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Encyclopedia > George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron
Lord Byron

Born 22 January 1788(1788-01-22)
London, England
Died 19 April 1824 (aged 36)
Messolonghi, Greece
Occupation Poet, revolutionary

George Gordon Byron, later Noel, 6th Baron Byron FRS (22 January 178819 April 1824) was an English poet and a leading figure in Romanticism. Among Byron's best-known works are the narrative poems Childe Harold's Pilgrimage and Don Juan, although the latter remained incomplete on his death. He is regarded as one of the greatest European poets and remains widely read and influential, both in the English speaking world and beyond. Byron's fame rests not only on his writings but also on his life, which featured extravagant living, numerous love affairs, debts, separation, pederasty, and marital exploits. He was famously described by Lady Caroline Lamb as "mad, bad, and dangerous to know." Byron served as a regional leader of Italy's revolutionary organization the Carbonari in its struggle against Austria, and later travelled to fight against the Ottoman Empire in the Greek War of Independence, for which Greeks revere him as a national hero. He died from a fever in Messolonghi. The poet George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron is often referred to simply as Byron. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Messolonghi (Greek: Μεσολόγγι, Mesolóngi, older forms Mesolongi, Misolonghi, Mesolongion) is a town of about 18,000 people (2001) in central Greece. ... This article is about work. ... A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Revolutionary, when used as a noun, is a person who either advocates or actively engages in some kind of revolution. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Alexander Pope (disambiguation). ... Pushkin may refer to: People Aleksandr Pushkin - a famous Russian poet Apollo Mussin-Pushkin - chemist and plant collector Aleksei Musin-Pushkin - statesman, historian, art collector Other Pushkin, a town in Russia Pushkin Square - square in Moscow Pushkin Museum - fine arts museum in Moscow This is a disambiguation page — a navigational... Romantics redirects here. ... Ebenezer Elliott Ebenezer Elliott (17 March 1781 - 1 December 1849) was an English poet, known as the Corn Law rhymer. ... John Clare (13 July 1793 – 20 May 1864) was an English poet, in his time commonly known as the Northamptonshire Peasant Poet, the son of a farm labourer, born at Helpston near Peterborough. ... For other uses, see Royal Society (disambiguation). ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Romantics redirects here. ... A narrative is a construct created in a suitable medium (speech, writing, images) that describes a sequence of fictional or non-fictional events. ... Childe Harolds Pilgrimage by J.M.W. Turner, 1823. ... Byrons Don Juan (Penguin Classics version) Don Juan is a long narrative poem by Lord Byron, based on the legend of Don Juan. ... Pederasty or paederasty (literally boy-love, see Etymology below) refers to an intimate or erotic relationship between an adolescent boy and an adult male outside his immediate family. ... Lady Caroline Lamb See also Lady Caroline Lamb (film) The Lady Caroline Lamb (13 November 1785–26 January 1828) was a novelist and British aristocrat, the only daughter of the 3rd Earl of Bessborough and Henrietta Ponsonby, Countess of Bessborough, with whom George IV fell in love. ... The Carbonari (charcoal burners[1]) were groups of secret revolutionary societies founded in early 19th-century Italy. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... Belligerents Greek revolutionaries United Kingdom France Russian Empire Ottoman Empire Egyptian Khedivate Commanders Theodoros Kolokotronis Alexander Ypsilanti Andreas Miaoulis Georgios Karaiskakis â€  Omer Vryonis Mahmud Dramali Pasha ReÅŸid Mehmed Pasha Ibrahim Pasha. ... Sir Galahad, a hero of Arthurian legend In many myths and folk tales, a hero is a man or woman (the latter often called a heroine), traditionally the protagonist of a story, legend or saga, commonly possessed of abilities or character far greater than that of a typical person, which... An analogue medical thermometer showing the temperature of 38. ... Messolonghi (Greek: Μεσολόγγι, Mesolóngi, older forms Mesolongi, Misolonghi, Mesolongion) is a town of about 18,000 people (2001) in central Greece. ...


His daughter Ada Lovelace, notable in her own right, collaborated with Charles Babbage on the analytical engine, a predecessor to modern computers. Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace (December 10, 1815 London, England – November 27, 1852 Marylebone, London, England [1]), born Augusta Ada Byron, is mainly known for having written a description of Charles Babbages early mechanical general-purpose computer, the analytical engine. ... Babbage redirects here. ... The analytical engine, an important step in the history of computers, was the design of a mechanical general-purpose computer by the British professor of mathematics Charles Babbage. ...

Contents

Name

Byron's names changed throughout his life. He was christened George Gordon Byron in London. "Gordon" was a baptismal name, not a surname, honouring his maternal grandfather. In order to claim his wife's estate in Scotland, Byron's father took the additional surname Gordon, becoming John Byron Gordon, and was occasionally styled John Byron Gordon of Gight. Byron himself used this surname for a time, and was registered at school in Aberdeen as George Byron Gordon. At the age of 10, he inherited the English Barony of Byron, becoming Lord Byron, and eventually dropped the double surname (though after this point his surname was hidden by his peerage in any event). When his mother-in-law died, her will required that he change his surname to Noel in order to inherit half her estate, and so he obtained a Royal Warrant allowing him to "take and use the surname of Noel only". Very unusually, the Royal Warrant also allowed him to "subscribe the said surname of Noel before all titles of honour", and from that point he signed himself "Noel Byron" (the usual signature of a peer being merely the peerage, in this case simply "Byron"). He was also sometimes referred to as Lord Noel Byron, as if "Noel" were part of his title, and likewise his wife was sometimes called Lady Noel Byron. Lady Byron eventually succeeded to the Barony of Wentworth, becoming Lady Wentworth; her surname before marriage had been "Milbanke". Baron Byron, of Rochdale in the County Palatine of Lancaster, is a title in the Peerage of England. ... For other uses, see Peerage (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... The title Baron Wentworth was created in 1529 for Thomas Wentworth, who was de jure Baron le Despencer of the 1387 creation. ...


Children

Lord Byron had one legitimate child with Anne Isabella Milbanke ("Annabella), who was Augusta Ada Byron, Lady Byron; later Lady Wentworth:

He also had one illegitimate child with Claire Clairmont, stepsister of Mary Shelley and stepdaughter of Political Justice and Caleb Williams writer, William Godwin: Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace (December 10, 1815 London, England – November 27, 1852 Marylebone, London, England [1]), born Augusta Ada Byron, is mainly known for having written a description of Charles Babbages early mechanical general-purpose computer, the analytical engine. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Claire Clairmont Clara Mary Jane Clairmont (April 27, 1798 – March 19, 1879), or Claire Clairmont as she was commonly known, was a stepsister of writer Mary Shelley. ... Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (née Godwin) (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English romantic/gothic novelist and the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... William Godwin (3 March 1756 – 7 April 1836) was an English journalist, political philosopher and novelist. ...

