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Encyclopedia > George Felix Allen
George Allen
Junior Senator, Virginia
Term of office:
January 2001–Present
Political party: Republican
Preceded by: Charles Robb
Succeeded by: Incumbent (2007)
Born: March 8, 1952
Whittier, California
Spouse: (1) Anne Patrice Rubel, divorced;

(2) Susan Brown Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x1875, 1180 KB) http://sbc. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... Charles Spittal Chuck Robb (born June 26, American politician. ... March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in Leap years). ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Government Country   State     County United States   California     Los Angeles Mayor Greg Nordbak Geographical characteristics Area     City 37. ... Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage before the death of either spouse, which can be contrasted with an annulment, which is a declaration that a marriage is void, though the effects of marriage may be recognized in such unions, such as spousal support, child custody...

George Felix Allen (born March 8, 1952, in Whittier, California) is a Republican United States Senator from Virginia. He is running for re-election in 2006 and has been mentioned as a possible candidate for the Republican nomination in the 2008 Presidential election. March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in Leap years). ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Government Country   State     County United States   California     Los Angeles Mayor Greg Nordbak Geographical characteristics Area     City 37. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... Seal of the Senate The Senate of the United States of America is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nomination is part of the process of selecting a candidate for either election to an office, or the bestowing of an honor or award. ... Presidential electoral votes by state, assuming no new states enter the Union The United States Presidential election of 2008 is scheduled to occur on November 4, 2008. ...

Contents


Family and early years

Allen's father, George Herbert Allen, of Dutch-Irish and Scottish descent, was a legendary NFL coach who was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2002. George Herbert Allen (April 29, 1918 – December 31, 1990) was an American football coach in the NFL. * - Head Coach // Early life Allen was born in Detroit, Michigan, where his father, Earl Allen, was recorded in the 1920 and 1930 U. S. census records for Wayne County, Michigan as working as... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... // Original meaning and etymology The original meaning of the term coach was: a horse-drawn vehicle designed for the conveyance of more than one passenger — and of mail — and covered for protection from the elements. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is technically the National Football Leagues Hall of Fame. ...


The family lived in Southern California until 1957, when they moved to the suburbs of Chicago after George Sr. got a job with the Chicago Bears. The family moved back to Southern California (Palos Verdes) in 1966 after Allen's father was named head coach of the Los Angeles Rams.[1] 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... City Chicago, Illinois Other nicknames Da Bears, The Monsters of the Midway Team colors Navy Blue, Orange and White Head Coach Lovie Smith Owner McCaskey Family General manager Jerry Angelo Fight song Bear Down, Chicago Bears Mascot Staley Da Bear Local radio Flagship stations: WBBM (780 AM) Announcers: Jeff Joniak... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... The St. ...


Education

Allen graduated in 1970 from Palos Verdes High School, where he was a member of the falconry club and the car club. He was also quarterback of the varsity football team. He was once suspended for painting graffiti on school walls along with other students. The New Republic magazine cites sources, including a school administrator, who say that Allen painted the graffitti, which may have said "Burn, Baby, Burn," a reference to the Watts Riots, or "Kill Whitey," in the run-up to a mostly-black rival school.[2] Palos Verdes High School (PVHS) is one of three public high schools on the Palos Verdes Peninsula in California (the others being Palos Verdes Peninsula High School (formerly Rolling Hills High School) and Rancho Del Mar High School). ... Falconry (occasionally referred to as falconeering) is the art or sport involving raptors (birds of prey) to hunt or pursue game. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Joe Montana, an American quaterback. ... A football team is the collective name given to a number of players who play together in a football game, be it Association football (soccer), Rugby union, Rugby league, Australian Rules football, American football, Gaelic football, or other version of football. ... Suspension is mandatory leave assigned to a student as a form of punishment that can last anywhere from one day to several weeks during which time the student cannot attend school. ... Example of a legal piece on a skateboard shop Graffiti is a type of deliberate application of a media made by humans on any surface, both private and public. ... For other uses, see the disambiguation section. ... The term Watts Riots refers to a large-scale riot which lasted six days in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, in 1965. ...


Allen attended the University of California, Los Angeles for a year before transferring to the University of Virginia, in 1971, where he received a B.A. degree with distinction in history in 1974. He was class president in his senior year at UVA. The University of California, Los Angeles, popularly known as UCLA, is a public, coeducational university located in the residential area of Westwood within the city of Los Angeles. ... Mascot Cavalier Website www. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B., from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ...


After graduating, Allen completed a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Virginia School of Law in 1977. In 1976 he was the chairman of the "Young Virginians for Ronald Reagan". A supporter of Richard Nixon and the Vietnam War, Allen never served in the military. Juris Doctor (J.D.) is a first degree in law offered by universities in a number of countries, most notably the United States. ... The University of Virginia School of Law was founded in Charlottesville in 1819 by Thomas Jefferson as one of the original subjects taught at his academical village, the University of Virginia. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan, (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam) United States of America South Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand the Philippines Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) National Liberation Front Strength ~1,200,000 (1968) ~420,000 (1968) Casualties South Vietnamese dead: 230,000 South Vietnamese wounded: 300,000 US dead: 58,191...


Personal

Allen was married to Anne Patrice Rubel from 1979 to 1983, when they divorced. Allen married Susan Brown in 1986 and the couple now have three children: Tyler, Forrest, and Brooke. The Allens are residents of Mount Vernon, Virginia. 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A child (plural: children) is a young human,or an individual who has not yet reached puberty. ... Mount Vernon is a census-designated place located in Fairfax County, Virginia. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ...


Allen is a member of the Presbyterian Church. He is fond of using football metaphors, a tendency which has been remarked upon by journalists and commentators.[1][2] Allen has been chewing tobacco since he was introduced to it in high school by his father's football players. Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... In language, a metaphor (from the Greek: metapherin) is a rhetorical trope defined as a direct comparison between two or more seemingly unrelated subjects. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A commentator is an individual who discusses social, political or cultural issues or events, typically in a public context; synonyms include pundit. ...


Career

Virginia state delegate

After earning his law degree, Allen served as clerk for a federal judge and then opened a law office in Charlottesville. Allen's first race for the Virginia House of Delegates was in 1979, two years after he graduated from law school. He lost, but won two years later in 1981. He was a delegate from 1982 to 1991, representing a district in Albemarle County. The Virginia House of Delegates is the lower house of the Virginia General Assembly. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed Seat Charlottesville Area  - Total  - Water 1,881 km² (726 mi²) 9 km² (4 mi²) 0. ...


