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Encyclopedia > George Clinton (vice president)
George Clinton
George Clinton (vice president)

In office
March 4, 1805 – April 20, 1812
President Thomas Jefferson
James Madison
Preceded by Aaron Burr
Succeeded by Elbridge Gerry

In office
April 1, 1801 – April 1, 1804
Lieutenant(s) Jeremiah Van Rensselaer
Preceded by John Jay
Succeeded by Morgan Lewis

In office
July 30, 1777 – April 1, 1795
Lieutenant(s) Pierre Van Cortlandt
Preceded by None
Succeeded by John Jay

Born July 26, 1739(1739-07-26)
Little Britain, New York
Died April 20, 1812 (aged 72)
Washington, D.C.
Nationality American
Political party Democratic-Republican
Spouse Sarah Cornelia Tappen
Signature

George Clinton (July 26, 1739April 20, 1812) was an American soldier and politician. He was the first (and longest-serving) Governor of New York, and then Vice President of the United States under Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. Image File history File links George_Clinton. ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Madison redirects here. ... This article discusses Aaron Burr (1756-1836), the American politician. ... Elbridge Thomas Gerry (pronounced ) (July 17, 1744 – November 23, 1814) was an American statesman and diplomat. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Jeremiah Van Rensselaer (August 27, 1738 – February 19, 1810) was a Representative from New York to the United States Congress. ... John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat, and jurist. ... Morgan Lewis (1754 - 1844) was the son of Francis Lewis. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Pierre Van Cortlandt (1721 - 1814) was the first Lieutenant Governor of the State of New York in the USA. He was born in New York, the son of Philip Van Cortlandt (1683 -1748) (a son of New York Mayor Stephanus Van Cortlandt) and Catherine DePeyster (a grandaugther of Johannes De... John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat, and jurist. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // About the number 1739 1739 is the smallest integer that can be written as sum of three perfect cubes, in two ways. ... Little Britain, New York is an area in Orange County, first settled in 1729 by Peter Mulliner, a devout Anglican, who named his farm Little Britain. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the Republican party (not related to the present-day Republican Party) in 1792, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until the 1820s, when it split into competing factions, one of which became the... George Clinton (July 26, 1739 – April 20, 1812) was an American soldier and politician. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // About the number 1739 1739 is the smallest integer that can be written as sum of three perfect cubes, in two ways. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... This article is about a military rank. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Madison redirects here. ...

Contents

Life

His political interests were inspired by his father, Charles Clinton, who was an Irish immigrant to Little Britain, New York and a member of the New York colonial assembly. Charles Clinton (1690–1773) was a French and Indian War Colonel, the father of American Revolutionary War General James Clinton and U.S. Vice President George Clinton, and the grandfather of New York Governor DeWitt Clinton. ... Little Britain, New York is an area in Orange County, first settled in 1729 by Peter Mulliner, a devout Anglican, who named his farm Little Britain. ...


At 18, he enlisted in the British Army to fight in the French and Indian War. He subsequently studied law, became clerk of the court of common pleas and served in the colonial assembly. He was elected to the Continental Congress and voted for the Declaration of Independence, but was called to serve George Washington as a brigadier general of militia and had to leave before the signing.He was known for his hatred of Tories[1] and used seizure and sale of Tory estates to help keep taxes down. A supporter and friend of George Washington, he supplied food to the troops at Valley Forge, rode with Washington to the first Inauguration and gave an impressive dinner to celebrate it. The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,040 killed, wounded or captured The French and... The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Britannia gives a heros welcome to returning American Loyalists. ... This article is about the American Revolutionary War winter encampment. ...


