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Encyclopedia > George Frideric Handel
George Frideric Handel, 1733
George Frideric Handel, 1733

George Frideric Handel (Friday 23 February 1685Saturday 14 April 1759) was a German-born British Baroque composer who was a leading composer of concerti grossi, operas and oratorios. Born in Halle as Georg Friedrich Händel (IPA: [ˈhɛndəl]), he dwelt during most of his adult life in England, becoming a subject of the British crown on 22 January 1727. His most famous works are Messiah, an oratorio set to texts from the King James Bible, Water Music and Music for the Royal Fireworks. Drawing on the techniques of the great composers of the Italian Baroque, as well as the music of Henry Purcell, he deeply influenced in his turn many composers who came after him, including Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven, and his work helped lead the transition from the Baroque to the Classical era. Look up Handel in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 6 - James Stuart, Duke of York becomes King James II of England and Ireland and King James VII of Scotland. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... 1759 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Baroque music describes an era and a set of styles of European classical music which were in widespread use between approximately 1500 and 1700[1] (see Dates of classical music eras for a discussion of the problems inherent in defining the beginning and end points). ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... The concerto grosso (plural concerti grossi) (Italian for big concert) was a popular form of baroque music using an ensemble and usually having four to six movements in which the musical material is passed between a small group of soloists (the concertino) and full orchestra (the ripieno). ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... An oratorio is a large musical composition for orchestra, vocal soloists and chorus. ... , Halle (also called Halle an der Saale (literally Halle on the Saale, and in some historic references is not uncommonly called Saale after the river) in order to distinguish it from Halle in North Rhine-Westphalia) is the largest city in the German State of Saxony-Anhalt. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ... Messiah (HWV 56), is an oratorio by George Frideric Handel based on a libretto by Charles Jennens. ... This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... The Water Music is a collection of orchestral movements, often considered as three suites, composed by George Frideric Handel. ... The Fireworks Music (also known as Music for the Royal Fireworks) was composed by George Frideric Handel in 1749 under contract of George II of Great Britain for the celebration fireworks occasion in Londons Green Park on 27 April 1749. ... Henry Purcell Henry Purcell (IPA: [1]; September 10 (?) [2], 1659–November 21, 1695), a Baroque composer, is generally considered to be one of Englands greatest composers. ... “Haydn” redirects here. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... “Beethoven” redirects here. ... Baroque music describes an era and a set of styles of European classical music which were in widespread use between approximately 1500 and 1700[1] (see Dates of classical music eras for a discussion of the problems inherent in defining the beginning and end points). ... The Classical period in Western music occurred from about 1730 through 1820, despite considerable overlap at both ends with preceding and following periods, as is true for all musical eras. ...

Contents

Biography

Handel was born in Halle at Saxony-Anhalt to Georg and Dorothea (née Taust) Händel in 1685, the same year that both Johann Sebastian Bach and Domenico Scarlatti were born. He displayed considerable musical talent at an early age; by the age of seven he was a skillful performer on the harpsichord and pipe organ, and at nine he began to compose music. However, his father, an eminent barber-surgeon who served as valet and barber to the Courts of Saxony and Brandenburg,[1] and altogether a distinguished citizen of Halle, was opposed to George Frideric's pursuing a musical career, preferring him to study law, whereas his mother, Dorothea, encouraged him in his music.[2] , Halle (also called Halle an der Saale (literally Halle on the Saale, and in some historic references is not uncommonly called Saale after the river) in order to distinguish it from Halle in North Rhine-Westphalia) is the largest city in the German State of Saxony-Anhalt. ... With an area of 20,447 km² and a population of 2. ... “Bach” redirects here. ... Giuseppe Domenico Scarlatti (October 26, 1685 – July 23, 1757) was an Italian composer who spent much of his life in Spain and Portugal. ... Harpsichord in the Flemish style A harpsichord is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard. ... The baroque organ in Roskilde Cathedral, Copenhagen The pipe organ is a musical instrument that produces sound by admitting pressurized air (referred to as wind) through a series of pipes. ... Barbers were often recruited for the job of surgery in earlier military history. ... Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DED Capital Dresden Minister-President Georg Milbradt (CDU) Governing parties CDU / SPD Votes in Bundesrat 4 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  18,416 km² (7,110 sq mi) Population 4,252,000 (11/2006)[1]  - Density 231 /km...   (Lower Sorbian: Bramborska; Upper Sorbian: Braniborska) is one of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states). ...