U.S. House of Representatives

On November 5, 1991, Allen won a special election to fill the seat in the U.S. House of Representatives for Virginia's 7th District. Incumbent congressman D. French Slaughter, Jr. had resigned due to a series of strokes. Allen's opponent was Slaughter's cousin, Kay Slaughter. During the campaign, the National Republican Congressional Committee ran a TV ad on Allen's behalf featuring Slaughter's image superimposed over a photograph of an anti-war rally with a banner reading, "Victory to Iraq." Allen won with 63 percent of the vote.[3] November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is, along with the United States Senate, one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States. ... The National Republican Congressional Committee is the Republican Hill committee for the United States House of Representatives, working to elect Republicans to that body. ... Superimposing, or superimposition, is the process of mixing two video sources together by overlaying one source with a partially transparent second source. ... A sepia-tinted photograph of an English couple, taken in 1895. ... A man holds up a street puppet designed to resemble George W. Bush at a demonstration against the World Bank and International Monetary Fund on April 16, 2005 in Washington, D.C.. American Civil Rights March on Washington, leaders marching from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial, August 28... A banner is a flag or other piece of cloth bearing a symbol, logo, slogan or other message. ...


Allen's career in the House was short-lived: in the 1990s round of redistricting, Allen's district, which stretched from the fringes of the Washington suburbs to Charlottesville and included much of the Shenandoah Valley, was eliminated even though Virginia gained a congressional seat as a result of the 1990 Census. This occurred because the Justice Department required Virginia to draw a majority-black district in order to comply with the Voting Rights Act and Virginia's Democratic legislature wished to eliminate a Republican seat. See Barone and Ujifusa, Almanac of American Politics 1994. Flag Seal Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location Location of Washington, D.C., with regard to the surrounding states of Maryland and Virginia. ... Charlottesville is an independent city located within the confines of Albemarle County in the state of Virginia. ... Canoeing on the Shenandoah River near Winchester, VA. The Shenandoah Valley region of western Virginia, from Winchester to Staunton, is bounded by the Blue Ridge mountains to the East and the Allegheny mountains to the West. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... Justice Department redirects here. ... The Voting Rights Act of 1965 (Public Law 89-10) outlawed the requirement that would-be voters in the United States take literacy tests to qualify to register to vote, and it provided for federal registration of voters -- instead of state or local voter registration which had often been denied...


Allen's district was split between three neighboring districts. While his home in Earlysville (a suburb of Charlottesville) was placed in the 5th District of Lewis F. Payne, Jr., most of his district was placed in the 10th District of Frank Wolf. Allen moved to Mount Vernon and prepared to challenge Wolf in a primary, but Virginia Republican figures made it known that he would have no future in the party if he waged such a challenge. Allen was therefore forced to leave the House in January 1993. Lewis Franklin Payne, Jr. ... Frank Rudolph Wolf (born January 30, 1939), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1981, representing the Tenth Congressional District of Virginia in Northern Virginia. ... Mount Vernon is a census-designated place located in Fairfax County, Virginia. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ...


Governor

In November 1993, Allen was elected the 67th Governor of Virginia, serving from 1994 to 1998. As governor, he was recognized for educational reforms such as the implementation of rigorous academic standards and accountability. His tenure also included the overhaul of the juvenile justice system, moves toward the elimination of state welfare programs, and the abolition of parole. Virginia, especially Northern Virginia, boomed during this time period, particularly in the technology area. Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal. // Events January Bill Clinton January 1 : North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) goes into effect. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ...


Minority groups, especially African-Americans, in Virginia criticized Governor Allen for his policies and his embrace of the Confederate flag, which the NAACP condemned as a symbol of racism and hate. As a lawyer, Allen also had a noose hanging from a ficus tree in his office, a decoration critics have charged was racially insensitive, but which Allen has explained as a symbol of his tough stance on law-and-order issues. Allen also staunchly opposed a state holiday in honor of the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.[3] While serving as Governor in 1994, he endorsed a convicted felon, Oliver North, for U.S. Senate. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, Allen proclaimed April as Confederate History and Heritage Month and called the Civil War "a four-year struggle for independence and sovereign rights."[4] The proclamation did not mention slavery, and his successor, Republican Governor James Gilmore, changed the proclamation and wrote a version that denounced slavery[5]. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, or NAACP, is one of the oldest and most influential civil rights organizations in the United States. ... Martin Luther King, Jr. ... Lt-Col. ... The Civil War is by far the most common term for this conflict; see Naming the American Civil War. ... For other uses, see Slavery (disambiguation). ...


Allen could not run for re-election because Virginia's constitution does not allow a governor to succeed himself; as of 2006 Virginia is the only state that has such a provision. [4] 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Law partner

In February 1998, Allen became a Richmond-based partner at the law firm McGuire Woods Battle & Booth (now McGuireWoods LLP), as head of its business expansion and relocation team. At the time, Allen said "I think it's healthy to get out of government. If you stay in too long, you lose track of reality and the real world."[6] According to a disclosure form Allen filed on May 12, 2000, he was paid $450,000 by the firm between January 1999 and April 2000. [7] May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (133rd in leap years). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


In mid-1998, Allen joined the board of directors of Xybernaut,[8] a company selling mobile, flip-screen computers. The firm never made a profit - it posted 33 consecutive quarterly losses after it went public in 1996. [9] In September 1999, Allen and the rest of the company's board dismissed the company's accounting firm, PricewaterhouseCoopers, which had issued a report with a "going concern" paragraph that questioned the company’s financial health. [10] Xybernaut Corporation is a provider of wearable / mobile computing hardware, software and services, bringing communications and full-function computing power in a hands-free design. ... Look up company in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A Lego RCX Computer is an example of an embedded computer used to control mechanical devices. ... PricewaterhouseCoopers (or PwC) is the worlds largest professional services firm. ...


In 1998 and 1999, McGuire Woods billed $315,925 to Xybernaut for legal work. Allen remained on the Xybernaut board until December 2000. He was granted 110,000 options of company stock that were worth $1.5 million at their peak, but he never exercised those options, which expired 90 days after he left the board. Allen made almost no money from the stock, according to his communications director, John Reid. He has refused repeated requests to discuss his involvement with the company.[7] McGuire Woods and its employees were, as of July 21, 2006, the top contributor to Allen's 2006 Senatorial campaign. [11]


United States Senate

Allen was elected to the Senate in November 2000, defeating the Democratic incumbent, Chuck Robb, son-in-law of the late President Lyndon B. Johnson. Allen is a member of the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee, the Foreign Relations Committee and the Energy and Natural Resources Committee. An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Sen. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was the 36th President of the United States (1963–1969). ... The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation is a standing committee of the United States Senate in charge of all senate matters related to the following subjects: Coast Guard Coastal zone management Communications Highway safety Inland waterways, except construction Interstate commerce Marine and ocean navigation, safety, and transportation Marine... The U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... The United States Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources has jurisdiction over matters related to energy and nuclear waste policy, territorial policy, native Hawaiian matters, and public lands. ...