In 1759 he was appointed County Clerk for Ulster County, New York, a position he held for the next fifty-two years[2]. He served as the first Governor of New York from 1777 to 1795, as a member of the New York Assembly in 1800 and 1801, and as Governor again from 1801 to 1804. In 1783, at Dobbs Ferry, Clinton and George Washington met General Sir Guy Carleton, later known as Lord Dorchester, to negotiate for the evacuation by the British troops of the posts they still held in the United States. With 21 years of service, he was the longest-serving governor of a U.S. state.[3] Herbert Storing attributes to George Clinton the authorship of the Anti-Federalist essays, which appeared in New York newspapers under the pseudonym Cato during the Constitutional ratification debates of 1787. However, the authorship of the essays is disputed. Ulster County is a county located in the state of New York, USA. It sits in the states beautiful Mid-Hudson Region of the Hudson Valley. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... The New York Legislature is the legislative branch of the U.S. state of New York, seated at the states capital, Albany. ... Dobbs Ferry is a village located in Westchester County, New York. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester. ... Sir Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester (1724-1808) was a British soldier who served as Governor of the Province of Quebec. ... Herbert J. Storing (1928-1977) was a noted professor of Constitutional History and Law, the Federalist Papers, and, most notably, the Anti-Federalists, in which he was considered the foremost authority. ... The Anti-Federalist Party, though not a true political party, but a faction, left a major legacy on the country by initiating the Bill of Rights. ... A pseudonym (Greek: , pseudo + -onym: false name) is an artificial, fictitious name, also known as an alias, used by an individual as an alternative to a persons legal name. ...


He went on to serve as the fourth Vice President of the United States, first from 1805 to 1809 under Thomas Jefferson, and then from 1809 until his death under James Madison, becoming the first Vice President to die in office. He died of a heart attack. The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Madison redirects here. ...


Clinton is one of only two United States vice presidents to serve the position under two presidents (John C. Calhoun being the other). He is of no known relation to the 42nd President of the United States, Bill Clinton, whose name at birth was William Jefferson Blythe III.-1... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century, at the center of the foreign policy and financial disputes of his age and best known as a spokesman for... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...


He had been an unwilling candidate for President of the United States in the 1808 election, garnering six electoral votes from a wing of the Democratic-Republican Party that disapproved of James Madison. He came in third after Madison and Charles Cotesworth Pinckney of the Federalist Party. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The election of 1808 was the first of only two cases where a new President would be elected, but the Vice Presidency remained in the same hands. ... The Democratic-Republican Party, also known as the Republican Party , was founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in 1792. ... Charles Cotesworth (C.C.) Pinckney (February 5, 1746 – August 16, 1825), was an early American statesman and a signer of the U.S. Constitution. ... The Federalist Party (or Federal Party) was an American political party in the period 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s. ...


His original burial was in Washington. He was reinterred in Kingston, New York in 1908. Kingston is a city in Ulster County, New York, United States. ...


Marriage and children

On February 7, 1770, Clinton married Sarah Cornelia Tappen. They had five daughters and one son: is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the village in Queensland, see 1770, Queensland. ... George Clinton (July 26, 1739 – April 20, 1812) was an American soldier and politician. ...

is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the village in Queensland, see 1770, Queensland. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the US Federal Agent designation, see Special agent. ... Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr. ... Pierre Van Cortlandt (1721 - 1814) was the first Lieutenant Governor of the State of New York in the USA. He was born in New York, the son of Philip Van Cortlandt (1683 -1748) (a son of New York Mayor Stephanus Van Cortlandt) and Catherine DePeyster (a grandaugther of Johannes De... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Edmond-Charles Genêt (January 8, 1763 – July 14, 1834), also known as Citizen Genêt, was a French ambassador to the United States during the French Revolution. ... For other persons named George Clinton, see George Clinton (disambiguation). ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1778 (MDCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... William Floyd in a 1792 portrait This article is about the signer of the Decleration of Independence. ... Benjamin Tallmadge (1754-1835) was born in Setauket, New York. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Pierre Van Cortlandt (1721 - 1814) was the first Lieutenant Governor of the State of New York in the USA. He was born in New York, the son of Philip Van Cortlandt (1683 -1748) (a son of New York Mayor Stephanus Van Cortlandt) and Catherine DePeyster (a grandaugther of Johannes De...