Allegra is not entitled to the style "The Hon." as is usually given to the daughter of barons since she is illegitimate. Clara Allegra Byron Clara Allegra Byron (January 15, 1817 - April 20, 1822), initially named Alba, meaning dawn, or white, by her mother, was the illegitimate daughter of George Gordon, Lord Byron and Claire Clairmont, the stepsister of Mary Shelley[1]. Born in Bath, England, she initially lived with her mother... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Early life

Catherine Gordon, Byron's mother
Catherine Gordon, Byron's mother
The mountain Lochnagar is the subject of one of Byron's poems, in which he reminsces about his childhood
The mountain Lochnagar is the subject of one of Byron's poems, in which he reminsces about his childhood

Byron was born in London, the son of Captain John "Mad Jack" Byron and his second wife, the former Catherine Gordon, heiress of Gight in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. His paternal grandparents were Vice-Admiral John "Foulweather Jack" Byron and Sophia Trevanion.[1] At the age of 10, George inherited the title and estates of his great-uncle, the "wicked" Lord Byron. His mother proudly took him to England. (John Byron had circumnavigated the globe and was the younger brother of the 5th Baron Byron, known as "the Wicked Lord".) From birth, Byron suffered from talipes of the right foot, causing a limp, which resulted in lifelong misery for him, aggravated by the suspicion that with proper care it might have been cured.[citation needed] He was christened George Gordon at St Marylebone Parish Church, after his maternal grandfather, George Gordon of Gight, a descendant of King James I. This grandfather committed suicide in 1779. Byron's mother Catherine had to sell her land and title to pay her father's debts. John Byron may have married Catherine for her money and, after squandering it, deserted her.[citation needed] Catherine moved back to Scotland shortly afterwards, where she raised her son in Aberdeen. On 21 May 1798, the death of his great-uncle made him the 6th Baron Byron, inheriting Newstead Abbey in Nottinghamshire, England. Byron only lived there infrequently as the Abbey was rented to Lord Grey de Ruthyn among others during Byron's adolescence. In August 1799 Byron entered the school of a Dr Glennie, an Aberdonian, in Dulwich[2]. Image File history File links Byronmother. ... Image File history File links Byronmother. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Lochnagar is a mountain located about five miles south of the River Dee near Balmoral. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Gight is the name of an estate in the parish of Fyvie in Aberdeenshire West, Scotland, United Kingdom. ... The traditional county of Aberdeenshire (Siorrachd Obar Dheathain in Gaelic) borders Banffshire and Inverness-shire to the west, Perthshire, Angus and Kincardineshire to the south, and the North Sea to the north and east. ... This article is about the country. ... John Byron (November 8, 1723 – April 10, 1786) was a British vice-admiral. ... William Byron, 5th Baron Byron, (November 5, 1722 ? May 19, 1798), also known as the Wicked Lord and the Devil Byron, was the poet Lord Byrons great-uncle. ... Clubfoot A clubfoot, or talipes equinovarus[1] (TEV), is a birth defect. ... // St Marylebone Parish Church is a church in London, from which Marylebone gets its name. ... George Gordon of Gight was the maternal grandfather of poet George Gordon Byron and a descendant of King James I Category: ... James I (December 10, 1394 – February 21, 1437) reigned as King of Scots from April 4, 1406 until February 21, 1437. ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1798 (MDCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Newstead Abbey in 1880 Newstead Abbey, near Nottingham, originally an Augustinian foundation, is now best known as the ancestral home of Lord Byron. ... Henry Edward Yelverton, 19th Baron Grey de Ruthyn (8 September 1780 – 29 October 1810) was a British Peer in the early 19th Century, notable for being a tenant and sometime friend of Lord Byron and as an ancestor of the current Aga Khan. ... This article is about the Scottish city. ... , Dulwich (pronounced or ) is a settlement mostly in the London Borough of Southwark with parts in the London Borough of Lambeth. ...


He received his early formal education at Aberdeen Grammar School. In 1801 he was sent to Harrow, where he remained until 1805. He represented Harrow during the very first Eton v Harrow cricket match at Lord's in 1805; a match that has been played every year since. After school he went on to Trinity College, Cambridge. While not at school or college, he lived, in some antagonism, with his mother at Burgage Manor in Southwell, Nottinghamshire.[citation needed] While there, he cultivated friendships with Elizabeth Pigot and her brother, John, with whom he staged two plays for the delight of the community. During this time, with the help of Elizabeth Pigot, who copied many of his rough drafts, he was encouraged to write his first volumes of poetry. "Fugitive Pieces" was the first, printed by Ridge of Newark, which contained poems written when Byron was only fourteen. However, it was promptly recalled and burned on the advice of his friend, the Reverend Thomas Becher, on account of its more amorous verses, particularly the poem "To Mary".[citation needed] "Pieces on Various Occasions", a "miraculously chaste" revision according to Byron, was published after this.[citation needed] "Hours of Idleness", which collected many of the previous poems, along with more recent compositions, was the culminating book. The savage criticism this received—anonymously, but now known to be the work of Henry Peter Brougham—in the Edinburgh Review prompted his first major satire, "English Bards and Scotch Reviewers".[citation needed] While at Trinity, he met and shortly fell in love with a fifteen year old choirboy by the name of John Edleston. About his "protégé" he wrote, "He has been my almost constant associate since October, 1805, when I entered Trinity College. His voice first attracted my attention, his countenance fixed it, and his manners attached me to him for ever."[citation needed] Later, upon learning of his friend's death, he wrote, "I have heard of a death the other day that shocked me more than any, of one whom I loved more than any, of one whom I loved more than I ever loved a living thing, and one who, I believe, loved me to the last."[citation needed] In his memory Byron composed Thyrza, a series of elegies, in which he changed the pronouns from masculine to feminine so as not to offend sensibilities.[citation needed] Aberdeen Grammar School is one of the twelve state secondary schools in the City of Aberdeen, Scotland, which are run by the Aberdeen City Council education department. ... Harrow School is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, near Windsor in England, north of Windsor Castle, and... The Media Centre at Lords Cricket Ground Lords Cricket Ground is a cricket ground in St Johns Wood in London. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... Lord Henry Peter Brougham Baron Brougham & Vaux sitting as Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain Henry Peter Brougham, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (September 19, 1778 - May 7, 1868) was Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain. ... The Edinburgh Review was one of the most influential British magazines of the 19th century. ...


Modern biographers believe that, due to his extremely fluctuating weight, Byron suffered from both Bulimia and Anorexia in his lifetime; both of which conditions seem to have developed in his late teens and early twenties, whilst he was at Cambridge. Bulimia nervosa, more commonly known as bulimia, is a psychological condition in which the subject engages in recurrent binge eating followed by intentionally doing one or more of the following in order to compensate for the intake of the food and prevent weight gain: vomiting inappropriate use of laxatives, enemas... Anorexia can refer to: Anorexia nervosa, an eating disorder in which people do not eat correctly due to the obsessive fear of weight gain Anorexia (symptom), the general symptom of decreased appetite Sexual anorexia, a term used to describe a lack of appetite for sex. ...


Travels to the East

From 1809 to 1811, Byron went on the Grand Tour then customary for a young nobleman. The Napoleonic Wars forced him to avoid most of Europe, and he instead turned to the Mediterranean. Correspondence among his circle of Cambridge friends also makes clear that a key motive was the hope of homosexual experience.[3] He travelled from England over Spain to Albania and spent time there and in Athens. For most of the trip, he had a travelling companion in his friend John Cam Hobhouse. On this tour, the first two cantos of his epic poem Childe Harold's Pilgrimage were written. For other uses, see Grand Tour (disambiguation). ... Combatants Austria[a] Portugal Prussia[a] Russia[b] Sicily[c] Sardinia  Spain[d]  Sweden[e] United Kingdom French Empire Holland[f] Italy Etruria[g] Naples[h] Duchy of Warsaw[i] Confederation of the Rhine[j] Bavaria Saxony Westphalia Württemberg Denmark-Norway[k] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... John Cam Hobhouse, 1st Baron Broughton and 2nd Baronet, PC (1786–1869) was the eldest son of Sir Benjamin Hobhouse, born at Redland near Bristol, educated at Westminster School and at Cambridge, where he became intimate with Lord Byron, and accompanied him in his journeys in the Peninsula, Greece, and... A canto is a significant section of a long poem or the highest part in a piece of choral music. ... Childe Harolds Pilgrimage by J.M.W. Turner, 1823. ...