Allen was appointed in the last Congress to serve as the chairman of the High Tech Task Force. Allen was elected as a member of the Senate Republican leadership as Chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee in 2002, and oversaw a net gain of four seats for the Republicans in the 2004 Senate elections. His successor as NRSC chair is Senator Elizabeth Dole. Seal of the Congress. ... A chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) is the Republican Hill committee for the United States Senate, working to elect Republicans to that body. ... Results -- light red represents Republican holds, dark red Republican pickups, light blue Democratic holds, dark blue Democratic pickups. ... Elizabeth Hanford Liddy Dole (born July 29, 1936) was elected to the United States Senate in 2002 to represent North Carolina for a term ending in 2009. ...


Allen played a minor role as a Confederate officer in the 2003 film Gods and Generals, a movie which included many cameos of people of politicians such as Senator Robert Byrd, and former Senator Phil Gramm [5]. His role included singing "Southern Rights Hoorah!" (Video). Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans... Any holder of an office or of a post may bear the title officer. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed. ... Robert Duvall as Robert E. Lee // Novel Gods and Generals is the prequel to Michael Shaaras 1974 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about the Battle of Gettysburg, The Killer Angels (filmed as Gettysburg). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Robert Byrd Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Robert Byrd Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917 in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina), a Democrat, is West Virginias senior United States Senator. ... William Philip Phil Gramm (born July 8, 1942, in Fort Benning, Georgia) served as a Democratic Congressman (1978-1983), a Republican Congressman (1983-1985) and a Republican Senator from Texas (1985-2002). ... Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, often constrasted with speech. ...


In June of 2005, Allen co-sponsored a resolution that had the Senate formally apologize for never passing federal legislation despite the lynching of nearly 5,000 people between 1882 and 1968. While spearheading this apology, Allen stood in the Senate and said, "I rise today to offer a formal and heartfelt apology to all the victims of lynching in our history, and for the failure of the United States Senate to take action when action was most needed." This article concerns the legal meaning of the term resolution. ... Bold textJAMES CHECKLEY Legislation (or statutory law) is law which has been promulgated (or enacted) by a legislature or other governing body. ... Lynching is a term loosely applied to various forms of violence, usually murder, conceived by its perpetrators as extra-legal punishment of offenders by a summary procedure, ignoring, or even contrary to, the strict forms of law, notably execution, or used as a terrorist method of enforcing social domination. ...


More recently, Allen joined calls for the Senate to consider an apology for slavery. However, in late May of 2006 he began to back away from a slavery apology proposal, explaining that "[s]o far, we haven't seen much of a coalition of support for it".[12]


2006 re-election campaign

Allen's current term in the Senate expires in January 2007. He is seeking re-election in 2006. The Virginia Senate election of 2006 will be held on November 7, 2006. ... Seats up for election. ...


Recent polls show Allen's approval rating at 53%. By comparison, fellow Republican Virginia senator John Warner has an approval rating of 57% in the same poll. [6] Former Secretary of the Navy James H. Webb, a supporter of Allen in 2000 [7], is the Democratic nominee. Gail Parker, a retired USAF officer and retired civilian Pentagon budget analyst, is also on the ballot as the Independent Green Party candidate. John William Warner (born February 18, 1927) is an American statesman and politician, who served as Secretary of the Navy from 1972-1974 and has served as a Republican senator from Virginia since 1979. ... James H. Webb, Jr. ... Gail Parker is a Virginia business woman, retired USAF Major, former Pentagon budget analyst, and Independent Green Party of Virginia candidate for Senate in 2006 from Virginia. ... This party holds a differnt platform from the Green Party in the respect that they are partially conservative. ...


A late July 2006 Rasmussen poll showed Allen leading Webb, with the support of 50% of likely voters supporting and 39% supporting Webb.[8]. Also, a Survey USA poll showed a larger lead for Allen, with 56% supporting Allen and 37% supporting Webb. Scott Rasmussen was the co-founder of the sports television network ESPN, along with his father Bill Rasmussen. ... SurveyUSA is a polling firm in the United States. ...


He won the Republican nomination on August 11, 2006. August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


On August 17, 2006, a SurveyUSA poll[9], sponsored by a local Virginian Television Station (WDBJ-TV Roanoke) was conducted and released. Although Allen holds a 47% approval of respondents, 67% of respondents concede that Allen's "macaca" comments were inappropriate. August 17 is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... SurveyUSA is a major polling firm in the United States. ... Macaca (also written as macaque) is a dismissive epithet used by Francophone colonials in Africa for native populations of North and Subsaharan Africans. ...


A Rasmussen poll released on August 18, 2006[10], shows Allen's challenger James H. Webb within 5 percentage points behind the incumbent (Allen 47%, Webb 42%). Many believe the recent poll is a reflection on how voters responded to Allen's recent comments of University of Virginia student S.R. Sidarth. Scott Rasmussen was the co-founder of the sports television network ESPN, along with his father Bill Rasmussen. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... James H. Webb, Jr. ... The Virginia Senate election of 2006 will be held on November 7, 2006. ...


On August 21, 2006, another Survey USA poll showed that James H. Webb was only three percentage points behind Allen (Allen 48% Webb 45%), confirming the results of the Rasmussen poll. [13] August 21 is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... SurveyUSA is a polling firm in the United States. ... James H. Webb, Jr. ...


An August 27 Zogby/WSJ poll showed Webb ahead by 1 point. Allen's seat was thought to be safe but it now appears he is in danger of losing it altogether.


2008 Presidential bid

In a survey of 175 Washington insiders conducted by National Journal's "The Hotline" and released April 29, 2005, Allen was the frontrunner for the Republican nomination for the 2008 Presidential election. [14] From [1]. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... National Journal is a weekly magazine about American politics and government, published by National Journal Group, Inc. ... April 29 is the 119th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (120th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 2008 is scheduled to occur on November 4, 2008. ...


In a subsequent insider survey by National Journal in May of 2006, Allen had dropped to second place, and John McCain held a 3-1 lead over Allen.[15]


Allen has traveled frequently to Iowa (the first state with a presidential caucus) and New Hampshire (the first state with a presidential primary) and is widely assumed to be preparing a run for president. While in Iowa, Allen said that he wished he had been born in Iowa.