Legacy

Clinton County, New York, Clinton County, Missouri[1], Clinton County, Ohio, and Clinton County, Illinois are named after him, and Washington, D.C. has erected a gilded equestrian sculpture of him on Connecticut Avenue. In 1873, the state of New York donated a bronze statue of Clinton to the U.S. Capitol's National Statuary Hall Collection. Clinton County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Clinton County is a county located in the state of Missouri. ... Clinton County is a county located in the state of Ohio, United States. ... Clinton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Illinois, and determined by the U.S. Census Bureau to include the mean center of U.S. population in 1960. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The equestrian Marcus Aurelius on Capitoline Hill displayed uninterruptedly for eighteen centuries was the prototype of Renaissance equestrian sculptures An equestrian sculpture (from the Latin equus meaning horse) is a statue of a mounted rider. ... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ... Part of the National Statuary Hall Collection The National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol is comprised of statues donated by individual states to honor persons notable in their history. ...


See also

Pierre Van Cortlandt (1721 - 1814) was the first Lieutenant Governor of the State of New York in the USA. He was born in New York, the son of Philip Van Cortlandt (1683 -1748) (a son of New York Mayor Stephanus Van Cortlandt) and Catherine DePeyster (a grandaugther of Johannes De...

Bibliography

  • Kaminski, John P. George Clinton: Yeoman Politician of the New Republic. Madison House, 1993.
  1. ^ AOC.gov
  2. ^ A Revolutionary Day
  3. ^ According to the National Governors Association[citation needed]

The National Governors Association (NGA) is an organization of the governors of the fifty U.S. states and five U.S. territories (American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). ...

External links

Preceded by
Governor of the Province of New York
Governor of New York
1777 – 1795
Succeeded by
John Jay
Preceded by
Benjamin Moore
Chancellor of Columbia College
1784 – 1787
Succeeded by
William Samuel Johnson
Preceded by
(none)
Democratic-Republican vice presidential candidate
1792 (lost)(1)
Succeeded by
Aaron Burr(1)
Preceded by
John Jay
Governor of New York
1801 – 1804
Succeeded by
Morgan Lewis
Preceded by
Aaron Burr(1)
Democratic-Republican vice presidential candidate
1804 (won), 1808 (won)
Succeeded by
Elbridge Gerry
Vice President of the United States
March 4, 1805April 20, 1812
Notes & References
1. Clinton was technically a presidential candidate in 1792 and Burr was technically a presidential candidate in 1796 and 1800. Prior to the passage of the Twelfth Amendment in 1804, each presidential elector would cast two ballots; the highest vote-getter would become President and the runner-up would become Vice President. Thus, in 1792, with George Washington as the prohibitive favorite for President, the Republican Party fielded Clinton with the intention that he be elected Vice President. Similarly, in both 1796 and 1800, the Republican Party fielded two candidates, Burr and Thomas Jefferson, with the intention that Jefferson be elected President and Burr be elected Vice President.

  Results from FactBites:
 
George Clinton (vice president) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (652 words)
George Clinton was the brother of General James Clinton and the uncle of DeWitt Clinton, who served as seventh and ninth Governor of New York.
He was an unwilling candidate for President of the United States in the 1808 election, garnering six electoral votes from a wing of the (Democratic-)Republican Party that disapproved of James Madison.
Thus, in 1792, with George Washington as the prohibitive favorite for President, the Republican Party fielded Clinton with the intention that he be elected Vice President.
Origin and Growth of the Democratic Party. – Its Triumph in the Election of Jefferson. – George Clinton chosen ... (2862 words)
In these views Dewitt Clinton concurred most cordially with his uncle; and we have seen that when the defence of the harbour of New-York was neglected by the government, he was the principal instrument in obtaining appropriations from the state for the purpose.
In the decision of this caucus Clinton and his friends acquiesced in silence; but the jealousy of the growing power of New-York, and particularly of the rising talents and influence of Dewitt Clinton, were powerfully excited in the breasts of those who desired to perpetuate the ascendancy of Virginia.
Clinton was, in consequence, put in nomination; and, when the electoral votes were counted, was found to have received 89, while Madison was elected by 128 votes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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