While in Athens, Byron had a torrid love affair with Nicolò Giraud, a boy of fifteen or sixteen who taught him Italian. In gratitude for the boy's love Byron sent him to school at a monastery in Malta and bequeathed him seven thousand pounds sterling – almost double what he was later to spend refitting the Greek fleet. The will, however, was later canceled.[4] On this tour, the first two cantos of his epic poem Childe Harold's Pilgrimage were written, though some of the more risqué passages, such as those touching on pederasty, were suppressed before publication.[5] Known primarily for his relationship to Lord Byron, Nicolò Giraud was a boy of fifteen or sixteen when he met the poet during the latters stay in Athens, probably around 1810. ... A canto is a significant section of a long poem or the highest part in a piece of choral music. ... Childe Harolds Pilgrimage by J.M.W. Turner, 1823. ... Pederasty or paederasty (literally boy-love, see Etymology below) refers to an intimate or erotic relationship between an adolescent boy and an adult male outside his immediate family. ...


Beginning of poetic career

As previously mentioned, some early verses which he had published in 1806 were suppressed. He followed those in 1807 with Hours of Idleness, which the Edinburgh Review, a Whig periodical, savagely attacked. In reply, Byron sent forth English Bards and Scotch Reviewers (1809), which created considerable stir and shortly went through five editions.[citation needed] While some authors resented being satirized in its first edition, over time in subsequent editions it became a mark of prestige to be the target of Byron's pen.[citation needed] The Edinburgh Review was one of the most influential British magazines of the 19th century. ... The Whigs (with the Tories) are often described as one of two political parties in England and later the United Kingdom from the late 17th to the mid 19th centuries. ...


After his return from his travels, the first two cantos of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage were published in 1812, and were received with acclaim.[citation needed] In his own words, "I awoke one morning and found myself famous."[citation needed] He followed up his success with the poem's last two cantos, as well as four equally celebrated Oriental Tales, The Giaour, The Bride of Abydos, The Corsair, and Lara, which established the Byronic hero.[citation needed] About the same time began his intimacy with his future biographer, Thomas Moore. The Byronic hero is an idealized, but flawed, character exemplified in the life and writings of Lord Byron, characterized by his ex-lover Lady Caroline Lamb as being mad, bad and dangerous to know.[1] The Byronic hero first appears in Byrons semi-autobiographical epic narrative poem Childe Harold... For other persons named Thomas Moore, see Thomas Moore (disambiguation). ...


Political career

Byron eventually took his seat in the House of Lords in 1811, shortly after his return from the Levant, and made his first speech there on 27 February 1812. A strong advocate of social reform, he received particular praise as one of the few Parliamentary defenders of the Luddites: specifically, he was against a death penalty for Luddite "frame breakers" in Nottinghamshire, who destroyed textile machines that were putting them out of work. His first speech before the Lords, on February 27, 1812, was loaded with sarcastic references to the "benefits" of automation which were actually producing inferior material as well as putting people out of work. He said later that he "spoke very violent sentences with a sort of modest impudence" and thought he came across as "a bit theatrical". [6] In another Parliamentary speech he expressed opposition to the established religion because it was unfair to people of other faiths. [7] These experiences inspired Byron to write political poems such as "Song for the Luddites" (1816) and "The Landlords' Interest" (1823). Examples of poems where he attacked his political opponents include "Wellington: The Best of the Cut-Throats" (1819) and "The Intellectual Eunuch Castlereagh" (1818).[citation needed] Note: "The Landlords' Interest" will not be found in any Byron anthology; it is Canto XIV of "The Age Of Bronze" (1823). This article is about the British House of Lords. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... The Luddites were a group of English workers in the early 1800s who protested – often by destroying machines – against the changes produced by the Industrial Revolution that they felt threatened their jobs. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... Italic text His Grace Field Marshal the Most Noble Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... Lord Castlereagh Foreign Secretary 1812–1822 Robert Stewart, 2nd Marquess of Londonderry, KG, GCH, PC (18 June 1769 in Dublin – 12 August 1822 at Loring Hall, Kent), known until 1821 by his courtesy title of Viscount Castlereagh, was an Anglo-Irish politician born in Dublin who represented the United Kingdom...


Affairs and scandals

Ultimately Byron was to attempt to escape the censure of British society by living abroad, where men could be forgiven for sexual misbehaviour up to a point--one which Byron far surpassed. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (576x768, 229 KB)[edit] Summary Lord Byrons house, Southwell [edit] Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (576x768, 229 KB)[edit] Summary Lord Byrons house, Southwell [edit] Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Vicars Court and the Residence Southwell is a small town in Nottinghamshire, England. ...


In an early scandal, Byron embarked in 1812 on a well-publicised affair with Lady Caroline Lamb. Byron eventually broke off the relationship, but Lady Caroline never entirely recovered, pursuing him even after he tired of her. She was emotionally disturbed and lost so much weight that Byron cruelly commented to her mother-in-law, his friend Lady Melbourne, that he was "haunted by a skeleton."[8] She began to call on him at home, sometimes dressed in disguise, at a time when such an act could ruin both of them socially. One day, during such a visit, she wrote on a book at his desk, "Remember me!" As a retort, Byron wrote a poem beginning: "Remember thee!" and ending "Thou false to him, thou fiend to me." Lady Caroline Lamb See also Lady Caroline Lamb (film) The Lady Caroline Lamb (13 November 1785–26 January 1828) was a novelist and British aristocrat, the only daughter of the 3rd Earl of Bessborough and Henrietta Ponsonby, Countess of Bessborough, with whom George IV fell in love. ...


As a child, Byron had seen little of his half-sister Augusta Leigh; in adulthood, he formed a close relationship with her that has widely been interpreted as incestuous.[9] Separated from her husband since 1811, Augusta gave birth on 15 April 1814 to a daughter, Elizabeth Medora Leigh. The extent of Byron's joy over the birth has been construed as evidence that he was Medora's father, a theory reinforced by the many passionate poems he wrote to Augusta. Augusta Byron, later Augusta Leigh (1783 - 1851) was the only daughter of Captain Mad Jack Byron, the poet Lord Byrons father, by his first wife, Amelia dArcy, Baroness Conyers in her own right, the divorced wife of Francis, Marquis of Carmarthen, who was later to become 5th Duke... Incest is defined as sexual relations between closely related persons (often within the immediate family) such that it is either illegal or socially taboo. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Elizabeth Medora Leigh (1814 - 1849) was the third daughter of Augusta Leigh. ...


Eventually Byron began to court Lady Caroline's cousin Anne Isabella Milbanke ("Annabella"), who refused his first proposal of marriage but later accepted. They married at Seaham Hall, County Durham, on 2 January 1815. The marriage proved unhappy. He treated her poorly and showed disappointment at the birth of a daughter (Augusta Ada), rather than a son.[citation needed] On 16 January 1816, Lady Byron left him, taking Ada with her. On 21 April, Byron signed the Deed of Separation. Rumours of marital violence, adultery with actresses, incest with Augusta Leigh, and sodomy were circulated, assisted by a jealous Lady Caroline.[citation needed] In a letter, Augusta quoted him as saying: "Even to have such a thing said is utter destruction & ruin to a man from which he can never recover." Anne Isabella Milbanke Anne Isabella Milbanke (May 17, 1792 - May 16, 1860), or Annabella as she was called, was born in London, the only child of Sir Ralph Milbanke and his wife, Lady Judith Milbanke née Noel, daughter of the ninth Lord Wentworth. ... , Seaham, formerly Seaham Harbour, is a small town in County Durham that grew up around a harbour on the North Sea coast of north-east England. ... County Durham is a county in north-east England. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace (December 10, 1815 London, England – November 27, 1852 Marylebone, London, England [1]), born Augusta Ada Byron, is mainly known for having written a description of Charles Babbages early mechanical general-purpose computer, the analytical engine. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


