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Encyclopedia > Georg Tannstetter
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Portrait ca. 1515, by Bernhard Strigel (1460 – 1528)
Portrait ca. 1515, by Bernhard Strigel (1460 – 1528)

Georg Tannstetter (April 1482March 26?, 1535), also called Georgius Collimitius, was a humanist teaching at the University of Vienna. He was a medical doctor, mathematician, astronomer, cartographer, and the personal physician of the emperors Maximilian I and Ferdinand I. He also wrote under the pseudonym of "Lycoripensis"[1]. His Latin name "Collimitius" is derived from limes meaning "border" and is a reference to his birthtown: "Rain" is a German word for border or boundary. Jump to: navigation, search Image File history File links Download high resolution version (417x657, 65 KB)Portrait of Georg Tannstetter (Collimitius) ca. ... Jump to: navigation, search Image File history File links Download high resolution version (417x657, 65 KB)Portrait of Georg Tannstetter (Collimitius) ca. ... // Events June - Invasion of Persia by Sultan Selim I of the Ottoman Empire. ... Events Portuguese fortify Fort Elmina on the Gold Coast Tizoc rules the Aztecs Diogo Cão, a Portuguese navigator, becomes the first European to sail up the Congo. ... Jump to: navigation, search March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (86th in leap years). ... Events January 18 - Lima, Peru founded by Francisco Pizarro April - Jacques Cartier discovers the Iroquois city of Stadacona, Canada (now Quebec) and in May, the even greater Huron city of Hochelaga (now Montreal) June 24 - The Anabaptist state of Münster (see Münster Rebellion) is conquered and disbanded. ... Jump to: navigation, search Humanism is an active ethical and philosophical approach to life, focusing on human solutions to human issues through rational (reasonable) thought, without recourse to supernatural entities, such as a God or gods, or to sacred texts, traditions or religious creeds. ... University of Vienna, main building, seen from Beethovens apartment The University of Vienna (German: Universität Wien) in Austria was founded in 1365 by Rudolph IV and hence named Alma mater Rudolphina. ... The word physician should not be confused with physicist, which means a scientist in the area of physics. ... A mathematician is a person whose area of study and research is mathematics. ... Astrometry: the study of the position of objects in the sky and their changes of position. ... Jump to: navigation, search Cartography or mapmaking (in Greek chartis = map and graphein = write) is the study and practice of making maps or globes. ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... Jump to: navigation, search Portrait by Albrecht Dürer, 1519 (Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna). ... Ferdinand I Habsburg Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor (March 10, 1503 – July 27, 1564) was one of the Habsburg emperors that at various periods during his life ruled over Austria, Germany, Bohemia and Hungary. ... Jump to: navigation, search A pseudonym (Greek: false name) is a fictitious name used by an individual as an alternative to their legal name (whereas an allonym is the name of another actual person assumed by one person, usually historical, in authorship of a work of art; e. ...


Born in Rain am Lech in Bavaria, he studied in Ingolstadt. In 1503, he followed a call of Conrad Celtis to the University of Vienna, where he taught mathematics. He soon became a leading figure amongst the humanists in Vienna. In 1510, he became the personal physician of emperor Maximilian I, who would six years later ennoble him with the prediacte "von Thanau". Jump to: navigation, search The Free State of Bavaria (German: Bayern or Freistaat Bayern), with an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ... Ingolstadt is a city in the Federal State of Bavaria, Germany. ... Events January 20 - Seville in Castile is awarded exclusive right to trade with the New World. ... University of Vienna, main building, seen from Beethovens apartment The University of Vienna (German: Universität Wien) in Austria was founded in 1365 by Rudolph IV and hence named Alma mater Rudolphina. ... Jump to: navigation, search Humanism is an active ethical and philosophical approach to life, focusing on human solutions to human issues through rational (reasonable) thought, without recourse to supernatural entities, such as a God or gods, or to sacred texts, traditions or religious creeds. ... Jump to: navigation, search Vienna (German: Wien [viːn]; Hungarian: Bécs, Czech: Vídeň, Slovak: Viedeň, Romany Vidnya; Serbian: Beč) is the capital of Austria, and also one of Austrias nine federal states (Bundesland Wien). ... Events Conquest of Pskov by Grand Prince Vasili III of Muscovy. ... Jump to: navigation, search Portrait by Albrecht Dürer, 1519 (Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna). ...