House in Halle where Handel was born
House in Halle where Handel was born
Handel as a boy
Handel as a boy

Nevertheless, the young Handel was permitted to take lessons in musical composition and keyboard techniques from Friedrich Wilhelm Zachau, the organist of the Liebfrauenkirche, Halle. His aunt, Anna, had given him a spinet for his seventh birthday, which was placed in the attic so that Handel could play it whenever he could get away from his father.[3] [4] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 276 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 276 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Handel_as_a_Boy. ... Image File history File links Handel_as_a_Boy. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Zachau (1663 - 1712) was a German musician and composer. ... A spinet is a smaller type of harpsichord or other keyboard instrument, such as a piano or organ. ...


In 1702, in obedience to his father's wishes, he began the study of law at the University of Halle, but after his father's death the following year, he abandoned law for music, becoming the organist at the Protestant Cathedral. The following year he moved to Hamburg, accepting a position as violinist and harpsichordist in the orchestra of the opera-house. Here his first two operas, Almira and Nero, were produced early in 1705. Two other early operas, Daphne and Florindo, were produced at Hamburg in 1708. Events March 8 - William III died; Princess Anne Stuart becomes Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... The Martin-Luther-University of Halle-Wittenberg is located in the German cities of Halle, Saxony-Anhalt and Wittenberg. ... This article is about the city in Germany. ... A violinist is an instrumentalist who plays the violin. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... “Der in Krohnen erlangte Glückswechsel”, or “Almira, Königin von Castilien” (HWV 1), is George Frideric Handels first opera. ... // Events Construction begins on Blenheim Palace, in Oxfordshire, England. ... Der beglückte Florindo is an opera composed by Handel in Hamburg in 1708 as part of a double opera, the other part being Die verwandelte Daphne. ... // Events March 23 - James Francis Edward Stuart lands at the Firth of Forth July 1 - Tewoflos becomes Emperor of Ethiopia September 28 - Peter the Great defeats the Swedes at the Battle of Lesnaya Kandahar conquered by Mir Wais In Masuria one third of the population die during the plague J...


During the years 17061709 Handel travelled and studied in Italy. When opera was banned by local authorities, Handel found work as a composer of sacred music and wrote some pieces in operatic style. The famous Dixit Dominus (1707) is from this era. His Rodrigo was produced in Florence in 1707, and his Agrippina at Venice in 1709. Agrippina, which ran for an unprecedented 27 performances, exhibited a mature technique in Handel's writing and established his reputation as an opera composer. Two oratorios, La Resurrezione and Il Trionfo del Tempo, were produced at Rome in 1709 and 1710, respectively. Events March 27 - Concluding that Emperor Iyasus I of Ethiopia had abdicated by retiring to a monastery, a council of high officials appoint Tekle Haymanot I Emperor of Ethiopia May 23 - Battle of Ramillies September 7 - The Battle of Turin in the War of Spanish Succession - forces of Austria and... // Events January 12 - Two-month freezing period begins in France - The coast of the Atlantic and Seine River freeze, crops fail and at least 24. ... Opera in three acts by Handel. ... Florence (Italian: ) is the capital city of the region of Tuscany, Italy. ... Agrippina is an opera by George Frideric Handel. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... // Events January 12 - Two-month freezing period begins in France - The coast of the Atlantic and Seine River freeze, crops fail and at least 24. ... An oratorio is a large musical composition for orchestra, vocal soloists and chorus. ... La Resurrezione is a sacred oratorio by George Frideric Handel, set to a libretto by Carlo Sigismondo Capece (1652-1728), court poet to Queen Maria Casimira of Poland, who was living in exile in Rome. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... // Events April 10 - The worlds first copyright legislation became effective, Britains Statute of Anne Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713) Births January 3 - Richard Gridley, American Revolutionary soldier (d. ...