After this break-up of his domestic life, Byron again left England, as it turned out, for ever. He passed through Belgium and continued up the Rhine River. In the summer of 1816 he settled at the Villa Diodati by Lake Geneva, Switzerland with his personal physician, John William Polidori. There Byron befriended the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Shelley's future wife Mary Godwin. He was also joined by Mary's stepsister, Claire Clairmont, with whom he had had an affair in London. Byron initially refused to have anything to do with Claire, and would only agree to remain in her presence with the Shelleys, who eventually persuaded Byron to accept and provide for Allegra, the child she bore him in January 1817.[citation needed] The Villa Diodati is a manor in Cologny close to Lake Geneva. ... Lake Geneva or Lake Léman (French Lac Léman, le Léman, or Lac de Genève) is the second largest freshwater lake in Central Europe (after Lake Balaton). ... John William Polidori (September 7, 1795 - August 24, 1821) is credited by some as the creator of the vampire genre of fantasy fiction. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (née Godwin) (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English romantic/gothic novelist and the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... Claire Clairmont Clara Mary Jane Clairmont (April 27, 1798 – March 19, 1879), or Claire Clairmont as she was commonly known, was a stepsister of writer Mary Shelley. ... Clara Allegra Byron Clara Allegra Byron (January 15, 1817 - April 20, 1822), initially named Alba, meaning dawn, or white, by her mother, was the illegitimate daughter of George Gordon, Lord Byron and Claire Clairmont, the stepsister of Mary Shelley[1]. Born in Bath, England, she initially lived with her mother...


Kept indoors at the Villa Diodati by the "incessant rain" of "that wet, ungenial summer" over three days in June, the five turned to reading fantastical stories, including "Fantasmagoriana", and then devising their own tales. Mary Shelley produced what would become Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus and Polidori was inspired by a fragmentary story of Byron's to produce The Vampyre, the progenitor of the romantic vampire genre.[citation needed] Byron's story fragment was published as a postscript to Mazeppa; he also wrote the third canto of Childe Harold. Byron wintered in Venice, but in 1817 he journeyed to Rome. On returning to Venice he wrote the fourth canto of Childe Harold. About the same time, he sold Newstead and published Manfred, Cain, and The Deformed Transformed. The first five cantos of Don Juan were written between 1818 and 1820, during which period he made the acquaintance of the Countess Guiccioli, who soon separated from her husband. It was about this time that he received a visit from Moore, to whom he confided his autobiography, which Moore, in the exercise of the discretion left to him, burned in 1824.[citation needed] Development of global average temperatures during the last thousand years. ... Tales of the Dead was an English language collection of horror fiction, published in 1813 by the publishing house White, Cochrane and Co. ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... The Vampyre is a short novel written by John William Polidori and is a progenitor of the romantic vampire genre of fantasy fiction. ... Romantics redirects here. ... Philip Burne-Jones, The Vampire, 1897 Vampires are mythological or folkloric beings that subsist on human and/or animal lifeforce. ... For the gay mens lifestyle magazine, see Genre (magazine). ... An aquaintance to George Gordon Byron whilst he was writing The first five cantos of Don Juan Categories: | ...


Byron and the Armenians

In 1816 Byron visited Saint Lazarus Island in Venice where he acquainted himself with Armenian culture through the Mekhitarist Order. He learned the Armenian language from Fr. H. Avgerian and attended many seminars about language and history. He wrote "English grammar and the Armenian" in 1817, and "Armenian grammar and the English" (1819) in which he quoted samples from classical and modern Armenian. He participated in the compilation of "English Armenian dictionary" (1821) and wrote the preface where he explained the relationship of the Armenians with and the oppression of the Turkish "pashas" and the Persian satraps, and their struggle of liberation. His two main translations are the "Epistle of Paul to the Corinthians", several chapters of Khorenatsi's "Armenian History" and sections of Lambronatsi's "Orations".[citation needed] When in Polis he discovered discrepancies in the Armenian vs the English version of the Bible and translated some passages that were either missing or deficient in the English version. His fascination was so great that he even considered a replacement of Cain story of the Bible with that of the legend of Armenian patriarch Haik.[citation needed] He may be credited with the birth of Armenology and its propagation.[citation needed] His profound lyricism and ideological courage has inspired many Armenian poets, the likes of Fr. Ghevond Alishan, Smbat Shahaziz, Hovhannes Tumanyan, Ruben Vorberian and others.[citation needed] San Lazzaro degli Armeni is a small island in the Venetian Lagoon, lying immediately west of the Lido; completely occupied by a monastery that is the mother-house of the Mekhitarist Order, the island is one of the worlds foremost centers of Armenian culture. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Mekhitarist Order, an Armenian Catholic order modelled on Benedictine lines, was founded by Mekhitar of Sebaste in Constantinople in 1700. ... The Armenian language (, IPA: — , conventional short form ) is an Indo-European language spoken by the Armenian people. ... Grabar meaning literary, Armenian was very developed by the time it came to be written down at the beginning of the 5th century. ... The Armenian language (, IPA: — , conventional short form ) is an Indo-European language spoken by the Armenian people. ... Pasha, pascha or bashaw (Turkish: paşa) was a high rank in the Ottoman Empire political system, typically granted to governors and generals. ... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... Look up satrap in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Moses of Chorene (left) on a 14th century manuscript. ... Nerses of Lambron (Armenian: , Nerses Lambronatsi; 1153 - 1198) was the Archbishop of Tarsus in the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia who is remembered as one of the most significant figures in Armenian literature and ecclesiastical history. ... Polis can refer to: Polis, or -polis, meaning a city or city-state. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... Look up fratricide in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Statue of Haik in Yerevan Haik (Also spelled Hayk or Haig) is the legendary patriarch and establisher of the first Armenian nation. ... Historian Ghevond Alishan Father Ghevont Alishan (Armenian: ) (1820-1901; also spelled Ghevond Alishan) was an ordained Armenian Catholic priest, historian and a poet. ... An Armenian poet that was partially inspired by the Armenological work of Lord Byron Category: ... Hovhannes Tumanyan (Armenian: ) (February 19, 1869 - March 23, 1923), is considered to be one of the greatest Armenian poets and writers. ...


Byron in Italy and Greece

Further information: Greek War of Independence
George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, painted by Thomas Phillips in 1813
George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, painted by Thomas Phillips in 1813

In 1821–22 he finished cantos 6–12 of Don Juan at Pisa, and in the same year he joined with Leigh Hunt and Percy Bysshe Shelley in starting a short-lived newspaper, The Liberal, in the first number of which appeared The Vision of Judgment. His last Italian home was Genoa, where he was still accompanied by the Countess Guiccioli, and where he met Charles John Gardiner, 1st Earl of Blessington and Marguerite, Countess of Blessington and provided the material for her work "Conversations with Lord Byron", an important text in the reception of Byron in the period immediately after his death. Belligerents Greek revolutionaries United Kingdom France Russian Empire Ottoman Empire Egyptian Khedivate Commanders Theodoros Kolokotronis Alexander Ypsilanti Andreas Miaoulis Georgios Karaiskakis â€  Omer Vryonis Mahmud Dramali Pasha ReÅŸid Mehmed Pasha Ibrahim Pasha. ... Image File history File links Lord_Byron_in_Albanian_dress. ... Image File history File links Lord_Byron_in_Albanian_dress. ... He is a fag and an asshole. ... An artists rendering of James Henry Leigh Hunt James Henry Leigh Hunt (October 19, 1784 - August 28, 1859) was an English essayist and writer. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... Charles John Gardiner Charles John Gardiner, 1st Earl of Blessington (1782-25 May 1829) was an Irish earl best known for his marriage to Margaret Farmer, née Power, whom he married at St Marys, Bryanston Square, London, on 16 February 1818 (only four months after her first husband... Marguerite, countess of Blessington (September 1, 1789 - June 4, 1849), Irish novelist and miscellaneous writer, daughter of Edmund Power, a small landowner, was born near Clonmel, County Tipperary, Ireland. ...


