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Encyclopedia > George Anthony Denison

George Anthony Denison (11 December 1805 - 21 March 1896) was an English churchman. December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (81st in leap years). ... 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Ethnicity... see also Holy Orders The following terms have traditional meanings for the Anglican Church, and possibly beyond: A churchman is in principle a member of a church congregation, in practice someone in holy orders. ...


Brother of politician John Evelyn Denison, 1st Viscount Ossington, he was horn at Ossington, Nottinghamshire, and educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford. In 1828 he was elected fellow of Oriel; and after a few years there as a tutor, during which he was ordained and acted as curate at Cuddesdon, he became rector of Broadwindsor, Dorset (1838). He became a prebendary of Sarum in 1841 and of Wells in 1849. In 1851 he was preferred to the valuable living of East Brent, Somerset, and in the same year was made archdeacon of Taunton. John Evelyn Denison, 1st Viscount Ossington (January 27, 1800 - March 7, 1873), English statesman, was the eldest son of John Denison (d. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... Eton can refer to several things: Eton, Berkshire, a town in England. ... Christ Church, called in Latin Ædes Christi (i. ... Oriel College (in full: The House of Blessed Mary the Virgin in Oxford commonly called Oriel College, of the Foundation of Edward the Second of famous memory, sometime King of England) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Broadwindsor is a village in west Dorset, England, two miles west of population of 1,218 (2001). ... Dorset (pronounced Dorsit, sometimes in the past called Dorsetshire) is a county in the southwest of England, on the English Channel coast. ... A prebendary is a post connected to a cathedral or collegiate church and is a type of canon. ... Sarum could be Salisbury, or New Sarum, in Wiltshire, England Old Sarum, a settlement some way away from modern Salisbury A book by Edward Rutherfurd This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Map sources for Wells at grid reference ST5445 The west front of Wells Cathedral Wells is a small city in the Mendip district of Somerset. ... Somerset is a county in the south-west of England. ... Map sources for Taunton at grid reference ST2324 Taunton is the county town of Somerset, England. ...


For many years Archdeacon Denison represented the extreme High Tory party not only in politics but in the Church, regarding all progressive movements in education or theology as abomination, and vehemently repudiating the higher criticism from the days of Essays and Reviews (1860) to those of Lux Mundi (1890). In 1853 he resigned his position as examining chaplain to the bishop of Bath and Wells owing to his pronounced eucharistic views. A suit on the complaint of a neighboring clergyman ensued and after various complications Denison was condemned by the archbishops court at Bath (1856); but on appeal the court of Arches and the privy council quashed this judgment on a technical plea. A privy council is a body that advises the head of state of a nation, especially in a monarchy. ...


The result was to make Denison a keen champion of the ritualistic school. He edited The Church and State Review (1862-1865). Secular state education and the conscience clause were anathema to him. Until the end of his life he remained a protagonist in theological controversy and a keen fighter against latitudinarianism and liberalism; but the sharpest religious or political differences never broke his personal friendships and his Christian charity. Among other things for which he will be remembered was his origination of harvest festivals. Note: This is not an article about Liberalism in the United States or in any other specific country, but it discusses liberalism as a world wide ideology. ... Thanksgiving ceremonies and celebrations for a successful harvest are both worldwide and very ancient. ...


This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, which is in the public domain. The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911), contend supporters, in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
George Anthony Denison - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (375 words)
George Anthony Denison (11 December 1805 - 21 March 1896) was an English churchman.
Brother of politician John Evelyn Denison, 1st Viscount Ossington, he was horn at Ossington, Nottinghamshire, and educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford.
A suit on the complaint of a neighboring clergyman ensued and after various complications Denison was condemned by the archbishops court at Bath (1856); but on appeal the court of Arches and the privy council quashed this judgment on a technical plea.
John Evelyn Denison, 1st Viscount Ossington - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (317 words)
Defeated in 1830 both at Newcastle-under-Lyme and then at Liverpool, Denison secured a seat as one of the members for Nottinghamshire in 1831; and after the Great Reform Act he represented the southern division of that county from 1832 until the general election of 1837.
In April 1857 Denison was chosen Speaker of the House of Commons.
Denison gave an explanation—referred to as Speaker Denison's rule—as to why the Speaker casts his or her vote in most cases in favour of, rather than against, a government, where they have the casting vote.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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