In 1710 Handel became Kapellmeister to George, Elector of Hanover, who would soon be King George I of Great Britain. He visited London in 1710 and settled there permanently in 1712, receiving a yearly income of £200 from Queen Anne. During Handel's early years in London one of his most important patrons was the young and wealthy Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington, who showed an early love of his music.[5] A Kapellmeister is nowadays the director or conductor of an orchestra or choir. ... , Hanover(i) (German: , IPA: ), on the river Leine, is the capital of the federal state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany. ... George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727)[1] was King of Great Britain and Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) became Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March 1702, succeeding William III. Her Roman Catholic father, James II and VII, was forcibly deposed in 1688; her brother-in-law and her sister then became joint monarchs as William III and Mary... Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington and 4th Earl of Cork (April 25, 1694 – 1753) , born in Yorkshire, was a descendant of Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork. ...


In 1723 Handel moved into a newly built house in 25 Brook Street, London, which he rented until his death in 1759, 36 years later. This house is now the Handel House Museum, a restored Georgian house open to the public with an events programme of Baroque music. There is a blue commemorative plaque on the outside of the building. It was here that he composed Messiah, Zadok the Priest, and Fireworks Music. (In 2000, the upper stories of 25 Brook Street were leased to the Handel House Trust, and, after an extensive restoration program, the Handel House Museum opened to the public on 8 November 2001.) Events February 16 - Louis XV of France attains his majority Births February 24 - John Burgoyne, British general (d. ... Brook Street is one of the principal streets on the Grosvenor Estate in the exclusive central London district of Mayfair. ... Handel House. ... Adoration, by Peter Paul Rubens. ... Handel House. ...


In 1726 Handel's opera Scipio (Scipione) was performed for the first time, the march from which remains the regimental slow march of the British Grenadier Guards. He was naturalised a British subject in the following year. Events George Friderich Handel becomes a British subject. ... Opera composed by Handel for the Royal Academy of Music in 1726. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grenadier Guards is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division of the British Army, and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. ...


In 1727 Handel was commissioned to write four anthems for the coronation ceremony of King George II. One of these, Zadok the Priest, has been also played at every British coronation ceremony since. Handel was director of the Royal Academy of Music 1720–1728, and a partner of J. J. Heidegger in the management of the King's Theatre 1729–1734. Handel also had a long association with the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden, where many of his Italian operas were premiered. Handel gave up operatic management entirely in 1740, after he had lost a fortune in the business. Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ... George II (George Augustus; 10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... Zadok the Priest being performed at the Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne in 2005 Zadok the Priest is a coronation anthem composed by George Frideric Handel (1685–1759) using texts from the King James Bible. ... The Royal Academy of Music (RAM) is a constituent college of the University of London, and is one of the worlds leading music institutions. ... A performance at Opera House, Haymarket, predecessor of Her Majestys Theatre in circa 1808. ... The Floral Hall of the Royal Opera House The Royal Opera House is a performing arts venue in London. ... Covent Garden is a district in central London and within the easterly bounds of the City of Westminster. ... Events May 31 - Friedrich II comes to power in Prussia upon the death of his father, Friedrich Wilhelm I. October 20 - Maria Theresia of Austria inherits the Habsburg hereditary dominions (Austria, Bohemia, Hungary and present-day Belgium). ...


In April 1737, aged 52, he suffered a stroke or some other malady which left his right arm temporarily paralysed and stopped him from performing. He also complained of difficulties in focusing his sight. For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 1750 Handel arranged a performance of Messiah in aid of the Foundling Hospital. The performance was considered a great success and was followed by annual concerts which continued throughout Handel's life. In recognition of his patronage Handel was made a governor of the Hospital the very day after his initial concert. He bequeathed a fair copy of Messiah to the institution upon his death. His involvement with the Foundling Hospital is today commemorated with a permanent exhibition in London's Foundling Museum, which also holds the Gerald Coke Handel Collection. The Foundling Hospital, London, was founded in 1739 by the philanthropic sea captain Thomas Coram. ... The Foundling Museums Court Room The Foundling Museum was set up in 1998 and houses the nationally important art collection of the Foundling Hospital. ...


In August, 1750, on a journey back from Germany to London, Handel was seriously injured in a carriage accident between The Hague and Haarlem in the Netherlands.[6] Events March 2 - Small earthquake in London, England April 4 - Small earthquake in Warrington, England August 23 - Small earthquake in Spalding, England September 30 - Small earthquake in Northampton, England November 16 – Westminster Bridge officially opened Jonas Hanway is the first Englishman to use an umbrella James Gray reveals her sex... Coordinates: , Country Netherlands Province South Holland Area (2006)  - Municipality 98. ... Coordinates: Country Netherlands Province North Holland Area (2006)  - Municipality 32. ...


