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Encyclopedia > Geolibertarianism
Libertarianism
This series is linked to the

Politics series This article is about the classical liberal individualist philosophy that strongly emphasizes private property rights conjoined with civil liberties. ... Politics, sometimes defined as the art and science of government[1], is a process by which collective decisions are made within groups. ...

Factions
Minarchism
Agorism
Geolibertarianism
Paleolibertarianism
Neolibertarianism
Left-libertarianism
In civics, minarchism, sometimes called minimal statism or small government, is the view that the size, role and influence of government in a free society should be minimal - only large enough to protect the liberty of each and every individual, without violating the liberty of any individuals itself, thus maximizing... Agorism is a radical left-libertarian political philosophy popularized by Samuel Edward Konkin III, who defined an agorist as a conscious practitioner of counter-economics (peaceful black markets and grey markets). ... Paleolibertarianism is a school of thought within American libertarianism founded by Murray Rothbard and Lew Rockwell, and closely associated with the Ludwig von Mises Institute. ... Neolibertarianism is a political philosophy combining elements of libertarian and conservative thought that embraces incrementalism and pragmatism domestically, and a generally interventionist foreign policy based on self-interest, national defense and the expansion of freedom. ... Historically, the term libertarianism was first coined by leftist followers of Mikhail Bakunin to describe their own, anti-statist version of socialism, as contrasted with the state socialism propounded by Marx. ...


Influences
Austrian School
Anarchism
Anarcho-capitalism
Classical liberalism
Objectivism
The Austrian School is a school of economic thought that rejects economists overreliance on methods used in natural science for the study of human action, and instead bases its formalism on a logic of action known as praxeology. Alongside this formalism, the school has traditionally advocated an interpretive approach. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... Anarcho-capitalism refers to an anti-statist philosophy that embraces capitalism as one of its foundational principles. ... Classical liberalism (also called classic liberalism) is a political ideology that embraces individual rights, private property and a laissez-faire economy, a government that exists to protect the liberty of each individual from others, and a constitution that protects individual autonomy from governmental power. ... Objectivism is the philosophical system developed by Russian-American philosopher and writer Ayn Rand. ...


Ideas
Civil liberties
Free markets
Laissez-faire
Liberty
Non-aggression
Self-ownership
Free trade
This article is in need of attention. ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ... Liberty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The non-aggression principle (also called the non-aggression axiom, anticoercion principle, or zero aggression principle) is an ethical prohibition against aggression, which is defined as the initiation of physical force or the threat of such upon persons or their property (the principle does not preclude retaliation against aggression). ... Self-ownership is the condition where an individual has the exclusive moral or legal right to control his or her own body and life. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ...


Key issues
Parties
Economic views
Views of rights
Theories of law
Many countries and subnational political entities have libertarian political parties. ... The Austrian School of economics and the Chicago School of economics are important foundations of the economic system favored by modern libertarians —capitalism, where the means of production are privately owned, economic and financial decisions are made privately rather than by state control, and goods and services are exchanged in... Libertarians and Objectivists limit what they define as rights to variations on the right to be left alone, and argue that other rights such as the right to a good education or the right to have free access to water are not legitimate rights and do not deserve the same... Libertarian theories of law build on libertarianism or classical liberalism. ...