The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee has accused Allen of changing his positions on key issues to appeal to the Republican Party's conservative base, in preparation for the primaries in 2008. [11] For example, although he had previously supported federal funding for embryonic stem cell research, he modified his stance on August 7, 2005 to confine the funding to research that did not destroy embryos.[16] DSCC can also refer to Defense Supply Center, Columbus. ... This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... Categories: Biology stubs | Developmental biology ...


Controversies

Charges by Allen's sister Jennifer

Allen's younger sister Jennifer Allen alleges in her memoir Fifth Quarter: The Scrimmage of a Football Coach's Daughter (Random House Publishing, 2000) that Allen attacked his younger siblings during his childhood. [17] She claims that Allen held her by her feet over Niagara Falls[18]; struck her boyfriend in the head with a pool cue[19]; threw his brother Bruce through a glass sliding door; tackled his brother Gregory, breaking his collarbone;[20]; and dragged Jennifer upstairs by her hair. In the book, she wrote, "George hoped someday to become a dentist…George said he saw dentistry as a perfect profession--getting paid to make people suffer."[21] Random House is a publishing division of the German media conglomerate Bertelsmann based in New York City. ... For other uses, see Niagara Falls (disambiguation). ... This article needs cleanup. ...


Allen has disputed his sister's characterizations of their childhood. [12]


Barr Labs controversy

It was revealed on August 8, 2006 that the Senator, who opposes abortion rights, owned stock in Barr Laboratories Inc., the only American maker of the Plan B "morning after pill", an emergency contraceptive that is supposed to prevent pregnancy if taken within 72 hours of intercourse. The Webb campaign criticized Allen for holding stock in a company that makes a product that many of his supporters oppose. Allen responded by saying that he holds the stock because Barr Labs has created jobs in Virginia, and by pointing to his consistently pro-life voting record. Allen has no plans to sell the stock. [22] August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (221st in leap years), with 145 days remaining. ... Throughout history, induced abortions have been a source of considerable debate and controversy. ... The morning-after pill, also known as emergency contraception or emergency birth control, is a pill regimen that a woman can take up to three days after she has had sexual intercourse to prevent the implantation of a fertilized egg in her uterus. ... Emergency contraception (EC) (also known as Emergency Birth Control (EBC), the morning-after pill, or postcoital contraception) refers to measures, that if taken after sex may prevent a pregnancy. ... Pregnant woman at 26-week gestation A pregnant woman near the end of her term Pregnancy is the carrying of one or more embryos or fetuses by female mammals, including humans, inside their bodies. ... The hour (symbol: h) is a unit of time. ... It has been suggested that Anti-abortion movement be merged into this article or section. ...


Confederate flag controversy

Allen has a long history of interest in the Confederate flag, in spite of his never having lived in the South until his transfer from UCLA to the University of Virginia as a sophomore in college. The following are the flags used by the short-lived Confederate States of America. ... The University of California, Los Angeles, popularly known as UCLA, is a public, coeducational university located in the residential area of Westwood within the city of Los Angeles. ... Mascot Cavalier Website www. ...


The May 8, 2006[23] and the May 15, 2006[24] issues of The New Republic reported extensively on Allen's long association with the Confederate flag. The magazine reported that "[a]ccording to his colleagues, classmates, and published reports, Allen has either displayed the [Confederate] flag – on himself, his car, inside his home – or expressed his enthusiastic approval of the emblem from approximately 1967 to 2000." Allen wore a Confederate flag pin for his high school senior class photo. In high school, college, and law school, Allen adorned his vehicle with a Confederate flag. In college he displayed a Confederate flag in his room. He displayed a Confederate flag in his family's living room until 1992. In 1993, Allen's first statewide TV campaign ad for governor included a Confederate flag. In 2000, when a voter told Allen, "Long live the Confederate flag!" Allen replied, "You got it!" For other uses, see the disambiguation section. ... The following are the flags used by the short-lived Confederate States of America. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ...


Allen has confirmed that the pin in his high school yearbook was a Confederate flag. Allen has said "it is possible" that he had a Confederate flag on his car in high school. He has not responded to the allegations that he displayed the flag on his pickup truck and in his room in college and law school.


In 1993, he confirmed that he had long displayed the Confederate flag in his living room, saying that he owned the flag as part of a collection of undeclared scope. In August 2006, however, longtime political journalist Bob Gibson of the [Charlottesville] Daily Progress reported that "two former officials who visited Allen’s log cabin home at different times recall only up to two flags on display there, a Confederate flag and, on an opposite wall, an American flag."[25] Details of cabin corner joint with squared off logs A log cabin is a small house built from logs. ...


Greg Stevens, the political consultant who made the 1993 TV ad, confirmed that the ad included a Confederate flag.


Council of Conservative Citizens

The Nation reported in 2006 that Allen, as Governor, initiated contact with the Council of Conservative Citizens (CCC), an organization descended from the White Citizens' Councils of the segregation-era South.[26] At a 1996 Conservative Political Action Conference attended by Governor Allen and CCC leaders, Allen suggested that the group join together for a photograph.[27] The Nation obtained and published the resulting snapshot, which the CCC had printed in the summer 1996 edition of its Citizens Informer newsletter. The CCC is designated as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center [13] This article is about the U.S publication. ... Council of Conservative Citizens logo. ... The White Citizens Council (WCC) movement was a U.S. movement against racial desegregation. ... Jim Crow laws were state and local laws enacted in the Southern and border states of the United States and in force between 1876 and 1964 that required racial segregation, especially of African-Americans, in all public facilities. ... The U.S. Southern states or The South, known during the American Civil War era as Dixie, is a distinctive region of the United States with its own unique historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... Conservative Political Action Conference is an annual political conference held in Washington, D.C.. It is attended by conservative groups, activists, authors and elected officials from across the United States. ... A sepia-tinted photograph of an English couple, taken in 1895. ... A newsletter is a regularly distributed publication generally about one main topic that is of interest to its subscribers. ... A hate group is an organized group or movement that advocates hate, hostility or violence towards members of a race, ethnicity, religion, or other sector of society. ...


Macaca controversy

Allen points to Webb volunteer, Sidarth, referring to him as "Macaca".
Allen points to Webb volunteer, Sidarth, referring to him as "Macaca".[28]

On Friday, August 11, 2006, Allen twice called S.R. Sidarth, a 20-year-old Webb campaign volunteer, a word that sounds like "macaca" or "macaque". Sidarth is of Indian ancestry, but was born and raised in Fairfax County, Virginia. Sidarth was filming an Allen campaign stop in Breaks, Virginia, near the Kentucky border, as a "tracker" for the opposing Webb campaign. Image File history File links Allentaunting. ... Image File history File links Allentaunting. ... Macaca (also written as macaque) is a dismissive epithet used by Francophone colonials in Africa for native populations of North and Subsaharan Africans. ... Type Species Simia inuus Linnaeus, 1758 = Simia sylvanus Linnaeus, 1758 Species See text. ... For an article on American Indians see Native Americans. ... Official website: http://www. ... The current version of the article or section reads like an advertisement. ... Official language(s) English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ...