In 1751 his eyesight started to fail in one eye. The cause was unknown and progressed into his other eye as well. He died some eight years later, in 1759, in London, his last attended performance being his own Messiah. He had more than 3,000 mourners attending at his funeral—which was given full state honours—and he was buried in Westminster Abbey. Handel never married, and kept his personal life very private. Unlike many composers, he left a sizable estate at his death, worth £20,000 (an enormous amount for the day), the bulk of which he left to a niece in Germany, as well as leaving gifts to his other relations, servants, friends and to favourite charities. Events Adam Smith is appointed professor of logic at the University of Glasgow March 25 - For the last time, New Years Day is legally on March 25 in England and Wales. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ...


Handel has generally been accorded high esteem by fellow composers, both in his own time and since. Bach apparently said "[Handel] is the only person I would wish to see before I die, and the only person I would wish to be, were I not Bach." Mozart is reputed to have said of him "Handel understands effect better than any of us. When he chooses, he strikes like a thunder bolt", and to Beethoven he was "the master of us all". The latter emphasized above all the simplicity and popular appeal of Handel's music when he said "go to him to learn how to achieve great effects, by such simple means". In music, the BACH motif is the sequence of notes B flat, A, C, B natural. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ...


He is commemorated as a musician in the Calendar of Saints of the Lutheran Church on July 28 with Johann Sebastian Bach and Heinrich Schütz. The Lutheran Calendar of Saints is a listing which details the primary annual festivals and events that are celebrated liturgically by the Lutheran Church. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... “Bach” redirects here. ... Heinrich Schütz. ...


Works

Handel's compositions include some fifty operas, twenty three oratorios, a large number of ecumenical pieces, and sixteen organ concerti. Among the most popular of these works are "The Cuckoo and the Nightingale", in which birds are heard calling during passages played in different keys representing the vocal ranges of two birds; The Opus 3 and 6 Concerti Grossi; the Water Music; and the Music for the Royal Fireworks. George Frideric Handel This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The concerto grosso was a popular form of baroque music centered around an ensemble, usually having four to six movements in which the musical material is passed between a small group of soloists (the concertino) and full orchestra (the ripieno). ... The Water Music is a collection of orchestral movements, often considered as three suites, composed by George Frideric Handel. ... The Fireworks Music (also known as Music for the Royal Fireworks) was composed by George Frideric Handel in 1749 under contract of George II of Great Britain for the celebration fireworks occasion in Londons Green Park on 27 April 1749. ...


After his death, Handel's Italian operas fell into obscurity, save for selections such as the ubiquitous aria from Serse, "Ombra mai fu"; his reputation throughout the 19th century and first half of the 20th century, particularly in the Anglophone countries, rested primarily on his English oratorios, which were customarily performed by enormous choruses of amateur singers on solemn occasions. These include Esther (1718); Athalia (1733); Saul (1739); Israel in Egypt (1739); Messiah (1742); Samson (1743); Judas Maccabaeus (1747); Solomon (1748); and Jephtha (1752), his best are based on a libretto by Charles Jennens. Serse (also known as Xerxes) is an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... The oratorio Esther by George Frideric Handel (HWV 50) is generally acknowledged to be the first English oratorio. ... Year 1718 (MDCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The structural and rhetorical achievements in Athalia project a dramatic concept that may be unique in Handels output. ... Events February 12 - British colonist James Oglethorpe founds Savannah, Georgia. ... An oratorio in three acts written by George Frideric Handel with a libretto by Charles Jennens. ... // About the number 1739 1739 is the smallest integer that can be written as sum of three perfect cubes, in two ways. ... Israel in Egypt. ... // About the number 1739 1739 is the smallest integer that can be written as sum of three perfect cubes, in two ways. ... Messiah (HWV 56), is an oratorio by George Frideric Handel based on a libretto by Charles Jennens. ... Samson is an oratorio by George Frideric Handel. ... Judas Maccabaeus (HWV 54) is an oratorio in three acts by Georg Friedrich Händel. ... Year 1747 (MDCCXLVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Solomon is an oratorio by George Frideric Handel. ... Jephtha (Jephthah) was an oratorio (1751) by Handel based on the story of Jephtha with a libretto by the Rev. ... 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Jennens (1700-1773) assembled the text for Handels oratorios Messiah and Saul, and is thought to have done the same for Handels Israel in Egypt. ...