Byron lived in Genoa until 1823 when—growing bored with his life there and with the Countess—he accepted overtures for his support from representatives of the movement for Greek independence from the Ottoman Empire.[citation needed] On July 16, Byron left Genoa on the Hercules, arriving at Kefalonia in the Ionian Islands on August 4. He spent £4000 of his own money to refit the Greek fleet, then sailed for Messolonghi in western Greece, arriving on December 29 to join Alexandros Mavrokordatos, a Greek politician with military power.[citation needed] Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... The island of Kefalonia, also known as Cephallenia, Cephallonia, Kefallinia, or Kefallonia (Ancient Greek: Κεφαλληνία; Modern Greek: Κεφαλλονιά or Κεφαλονιά; Italian: Cefalonia), is the largest of the Ionian Islands in western Greece, with an area of 350 sq. ... The Ionian Islands (Modern Greek: Ιόνια νησιά, Ionia nisia; Ancient Greek: , Ionioi NÄ“soi) are a group of islands in Greece. ... Messolonghi (Greek: Μεσολόγγι, Mesolóngi, older forms Mesolongi, Misolonghi, Mesolongion) is a town of about 18,000 people (2001) in central Greece. ... Prince Alexander Mavrocordato (1791-August 18, 1865), Greek statesman, a descendant of the hospodars, was born at Constantinople February 1791. ...


Mavrokordatos and Byron planned to attack the Turkish-held fortress of Lepanto, at the mouth of the Gulf of Corinth. Byron employed a fire-master to prepare artillery and took part of the rebel army under his own command and pay, despite his lack of military experience, but before the expedition could sail, on 15 February 1824, he fell ill, and the usual remedy of bleeding weakened him further.[citation needed] He made a partial recovery, but in early April he caught a violent cold which the bleeding — insisted on by his doctors — aggravated. The cold became a violent fever, and he died on April 19.[citation needed] Naupactus or Nafpaktos (Greek: , rarely Έπαχτος, Latin: ; Turkish: ; Italian, Spanish and Portuguese: Lepanto), is the second largest town in the prefecture of Aetolia-Acarnania, Greece, situated on a bay on the north side of the straits of Lepanto. ... The Gulf of Corinth or the Corinthian Gulf is a deep inlet of the Ionian Sea separating the Peloponnese from western mainland Greece. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Post mortem

Lord Byron on his deathbed as depicted by Joseph-Denis Odevaere c.1826 Oil on canvas, 166 × 234.5 cm Groeninge Museum, Bruges. Note the sheet covering his misshapen right foot.
Lord Byron on his deathbed as depicted by Joseph-Denis Odevaere c.1826 Oil on canvas, 166 × 234.5 cm Groeninge Museum, Bruges. Note the sheet covering his misshapen right foot.

The Greeks mourned Lord Byron deeply, and he became a hero. The national poet of Greece, Dionysios Solomos wrote a poem about his unexpected loss, named To the Death of Lord Byron (Εις το Θάνατο του Λόρδου Μπάιρον). Βύρων (Vyron), the Greek form of "Byron", continues in popularity as a masculine name in Greece, and a suburb of Athens is called Vyronas in his honour. His body was embalmed and his heart buried under a tree in Messolonghi. His remains were sent to England for burial in Westminster Abbey, but the Abbey refused.[10] He is buried at the Church of St. Mary Magdalene in Hucknall, Nottingham. At her request, Ada, the child he never knew, was buried next to him. In later years, the Abbey allowed a duplicate of a marble slab given by the King of Greece, which is laid directly above Byron's grave. In 1969, 145 years after Byron's death, a memorial to him was finally placed in Westminster Abbey.[citation needed] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1048x735, 106 KB) Summary A painting of Lord Byron on his Death Bed - ODEVAERE, Joseph-Denis c. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1048x735, 106 KB) Summary A painting of Lord Byron on his Death Bed - ODEVAERE, Joseph-Denis c. ... Look up deathbed in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province West Flanders Arrondissement Bruges Coordinates , , Area 138. ... Image:Dionysios Solomos. ... Vyronas (Greek, Modern: Βύρωνας, Ancient/Katharevousa: Βύρων), older forms: Viron and Vyron is a suburb in the northeastern part of Athens, Greece. ... Messolonghi (Greek: Μεσολόγγι, Mesolóngi, older forms Mesolongi, Misolonghi, Mesolongion) is a town of about 18,000 people (2001) in central Greece. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... The Church of St. ... Hucknall, formerly known as Hucknall Torkard, is a town in Nottinghamshire, England, in the district of Ashfield. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... This is a list of the Kings of Greece, formally known by the title of King of The Hellenes. ...


Upon his death, the barony passed to a cousin, George Anson Byron (1789–1868), a career military officer and Byron's polar opposite in temperament and lifestyle.[citation needed] Born 1789, Died 1868. ...


Poetic works

Byron wrote prolifically.[11] In 1833 his publisher, John Murray, released the complete works in 17 duodecimo volumes, including a life by Thomas Moore. His magnum opus, Don Juan, a poem spanning 17 cantos, ranks as one of the most important long poems published in England since Milton's Paradise Lost.[citation needed] Don Juan, Byron's masterpiece, often called the epic of its time, has roots deep in literary tradition and, although regarded by early Victorians as somewhat shocking, equally involves itself with its own contemporary world at all levels—social, political, literary and ideological.[citation needed] John Murray is a British publishing house, renowned for the roster of authors it has published in its history, including Jane Austen, Lord Byron and Charles Darwin. ... For other persons named Thomas Moore, see Thomas Moore (disambiguation). ... Magnum opus (sometimes Opus magnum, plural magna opera), from the Latin meaning great work,[1] refers to the best, most popular, or most renowned achievement of an author, artist, or composer, and most commonly one who has contributed a very large amount of material. ... Byrons Don Juan (Penguin Classics version) Don Juan is a long narrative poem by Lord Byron, based on the legend of Don Juan. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Paradise Lost (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of epic, see Epic. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her Accession to the Throne, June 20, 1837) gave her name to the historic era. ...

Lord Byron (1803), as painted by Marie Louise Élisabeth Vigée-Lebrun.
Lord Byron (1803), as painted by Marie Louise Élisabeth Vigée-Lebrun.

The Byronic hero pervades much of Byron's work. Scholars have traced the literary history of the Byronic hero from Milton, and many authors and artists of the Romantic movement show Byron's influence -- during the 19th century and beyond.[citation needed] The Byronic hero presents an idealised but flawed character whose attributes include[citation needed]: Painting of Byron by Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun, circa 1802. ... Painting of Byron by Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun, circa 1802. ... Self Portrait in a Straw Hat, 1782 Elisabeth-Louise Vigee-LeBrun (April 16, 1755 - March 30, 1842) was a French painter, the most famous woman painter of the 18th century. ... The Byronic hero is an idealized, but flawed, character exemplified in the life and writings of Lord Byron, characterized by his ex-lover Lady Caroline Lamb as being mad, bad and dangerous to know.[1] The Byronic hero first appears in Byrons semi-autobiographical epic narrative poem Childe Harold... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... Romantics redirects here. ...

