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Encyclopedia > George Frisbie Hoar
George Frisbie Hoar
George Frisbie Hoar

Junior Senator, Massachusetts
In office
18771904
Preceded by George S. Boutwell
Succeeded by Winthrop M. Crane

Born April 29, 1826
Concord, Massachusetts
Died September 30, 1904
Worcester, Massachusetts
Political party Republican
Profession Lawyer

George Frisbie Hoar (29 August 182630 September 1904) was a prominent United States politician. George Frisbie Hoar, PD from congress. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... George Sewall Boutwell (January 28, 1818–February 27, 1905) was an American statesman who served as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Ulysses S. Grant. ... Winthrop Murray Crane (1853 - 1920) was a U.S. political figure. ... April 29 is the 119th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (120th in leap years). ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Settled: 1635 â€“ Incorporated: 1635 Zip Code(s): 01742 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ...   Nickname: The Heart of the Commonwealth, The City of the Seven Hills, Wormtown Settled: 1673 â€“ Incorporated: 1684 Zip Code(s): 01608 â€“ Area Code(s): 508 / 774 Official website: http://www. ... For other uses, see Republican Party (disambiguation) or GOP (disambiguation). ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... August 29 is the 241st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (242nd in leap years), with 124 days remaining. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Hoar was born in Concord, Massachusetts. He was a member of an extended family that was politically prominent in 18th and 19th century New England. Through his mother, Sarah Sherman, he was a grandson of a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence, Roger Sherman and wife Rebecca Minot Prescott. G.F. Hoar's father, Samuel Hoar, was a prominent lawyer who served on the Massachusetts state senate and the United States House of Representatives. His brother Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar was an Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, one of Ulysses S. Grant's Attorneys General, and a nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court. Settled: 1635 â€“ Incorporated: 1635 Zip Code(s): 01742 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... A copy of the 1823 William J. Stone reproduction of the United States Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies were independent of Great Britain. ... Roger Sherman Roger Sherman (April 19 (O.S.), April 30 (N.S.), 1721 – July 23, 1793) was an early American lawyer and politician. ... Rebecca Minot Prescott (1743 – 1793) was the daughter of Benjamin Prescott and Rebecca Minot Prescott from Salem, Massachusetts; and the niece of Roger Sherman’s brother Reverend Josiah Sherman. ... Samuel Hoar (1778 - 1856) was a United States lawyer and politician. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar (February 21, 1816–January 31, 1895) was an American politician. ... The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (SJC) is the highest court in the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Ulysses S. Grant[1] (born Hiram Ulysses Grant, April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American general and politician who was elected as the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States...

Contents

Political and Legal Career

Hoar graduated from Harvard University in 1846, then studied law at Harvard Law School and settled in Worcester, Massachusetts where he practiced law before entering politics. Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Harvard Law School (HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ...   Nickname: The Heart of the Commonwealth, The City of the Seven Hills, Wormtown Settled: 1673 â€“ Incorporated: 1684 Zip Code(s): 01608 â€“ Area Code(s): 508 / 774 Official website: http://www. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ...


Hoar initially was a member of the Free Soil Party, then joined the Republican Party shortly after its founding. He was elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1852, and the Massachusetts Senate in 1857. The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States organized in 1848 that petered out by about 1852. ... For other uses, see Republican Party (disambiguation) or GOP (disambiguation). ... The Massachusetts House of Representatives is the lower house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ... The Massachusetts Senate is the upper house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ...

In 1865, Hoar was one of the founders of the Worcester County Free Institute of Industrial Science, now the Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3040x3760, 665 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): George Frisbie Hoar ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3040x3760, 665 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): George Frisbie Hoar ... Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) is a private university located in Worcester, Massachusetts, in the United States. ...


Hoar represented Massachusetts as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1869 through 1877; he then served in the U.S. Senate until his death. He was a Republican, who generally avoided party partisanship and did not hesitate to criticize other members of his party whose actions or policies he believed were in error. Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ...


Hoar was long noted as a fighter against political corruption, and campaigned for the rights of African Americans and Native Americans. He argued in the Senate in favor of Women's suffrage as early as 1886. World map of the Corruption Perceptions Index, which measures the degree to which corruption is perceived to exist among public officials and politicians In broad terms, political corruption is the misuse by government officials of their governmental powers for illegitimate, usually secret, private gain. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Economic and political reform movement aimed at extending suffrage—the right to vote—to women. ...


Hoar was part of the Congressional Electoral Commission involved with settling the highly disputed U.S. presidential election, 1876. He authored the Presidential Succession Act of 1886. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Presidential Succession Act of 1886 redefined the order of succession to the office of President of the United States in the event neither a President nor Vice President is able to discharge the powers and duties of the office. ...


Hoar was chairman of the 1888 Republican National Convention. The Republican National Convention, the presidential nominating convention of the United States Republican Party, is held every four years to determine the partys candidate for the coming Presidential election and the partys platform. ...


