it as an expression of love. ...


George Herriman was born in a light-skinned, Creole African-American family in New Orleans, Louisiana, both of his parents were listed as "mulatto" in the 1880 census. In his adolescence Herriman's father moved the family to Los Angeles, California, as did many educated New Orleans Creoles of Color at the time in order to avoid the increasing restrictions of Jim Crow laws in Louisiana. In later life many of Herriman's newspaper colleagues were under the impression that Herriman's ancestry was Greek, and Herriman did nothing to dissuade them of this notion. According to close friends of Herriman, he wore a hat at all times in order to hide his "kinky" hair. He was also listed on his death certificate as "caucasian". (from Jeet Heer's introduction to Krazy & Ignatz: 1935-1936, Fantagraphics, 2005.) The term Louisiana Creole refers to people of any race or mixture thereof who are descended from settlers in colonial Louisiana before it became part of the USA in 1803 with the Louisiana Purchase, or to the culture and Creole cuisine typical of these people. ... Nickname: The Crescent City, The Big Easy, The City That Care Forgot, NOLA (acronym for New Orleans, LA) Location in the State of Louisiana and the United States Coordinates: Country United States State Louisiana Parish Orleans Founded 1718 Mayor Ray Nagin (D) Area    - City 350. ... Dame Kelly Holmes is half Black (Jamaican) and half White (English). ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... Nickname: City of Angels Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: State California County Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa Area    - City 1,290. ... The Jim Crow Laws were state and local laws enacted in the Southern and Border States of the United States and enforced between 1876 and 1965 and affected African Americans and many other races. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Caucasoid race be merged into this article or section. ...


At the age of 17, Herriman began working as an illustrator and engraver for the Los Angeles Herald newspaper. Over the next few years he did many newspaper spot illustrations and cartoons, and produced several early comic strips, at times producing several daily strips at the same time. Herriman's early strips included Major Ozone, Musical Mose, Acrobatic Archie, Professor Otto and his Auto, Two Jolly Jackies and several others, most of which were only slightly above the average quality of newspaper strips of the time. This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ...


Perhaps the first indication of Herriman's unusual creativity and poetical sense of humor which would make him famous surfaced in 1909 with his strip Goosebury Sprig. The following year Herriman began a domestic comedy strip called The Dingbat Family. The precursors to the characters of Krazy and Ignatz first appeared in a small, unrelated side comic (begun on July 26, 1910) that ran below "The Dingbat Family". The small comic appeared intermittently before becoming a regular feature of the strip: the main action happening with the human family taking up most of each panel, and an unrelated storyline involving a cat and mouse underneath the family's floorboards taking place in the bottom segment of each panel. This strip was then renamed The Family Upstairs. The cat and mouse strip was then spun off into another strip in 1913, originally Krazy Kat and Ignatz, and then simply Krazy Kat. Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Herriman also continued drawing the domestic comedy strip, again named The Dingbat Family, until 1916. From 1916 through 1919 Herriman also drew the daily strip Baron Bean. Herriman would continue to draw other strips in addition to Krazy Kat through 1932. Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ...


Krazy Kat, however, was the strip which became Herriman's most famous. It reached its greatest level of popularity in the early twenties, when it inspired merchandise, critical acclaim, and even an interpretive ballet. Over the years it gradually lost readers, and many complained that "it made no sense." However it had an enthusiastic (if relatively small) following among art-lovers, artists, and intellectuals of the era, such as the critic Gilbert Seldes and the poet E. E. Cummings. Most importantly, it was championed by Herriman's publisher, William Randolph Hearst. Gilbert Vivian Seldes (January 3, 1893 – September 29, 1970) was an American writer and cultural critic. ... E. E. Cummings Edward Estlin Cummings (October 14, 1894 – September 3, 1962), abbreviated E. E. Cummings, was an American poet, painter, essayist, and playwright. ... William Randolph Hearst (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate, born in San Francisco, California. ...


On June 25, 1944, two months after Herriman's death, the last of his Krazy Kat strips was printed. At the time Hearst usually brought in new cartoonists when the artists of a popular strip died or quit, but an exception was made for Herriman, as no one else could take his place. June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ...


Herriman was the illustrator for the first printed edition of Don Marquis' archy and mehitabel stories. Don Marquis (July 29, 1878 - December 29, 1937) Was the stupidest person alive. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ...


Herriman and race in his work

Some critics see reflections of Herriman's complex experience of America's racial divide reflected in his work. Eyal Amiran points out in an essay in Mosaic that in some later strips, Krazy and the other characters switch between black and white. The strip's inter-species love triangle has also been described as a "thwarted fantasy of miscegenation" (Heer, ibid) in which "the white (mouse) Ignatz loves to hate Krazy, but only as long as he/she is black. Conversely, black Krazy loves Ignatz only as long as he's white." Meanwhile, the white police dog, Offisa Bull Pupp, is secretly in love with Krazy, the black cat. Heer highlights one strip in which Krazy leaves a beauty salon covered in white makeup. Ignatz sees Krazy and is in love. Conversely, in another strip, Ignatz is blackened after hiding in a pipe and Krazy's love for the mouse does not resume until his black face is washed clean. It has been suggested that Anti-miscegenation laws be merged into this article or section. ...


In another strip published in 1931, an art critic visits and describes Krazy and Ignatz as "a study in black & white". Krazy responds saying "he means us: Me bleck, You white" and suggests that the two "fool him. You be bleck and I'll be white" and in the next panel Krazy appears as white while Ignatz appears as black. The critic responds by declaring the transformation "another study in black & white".


Another, earlier cartoon of Herriman's, Musical Mose (1902) features a black man who tries, unsuccessfully, to impersonate a white man declaring, in dialect, "I wish mah color would fade", a possible example of Herriman mocking himself, as Heer points out.


References

  • "A cat-and-mouse game of identity: Excerpt: George Herriman played with race in his work and real life" by Jeet Heer, (Toronto) Sunday Star, December 11, 2005 (excerpt from Heer's introduction to Krazy & Ignatz in "A Wild Warmth of Chromatic Gravy": The Komplete Kat Komics 1935 - 1936 by George Herriman (Fantagraphics Books:2005) ISBN 1-56097-690-X ).
  • Patrick McDonell, Karen O'Connell, and Georgia Riley De Havenon, Krazy Kat: The Comic Art of George Herriman (New York:Abradale Press, 1986).

The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fantagraphics Books is an American publisher of alternative comics, classic comic strip anthologies, magazines, graphic novels, and the adult-oriented Eros Comix imprint. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
George Herriman (424 words)
George Joseph Herriman was born in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1880.
At some point, Herriman visited the American southwest, and was remarkably drawn to Monument Valley and the painted desert in Coconino County, Northeastern Arizona, home of the Grand Canyon.
Herriman's biographers describe him as a solitary man who loved his family, gave generously to charities, and enjoyed a good poker game.
George Herriman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (948 words)
George Herriman was born in a light-skinned Creole of Color family in New Orleans, Louisiana, both of his parents were listed as "mulatto" in the 1880 census.
In later life many of Herriman's newspaper colleagues were under the impression that Herriman's ancestry was Greek, and Herriman did nothing to dissuade them of this notion.
Herriman was the illustrator for the first printed edition of Don Marquis' archy and mehitabel stories.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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