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Geolibertarianism (also geoanarchism) is a liberal political philosophy that holds along with other forms of libertarian individualism that each individual has an exclusive right to the fruits of his or her labor, as opposed to this product being owned collectively by society or the community. In other words, geolibertarians support private property. However, unlike more individualist forms of libertarianism, geolibertarianism holds that all land is owned collectively by society and may not become private property. Therefore, if individuals use the land they must pay rent to the community for doing so. They hold that private property is the product of labor, and since land itself was not created by human labor, it cannot rightfully be considered the property of any individual. Geolibertarians generally advocate distributing the land rent to the community via a land value tax, as proposed by Henry George and others before him. For this reason, they are often called "single taxers." Fred E. Foldvary coined the word "geo-libertarianism" in an article so titled in Land and Liberty, May/June 1981, pp. 53-55. In the case of geoanarchism as described by Foldvary, rent would be collected by private associations with the opportunity to secede from a geocommunity (and not receive the geocommunity's services) if desired. This article discusses liberalism as a major political ideology as it developed and stands currently. ... Political philosophy is the study of the fundamental questions about the state, government, politics, property, law and the enforcement of a legal code by authority: what they are, why they are needed, what makes a government legitimate, what rights and freedoms it should protect and why, what form it should... See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... Land Value Taxation (LVT) is the policy of raising state revenues by charging each landholder a portion of the value of a site or parcel of land that would exist even if that site had no improvements. ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Fred Foldvary is a Lecturer in Economics at Santa Clara University, California, and a Research Fellow at The Independent Institute. ...


Geolibertarians are generally influenced by Georgism, but the ideas behind it pre-date Henry George, and can be found in different forms in the writings of John Locke, the French Physiocrats, Thomas Jefferson, Adam Smith, Thomas Paine, James Mill (John Stuart Mill's father), David Ricardo, John Stuart Mill, and Herbert Spencer. Perhaps the best summary of geolibertarianism is Thomas Paine's assertion that "Men did not make the earth. It is the value of the improvements only, and not the earth itself, that is individual property. Every proprietor owes to the community a ground rent for the land which he holds." Georgism, named after Henry George (1839-1897), is a philosophy and economic ideology that follows from the belief that everyone owns what they create, but everything supplied by nature, most importantly land, belongs equally to all humanity. ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... John Locke (August 29, 1632 – October 28, 1704) was an influential English philosopher and social contract theorist. ... The Physiocrats were a group of economists who believed that the wealth of nations was derived solely from agriculture. ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential founders of the United States. ... Adam Smith, FRSE (baptised June 5, 1723 – July 17, 1790) was a Scottish political economist and moral philosopher. ... Thomas Paine Thomas Paine (January 29, 1737 – June 8, 1809), intellectual, scholar, revolutionary, deist and idealist, is widely recognized as one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. ... James Mill James Mill (April 6, 1773 - June 23, 1836), Scottish historian, economist and philosopher, was born at Northwater Bridge, in the parish of Logie-Pert, Angus, Scotland, the son of James Mill, a shoemaker. ... {{Infobox_Biography subject_name = David Ricardo | image_name = David_ricardo. ... John Stuart Mill (May 20, 1806 – May 8, 1873), an English philosopher and political economist, was an influential classical liberal thinker of the 19th century. ... Herbert Spencer. ...

Contents


Property rights

Geolibertarians consider land to be the common property of all mankind. They say that private property is derived from an individual's right to the fruits of their labor. (in this first label geolibertarianism have no difference with anarchists economic vision). Since land is not created by anyone's labor, it cannot be owned. Thus, geolibertarians recognize a right to privately possess land, on the condition that the full rental value be paid to the community. This, they say, has the effect of both giving back the value that belongs to the community and encouraging landowners to only use as much land as they need, leaving plenty for others.


This strict definition of property as all fruits of labour makes geolibertarians fervent advocates of free trade. They believe that people have the right to do anything with what is legitimately theirs. Like all libertarians, they believe in the legalization of every activity between consenting adults, which includes any trade to which both parties agree.


The geolibertarian take on poverty and welfare

According to geolibertarianism, the guiding parameter behind wages is what is called the margin of production. The margin of production is the amount of money that a person can make working on land that is free. When anyone chooses to work for someone else instead of working for himself on the free land, it is because he gets a higher amount of money. Thus, the margin of production represents an absolute floor on wage level in any society, under free market circumstances.