With the Spanish-American War, Hoar became one of the Senate's most outspoken opponents of the imperialism of the William McKinley administration. He denounced the Philippine-American War, calling for allowing independence of the Philippines. He also denounced the U.S. intervention in Panama. Combatants United States Republic of Cuba First Philippine Republic Spanish Empire Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (only 332 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties Unknown[1... Cecil Rhodes: Cape-Cairo railway project. ... William McKinley, Jr. ... Combatants United States Philippines Commanders William McKinley Emilio Aguinaldo Strength 126,000 soldiers 80,000 soldiers Casualties 4,324 U.S. soldiers dead 2,000 Philippine Constabulary 16,000 soldiers killed est. ...

"You have sacrificed nearly ten thousand American lives—the flower of our youth. You have devastated provinces. You have slain uncounted thousands of the people you desire to benefit. You have established reconcentration camps. Your generals are coming home from their harvest bringing sheaves with them, in the shape of other thousands of sick and wounded and insane to drag out miserable lives, wrecked in body and mind. You make the American flag in the eyes of a numerous people the emblem of sacrilege in Christian churches, and of the burning of human dwellings, and of the horror of the water torture. Your practical statesmanship which disdains to take George Washington and Abraham Lincoln or the soldiers of the Revolution or of the Civil War as models, has looked in some cases to Spain for your example. I believe—nay, I know—that in general our officers and soldiers are humane. But in some cases they have carried on your warfare with a mixture of American ingenuity and Castilian cruelty.
"Your practical statesmanship has succeeded in converting a people who three years ago were ready to kiss the hem of the garment of the American and to welcome him as a liberator, who thronged after your men when they landed on those islands with benediction and gratitude, into sullen and irreconciliable enemies, possessed of a hatred which centuries can not eradicate." --Senator George Hoar, From a speech in the United States Senate in May, 1902, chastizing the Philippine-American War and the three Army officers, who were court-martialed.[1]


Hoar pushed for and served on the Lodge Committee investigating alleged, and later confirmed, war crimes in the Philippine-American War The Lodge Committee began in January 1902 and adjourned on June 28, 1902. ... In the context of war, a war crime is a punishable offense under International Law, for violations of the laws of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Combatants United States Philippines Commanders William McKinley Emilio Aguinaldo Strength 126,000 soldiers 80,000 soldiers Casualties 4,324 U.S. soldiers dead 2,000 Philippine Constabulary 16,000 soldiers killed est. ...


In addition to his political career, Hoar was active in the American Historical Society and the American Antiquarian Society, serving terms as president of both organizations. He was a regent of the Smithsonian Institution in 1880, and a trustee of the Peabody Museum. The American Antiquarian Society (AAS) is both a learned society and national research library of pre-twentieth century American History and culture. ... The Smithsonian Institution Building or Castle on the National Mall serves as the Institutions headquarters. ... The Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale University was founded by the philanthropist George Peabody in 1866 at the behest of his nephew Othniel Charles Marsh, the early paleontologist. ...


George Frisbie Hoar's autobiography, Autobiography of Seventy Years was published in 1903; it first appeared in serial form in Scribner's magazine. Cover of An autobiography, from the Greek auton, self, bios, life and graphein, write, is a biography written by the subject or composed conjointly with a collaborative writer (styled as told to or with). The term dates from the late eighteenth century, but the form is much older. ... Scribners Magazine is a magazine. ...


Hoar enjoyed good health until June of 1904. He died in Worcester, and was buried in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord. After his death, a statue of Hoar was erected in front of Worcester's city hall, paid for by public donations. Sleepy Hollow Cemetery is a cemetery located on Bedford Road in the center of Concord, Massachusetts. ...


See also

Baldwin, Hoar & Sherman family The Baldwin, Evarts, Hoar & Sherman family is an exceedingly large political family of the United States spanning the countrys history. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Hoar, George Frisbee. From a speech in the United States Senate given May, 1902. Originally published in Bryan, William Jennings, ed. The World’s Famous Orations. Volume X, America III. New York: Funk and Wagnalls, 1906.

References

  • Biography at the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress "HOAR, George Frisbie, (1826 - 1904)"
  • Hoar, George F. Autobiography of Seventy Years. 2 vols., New York: Scribner’s Sons, 1903
  • Welch, Richard E., Jr. George F. Hoar and the Half-Breed Republicans. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1971.
Preceded by
John D. Baldwin
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 8th congressional district

1869 – 1873
Succeeded by
John M. S. Williams (district moved)
Preceded by
Alvah Crocker (district moved)
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 9th congressional district

1873 – 1877
Succeeded by
William W. Rice
Preceded by
George S. Boutwell
United States Senator (Class 2) from Massachusetts
1877 – 1904
Served alongside: Henry L. Dawes, Henry Cabot Lodge
Succeeded by
Wintrop M. Crane

  Results from FactBites:
 
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     Charles Hoar was the son of Charles Hoar and Margery (Unknown) of Gloucester.
     Elinor Hoar was the daughter of Charles Hoar and Margery (Unknown) of Gloucester.
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George Frisbie Hoar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (644 words)
In 1865 Hoar was one of the founders of the Worcester County Free Institute of Industrial Science, now the Worcester Polytechnic Institute.
Hoar represented Massachusetts as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1869 through 1877; he then served in the U.S. Senate until his death.
George Frisbie Hoar's autobiography, Autobiography of Seventy Years was published in 1903; it first appeared in serial form in Scribner's magazine.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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