During a speech, Allen paused, then began referring to Sidarth:

   
This fellow here over here with the yellow shirt, Macaca, or whatever his name is. He's with my opponent. He's following us around everywhere. And it's just great. We're going to places all over Virginia, and he's having it on film and it's great to have you here and you show it to your opponent because he's never been there and probably will never come. [...] Let's give a welcome to Macaca, here. Welcome to America and the real world of Virginia.[29]
   

According to Sidarth, he was the only person of color present among the crowd of 100 or so Republican supporters, some of whom applauded Allen's remarks.[30] Image File history File links Cquote1. ... Image File history File links Cquote2. ...


The Webb campaign accused Allen of having insulted Sidarth's race. The word "macaca" is a variation of "macaque", which refers to a type of monkey, and is a French racial slur used for dark skinned peoples of North African descent. However, the word has different meanings in other languages such as Italian and Spanish. In Italian, the word macaca/macaco means fool, clown, simpleton.[31] Allen's mother emigrated from Tunisia. She hailed from an ancient Jewish family from Italy and she speaks Italian and French.[32] [33] Allen speaks French and obtained excellent grades in French as an undergraduate.[34] Allen's campaign maintains that the word was used in reference to Sidarth's hairstyle, which they claim to have called a mohawk, while Sidarth calls his haircut a mullet[29]. Both sides have claimed that a now widely disseminated photo of Sidarth[35], hosted by the Webb campaign, supports their descriptions of his hairstyle.[citation needed] According to an interview of Sidarth conducted on the Young Turks radio program, Sidarth was wearing a baseball cap on the day the incident occurred.[36] For other senses of this word, see race (disambiguation). ... Approximate worldwide distribution of monkeys. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A typical mullet A mullet is a haircut that is short in the front, on the top, and on the sides, but long in the back. ...


According to the Washington Post, Allen's campaign manager initially dismissed the racial incident with an expletive. Allen later said that he had heard his staff use the term "macaca" in reference to Sidarth, that he did not know what the word meant, and that he did not intend to insult Sidarth's ethnicity when he singled him out to the crowd. "I do apologize if he's offended by that," Allen said, adding that "I would never want to demean him as an individual."[29] On August 20, the Richmond Times-Dispatch reported Allen as saying "he made up the word macaca (a different explanation from the campaign's first response)." [14]


On August 15, John Reid, Allen's communications director, told the New York Times that members of Allen's campaign "good-naturedly" nicknamed Sidarth "Mohawk" when speaking among themselves, but could not explain how the word morphed into "macaca."[37] Reid told the Times that Sidarth only received a nickname from Allen campaign staff because he would not give his real name. Interviewed that day on CNN, however, Sidarth recalled shaking Allen's hand earlier in the week and giving his name. "He's very good with names, legendarily. He tries very hard to remember peoples' names when meeting them," Sidarth said. As for the "macaca" remark, "I am disappointed that someone like a Senator of the United States could use something [so] completely offensive."[38]


On August 16, the National Journal reported that two Virginia Republicans who heard the word used by Allen's campaign staff said "macaca" was a neologism created from "Mohawk" and "caca," Spanish slang for excrement. "Said one Republican close to the campaign: 'In other words, [Sidarth] was a shit-head, an annoyance.'"[39] National Journal is a weekly magazine about American politics and government, published by National Journal Group, Inc. ... A neologism is a word, term, or phrase which has been recently created (coined) — often to apply to new concepts, or to reshape older terms in newer language form. ... Look up caca in Wiktionary, the free dictionary In Roman mythology, Caca was the sister of the fire-breathing giant Cacus. ... Feces (also spelled faeces or fæces) are the waste products from the digestive tract expelled through the anus during defecation. ...


In an interview released on August 16, Sidarth said that "he ha[d] yet to hear from Allen directly with an apology".[15] However, Allen's communications director John Reid stated on the same day that "[t]he Senator ha[d] apologized sincerely and repeatedly over the last two days to the young man and to the public in general." [40] [41]


On August 23, twelve days after the incident, Allen phoned in an apology to Sidarth and apologized for the remarks, saying that the apology was "from his heart." Sidarth declined to comment on whether he considered the apology sincere. [42]