He travelled with his student Joachim Vadian to Buda in 1518 and subsequently produced a map of Hungary together with others, in particular Rosetus Lazarus (Lazarus Secretarius). The map was printed 1528 in Ingolstadt by Petrus Apianus; the original is today in the National Library of Hungary. It is generally praised for its accuracy, and it was one of the very first maps to include a scale. Tannstetter is also considered a pioneer of the history of science with his work Viri Mathematici, containing biographies of mathematicians at the University of Vienna from the 15th century. Engraving by David Herrliberger from Zurich, 1748, after an older original Joachim Vadian (November 29, 1484 – April 6, 1551), born as Joachim von Watt, was a Swiss Humanist and scholar and also mayor and reformer in St. ... Buda (German: Ofen) is the western part of the Hungarian capital Budapest on the right bank of the Danube. ... Events A plague of tropical fire ants devastates crops on Hispaniola. ... Events June 19 - Battle of Landriano - A French army in Italy under Marshal St. ... Ingolstadt is a city in the Federal State of Bavaria, Germany. ... Petrus Apianus (real name Peter Bienewitz) (April 16, 1495 - April 21, 1557) was a German astronomer, cartographer and instrument maker. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ...


In 1530, he moved to Ferdinand's court at Innsbruck, where he died five years later. Events June 25 - Augsburg confession presented to Charles V of Holy Roman Empire. ... Innsbruck City Center Innsbruck and Nordkette from south // Geography Innsbruck is a city in western Austria, and the capital of the Tyrol province. ...


Selected works

  • Librum consolatorium contra opiniones de diluvio et aliis horrendis periculis anni 1523 Full german title ["Ich vil nemen mein shteken un vil gebben du a zetz vos di vest nisht fergessen"], Vienna 1523. A tractate to counter the Flood hysteria of that year.
  • Viri Mathematici
  • Tabula Hungarie ad quatuor latera, Ingolstadt 1528. Map of Hungary.
  • Artificium De Applicatione Astrologiae ad Aliz Medicinam..., 1531.

Jump to: navigation, search The Deluge by Gustave Doré The story of a Great Flood sent by God or gods to destroy civilization as an act of divine retribution is a widespread theme in myths. ...

References

  • Collimitius at the Encyclopedia of Austria.
  • Georg Tannstetter.
  • Tannstetter, Collimitius Georg.

Further reading

  • Graf-Stuhlhofer, F: Humanismus zwischen Hof und Universität. Georg Tannstetter (Collimitus) und sein wissenschaftliches Umfeld im Wien des frühen 16. Jahrhunderts., University of Vienna, 1996; 212 pages. ISBN 3-851-14256-X. In German.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Georg Tannstetter (864 words)
Georg Tannstetter (1482-1535), einer der größten Söhne Rains, leistete nicht nur Bedeutendes als Leibarzt bei Kaisern und Königen in Wien sowie als Universitätsprofessor, Mathematiker, Astronom und Astrologe, sondern war als Kartograph zusammen mit dem Ungar Rosetus Lazarus, seinem Schüler, auch Mitautor der 1528 erschienenen ersten gedruckten Landkarte Ungarns.
"Leiterin Edith Findel wird dafür sorgen, dass der Druck zusammen mit einem Porträt Tannstetters in unserem Heimatmuseum einen würdigen Platz findet", kündigte er an.
Literaturhinweis zu Tannstetter: Franz Graf-Stuhlhofer, Humanismus zwischen Hof und Universität.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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