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Encyclopedia > George Herbert
George Herbert

Portrait by Robert White in 1674
(National Portrait Gallery)

Born April 3, 1593(1593-04-03)
Montgomery, Wales
Died March 1, 1633 (aged 39)
Bemerton, Wiltshire, England
Occupation Poet, orator, priest
Anglicanism Portal

George Herbert (April 3, 1593March 1, 1633) was a Welsh poet, orator and a priest. Being born into an artistic and wealthy family, he received a good education which led on to him holding prominent positions at Cambridge University and Parliament. As a student at Trinity College, Cambridge, England, George Herbert excelled in languages and music. He went to college with the intention of becoming a priest, but his scholarship attracted the attention of King James I. Herbert served in parliament for two years. After the death of King James and at the urging of a friend, Herbert's interest in ordained ministry was renewed. In 1630, in his late thirties he gave up his secular ambitions and took holy orders in the Church of England, spending the rest of his life as a rector of the little parish of St. Andrew Bemerton, near Salisbury. He was noted for unfailing care for his parishioners, bringing the sacraments to them when they were ill, and providing food and clothing for those in need. Throughout his life he wrote religious poems characterized by a precision of language, a metrical versatility, and an ingenious use of imagery or conceits that was favored by the metaphysical school of poets.[1] He is best remembered as a writer of poems and the hymn "Come, My Way, My Truth, My Life." He is commemorated on February 27 throughout the Anglican Communion and on March 1 of the Calendar of Saints of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. George Herbert is the name of: George Herbert (1593-1633), an English poet George Herbert, 5th Earl of Carnarvon (1866-1923), an English Egyptologist George Herbert, 11th Earl of Pembroke (1759-1827), an English peer George Herbert, 13th Earl of Pembroke (1850-1895), an English peer George Enrique Herbert, a... Image File history File links GeorgeHerbert. ... Events February 19 - England and the Netherlands sign the Treaty of Westminster. ... The National Portrait Gallery is an art gallery in St Martins Place, London, England, which opened to the public in 1856. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 18 - Playwright Thomas Kyds accusations of heresy lead to an arrest warrant for Christopher Marlowe. ... Montgomery (Welsh: ) is the county town of Montgomeryshire, lying in Powys, Wales. ... This article is about the country. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 13 - Galileo Galilei arrives in Rome for his trial before the Inquisition. ... Bemerton has claim to fame as the parish where George Herbert was rector and where he is buried. ... Not to be confused with Wilshire. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about work. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Look up orator in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about religious workers. ... Photograph by Keith Edkins File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 18 - Playwright Thomas Kyds accusations of heresy lead to an arrest warrant for Christopher Marlowe. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 13 - Galileo Galilei arrives in Rome for his trial before the Inquisition. ... This article is about the country. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Look up orator in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about religious workers. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Catholic deacon... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... Bemerton has claim to fame as the parish where George Herbert was rector and where he is buried. ... This article is about the city in the United Kingdom. ... Main article: Anglicanism The Anglican Communion is a world-wide affiliation of Anglican Churches. ... The Lutheran Calendar of Saints is a listing which details the primary annual festivals and events that are celebrated liturgically by the Lutheran Church. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ...

Contents

Early life

Herbert was born in Montgomery in Wales. His family was wealthy, eminent, intellectual and fond of the arts. His mother Magdalen was a patron and friend of John Donne and other poets; his older brother Edward, later Lord Herbert of Cherbury, was an important poet and philosopher, often referred to as "the father of English deism". Herbert's father died when George was three, leaving a widow and ten children. Montgomery (Welsh: ) is the county town of Montgomeryshire, lying in Powys, Wales. ... This article is about the country. ... For the Welsh courtier and diplomat, see Sir John Donne. ... Edward Herbert, portrait by Isaac Oliver(1560–1617) Edward Herbert, 1st Baron Herbert of Cherbury (March 3, 1583 – August 20, 1648) was a British soldier, diplomat, historian, poet and religious philosopher. ... For other uses, see Ceremonial Deism. ...


After graduating from Westminster School and Trinity College, Cambridge (where he achieved degrees with distinction), Herbert was elected a major fellow of his college. In 1618 he was appointed Reader in Rhetoric at Cambridge and in 1620 he was elected to the post of "public orator", whose duties would be served by poetic skill. He held this position until 1628. For other uses, see Westminster School (disambiguation). ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... Rhetoric (from Greek , rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is generally understood to be the art or technique of persuasion through the use of oral, visual, or written language; however, this definition of rhetoric has expanded greatly since rhetoric emerged as a field of study in universities. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ...


In 1624 he became a Member of Parliament, representing Montgomeryshire. While these positions were suited to a career at court, and James I had shown him favor, circumstances worked against him: the King died in 1625, and two influential patrons of Herbert died later in the decade. A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Montgomeryshire is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary...


Priesthood

He took up his duties in Bemerton, a rural parish in Wiltshire, about 75 miles southwest of London in 1630. Here he preached and wrote poetry; also helping to rebuild the church out of his own funds. Bemerton has claim to fame as the parish where George Herbert was rector and where he is buried. ... Not to be confused with Wilshire. ...


In 1633 Herbert finished a collection of poems entitled The Temple: Sacred Poems and Private Ejaculations, which imitates the architectural style of churches through both the meaning of the words and their visual layout. The themes of God and love are treated by Herbert as much as psychological forces as metaphysical phenomena. This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... For other uses, see Love (disambiguation). ... Psychological science redirects here. ... Plato (Left) and Aristotle (right), by Raphael (Stanza della Segnatura, Rome) Metaphysics is the branch of philosophy concerned with explaining the ultimate nature of reality, being, and the world. ... A phenomenon (plural: phenomena) is an observable event, especially something special (literally something that can be seen from the Greek word phainomenon = observable). ...