References

  1. ^ A Tough Question for George Allen. The Decembrist (2005-05-13). Retrieved on 2006-08-15.
  2. ^ "Mixing Politics, Pigskins", The Washington Post, February 6, 2006, p. C01.
  3. ^ Jake Tapper, Dead senator running?, Salon magazine, November 17, 1999.
  4. ^ "Governor Is Criticized For 'Confederacy Month'", The New York Times, April 11, 1997.
  5. ^ "GEORGE ALLEN'S FLAG FETISH", The New Republic, May 15, 2006.
  6. ^ Mark Hilpert,"Ex-Gov. Allen now `rainmaker' for Va. law firm", Washington Business Journal, February 13, 1998
  7. ^ a b Garance Franke-Ruta,"Just a Gigolo: In the go-go ’90s, George Allen sat on the board of a Virginia tech company. Now, the company faces several class-action suits and an SEC insiders probe", American Prospect magazine, issue date of September 12, 2006
  8. ^ [http://sec.edgar-online.com/1998/10/01/08/0000910680-98-000357/Section9.asp Xybernaut October 1, 1999 SB-2 SEC filing
  9. ^ Ellen McCarthy, "Xybernaut Hid Gathering Storm In Bright Forecasts", Washington Post, April 21, 2005
  10. ^ Xybernaut SEC filing, Form 8-K, September 19, 1999
  11. ^ Campaign contributions to Allen's Senatorial campaign, Washington Post
  12. ^ "Allen undecided on slavery apology, cites little support", Richmond Times-Dispatch, May 26, 2006.
  13. ^ http://www.wusatv9.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=51530
  14. ^ Gwen Glazer. "Signed, Sealed... But Not So Fast. Insiders' Predictions For WH 2008 May Not Match Public's Vision", National Journal, April 29, 2005.
  15. ^ McCain Roars Past Allen In New NJ Insiders Poll. National Journal (May 11, 2006).
  16. ^ "CNN LATE EDITION WITH WOLF BLITZER", CNN, August 7, 2005.
  17. ^ Fifth Quarter: The Scrimmage of a Football Coach's Daughter Contains editorial reviews
  18. ^ Jennifer Allen. Fifth Quarter: The Scrimmage of a Football Coach's Daughter, Random House, 2000. page 34
  19. ^ Jennifer Allen. Fifth Quarter: The Scrimmage of a Football Coach's Daughter, Random House, 2000. page 178
  20. ^ Jennifer Allen. Fifth Quarter: The Scrimmage of a Football Coach's Daughter, Random House, 2000. page 22
  21. ^ Jennifer Allen. Fifth Quarter: The Scrimmage of a Football Coach's Daughter, Random House, 2000. page 22
  22. ^ "Abortion Foe Allen Faulted for Stock in Morning-After Pill Maker", The Washington Post, August 9, 2006, p. B05.
  23. ^ "GEORGE ALLEN'S RACE PROBLEM", The New Republic, May 08, 2006.
  24. ^ "GEORGE ALLEN'S FLAG FETISH", The New Republic, May 15, 2006.
  25. ^ Gibson, Bob, "Allen’s old flag collection may be small", The Daily Progress, August 25, 2006.
  26. ^ Applebome, Peter, "DIVISIVE WORDS: THE RECORD; Lott's Walk Near the Incendiary Edge of Southern History", The New York Times, December 13, 2002.
  27. ^ Blumenthal, Max, "Beyond Macaca: The Photograph That Haunts George Allen", The Nation, September 11, 2006. Published online on August 29, 2006.
  28. ^ Allen's Listening Tour. YouTube (2006-08-14). Retrieved on 2006-08-15.
  29. ^ a b c "Sen. Allen's Remarks Spark Ire", The Washington Post, August 14, 2006.
  30. ^ "Allen Quip Provokes Outrage, Apology", The Washington Post, August 15, 2006.
  31. ^ {Collins Sansoni Italian Dictionary:publisher= Sansoni of Florence, Italy {cite news | url=http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/List-of-ethnic-slurs#M | title=Encyclopedia: List of ethnic slurs | publisher=Nationmaster.com}}
  32. ^ "'Hardball with Chris Matthews' for March 29", MSNBC, March 30, 2006.
  33. ^ Senator George Allen addresses Graduates. Longwood University (May 14, 2005).
  34. ^ Senator George Allen addresses Graduates. Longwood University (May 14, 2005).
  35. ^ S.R. Sidarth at an Allen Campaign Event. Virginia Conservative (August 18, 2006).
  36. ^ http://www.theyoungturks.com/story/2006/8/16/201332/564
  37. ^ Verbal Gaffe From a Senator, Then an Apology. New York Times (August 15, 2005).
  38. ^ George Allen's 'Macaca' Remark. CNN News (August 15, 2006).
  39. ^ A New Explanation For "Macaca?". National Journal (Hotline) (August 16, 2006).
  40. ^ http://www.theyoungturks.com/story/2006/8/16/201332/564
  41. ^ http://hotlineblog.nationaljournal.com/archives/2006/08/a_new_explanati.html
  42. ^ http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/23/AR2006082301600_2.html

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See also

The Virginia Senate Election of 2006 will be held on November 7, 2006. ...

External links

Preceded by:
D. French Slaughter, Jr.
United States Representative for the 7th Congressional District of Virginia
1991–1993
Succeeded by:
Thomas J. Bliley, Jr.
Preceded by:
Douglas Wilder
Governor of Virginia
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Jim Gilmore
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Current United States Senators

AL: Shelby (R), Sessions (R)
AK: Stevens (R), Murkowski (R)
AZ: McCain (R), Kyl (R)
AR: Lincoln (D), Pryor (D)
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HI: Inouye (D), Akaka (D)
ID: Craig (R), Crapo (R)
IL: Durbin (D), Obama (D) This is a complete list of current United States Senators arranged alphabetically by the state they represent, along with lists of party affiliation, and leadership. ... Alabama was admitted to the Union on December 14 1819. ... Richard Craig Dick Shelby (born May 6, 1934) is an American politician. ... Jefferson Beauregard Jeff Sessions III (born December 24, 1946) is the junior United States Senator from Alabama. ... Alaska was admitted to the Union on January 3, 1959. ... Theodore Fulton “Ted” Stevens (born November 18, 1923) is a U.S. Senator from Alaska. ... Lisa Ann Murkowski (born May 22, 1957) is an American politician. ... Arizona was admitted to the Union on February 14 1912. ... John Sidney McCain III (born August 29, 1936) is an American politician. ... This page is about the current Arizona Senator; for his father, a U.S. Representative from Iowa, see John Kyl; for a U.S. Representative from Mississippi with a similar name, see John Kyle. ... Arkansas was admitted to the Union on June 15, 1836. ... Blanche Lambert Lincoln (born September 30, 1960) is a Democratic United States Senator from the State of Arkansas. ... Mark Lunsford Pryor (born January 10, 1963) is a politician in Arkansas. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into U.S. Congressional Delegations from California. ... Dianne Goldman Berman Feinstein (born June 22, 1933) is a Democratic U.S. Senator from California, a position she has held since 1992. ... Barbara Levy Boxer (born November 11, 1940) is an American politician and the current junior U.S. Senator from the State of California. ... Colorado was admitted to the Union on August 1, 1876. ... Alan Wayne Allard (born December 2, 1943) is a United States Senator from Colorado and a member of the Republican Party. ... Kenneth Lee Salazar (born March 2, 1955) is an American politician, rancher, and environmentalist from the U.S. state of Colorado. ... Connecticut ratified the Constitution on January 9, 1788. ... Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944), is an American politician. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is an American politician from Connecticut. ... Delaware ratified the Constitution on December 7, 1787. ... Joseph Robinette Joe Biden, Jr. ... Thomas Richard Tom Carper (born January 23, 1947) is an American politician from Wilmington, in New Castle County, Delaware. ... Florida was admitted to the Union on March 3, 1845. ... There have been several well-known people named Bill Nelson, including: Bill Nelson (politician) Bill Nelson (musician) Bill Nelson (illustrator) Bill Nelson (fictional, Marvel Comics) Former husband of the feline Avenger known as Tigra (Greer Grant Nelson), NYPD officer, deceased as of current writing. ... Melquiades Rafael Mel Martinez (born October 23, 1946) is a Cuban-born American politician, currently a United States Senator from Florida. ... |Georgia ratified the Constitution on January 2, 1788. ... Clarence Saxby Chambliss (born November 10, 1943) is the senior United States Senator from Georgia. ... John Hardy Johnny Isakson (born December 28, 1944), American politician, has been a Republican United States Senator from Georgia since 2005. ... Hawaii was admitted to the Union on August 21, 1959. ... Daniel Ken Inouye (born September 7, 1924) is a recipient of the Medal of Honor and currently serves as the senior United States Senator from Hawaii. ... Daniel Kahikina Akaka (born September 11, 1924) is a U.S. Senator from Hawaii and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Idaho was admitted to the Union on July 3, 1890. ... Larry Edwin Craig (born July 20, 1945) is the senior United States Senator from Idaho. ... Michael Dean Crapo (pronounced Cray-po) (born May 20, 1951) is the junior United States Senator from Idaho. ... Illinois was admitted to the Union on December 3, 1818. ... Richard Joseph Dick Durbin (born November 21, 1944) is a Democratic American politician. ... Barack Hussein Obama, Jr. ...