Since the 1960s, with the revival of interest in baroque music, original instrument playing styles, and the prevalence of countertenors who could more accurately replicate castrato roles, interest has revived in Handel's Italian operas, and many have been recorded and performed onstage. Of the fifty he wrote between 1705 and 1738, Agrippina (1709), Rinaldo (1711, 1731), Orlando (1733), Alcina (1735), Ariodante (1735), and Serse (1738, also known as Xerxes) stand out and are now performed regularly in opera houses and concert halls. Arguably the finest, however, are Giulio Cesare (1724) and Rodelinda (1725), which, thanks to their superb orchestral and vocal writing, have entered the mainstream opera repertoire. The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... The authentic performance movement is an effort on the part of musicians and scholars to perform works of classical music in ways similar to how they were performed when they were originally written. ... A Countertenor is an adult male singer who uses the falsetto part of his voice more than usual to sing a higher range than the typical adult male voice. ... A castrato is a male soprano, mezzo-soprano, or alto voice produced either by castration of the singer before puberty or one who, because of an endocrinological condition, never reaches sexual maturity. ... // Events Construction begins on Blenheim Palace, in Oxfordshire, England. ... Events February 4 - Court Jew Joseph Suss Oppenheimer is executed in Württenberg April 15 - Premiere in London of Serse, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel. ... Rinaldo is an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel, now a part of the standard operatic repertoire. ... Handel opera composed in 1733. ... Events February 12 - British colonist James Oglethorpe founds Savannah, Georgia. ... Alcina is an opera composed by George Frideric Handel for his first season at the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden. ... Ariodante is an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel. ... Serse (also known as Xerxes) is an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel. ... Events February 4 - Court Jew Joseph Suss Oppenheimer is executed in Württenberg April 15 - Premiere in London of Serse, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Events January 14 - King Philip V of Spain abdicates the throne February 20 - The premiere of Giulio Cesare, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel, takes place in London June 23 - Treaty of Constantinople signed. ... Rodelinda is an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel. ... Events February 8 - Catherine I became empress of Russia February 20 - The first reported case of white men scalping Native Americans takes place in New Hampshire colony. ...


Also revived in recent years are a number of secular cantatas and what one might call secular oratorios or concert operas. Of the former, Ode for St. Cecilia's Day (1739) (set to texts of John Dryden) and Ode for the Birthday of Queen Anne (1713) are particularly noteworthy. For his secular oratorios, Handel turned to classical mythology for subjects, producing such works as Acis and Galatea (1719), Hercules (1745), and Semele (1744). In terms of musical style, particularly in the vocal writing for the English-language texts, these works have close kinship with the above-mentioned sacred oratorios, but they also share something of the lyrical and dramatic qualities of Handel's Italian operas. As such, they are sometimes performed onstage by small chamber ensembles. With the rediscovery of his theatrical works, Handel, in addition to his renown as instrumentalist, orchestral writer, and melodist, is now perceived as being one of opera's great musical dramatists. A cantata (Italian, sung) is a vocal composition with an instrumental accompaniment and generally containing more than one movement. ... Ode for St. ... // About the number 1739 1739 is the smallest integer that can be written as sum of three perfect cubes, in two ways. ... John Dryden John Dryden (August 19 {August 9 O.S.}, 1631 - May 12 {May 1 O.S.}, 1700) was an influential English poet, literary critic, translator and playwright, who dominated the literary life of Restoration England to such a point that the period came to be known in literary circles... Ode for the Birthday of Queen Anne is a secular cantata composed by George Friederick Handel (1685-1759) to a libretto by Ambrose Philips (1674-1749), and first performed in 1713, shortly after Handel took up residence in Britain. ... Acis and Galatea is a pastoral opera or masque composed by George Frideric Handel while he was living in Cannons (the seat of James Brydges, 1st Duke of Chandos, during the summer of 1718, and later revised and expanded to three acts in 1732, to words by John Gay, Alexander... // Events January 23 - The Principality of Liechtenstein is created within the Holy Roman Empire April 25 - Daniel Defoe publishes Robinson Crusoe June 10 - Battle of Glen Shiel Prussia conducts Europes first systematic census Miners in Falun, Sweden find an apparently petrified body of Fet-Mats Israelsson in an unused... Hercules (HWV 60) is a music drama in three acts by George Frideric Handel. ... // Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected... Semele is a secular oratorio by George Frideric Handel. ...

