FACTOID # 29: 73.3% of America's gross operating surplus in motion picture and sound recording industries comes from California.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > George Clinton (politician)

This page is for the Vice President George Clinton. For others of that name see George Clinton. George Clinton, from [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... George Clinton is the name of several notable people: George Clinton (royal governor) (c. ...


George Clinton (July 26, 1739April 20, 1812) was an American soldier and politician. He served as the first Governor of New York from 1777 to 1795, as a member of the State Assembly in 1800 and 1801, and as the third Governor from 1801 to 1804. According to the National Governors Association, with 21 years of service, he is the longest-serving governor of a U.S. state. July 26 is the 207th day (208th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 158 days remaining. ... Events March 20 - Nadir Shah occupies Delhi in India and sacks the city stealing the jewels of the Peacock Throne, including the Koh-i-Noor September 9 - Stono Rebellion erupts near Charleston September 18 - Treaty of Belgrade signed October 3 - Treaty of Nissa signed October 23 - Great Britain declares war... April 20 is the 110th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (111th in leap years). ... 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... A Norwegian soldier (a Corporal, armed with an MP-5) A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment to defend that country or its interests. ... A politician is an individual involved in politics. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The New York Legislature is the legislative branch of the U.S. state of New York, seated at the states capital, Albany. ... 1800 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1801 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1801 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The National Governors Association (NGA) is an organization of the governors of the fifty U.S. states and five U.S. territories (American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). ...


He went on to serve as the fourth Vice President of the United States, first from 1805 to 1809 under Thomas Jefferson, and then from 1809 until his death under James Madison, becoming the first Vice President to die in office. The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, a heartbeat from the presidency. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13 (April 2 O.S.), 1743 – July 4, 1826) was the third (1801–1809) President of the United States, second (1797–1801) Vice President, first (1789–1785) United States Secretary of State, and an American statesman, ambassador to France, political philosopher, revolutionary, agriculturalist, horticulturist, land owner, architect... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was the fourth (1809–1817) President of the United States. ...


At 18 he enlisted in the British Army to fight in wars with France and India. He subsequently studied law, became clerk of the court of common pleas and served in the state assembly. He was elected to the Continental Congress and voted for the Declaration of Independence but was called to serve Washington as a brigadier general of militia and had to leave before the signing. He did not support the adoption of the Constitution until the Bill of Rights was added. The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Continental Congress was the federal legislature of the Thirteen Colonies and later of the United States from 1774 to 1789, a period that included the American Revolutionary War and the Articles of Confederation. ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is a document in which the Thirteen Colonies declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ... United States Bill of Rights The Bill of Rights is the name given to the first ten amendments of the United States Constitution. ...


He was known for his hatred of Tories [1] and used seizure and sale of Tory estates to help keep taxes down. A supporter and friend of George Washington, he supplied food to the troops at Valley Forge, rode with Washington to the first Inauguration and gave an impressive dinner to celebrate it. Loyalists (often capitalized L) were British North American colonists who remained loyal subjects of the British crown during the American Revolutionary War. ... Recreation of a cabin in which soldiers would have lived at Valley Forge. ...


His father, Charles Clinton, was an Irish immigrant to Little Britain, New York and member of the New York colonial assembly who inspired his political interests. George Clinton was the brother of General James Clinton and the uncle of De Witt Clinton, who served as seventh and ninth Governor of New York. Charles Clinton (1690–1773) was a French and Indian War Colonel, the father of American Revolutionary War General James Clinton and U.S. Vice President George Clinton, and the grandfather of New York Governor DeWitt Clinton. ... Little Britain, New York is an area in Orange County, first settled in 1729 by Peter Mulliner, a devout Anglican, who named his farm Little Britain. ... General is a military rank used by nearly every country in the world. ... James Clinton (August 9, 1733 – September 22, 1812) was a American Revolutionary War soldier who obtained the rank of major general. ... DeWitt Clinton Clinton Memorial at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn NY DeWitt Clinton (March 2, 1769 – February 11, 1828) was an early American politician. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York City Governor George Pataki (R) Senators Charles Schumer (D) Hillary Rodham Clinton (D) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ...


Clinton County, New York and Clinton County, Ohio are named after him, and Washington, D.C. has erected a gilded equestrian sculpture of him on Connecticut Avenue. In 1873, the state of New York donated a bronze statue of Clinton to the U.S. Capitol's National Statuary Hall Collection. Clinton County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Clinton County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ... Washington, D.C. is the capital city of the United States of America. ... The Marcus Aurelius on Capitoline Hill is the prototype of all modern equestrian sculptures, since it was displayed uninterruptly for eighteen ceturies In sculpture, an equestrian (from the Latin equus meaning horse) is a statue consisting of a horse with mounted rider. ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ... The National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol is comprised of statues donated by individual states to honor persons notable in their history. ...