  • having great talent
  • exhibiting great passion
  • having a distaste for society and social institutions
  • expressing a lack of respect for rank and privilege
  • thwarted in love by social constraint or death
  • rebelling
  • suffering exile
  • hiding an unsavoury past
  • arrogance, overconfidence or lack of foresight
  • ultimately, acting in a self-destructive manner

Although Byron falls chronologically into the period most commonly associated with Romantic poetry, much of his work looks back to the satiric tradition of Pope and Dryden. In Canto III of Don Juan, he expresses his detestation for poets such as Wordsworth and Coleridge.[12] The most striking thing about Byron’s poetry is its strength and masculinity[neutrality disputed] . Trenchantly witty, he used unflowery and colloquial language in many poems, such as Written after Swimming from Sestos to Abydos.[citation needed] His talent for drama was expressed in the vibrantly galloping rhythms of The Destruction of Sennacherib.[citation needed] However, poems such as When We Two Parted and So We’ll Go No More A-Roving express strong feelings in simple and touching language.[citation needed] He made little use of imagery and did not aspire to write of things beyond this world; the Victorian critic John Ruskin wrote of him that he spoke only of what he had seen and known; and spoke without exaggeration, without mystery, without enmity, and without mercy.[citation needed] For other uses, see Alexander Pope (disambiguation). ... John Dryden John Dryden (August 19 {August 9 O.S.}, 1631 - May 12 {May 1 O.S.}, 1700) was an influential English poet, literary critic, translator and playwright, who dominated the literary life of Restoration England to such a point that the period came to be known in literary circles... For other uses, see Don Juan (disambiguation). ... Wordsworth redirects here. ... Samuel Taylor Coleridge (October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) (pronounced ) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and one of the Lake Poets. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Destruction of Sennacherib The Destruction of Sennacherib is a poem by Lord Byron first published in 1815. ... Upper: Steel-plate engraving of Ruskin as a young man, made circa 1845, scanned from print made circa 1895. ...


His attitude towards writing poetry is summed up well in a letter to Thomas Moore on July 5th 1821:

I can never get people to understand that poetry is the expression of excited passion, and that there is no such thing as a life of passion any more than a continuous earthquake, or an eternal fever. Besides, who would ever shave themselves in such a state?[citation needed]

Lord Byron and the Parthenon marbles

Further information: Elgin Marbles

Byron was a bitter opponent of Lord Elgin's removal of the Parthenon marbles from Greece, and "reacted with fury" when Elgin's agent gave him a tour of the Parthenon in which he saw the missing friezes and metopes. He penned a poem, "The curse of Minerva", to denounce Elgin's actions:[13] Metope from the Elgin marbles depicting a Centaur and a Lapith fighting. ... James Bruce, 8th Earl of Elgin and 12th Earl of Kincardine (July 20, 1811 - November 20, 1863) was a British colonial administrator and diplomat, best known as Governor General of the Province of Canada and Viceroy of India. ... Metope from the Parthenon marbles depicting a Centaur and a Lapith fighting The Elgin Marbles is the popular term for the Parthenon Marbles, a large collection of marble sculptures brought to Britain between 1801 and 1805 by Thomas Bruce, 7th Earl of Elgin, the official British resident in Ottoman Athens...

[...]
I saw successive tyrannies expire.
'Scaped from the ravage of the Turk and Goth,
Thy country sends a spoiler worse than both.
Survey this vacant, violated fane;
Recount the relics torn that yet remain
[...]
The insulted wall sustains his hated name.
For Elgin's fame thus grateful Pallas pleads,
Below, his name—above, behold his deeds!

Character

Lord Byron, by all accounts, had a magnetic personality.[citation needed] He obtained a reputation as being unconventional, eccentric, flamboyant and controversial. He was given to extremes of temper. Byron had a great fondness for animals, most famously for a Newfoundland dog named Boatswain; when Boatswain contracted rabies, Byron reportedly nursed him without any fear of becoming bitten and infected.[citation needed] Boatswain lies buried at Newstead Abbey and has a monument larger than his master's. The inscription, Byron's "Epitaph to a Dog", has become one of his best-known works, reading in part: Breed standards (external links) FCI, AKC, ANKC, CKC KC(UK), NZKC, UKC The Newfoundland is a large, usually black, breed of dog originally used as a working dog in Canada. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...

Near this Spot
are deposited the Remains of one
who possessed Beauty without Vanity,
Strength without Insolence,
Courage without Ferosity,
and all the Virtues of Man without his Vices.
This praise, which would be unmeaning Flattery
if inscribed over human Ashes,
is but a just tribute to the Memory of
BOATSWAIN, a DOG,
who was born in Newfoundland May 1803,
and died at Newstead Nov.r 18th, 1808.[14]

Byron also kept a bear while he was a student at Trinity College, Cambridge (reputedly out of resentment of Trinity rules forbidding pet dogs—he later suggested that the bear apply for a college fellowship).[citation needed] At other times in his life, Byron kept a fox, monkeys, a parrot, cats, an eagle, a crow, a crocodile, a falcon, peacocks, guinea hens, an Egyptian crane, a badger, geese, and a heron. This article is about the animal. ... Systematics (but see below) Family Cacatuidae (cockatoos) Subfamily Microglossinae (Palm Cockatoo) Subfamily Calyptorhynchinae (dark cockatoos) Subfamily Cacatuinae (white cockatoos) Family Psittacidae (true parrots) Subfamily Loriinae (lories and lorikeets) Subfamily Psittacinae (typical parrots and allies) Tribe Arini (American psittacines) Tribe Cyclopsitticini (fig parrots) Tribe Micropsittini (pygmy parrots) Tribe Nestorini (kakas and... Binomial name Felis catus Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Felis lybica invalid junior synonym The cat (or domestic cat, house cat) is a small carnivorous mammal. ... Genera Several, see text. ... For other uses, see Crow (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Crocodile (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Falcon (disambiguation). ... Genera Grus Anthropoides Balearica Bugeranus Cranes are large, long-legged and long-necked birds of the order Gruiformes, and family Gruidae. ... For other uses, see Badger (disambiguation). ... Geese redirects here. ... For other uses, see Heron (disambiguation). ...


Lasting influence

The re-founding of the Byron Society in 1971 reflects the fascination that many people have for Byron and his work.[15] This society has become very active, publishing a learned annual journal. Today some 36 International Byron Societies function throughout the world, and an International Conference takes place annually. Hardly a year passes without a new book about the poet appearing. In the last 20 years two new feature films about him have screened, and a television play has been broadcast.[citation needed]


Byron exercised a marked influence on Continental literature and art, and his reputation as poet is higher in many European countries than in Britain or America, although not as high as in his time.[citation needed]


A complete picture of Byron's character has only been possible in recent years with the freeing up of the archive of Murray, Byron's original publishers, who had formerly withheld compromising letters and instructed at least one major biographer (Leslie A. Marchand) to censor details of his bisexuality.[16] Bisexual redirects here. ...


Fictional depictions

Byron is the main character of the film Byron by the Greek film maker Nikos Koundouros. Nikos Koundouros (Greek: Νίκος Κούνδουρος), is a Greek film director. ...


Byron's spirit is one of the title characters of the "Ghosts of Albion" books by Amber Benson and Christopher Golden, published by Del Rey in 2005 and 2006. Ghosts of Albion started as computer-animated web movie series on the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)s website. ... Amber Nicole Benson, born on January 8, 1977, is an American actress, writer, film director, and film producer. ... Christopher Golden is an American award-winning, bestselling author of such novels as Wildwood Road, The Boys Are Back in Town, The Ferryman, Strangewood, Of Saints and Shadows, and the Body of Evidence series of teen thrillers. ... Del Rey Books is a branch of Ballantine Books, which is owned by Random House. ...


Byron is an immortal still alive in modern times in the hit television show Highlander: The Series in the 5th season episode "The Modern Prometheus", living as a decadent rock star.