Handel House at 25 Brook Street, London
Handel House at 25 Brook Street, London

Handel adopted the spelling "George Frideric Handel" on his naturalization as a British subject, and this spelling is generally used in English speaking countries. The original form of his name (Georg Friedrich Händel) is generally used (naturally enough) in Germany and elsewhere, but he is known as "Haendel" in France, which causes no small grief to cataloguers everywhere. There was another composer with a similar name, Handl, who was a Slovene and is more commonly known as Jacobus Gallus. Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 625 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 625 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Brook Street is one of the principal streets on the Grosvenor Estate in the exclusive central London district of Mayfair. ... Jacobus Gallus, a portrait from 1590 Jacobus Gallus Carniolus (Jacob Handl or Jacob Handl-Gallus) (July 3, 1550 – July 18, 1591) was a late Renaissance Czech composer of Slovene origin. ...


Handel's works were edited by Samuel Arnold (40 vols., London, 1787-1797), and by Friedrich Chrysander, for the German Händel-Gesellschaft (100 vols., Leipzig, 18581902). Samuel Arnold (1740 - October 22, 1802) was an English composer. ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Karl Franz Friedrich Chrysander (July 8, 1826-September 3, 1901) was a German music historian and critic, whose edition of the works of George Frideric Handel and authoritative writings on many other composers established him as a pioneer of 19th-century musicology. ... The Händel-Gesellschaft, or German Handel Society, produced the second collected edition of the works of Georg Frideric Handel between 1858 and 1902. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Messiah was first performed in New Musick Hall in Fishamble Street, Dublin on 13 April, 1742, with 26 boys and five men from the combined choirs of St Patrick's and Christ Church cathedrals participating.


This article includes content derived from the Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge, 1914, which is in the public domain. The Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge is a 1914 religious encyclopedia, published in thirteen volumes. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


Media

  • Handel's Messiah, And the Glory of the Lord
    Handel's Messiah, For unto us a child is born
    Handel's Messiah, Hallelujah
    Gigue - HWV 433
    Sonata in E minor - Adagio
    Sonata in E minor - Allegro
    Sonata in E minor - Allegro (2)
    Sonata in E minor - Grave
    Fantasias 8, 12 and Carillon
  • Problems playing the files? See media help.

Handel - messiah - 04 and the glory of the lord. ... Handel - messiah - 12 for unto us a child is born. ... Handel - messiah - 44 hallelujah. ... Handel Gigue HWV433. ... Image File history File links Handel_-_Sonata_in_E_minor_-_Adagio. ... Image File history File links Handel_-_Sonata_in_E_minor_-_Allegro. ... Image File history File links Handel_-_Sonata_in_E_minor_-_Allegro_(2). ... Image File history File links Handel_-_Sonata_in_E_minor_-_Grave. ... Image File history File links George_Frideric_Handel_-_Fantasias_8,12_and_Carillon. ...

See also

The following is a list of compositions by George Frideric Handel. ... The Handel festival or ‘Commemoration’ took place in Westminster Abbey in 1784, to commemorate the twenty-fifth anniversary of the death of George Frideric Handel in 1759. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Adams Aileen, K., Hofestadt, B., "Georg Handel (1622–97): the barber-surgeon father of George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)", Journal of Medical Biography, 2005, Aug;13(3):142-9. [1]
  2. ^ Virginia Tech Multimedia Music Dictionary Composer Biographies
  3. ^ Deutsch, Otto Erich, "Handel: A Documentary Biography", Music & Letters, Vol. 36, No. 3 (Jul., 1955), pp. 269-272.
  4. ^ Hird, Edward, Rev., Rediscovering Handel's Messiah, April 1993, Deep Cove Crier, North Vancouver, B.C., Canada.
  5. ^ Handel. A Celebration of his Life and Times 1685 – 1759. National Portrait Gallery, p. 92.
  6. ^ Dent, Edward Joseph [2004-06-17]. Handel. R A Kessinger Publishing, 63. ISBN 1-4191-2275-4. 