Suffering from poor health, Herbert died of tuberculosis only three years after taking holy orders. On his deathbed, he gave the manuscript of The Temple to Nicholas Ferrar, the founder of a semi-monastic Anglican religious community at Little Gidding (a name best known today through the poem Little Gidding by T. S. Eliot), telling him to publish the poems if he thought they might "turn to the advantage of any dejected poor soul", and otherwise, to burn them. In less than 50 years, The Temple: Sacred Poems and Private Ejaculations had gone through thirteen printings. Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Nicholas Ferrar (1592-1637) came from a family deeply involved in the London Virginia Company. ... Map sources for Great Gidding at grid reference TL117830 Great Gidding, Little Gidding and Steeple Gidding in Huntingdonshire (now part of Cambridgeshire), England are villages near Sawtry north west of Huntingdon. ... Four Quartets is the name given to four related poems by T. S. Eliot, collected and republished in book form in 1943. ... Thomas Stearns Eliot, OM (September 26, 1888 – January 4, 1965), was a poet, dramatist and literary critic. ...


Works

All of Herbert's surviving poems are religious, and some have been used as hymns. They are characterised by directness of expression and some conceits which can appear quaint. Many of the poems have intricate rhyme schemes, and variations of lines within stanzas. Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... For other uses, see Hymn (disambiguation). ... Look up conceit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Herbert also wrote A Priest to the Temple (or The Country Parson) offering practical advice to country parsons. In it, he advises that "things of ordinary use" such as ploughs, leaven, or dances, could be made to "serve for lights even of Heavenly Truths".


His Jacula Prudentium (sometimes seen as Jacula Prudentum), a collection of pithy proverbs published in 1651, included many sayings still repeated today, for example "His bark is worse than his bite."


Richard Baxter said, "Herbert speaks to God like one that really believeth a God, and whose business in the world is most with God. Heart-work and heaven-work make up his books". Dame Helen Gardner adds "head-work" because of his "intellectual vivacity". Richard Baxter Richard Baxter (November 12, 1615 - December 8, 1691) was an English Puritan church leader, theologian and controversialist, called by Dean Stanley the chief of English Protestant Schoolmen. // Baxter was born at Rowton, in Shropshire, at the house of his maternal grandfather. ... Helen Gardner (1909-1986) was an English literary critic. ...


Herbert influenced his fellow metaphysical poet Henry Vaughan who, in turn, influenced William Wordsworth. The Metaphysical poets were a loose group of British lyric poets of the 17th century, who shared an interest in metaphysical concerns and a common way of investigating them. ... Henry Vaughan (April 17, 1622 - April 28, 1695) was a Welsh Metaphysical poet and a doctor, the twin brother of the philosopher Thomas Vaughan. ... Wordsworth redirects here. ...


George Herbert's poetry has been set to music by several composers, including Ralph Vaughan Williams, Lennox Berkeley, Judith Weir, Randall Thompson, William Walton and Patrick Larley. A statue of Ralph Vaughan Williams in Dorking. ... Sir Lennox Berkeley (May 12, 1903 - December 26, 1989) was a British composer. ... Judith Weir (born 1954) is a British composer. ... Randall Thompson (April 21, 1899 - July 9, 1984) was an American composer. ... Sir William Turner Walton, OM (March 29, 1902–March 8, 1983) was a British composer whose style was influenced by the works of Stravinsky, Sibelius and jazz. ... Patrick Larley (born 1951) is a British composer. ...


References

  1. ^ The Grolier 1996 Multimedia Encyclopedia, Grolier Electronic Publishing, Inc.
  • Izaak Walton (1593–1683), The Lives of John Donne and George Herbert [1]

Izaak Walton (August 9, 1593 - December 15, 1683) was an English writer, author of The Compleat Angler. ...

See also

The Book of Sand (El libro de arena) is a short story by Jorge Luis Borges. ... The Waste Land (1922)[1] is a highly influential 434-line modernist poem by T. S. Eliot. ... Not everyone listed here is Christian or a mystic, but all have contributed to the Christian understanding of connection to or direct experience of God. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
George Herbert
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Persondata
NAME Herbert, George
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Welsh poet, priest
DATE OF BIRTH April 3, 1593
PLACE OF BIRTH Montgomery, Wales
DATE OF DEATH March 1, 1633
PLACE OF DEATH Bemerton, Wiltshire, England
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... This article is about religious workers. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 18 - Playwright Thomas Kyds accusations of heresy lead to an arrest warrant for Christopher Marlowe. ... Montgomery (Welsh: ) is the county town of Montgomeryshire, lying in Powys, Wales. ... This article is about the country. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 13 - Galileo Galilei arrives in Rome for his trial before the Inquisition. ... Bemerton has claim to fame as the parish where George Herbert was rector and where he is buried. ... Not to be confused with Wilshire. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

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Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More - George Herbert (361 words)
George Herbert was born on April 3, 1593, the fifth son of an eminent Welsh family.
Herbert's father died when he was three, leaving his mother with ten children, all of whom she was determined to educate and raise as loyal Anglicans.
Herbert received two degrees (a B.A. in 1613 and an M.A. in 1616) and was elected a major fellow of Trinity.
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