John Crowley's novel Lord Byron's Novel: The Evening Land At Night (2005) involves the rediscovery of a lost manuscript by Lord Byron, as does Frederic Prokosch's The Missolonghi Manuscript (1968). John Crowley (born December 1, 1942 in Presque Isle, Maine) is an American author of fantasy, science fiction and mainstream fiction. ... Frederic Prokosch (May 17, 1908 – June 6, 1989) was an American writer, known for his novels, poetry, memoirs and criticism. ...


Tom Holland, in his 1995 novel The Vampyre, romantically describes how Lord Byron became a vampire during his first visit to Greece—a fictional transformation that explains much of his subsequent behaviour towards family and friends, and finds support in quotes from Byron poems and the diaries of John Cam Hobhouse. It is written as though Byron is retelling part of his life to his great great great great granddaughter. He describes traveling in Greece, Italy, Switzerland, meeting Percy Bysshe Shelley, Shelley's death and many other events in life around that time. The Byron as vampire character returns in the 1996 sequel Supping with Panthers. Tom Holland. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ...


Byron appears as a character in Tim Powers' The Stress of Her Regard (1989) and Walter Jon Williams' novella Wall, Stone Craft (1994), and also in Susanna Clarke's Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell (2004). Tim Powers at the Israeli ICon 2005 SF&F Convention Timothy Thomas Powers (born February 29, 1952) is an American science fiction and fantasy author. ... Walter Jon Williams (born 15 October 1953) is an American writer, primarily of science fiction. ... Susanna [Mary] Clarke (born November 1, 1959) is a British author best known for her debut novel Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell (2004), a Hugo Award-winning alternate history fantasy. ... Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell is the award-winning debut novel by British writer Susanna Clarke. ...


Byron and Percy & Mary Shelley are portrayed in the Roger Corman's final film Frankenstein Unbound where the time traveler Dr. Buchanan (played by John Hurt) meets them as well as Victor von Frankenstein (played by Raul Julia). Percy Bysshe Shelley Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 - July 8, 1822) was one of the major English Romantic poets. ... Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (née Godwin) (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English romantic/gothic novelist and the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... Roger William Corman (born April 5, 1926), sometimes nicknamed King of the Bs for his output of B-movies (though he himself rejects this appellation as inaccurate), is a prolific American producer and director of low-budget exploitation movies, many of which are some of the most influential movies made. ... Frankenstein Unbound is a 1990 horror movie based on Brian Aldiss novel of the same name. ... For the singer, see Mississippi John Hurt. ... Raúl Rafael Juliá y Arcelay (March 9, 1940 - October 24, 1994) was a Puerto Rican actor who lived and worked for many years in the United States. ...


The Black Drama by Manly Wade Wellman (Weird Tales, 1938; Fearful Rock and Other Precarious Locales, 2001) involves the rediscovery and production of a lost play by Byron (from which Polidori's The Vampyre was plagiarised) by a man who purports to be a descendant of the poet. Manly Wade Wellman (May 21, 1903 - April 5, 1986) was an American writer of fiction and non-fiction. ... This page is about the fantasy and horror fiction pulp magazine and its heirs. ...


Tom Stoppard's play Arcadia revolves around a modern researcher's attempts to find out what made Byron leave the country. Sir Tom Stoppard, OM, CBE (born as Tomáš Straussler on July 3, 1937)[1] is an Academy Award winning British playwright of more than 24 plays. ... Arcadia is a play by Tom Stoppard which first opened at the Royal National Theatre in London on 13 April 1993 and has played at many theatres since. ...


Television portrayals include a major 2003 BBC drama on Byron's life, and minor appearances in Highlander: The Series (as well as the Shelleys), Blackadder the Third, The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy, and episode 60 ("The Darkling") of Star Trek: Voyager. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Blackadder the Third was the third series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 17 September 1987 to 22 October 1987. ... The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy, created by Maxwell Atoms, is an American animated television series that currently airs on Cartoon Network and Teletoon. ... The starship Voyager (NCC-74656), an Intrepid-class starship. ...


He makes an appearance in the alternative history novel The Difference Engine, by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling. In a Britain powered by the massive, steam-driven, mechanical computers invented by Charles Babbage, he is leader of the "Industrial Radical Party", eventually becoming Prime Minister. Alternate history (fiction) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Difference Engine is an alternate history novel by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling. ... For other persons named William Gibson, see William Gibson (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Bruce Sterling, see Bruce Sterling (disambiguation). ... Babbage redirects here. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ...


The events featuring the Shelley's and Lord Byron's relationship at the house beside Lake Geneva in 1816 have been fictionalized in film, at least three times.

  1. A 1986 British production, Gothic, directed by Ken Russell, and starring Gabriel Byrne as Byron.
  2. A 1988 Spanish production, Rowing with the Wind (Remando al viento), starring Hugh Grant as Byron.
  3. A 1988 U.S.A. production Haunted Summer. Adapted by Lewis John Carlino from the speculative novel by Anne Edwards, staring Philip Anglim as Lord Byron.

The brief prologue to Bride of Frankenstein includes Gavin Gordon as Byron, begging Mary Shelley to tell the rest of her Frankenstein story. Gothic is a 1986 motion picture directed by Ken Russell. ... Henry Kenneth Alfred Russell, known as Ken Russell (born July 3, 1927), is an English film director, particularly well-known for his films about famous composers and his controversial, often outrageous pioneering work in film. ... Gabriel Byrne (born 12 May 1950) is an Irish actor. ... Hugh John Mungo Grant (born September 9, 1960) is a Golden Globe-winning British actor and film producer. ... Bride of Frankenstein is a horror/science fiction film released on April 22, 1935, a sequel to the 1931 film Frankenstein. ...


The writer and novelist, Benjamin Markovits, is in the process of producing a fictional trilogy about the life of Byron. Imposture (2007) looked at the poet via his friend and doctor, John Polidori. A Quiet Adjustment, which came out in January 2008, is an account of Byron's marriage more sympathetic to his wife, Annabella, than many of its predecessors. He is currently writing the third instalment.


Musical settings of, or music inspired by, poems by Byron

Lithograph of Berlioz by August Prinzhofer, Vienna, 1845. ... Harold en Italie (English: Harold in Italy, Symphony with Viola obbligato), Op. ... Verdi redirects here. ... Il corsaro (The Corsair) is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi, from a libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on Lord Byrons poem The Corsair. ... Verdi redirects here. ... I due Foscari (The Two Foscaris) is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on a historical play The Two Foscari by Lord Byron. ... For other persons named Robert Schumann, see Robert Schumann (disambiguation). ... Scene from Manfred by Thomas Cole Manfred is a dramatic poem written in 1816-1817 by Lord Byron; it contains supernatural elements, in keeping with the popularity of the ghost story in England at the time. ... “Tchaikovsky” redirects here. ... Manfred Symphony in B minor, Op. ... Photograph of Hugo Wolf Hugo Wolf (March 13, 1860 – February 22, 1903) was an Austrian composer of Slovene origin, particularly noted for his art songs, or Lieder. ... Germaine Tailleferre (April 19, 1892 - November 7, 1983) was a French composer and the only female member of the famous Group Les Six. ... Deux Poèmes de Lord Byron (in English Two Poems of Lord Byron) are the only known songs set to an English text by Germaine Tailleferre and date from 1934. ... Arnold Schoenberg, Los Angeles, 1948 Arnold Schoenberg (pronounced [ˈaːrnɔlt ˈʃøːnbɛrk]) (13 September 1874 – 13 July 1951) was an Austrian and later American composer, associated with the expressionist movement in German poetry and art, and leader of the Second Viennese School. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Hebrew Melodies/She walks in beauty Wikisource has original text related to this article: She walks in Beauty She Walks in Beauty is a poem written in 1814 by Lord Byron. ... Solefald is a Norwegian avant-garde metal/black metal band that was formed by members Lars Are Lazare Nedland and Cornelius Jakhelln in August 1995, with Lars singing and playing keyboard/synthesizer/piano and drums, and Cornelius singing and playing guitar and bass. ... Kris Delmhorst is an American singer/songwriter who is part of the Boston folk scene. ... Cockfighter Cockfighter is a Rock and Roll band from Southern California founded in 2003. ... Leonard Norman Cohen, CC, (born September 21, 1934 in Westmount, Quebec) is a Canadian singer-songwriter, poet and novelist. ... Cradle of Filth are an extreme metal band formed in Suffolk, England in 1991. ... Warren William Zevon (January 24, 1947 – September 7, 2003) was a Grammy Award-winning American rock singer-songwriter and musician. ...