IN: Lugar (R), Bayh (D)
IA: Grassley (R), Harkin (D)
KS: Brownback (R), Roberts (R)
KY: McConnell (R), Bunning (R)
LA: Landrieu (D), Vitter (R)
ME: Snowe (R), Collins (R)
MD: Sarbanes (D), Mikulski (D)
MA: Kennedy (D), Kerry (D)
MI: Levin (D), Stabenow (D)
MN: Dayton (D), Coleman (R)
MS: Cochran (R), Lott (R)
MO: Bond (R), Talent (R) Indiana was admitted to the Union on December 11, 1816. ... Richard Green Dick Lugar (born April 4, 1932) is the senior United States Republican Senator from Indiana. ... Birch Evans Evan Bayh III (born December 26, 1955) is an American politician who has served as a U.S. Senator from Indiana since 1999 and a former Governor of Indiana. ... Iowa was admitted to the Union on December 28, 1846. ... Charles Ernest Chuck Grassley (born September 17, 1933) is the senior United States Senator from Iowa. ... Thomas Richard Tom Harkin (born November 19, 1939) is the junior United States Senator from Iowa. ... Kansas was admitted to the Union on January 29, 1861. ... Samuel Dale Brownback (born September 12, 1956) is a Senator from Kansas. ... Charles Patrick Roberts (born April 20, 1936) is a United States Senator from Kansas. ... Kentucky was admitted to the Union on June 1, 1792. ... Addison Mitchell McConnell, Jr. ... James Paul David Jim Bunning (born October 23, 1931 in Southgate, Kentucky) is an American politician who was a Hall of Fame pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1955 to 1971. ... Louisiana was admitted to the Union on April 30, 1812. ... Mary Loretta Landrieu (born November 23, 1955) is the senior Democratic United States Senator for the state of Louisiana. ... David Bruce Vitter (born May 3, 1961), American politician, is a Senator from Louisiana. ... Maine was admitted to the Union on March 15, 1820. ... Olympia Jean Bouchles Snowe (born February 21, 1947 in Augusta, Maine) is a Republican politician and the senior United States senator from Maine. ... Susan Margaret Collins (born December 7, 1952 in Caribou, Maine) is the junior U.S. Senator from Maine and a Republican. ... Maryland ratified the Constitution on April 28, 1788. ... Paul Spyros Sarbanes (born February 3, 1933), a Democrat, is the senior United States Senator representing the state of Maryland. ... Barbara Ann Mikulski (born July 20, 1936), a member of the Democratic Party, is the current Class 3 United States Senator representing the State of Maryland. ... Massachusetts ratified the Constitution on February 26, 1788. ... Edward Moore Ted Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, having served since 1962. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... Michigan was admitted to the Union on January 26, 1837. ... Carl Milton Levin (born June 28, 1934) is a Democratic United States Senator from Michigan. ... Deborah Ann Stabenow (born April 29, 1950) is a Democratic United States Senator from Michigan. ... Minnesota was admitted to the Union on May 11, 1858. ... Mark B. Dayton (born January 26, 1947) is a Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party US Senator from Minnesota who took office in 2001. ... Norman Bertram Norm Coleman Jr. ... Mississippi was admitted to the Union on December 10, 1817. ... William Thad Cochran (born December 7, 1937) is the senior United States Senator from Mississippi. ... Chester Trent Lott (born October 9, 1941 in Grenada, Mississippi) is a United States Senator from Mississippi and a member of the Republican Party. ... Missouri was admitted to the Union on August 10, 1821. ... Christopher Samuel Kit Bond (born March 6, 1939 in St. ... James Matthes Jim Talent (born October 18, 1956) is an American politician, the junior Senator from Missouri. ...

MT: Baucus (D), Burns (R)
NE: Hagel (R), Nelson (D)
NV: Reid (D), Ensign (R)
NH: Gregg (R), Sununu (R)
NJ: Lautenberg (D), Menendez (D)
NM: Domenici (R), Bingaman (D)
NY: Schumer (D), Clinton (D)
NC: Dole (R), Burr (R)
ND: Conrad (D), Dorgan (D)
OH: DeWine (R), Voinovich (R)
OK: Inhofe (R), Coburn (R)
OR: Wyden (D), Smith (R) Montana was admitted to the Union on November 8, 1889. ... Max Sieben Baucus (born December 11, 1941) is the senior United States Senator from Montana and is a member of the Democratic Party. ... Conrad Ray Burns (born January 25, 1935) is the junior United States Senator from Montana and thanks to intergalactic communication, now known to be the biggest douchebag in the universe. ... Nebraska was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1867. ... Charles Timothy Chuck Hagel (born October 4, 1946) is the senior United States Senator from Nebraska. ... Earl Benjamin Nelson (born May 17, 1941 in McCook, Nebraska) to English-American parents. ... Nevada was admitted to the Union on October 31, 1864. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party, for which he serves as Senate Minority Leader. ... John Eric Ensign (born March 25, 1958) is the junior United States Senator from Nevada. ... New Hampshire ratified the Constitution on June 21, 1788. ... Judd Alan Gregg (born February 14, 1947) is an American politician from New Hampshire, currently serving in the U.S. Senate. ... John Edward Sununu (born September 10, 1964) is a United States Senator from New Hampshire. ... New Jersey ratified the Constitution on December 18, 1787. ... Frank Raleigh Lautenberg (born January 23, 1924) is an American politician. ... Robert Menendez (born January 1, 1954) is a Democratic politician from New Jersey. ... New Mexico was admitted to the Union on January 6, 1912. ... Peter Pete Vichi Domenici (born May 7, 1932) is the longest serving United States senator in the history of New Mexico. ... Jesse Francis Jeff Bingaman Jr. ... The state of New York ratified the Constitution on July 26, 1788, thereby becoming the eleventh state. ... Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is an American politician. ... Hillary Rodham Clinton (born Hillary Diane Rodham on October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, serving her freshman term since January 3, 2001. ... United States Senate House of Representatives Congress District 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 1st* (1789-1791) John Baptista Ashe John Steele Hugh Williamson Timothy Bloodworth John Sevier 2nd* (1791-1793) William Barry Grove Nathaniel Macon 3rd* (1793-1795) William J. Dawson Matthew... Elizabeth Hanford Liddy Dole (born July 29, 1936) was elected to the United States Senate in 2002 to represent North Carolina for a term ending in 2009. ... Richard Mauze Burr (born November 30, 1955) is a United States Senator from Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... North Dakota was admitted to the Union on November 2, 1889. ... Kent Conrad (born Gay Kent Conrad on March 12, 1948) is a United States senator from North Dakota. ... Byron Leslie Dorgan (born May 14, 1942) is the junior United States Senator from North Dakota. ... Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... Richard Michael (Mike) DeWine (born January 5, 1947) is an American politician from Ohio. ... George Victor Voinovich (Vojnović in Serbian) (born July 15, 1936) is an American politician of the Republican party. ... Oklahoma was admitted to the Union on November 16, 1907. ... James Mountain Inhofe (born November 17, 1934), usually known as Jim Inhofe, is an American politician from Oklahoma. ... Thomas Allen Coburn, M.D. (March 14, 1948) is a medical doctor and a Republican U.S. Senator from Oklahoma. ... This is a List of United States Senators from Oregon, in the United States of America. ... Ronald Lee Wyden (born May 3, 1949) to German American parents, is Oregons senior United States Senator. ... Gordon Harold Smith (born May 25, 1952) is a United States Senator from Oregon. ...