Otto Erich Deutsch (September 5, 1883 – November 23, 1967) was an Austrian musicologist. ...

References

  • Burrows, Donald. Handel. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994. ISBN 0-19-816470-X
  • Deutsch, Otto Erich, Handel: A Documentary Biography, 1955.
  • Frosch, W.A., The "case" of George Frideric Handel, New England Journal of Medicine, 1989; 321:765-769, Sep 14, 1989. [2]
  • Harris, Ellen T. (general editor) The librettos of Handel's operas: a collection of seventy librettos documenting Handel's operatic career New York: Garland, 1989. ISBN 0-8240-3862-2
  • Hogwood, Christopher. Handel. London: Thames and Hudson, 1984. ISBN 0-500-01355-1
  • Keates, Jonathan. Handel, the man and his music. London: V. Gollancz, 1985. ISBN 0-575-03573-0
  • Dean, Winton and John Merrill Knapp. Handel's Operas, 1704-1726 (Volume 1) Oxford: Clarendon Press. (1987; 2nd Ed. 1994 (softcover) ISBN 0-198-16441-6
  • Meynell, Hugo. The Art of Handel's Operas The Edwin Mellen Press (1986) ISBN 0-889-46425-1

Otto Erich Deutsch (September 5, 1883 – November 23, 1967) was an Austrian musicologist. ...

Further Reading

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Georg Friedrich Händel

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Scores and recordings

Persondata
NAME Handel, George Frideric
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Händel, Georg Friedrich
SHORT DESCRIPTION German Baroque composer
DATE OF BIRTH 23 February 1685(1685-02-23)
PLACE OF BIRTH Halle at Saxony-Anhalt
DATE OF DEATH 14 April 1759
PLACE OF DEATH London

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Musical Instrument Digital Interface, or MIDI, is a system designed to transmit information between electronic musical instruments. ... The Werner Icking Music Archive, often abbreviated WIMA, is a web archive of public domain sheet music. ... The International Music Score Library Project (IMSLP) is a project for the creation of a virtual library of public domain music scores, based on the wiki principle. ... The Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project is a free digital collection maintained by the University of California, Santa Barbara Libraries with streaming and downloadable versions of over 5,000 phonograph cylinders manufactured between 1895 and the mid 1920s. ... The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) is a coeducational public university located on the Pacific Ocean in Santa Barbara County, California, USA. It is one out of 10 campuses of the University of California. ... Baroque music describes an era and a set of styles of European classical music which were in widespread use between approximately 1500 and 1700[1] (see Dates of classical music eras for a discussion of the problems inherent in defining the beginning and end points). ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 6 - James Stuart, Duke of York becomes King James II of England and Ireland and King James VII of Scotland. ... , Halle (also called Halle an der Saale (literally Halle on the Saale, and in some historic references is not uncommonly called Saale after the river) in order to distinguish it from Halle in North Rhine-Westphalia) is the largest city in the German State of Saxony-Anhalt. ... With an area of 20,447 km² and a population of 2. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... 1759 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
George Frideric Handel: his story from Germany to England (2548 words)
Handel's great love of opera, its flamboyant singers and the challenge of inciting and maintaining the interest of a fickle public audience began to draw him away from the fairly constricted circle of the court and its music.
Handel took an appointment as resident composer with the Earl of Carnarvon (from 1717 the Duke of Chandos) who maintained a complement of singers and instrumentalists for use in his two houses, one in central London, the other in the (then!) quiet countryside at Cannons, Edgware, north London.
Handel's popularity at this popular social venue was attested by the installation of a marble bust of Handel by the sculptor Louis-Francois Roubiliac, commissioned by Jonathan Tyers, owner of the pleasure gardens.
- Classical Music Dictionary - Free MP3 (1138 words)
In the earlier part of his career Handel wrote a large number of solo and duo Italian cantatas, with instrumental accompaniment, as well as vocal duets and trios with the more economical accompaniment of basso continuo, a chordal and a bass instrument.
Since Corelli, a musician who was said to have found Handel's "French" style alien to Italian tradition, the "concerto grosso" had continued as the most popular Baroque orchestral form, with a small concertino group, usually of 2 violins, cello and harpsichord, contrasted with the whole string orchestra.
Handel left a great deal of keyboard music, most of it for the harpsichord and much of it written early in his career.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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