Bibliography

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ...

Major works

--58. ... Childe Harolds Pilgrimage by J.M.W. Turner, 1823. ... Combat of the Giaour and the Pasha Painted by Eugène Delacroix (1827) The Giaour is a poem by Lord Byron first published in 1813 and the first in the series of his Oriental romances. ... The Corsair was a semi-autobiographical tale about a pirate written by Lord Byron, which was extremely popular and influential in its day (it sold ten thousand copies on its first day of sale. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Parisina is a poem written by Lord Byron. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wikisource. ... The Dream is a poem written by Lord Byron in 1816. ... Darkness is a poem written by Lord Byron in July 1816. ... Scene from Manfred by Thomas Cole Manfred is a dramatic poem written in 1816-1817 by Lord Byron; it contains supernatural elements, in keeping with the popularity of the ghost story in England at the time. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Beppo Beppo, a poem by Lord Byron, written in 1818, tells the story of how Beppo (or Guiseppe) disappears on a sea voyage, how his wife Laura assumes hes dead and, after a perfunctory period of mourning, takes a dilettante called... This article is about the poem by Lord Byron, for other uses see Mazeppa Mazeppa is an epic poem written by Lord Byron in 1818. ... Assurbanipal in a relief from the north palace at Nineveh There were several Assyrian kings named Assur-bani-pal, also spelled Asurbanipal, Assurbanipal (most commonly), Ashurbanipal and Ashshurbanipal, but the best known was Assurbanipal IV.  Ashurbanipal, or Assurbanipal, (reigned 668 - 627 BCE), the son of Esarhaddon and Naqia-Zakutu... Cain is a dramatic work written by Byron in 1821. ... Byrons Don Juan (Penguin Classics version) Don Juan is a long narrative poem by Lord Byron, based on the legend of Don Juan. ...

Minor works

So, well go no more a roving is a poem, written by Lord (George Gordon) Byron (1788–1824), and included in a letter to Thomas Moore on February 28, 1817. ... The First Kiss of Love by Lord Byron Away with your fictions of flimsy romance, Those tissues of falsehood which folly has wove ! Give me the mild beam of the soul-breathing glance, Or the rapture which dwells on the first kiss of love. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Hebrew Melodies/She walks in beauty Wikisource has original text related to this article: She walks in Beauty She Walks in Beauty is a poem written in 1814 by Lord Byron. ... Gentlemen is the plural of the word gentleman. ...

See also

BYRON (January 22, 1788 - April 19, 1824) 1788 22 January – Born, 16 Holles Street, London. ... The Bridge of Sighs in Venice. ... 3306 Byron is a main belt asteroid, which was discovered by Nikolai Stepanovich Chernykh in 1979. ... Henry Edward Yelverton, 19th Baron Grey de Ruthyn (8 September 1780-29 October 1810) was a British Peer in the early 19th Century, notable for being a tenant and sometime friend of Lord Byron and as an ancestor of the current Aga Khan. ...

References

This article incorporates public domain text from: Cousin, John William (1910). A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature. London, J.M. Dent & sons; New York, E.P. Dutton.
  1. ^ "Bibliotheca Cornubiensis: A Catalogue..."
  2. ^ Jerome McGann, ‘Byron, George Gordon Noel, sixth Baron Byron (1788–1824)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, Oct 2007
  3. ^ Crompton, Louis: Byron And Greek Love (1985), pp123–128
  4. ^ Fiona MacCarthy, Byron: Life and Legend p.128
  5. ^ Childe Harold's Pilgrimage Cantos I and II, uncensored. The International Byron Society.
  6. ^ Thomas Moore, Life of Lord Byron, with his Letters & Journals, published in 1829, Vol. 1, pp. 154 and 676.
  7. ^ Ibid, p. 679.
  8. ^ Lord Byron's Lovers: Lady Caroline Lamb
  9. ^ Lord Byron's Lovers: Lady Caroline Lamb
  10. ^ Neurotic Poets - Lord Byron
  11. ^ List of Byron's works. Retrieved on ?.
  12. ^ Don Juan, Canto III, XCIII-XCIV.
  13. ^ Atwood, Roger (2006). Stealing History: Tomb Raiders, Smugglers, And the Looting of the Ancient World, p. 136. ISBN 0312324073. 
  14. ^ A Collection Of Poems By George Gordon Byron
  15. ^ The Byron Society. Retrieved on ?.
  16. ^ The Guardian, November 9, 2002.

The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature is a collection of biographies of writers by John W. Cousin, published around 1910. ...

Further reading

  • MacCarthy, Fiona: Byron: Life and Legend. John Murray, 2002. ISBN 071955621X.
  • McGann, Jerome: Byron and Romanticism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. ISBN 0-521-00722-4.
  • Rosen, Fred: Bentham, Byron and Greece. Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1992. ISBN 0198200781
  • Harvard University Press Edition of Byron's Letters. Marchand, Leslie A., editor:
  • Thiollet, Jean-Pierre: Carré d'Art : Barbey d'Aurevilly, lord Byron, Salvador Dali, Jean-Edern Hallier, Anagramme éditions, 2008. ISBN 2 35035 189 6

Image:JeromeMcGann. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
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Peerage of England
Preceded by
William Byron
Baron Byron
1798–1824
Succeeded by
George Byron
Persondata
NAME Byron, George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Byron, Lord
SHORT DESCRIPTION English Poet
DATE OF BIRTH 22 January 1788(1788-01-22)
PLACE OF BIRTH London, England
DATE OF DEATH 19 April 1824
PLACE OF DEATH Missolonghi, Greece
The word Enlightment redirects here. ... Victorianism is the name given to the attitudes, art, and culture of the later two-thirds of the 19th century. ... For other uses, see Realism (disambiguation). ... A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Messolonghi (Greek: Μεσολόγγι, Mesolóngi, older forms Mesolongi, Misolonghi, Mesolongion) is a town of about 18,000 people (2001) in central Greece. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
George Gordon Byron, 6th baron Byron - LoveToKnow 1911 (10818 words)
GEORGE GORDON BYRON BYRON, 6TH Baron (1788-1824), English poet, was born in London at 16 Holles Street, Cavendish Square, on the 22nd of January 1788.
The Byrons were of Norman stock, but the founder of the family was Sir John Byron, who entered into possession of the priory and lands of Newstead in the county of Nottingham in 1540.
Byron's contemporaries judged him by the tone and temper of his works, by his own confessions or self-revelations in prose and verse, by the facts of his life as reported in the newspapers, by the talk of the town.
George Byron, 6th Baron Byron (3756 words)
George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron (22 January 1788 19 April 1824) was a British poet and a leading figure in Romanticism.
Byron served as a regional leader of Italy's revolutionary organization the Carbonari in its struggle against Austria, and later travelled to fight against the Turks in the Greek War of Independence, for which the Greeks consider him a national hero.
Byron was born in London, the son of Captain John "Mad Jack" Byron and his second wife, the former Catherine Gordon, heiress of Gight in Aberdeenshire, Scotland.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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