The differences between geolibertarians and other libertarians arise at this point. Geolibertarians believe that the implementation of the rule of law, protection of private property and creation of public goods are undoubtedly public benefits, but the greatest gain from these go to land owners. And because of this benefit, it becomes economically feasible for many to hold economically valuable land out of use and still gain benefits from its price rise. This is in contrast to any capital good, that can be benefitted from only by putting it in service of others. (aka by going into business) Thus, this continued retention of land without usage (or in sub-optimal use) results in those who actually desire to use land settling for lower and lower quality of land. This pushes the margin of production downwards resulting in lower wages.


The elimination of this incentive to hold land out of use, along with higher employment (because of more land going to usage), and lower interest rates (because of lower prices of land, resulting in lesser need of capital for going into ANY business) results in a high level of prosperity and eliminates the need for welfare.


The land value tax

Geolibertarians advocate the land value tax for a number of reasons. As explained already, it is seen as a means of upholding the equal right to land. It is also the tax most compatible with the free market. It does not affect the price of goods, nor does it discourage productivity, since it does not affect the cost of production. In fact, it actually increases productivity by lowering the entrance barrier into the market and encouraging more efficient land use. Land Value Taxation (LVT) is the policy of raising state revenues by charging each landholder a portion of the value of a site or parcel of land that would exist even if that site had no improvements. ...


Geolibertarians defend that, since public utilities and services increase land value, they could essentially fund themselves through the land value tax. In this way, the tax can fund the functions of government so long as it contributes to the community. Some geolibertarians believe that all government expenditures beyond these functions should go towards a citizens' dividend, an equal payment to the whole community. Some others have argued that the citizens' dividend should come first, and then people can sign a contract to have portions of it go to fund certain services. Citizens dividend is a proposed state policy based upon the principle that the natural world is the common property of all persons (see Georgism). ...


Criticisms

One criticism of geolibertarianism is economic - that their analysis of fallow land as the major cause of poverty is wrong. Critics point out that many places have poverty but plenty of land - Bolivia for instance. Modern economists do not consider land a separate factor of production, but rather classify it as capital. Geolibertarianism is considered anti-environmentalist by some who believe it abhors natural preserves or any fallow land. A criticism of geolibertarianism's view of property is that scarcity, not labor, determines valid property. Thus the fact that land is scarce is seen as all the more reason to make it private property.


See also

Georgism, named after Henry George (1839-1897), is a philosophy and economic ideology that follows from the belief that everyone owns what they create, but everything supplied by nature, most importantly land, belongs equally to all humanity. ... Josiah Warren is the first American anarchist Individualist anarchism, while being advocated among some European philosophers in various forms, has a distinctive flavor in The United States of America. ... Individualist anarchism is a philosophical tradition that opposes collectivism and has a particularly strong emphasis on the supremacy and autonomy of the individual. ... Agorism is a radical left-libertarian political philosophy popularized by Samuel Edward Konkin III, who defined an agorist as a conscious practitioner of counter-economics (peaceful black markets and grey markets). ... Historically, the term libertarianism was first coined by leftist followers of Mikhail Bakunin to describe their own, anti-statist version of socialism, as contrasted with the state socialism propounded by Marx. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Geolibertarianism at AllExperts (1058 words)
Geolibertarianism (also geoanarchism) is a liberal political philosophy that holds, like other forms of libertarian individualism, that each individual has an exclusive right to the fruits of his or her labor, as opposed to this product being owned collectively by society or the community.
Geolibertarians are generally influenced by Georgism, but the ideas behind it pre-date Henry George, and can be found in different forms in the writings of John Locke, the French Physiocrats, Thomas Jefferson, Adam Smith, Thomas Paine, James Mill (John Stuart Mill's father), David Ricardo, John Stuart Mill, and Herbert Spencer.
Geolibertarianism is considered anti-environmentalist by some who worry that it wouldn't acknowledge natural capital as separate from land, thus abhorring natural preserves or any fallow land.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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