PA: Specter (R), Santorum (R)
RI: Reed (D), Chafee (R)
SC: Graham (R), DeMint (R)
SD: Johnson (D), Thune (R)
TN: Frist (R), Alexander (R)
TX: Hutchison (R), Cornyn (R)
UT: Hatch (R), Bennett (R)
VT: Leahy (D), Jeffords (I)
VA: Warner (R), Allen (R)
WA: Murray (D), Cantwell (D)
WV: Byrd (D), Rockefeller (D)
WI: Kohl (D), Feingold (D)
WY: Thomas (R), Enzi (R) Pennsylvania ratified the Constitution on December 12, 1787. ... Arlen Specter (born February 12, 1930) is a United States Senator from Pennsylvania. ... Richard John Santorum (born May 10, 1958), commonly known as Rick Santorum, is an Italian American politician from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, in the United States. ... Rhode Island ratified the Constitution on May 29, 1790. ... John Francis Jack Reed (b. ... Lincoln Davenport Chafee (born March 26, 1953) is a Republican United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... South Carolina ratified the Constitution on May 23, 1788. ... Lindsey Olin Graham (born July 9, 1955) is an American politician from South Carolina. ... James Warren Jim DeMint (born September 2, 1951) has been a U.S. Senator from South Carolina since 2005. ... The following is a list of United States Senators from South Dakota. ... This article is about the U.S. Senator from South Dakota. ... John Randolph Thune (born January 7, 1961) is the junior U.S. Senator from the state of South Dakota. ... Tennessee was admitted to the Union on June 1, 1796. ... William Harrison Frist (born February 22, 1952 in Nashville, Tennessee) is a Republican U.S. Senator from Tennessee. ... Andrew Lamar Alexander (born July 3, 1940) is the junior United States Senator from Tennessee and a member of the Republican Party. ... Texas was admitted to the Union on December 29 1845. ... Kathryn Ann Bailey Hutchison, usually known as Kay Bailey Hutchison (born July 22, 1943 in Galveston, Texas), is the senior United States Senator from Texas. ... John Cornyn III (born February 2, 1952) is the junior United States Senator from Texas. ... Utah was admitted to the Union on January 4, 1896. ... Orrin Grant Hatch (born March 22, 1934) is a Republican United States Senator from Utah, serving since 1977. ... Robert F. Bennett (born 1933) For other men named Robert Bennett see Robert Bennett (disambiguation). ... Vermont was admitted to the Union on March 4, 1791. ... Patrick Joseph Leahy (born May 31, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Vermont. ... James Merrill Jim Jeffords (born May 11, 1934 in Rutland, Vermont) is currently the junior U.S. Senator from Vermont and the only Independent in the United States Senate. ... Virginia ratified the Constitution on June 25 1788. ... John William Warner (born February 18, 1927) is an American statesman and politician, who served as Secretary of the Navy from 1972-1974 and has served as a Republican senator from Virginia since 1979. ... Washington was admitted to the Union on November 11, 1889. ... Patricia Lynn Murray (born October 11, 1950) is a Democratic United States Senator from Washington. ... Maria E. Cantwell (born October 13, 1958) is the junior United States Senator from Washington state and is a member of the Democratic Party. ... West Virginia was admitted to the Union on June 19, 1863. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Robert Byrd Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Robert Byrd Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917 in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina), a Democrat, is West Virginias senior United States Senator. ... John Davison Rockefeller IV (born on June 18, 1937), generally known as Jay Rockefeller, has served as a Democratic U.S. Senator from West Virginia since 1985. ... Wisconsin was admitted to the Union on May 29, 1848. ... Herbert H. Kohl (born February 7, 1935) is an American politician and the senior senator from the state of Wisconsin. ... Russell Dana Feingold (born March 2, 1953) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... Wyoming was admitted to the Union on June 10, 1890. ... Craig Lyle Thomas (born February 17, 1933) is a United States Senator from Wyoming. ... Michael Bradley Mike Enzi (born February 1, 1944) is a United States senator from Wyoming. ...

Republican | Democrat | Independent

  Results from FactBites:
 
George Felix Allen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3770 words)
Allen's career in the House was short-lived: in the 1990s round of redistricting, Allen's district, which stretched from the fringes of the Washington suburbs to Charlottesville and included much of the Shenandoah Valley, was eliminated even though Virginia gained a congressional seat as a result of the 1990 Census.
Allen was elected to the Senate in November 2000, defeating the Democratic incumbent, Chuck Robb, son-in-law of the late President Lyndon B. Johnson.
Allen was elected as a member of the Senate Republican leadership as Chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee in 2002, and oversaw a net gain of four seats for the Republicans in the 2004 Senate elections.
race42008.com » George Allen (1513 words)
Allen was elected to the Senate in 2000, defeating the Democratic incumbent, Chuck Robb, son-in-law of the late President Lyndon B. Johnson.
Allen was unanimously elected as a member of the Senate Republican leadership as Chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee in 2002, and oversaw a net gain of four seats for the Republicans in the 2004 Senate elections.
George Allen is a formidable challenger to the perceived GOP Frontrunners of John McCain and Rudy Giuliani.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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