His original burial was in Washington. He was reinterred in Kingston, New York in 1908. Kingston is a city located in Ulster County, New York, United States. ...


See also

Pierre van Cortlandt (1721 - 1814) was the first Lieutenant Governor of the State of New York in the USA. He was born in New York, the son of Philip van Cortlandt (1683 -1748) and Catherine DePeyster. ...

External links

  • Architect of the Capitol: George Clinton
  • Senior U.S. Governors-National Governors Association


Preceded by:
(none)
Governor of New York
17771795
Succeeded by:
John Jay
Preceded by:
(none)
Republican Party Vice Presidential candidate
1792 (lost)(a)
Succeeded by:
Aaron Burr(a)
Preceded by:
John Jay
Governor of New York
18011804
Succeeded by:
Morgan Lewis
Preceded by:
Aaron Burr(a)
Republican Party Vice Presidential candidate
1804 (won), 1808 (won)
Succeeded by:
Elbridge Gerry
Preceded by:
Aaron Burr
Vice President of the United States
March 4, 1805April 20, 1812
Succeeded by:
Elbridge Gerry
(a) Clinton was technically a Presidential candidate in 1792 and Burr was technically a Presidential candidate in 1796 and 1800. Prior to the passage of the Twelfth Amendment in 1804, each presidential elector would cast two ballots; the highest vote-getter would become President and the runner-up would become Vice President. Thus, in 1792, with George Washington as the prohibitive favorite for President, the Republican Party fielded Clinton with the intention that he be elected Vice President. Similarly, in both 1796 and 1800, the Republican Party fielded two candidates, Burr and Thomas Jefferson, with the intention that Jefferson be elected President and Burr be elected Vice President.


This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... John Jay, first Chief Justice of the United States Oil painting by Gilbert Stuart, 1794 John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat and jurist. ... The Democratic-Republican party was the first United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, a heartbeat from the presidency. ... The election of 1792 was the second presidential election in the United States, and the first in which each of the original 13 states appointed electors. ... Vice President Aaron Burr Alternate meaning: Rev. ... John Jay, first Chief Justice of the United States Oil painting by Gilbert Stuart, 1794 John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat and jurist. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... 1801 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Morgan Lewis (1754 - 1844) was the son of Francis Lewis. ... Vice President Aaron Burr Alternate meaning: Rev. ... The Democratic-Republican party was the first United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 1804 was the first presidential election conducted following the ratification of the Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution. ... The election of 1808 was the first of only two cases where a new President would be elected, but the Vice Presidency remained in the same hands. ... Elbridge Gerry (July 17, 1744 – November 23, 1814) was an American politician, a member of the Democratic-Republican Party. ... Vice President Aaron Burr Alternate meaning: Rev. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, a heartbeat from the presidency. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... April 20 is the 110th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (111th in leap years). ... 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Elbridge Gerry (July 17, 1744 – November 23, 1814) was an American politician, a member of the Democratic-Republican Party. ... The Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution altered Article II relating to presidential elections. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799) was an American planter, political figure, and military leader. ... The Democratic-Republican party was the first United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13 (April 2 O.S.), 1743 – July 4, 1826) was the third (1801–1809) President of the United States, second (1797–1801) Vice President, first (1789–1785) United States Secretary of State, and an American statesman, ambassador to France, political philosopher, revolutionary, agriculturalist, horticulturist, land owner, architect...



Vice Presidents of the United States of America Seal of the Vice President of the United States
Adams | Jefferson | Burr | Clinton | Gerry | Tompkins | Calhoun | Van Buren | R. Johnson | Tyler | Dallas | Fillmore | King | Breckinridge | Hamlin | A. Johnson | Colfax | Wilson | Wheeler | Arthur | Hendricks | Morton | Stevenson | Hobart | Roosevelt | Fairbanks | Sherman | Marshall | Coolidge | Dawes | Curtis | Garner | Wallace | Truman | Barkley | Nixon | L. Johnson | Humphrey | Agnew | Ford | Rockefeller | Mondale | Bush | Quayle | Gore | Cheney

  Results from FactBites:
 
George Clinton (vice president) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (529 words)
George Clinton was the brother of General James Clinton and the uncle of De Witt Clinton, who served as seventh and ninth Governor of New York.
Clinton County, New York and Clinton County, Ohio are named after him, and Washington, D.C. has erected a gilded equestrian sculpture of him on Connecticut Avenue.
Thus, in 1792, with George Washington as the prohibitive favorite for President, the Democratic-Republican Party fielded Clinton with the intention that he be elected Vice President.
Encyclopedia: George Clinton (politician) (3234 words)
George Clinton, from [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version.
Charles Clinton (1690–1773) was a French and Indian War Colonel, the father of American Revolutionary War General James Clinton and U.S. Vice President George Clinton, and the grandfather of New York Governor DeWitt Clinton.
Clinton County is a county located in the state of New York.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m